OCR Interpretation


The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, October 31, 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1914-10-31/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

Ip DRESS GOODS SALE SILK SALE f
Dress Fabrics Rich in Value Varied in Assortment -
Many different filings mark our assortment of dress goods as especially worth your attention. The elaborateness of showing is only excelled by THE very excellent I
fl qualifies that are to be found in every piece of goods in the entire lot. Economy urges every shopper to buy liberally of these goods now when assortments are I
j so varied and values are so good, The special excellence of the many different patterns and colors will appeal to each lady who sees it. I
Buy Dress Goods Saturday and Monday I
SILKS Gigantic Bargain Feast
Varied in weave and color excellent in quality yet priced so very reasonable that This is not a clearing sale of end season leftovers it is a GIGANTIC BARGAIN J
every one can easily buy what they need. The patterns and colors are the newest, the qual- FEAST of seasonable merchandise right in the heart of the season and we urge you, with
ities as good as before and the prices arc just a little less. This means a most delightful all confidence in the exceptional savings you will make, to buy liberally and supply your I
selection to choose from, and right now is a most opportune time to buy. future needs for many months to come. You will certa'niy be delighted with the unusual 91
BUY SILKS SATURDAY AND MONDAY, savings, the big selections and the usual high qualities of our merchandise. 1
J ALL FABRICS INCLUDED IN THIS SALE Jf ffll g Jjtt fl3 ALL SiLKS INCLlJDED !N THIS SALE ARE I
J ARE NEW AND FASHIONABLE. LSc JtS " FASH1NABLE' I
I lit ftattttaul
(BBTABL ISHKD 1S70)
" An Independent Newspaper, published
every evening except Sunday, without a
muzzle fr a club.
TERMS OK SUBSCRIPTION:
Dallv In Ogden 'l(y p.r month ....? 5
Dllv In ocdin City, per year.. .. w
Dallv nutslnV of DK'iien. p-r year .. .
Dally outside of Opden, 3 months. 1.H
Saturday Efesue only, per year. , '- W
No anonymous eommunleatlona pub
lished. Wl'lllnm Glasmann. Publisher.
I SUBSCRIBERS' NOTICE.
The majorllv of subscriber to the
Standard desire that It shall not be dls
rontlnui d wh- n their subscriptions ex
pire. This Is the reason why. If you want
the Btandard discontinued to your ad
dress when the period for which pay
ment Is made has i icplred, ou are asked
to liotlfv lh publisher by card letter or
pero;i;iil . or notify your mall carrier
It is as easy ( st..j the Standard as It
Is to start It. and the paper will ni.t be
sent lonper than vnvt pay for It. If It Is
vour desire that It be discontinued and
bo notify the publisher. One subscriber
gets angry if we stop his paper, while
another gets angry If we keep on send
ing, the latter beiw we want to
force the paper on him. Plea.-- notify
us if vou want the Standard Stopped
I AIDING THE CRIMINAL
ELEMENT.
Billboards of great size and cover
ing much ground arc being erected
along Wall avenue, near Twenty-sixth
street, a district that is nightly filled
with street walkers and character
less men. The city officials should
prevent the placing of these screens,
which are made places of rendezvous
by the tough element, and they can
do so on the ground that such bill
boards are a public nuisance.
There may be points where bill
boards will do no harm, but Wall ave
nue is not one of them.
on
I HEAVY APPLE PRODUCTION
IN IDAHO.
'When all the Twin Fall apple
orchards come in to bearing," said
an Ogdenite, who has been in that
district, "there will be more apples
than (he Oregon Short Line can haul
There are single orchards of 440
acres of nothing but apples "
Twin Falls is making the mistake
of going too heavily in to one line
of fruit, although apple culture is
not so easily overdone as that of
peaches or other highly perishable
fruit
"The Delicious ' is an apple which
I is being gathered near Twin Falls
I which commands $2.25 a box. and
I meets with a ready sale, as It has a
most pleasing flavor, keeps well and
; but few are produced A small num
ber of the trees have been planted
near Ogden this season and more will
j bs put out next year. But when
J this apple is produced in greater
quantity, it may not command more
than the Jonathan.
ANNEXATION OF A PART
OF DAVIS COUNTY.
Davis count politicians have been
through the north end of their coun
ty, hi the Hooper and Clinton dis
tricts urging iho voters to reject the
proposition of annexation to Weber
i (,unty. In south Hooper, they have
made some converts, but we are in
formed the disaffection is not great
enough to overcome the vou that will
be cast In favor of the change
One argument which has had some
weight is to the effect that taxes
are higher ,n Weber than in Davis
county One of the farmers of Hoop
er has investigated this matter by
referring to the official records and
be reports that land is assessed at
mor- per acre and the rate is higher
In Davis eounl than in Weber coun
ty, in fact that Davis county has the
highest land taxation in the state.
There is a prospect that the new
electric line building from Salt Lake
to Ogden. which has been extended
as far north as Farmingfon will
swing to the west and pass through
Hooper. Syracuse and other districts
in the northwest part of Davis coun
ty and enter Ogden over the Twenty j
fourth street viaducL With electric
cars bringing Hooper and neighbor
hood within a few minutps of Ogden,
virtually making all that district a
suburb of 'his city the farmers would
be neglectful of their ov, n bnst in
terests were thoy to persist in hold
ing to Karmington as the place where
they repeatedly must go to transact
their legal business and attend to
county affairs.
This matter though is up to the'
people of northern Davis county and
I it is for them to make the final de-
cision The Standard has made no
particular campaign on this subject
The deposits of the customers of this strong bank
4 are safeguarded by being loaned only on approval and
KmL "readily marketable collateral or invested in carefully se-
Sli lected bonds. Its stockholders are men influential in the
v3M business world who have proven their responsibility and
$S ability.
, UNITED STATES DEPOSITORS
fUTAH National Bank
c-"3 of Ogden rvs
I 1
as we have aimed to allow those di
rectly concerned to reach a conclu
-ion free from outside influence, ex
cept to keep before the voters of
Weber county that a majority must
vcte 'Yes' on the question. "Shall
u portion of Davis county be annexed
to Weber county,'' in order to make
annexation possible
oo
HEAVIER TAXATION OF
THE PEOPLE.
An appeal to the voters of the coun
I try has been made In the name of
the Republican committee In whieh
these facts ha e been set forth:
Since the present Democrritir tariff
law went Into effeet. our purchases
from foreign nations have increaHed
102,000,000, while our sales abroad
have decreased In the same time
$108,000,000. We have bought more
and sold lrs. and the most of which
we have bought from abroad should
have been produced at home We have
lost in foreign commerce since this
bill went into effect not less than
$150,000,000. We have donated to j
Canadian lumbermen in the same
period $2. huh iidO w hich ig the amount
thoy contributed to the expenses of i
our government during the last year
of a Republican tariff Had they
paid the old rate on what they ship-
ped into this country during the first
eight months of the I'nderwood law , I
they would have contributed $4,000,000
to this government With all this
sacrifice, the consumer has not paid
one cent less for bis lumber In the
same time, $10,iiOO,000 has been given 1
to the Sugar Trust, and the consumer
pavs more for his sugar To the for
eign wool grower, a donation of $20,
000,000 in duties has been made, and
woolen clothes cost no less than be
fore. The Importers of beef and cat
tle have been relieved of paving $5,
000,000 toward the support of this gov
ernment, and the overburdened tax- I
payer pavs more for his meat Now, I
to make up the deficit thus produced, j
and from which the consumer has re- j
celved no benefit, the people of the
country are asked in a so-called "war
revenue bill to pay a direct tax of
$105,000,000. in addition to the tax 1
burden the are already bearing, at
a time when our nation is at peace
with all the world. Are you going to 1
vote to continue this kind of Demo -cratlc
lnefflency?
STARTLING STATEMENT BY
ROOSEVELT.
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt, ad
dressing the students of Princeton
yesterday, made the sensational an
nouncement that he had seen plans
of two foreign countries by which New
York and San Francisco were to be
captured and held for ransom. The
Colonel made this statement Id sup
port of his contention that the United
States should prepare a better de
fense "It is the country's duty," he said,
'to put itself in such shape that it
will he able to defend its rights if
they are invaded. I myself have seen
the plans of at least two empires now
involved in war to capture our great
cities and hold them for ransom, be
cause our standing army is too weak
to protect them I have seen deliber
ate plans prepared to take both San
Francisco and New York and hold
them for ransom that would cripple
our country and give funds to the
enemy for carrying on war."
Continuing, the former president
said: "I hope the time will come
when this country will provide that
every man may have to practice in
marksmanship and some military
training. It 1R also my earnest hope
that we shall finally achieve interna
tional status by which there shall be
a postje comltatus, when v e can com
bine to coerce any recalcitrant power,
hut we have seen the utter worth Iess
ness of scraps 0f paper and other
treaties that may be swept aside like
dust in a windy street A fight never
was won by parrying; you've got to
hit and not hit soft The American
people owe It to themselves to make
their hand safeguard their head."
Roosevelt is light This country
should get out of the class China Is in
as a defensless nation Treaties no
longer are of any value and tomorrow.
If Japan saw fit, that nation could
land a force in Lower California, or
even in California itself, large enough
to capture San Francisco before we
could offer an great resistance
But we dread the thought of the
l nlted States becoming a military na
tion, with all Its young men compelled
to serve thrr-e vears In the army
Only a few years would pass when
our sense of strength and the constant
suggestion of war would send us swag
gering and bullying among the other
nations of the earth and war Inevitab
ly would be upon us.
HOW UTAH COULD
BLUNDER.
J. H Galllnger, United States sena
tor from New Hampshire, writing to
Col. Ed Loose, tells or the worth of
Senator Smoot as a national legisla
tor, as follows:
"Dear Sir I have served for al
most twelve years in the senate of the
United States with Hon Reed Smoot.
senator from the state of Utah, hence I
I have been in a position to under
Btand the value of his services to his
state and the country. During much!
01 that time Senator Smoot and T j
have been members of three import-1
ant committees, on appropriations, fl- I
nance, and printing, so that we have!
been In very close relationship in the I
matter of important legislation, j
Among other important duties the
committee on finance considers all j
tariff bills, and in the committee
room and on the floor of the senate
during the consideration of the bills.
Senator Smoot Is regarded by mem
bers of both parties as an expert on
the subject and an authoritv on the
different rates and their practical ap
plication. "Senator Smoot has also made a
close study of the printing of govern
ment publications, and as chairman
of the committee on printing has un
doubtedly saved the government many
thousands of dollars by his untiring
vigilance and close scrutiny of all or
ders for printing He has prepared a
comprehensive bill, which, when It
becomes a law, will prevent the waste
of a tremendous amoun of literature
and tend to great economy In the ad
ministration of the government print
ing office
' Hiit-lnfr c -o e i mi nf the con.ntc
Mr Smoot is always in his seat giving
watchful attention to the transaction
Of business, and it is impossible to
pass a bill of doubtful merit until I
he has satisfied himself that its pro- j
j visions are sound
While occupied with matters of na
I tional moment Senator Smoot neg i
I lects no opportunity to advance the I
interests of his home state, and It Is
distinctly to her welfare, as it Is to
the country at large, that he be re
tained in the high position that he
now occupies Sincerely vours,
(Signed) "J. H GALLIXGER."
Dozens of similar letters have been
received from public men In Washing
ton. A prominent Ogden architect yes
terday said he had not been an ad
mirer or" Reed Smoot in the earlier
period of the senator's political ac
tlvity, but be hail come to regard
him aK one of the great men of the
nation, who should be retained In of
I flee. He said Utah would blunder,
, if the state failed to keep him where
he is, because he is of tremendous
influence In the councils of the na
tion and a mighty force for the ad
vancement of the best interests of
Utah.
00
Chicago Caoh Sales.
Chicago. Oct. 31 Wheat, 2 red,
SI 1401.16; 2 hard, $1.13 3-41.14 3-4.
CornNo. 2 yellow, 75 l-4rfj'3-4c, 3
yellow, 7575 l-2c. Oats No. 3
white, 46 3-8 48c, standard, 48 1-4&
3-4c Rye, No. 2, 96c. Barley, 60gj
77c Timothy, $3.75 (fj) 6 26. Clover.
$11.00014.00. Pork, $16.50. Lard,
$10.75 Ribs, $9 75S'10.75.
Read the Classified Ads.
SIXTH ANNIVERSARY
OF THE EPISCOPAL
RECTOR
A special memorial service for
Bishop Spalding will be held in the
Church of the Good Shepherd, Sunday
morning (all Saints day) at 11
o'clock. The music will be rendered
by the vested choir, asslted by Her
bert F Aldridge, A R. White and
.Miss Rosalie Holberg, and the me
morial sermon will be preached by
the rector
On Monday evening. November 2,
there will be a Parish meeting and
.vjpper in the Guild hall, in ommemo
ration of the rectors sixth anniver
Bary Supper will be served at 6.30
p. m.
The regular meeting of the Sunday
Night club will be omitted this week
vjvj -
Loss of Appetite.
Is the first signal of disorder and
decay The usual loss of appetite
is often caused by functional disturb
ances in the stomach. The stomach
fails to do the work required, the ap
petite I9 gone, and the body suffers
from lack of nourishment. Such a
stomach needs to be cleaned and
sweetened. Merltol Tonic Digestive
is made especially to assist the stom
ach to digest food, and promote a
healthy appetite. This remedy Is
sold on our positive guarantee, and
we ask you to give it a trial. It is
a genuine tonic Price $1.00. Sole
agents; Culloy Drug Co , Ogden, Utah
Ad crtlsement.
WHAT ELECTION DAY
MEANS. TO BE TOLD
IN A SERIN
Election day is the typical Ameri
can day and must stand for all that
is best and highest of our citizenship
This election day should mean much
to all Americans. It can mean just
; what we make It. Therp is always
a permanent and a transient message
. in every day and this is doubly true
J of election day. For years there has
j been a wide difference of opinion as
to the advisability of secrecy in elec
tions One county has used rods
four feet long as ballots in order to '
avoid secrecy and fraud. We an;
trying to make the ballot as secret
as possible. The history of the day
and methods and the principles in
volved Is the Sunday night theme in
the First Presbyterian church. The
subject being, "What this Election
Day Means to Vs.''
There will be special music.
no
SUNDAY SERVICES AT
TABERNACLE WITH
SPECIAL MUSIC
Sunday, November S, the Ogden
stake quarterly conference will be
held at the Tabernacle with sessions
at 10 a. m and 2 p m Apostle J. j
E. Talmage and President Levi Ed
gar Young will be the principal speak
ers, and at the morning service the
priesthood of the stake will attend In
a bodv .
Special music will be furnished by
the Tabernacle choir.
AMUSEMENTS
EXTRAORDINARY
Francis X. Rushman and Beverly j
Rayne Show at the Isis tonight onlv
In 'The Private Office.1' The Hippo
drome Show at the Globe for the last
time today "The Lure" comes to the
Globe tomorrow Mary Pickford in
'Ramona " Norma falmadge In
' Good-Bye Summer," comes tomorrow
night Tuesday Bessie Eyton comes
to the Globe Tuesday anrl Wednes
day in "Playing With Fire." Thurs
day Robert Warwick comes in "The
Dollar Mark "
The greatest Hne-up of phot-, plays
are presented in the Alhambra Thea
ters. Advertisement.
uo
Kansas City Wheat.
Kansas City, Oct. 31 Wheat 2 hard
$1.07(01.08 1-2; 2 red. $1.07; Decern
ber. $1.07 1-4. May, $1.13 7 8ft 114
Corn Two mixed. 75tf?72c, 2 white,
70071c; December, 64 3-4c; Mav, 69c.
Oats Unchanged to l-2c higher; 2
white, 47c; 2 mixed. 42 43 l-2c. Rye 1
and hay. unchanged. I
REPUBLICAN TICKET !
November 3, 1914.
The Party of Progress and
Prosperity.
STATE TICKET. !
For United States Senator
REED SMOOT.
For Congress,
JOSEPH HOWELL.
For Justice of the Supreme Court,
WILLIAM M. M'CARTY.
For Supt. of Public Instruction,
A. C. MATHESON.
LEGISLATIVE TICKET.
For Senator, 1
EDWIN DIX.
For Representatives,
JAMES J. BARKER
GEORGE D. FOLKMAN
JOHN C. CHILD
JOSEPH H. FOWLES.
COUNTY TICKET
County Commissioner (4-Yr. Term)
MORONI SKEEN
County Commissioner (2-yr. Term)
WARREN G. CHILD
County Clerk and Auditor.
HARRY HALES
County Treasurer,
JOSEPH E. STOREY
County Assessor,
JAMES L. ROBSON
County Sheriff
THOMAS A. DEVINE
County Recorder,
ANGUS E. BERLIN
County Attorney
JOSEPH E. EVANS
County Surveyor,
RALPH S. CORLEW.
CITY TICKET
Constable,
ELI AS S. KING.
For "SAFETY FIRST" Pull
Republican (top) Lever.
For Information as to Registration
and Election matters call Repub
lican Headquarters, No. 2419
Hudson Ave. Advertisement.
B. to
U M c He 1
Power-Speed-Durability Economical-Easy Riding 1
LET US DEMONSTRATE TO YOU.
Wottierspoon & Jost Automobile Co. i
COR. 21ST AND WASHINGTON.

xml | txt