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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, January 11, 1918, 4 P.M. CITY EDITION, Image 8

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THE QGDEN STANDARD: OGPEN, UTAH, FRIDAY, JANUARY II, 1918. ' T
HAROLD LOCKWOOD
in "UNDER HANDICAP"
and a Roaring Comedy.
Ii THE WORLD'S MOST CLEVER AND BEAUTIFUL
" ACTRESS IN A SUPERB PRODUCTION,
. 'THE GREAT WHITE TRAIL"
.' "X
' DORIS KEN YON
'..'J SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
POPULAR PLAYERS AT UTAH. FONE 3060.
I III. Ill Mill I
INachrichten of Dusseldorf
Rejects Peace Conditions as
Utterly Impossible.
WAR MUST CONTINUE
Claim President Has Erected
Brutal Military Dictatorship
In His Own Country,
r
AMSTERDAM, Jan. 10. Tho Nach
rlcbten of Dusseldorf rejects President
Wilson'B proposition as utterly unac
ceptable and says that discussion is
useless.
"It may be hard." 1J; says, "after
three years of war. but a decision must
be sought on tho battlefield. It Is not
our wish but we Bhall not leave the
fiold except with honor."
The AUgeraeine Zeitung of Essen
'
says:
"President Wilson seems not to
know that the smallest appropriation
for tho army requires the sanction of
the reichstag, tbo most democratic
parliament in the world. Yet he, who.
unheeding tho spirit of tho American
constitution, has-erected a brutal mili
tary dictatorship in his own country,
now presumes to talk about autocracy
In froo Germany."
PLAN FOR DISTRIBUTING SPEECH.
LONDON, Jan. 11. Referring to tho
report that it is intended to drop a
million copies of President Wilson's
address in Germany from airplanes,
the Daily Chronicle, while thinking the
Idea excellent and that if eery Ger
man could read tho address it might
lead to a national strike against the
war, recalls Germany's recent "an
nouncement that pilots caught drop
ping propaganda would bo shot as
spies. Accordingly the paper appeals
to inventors to produce a machine
which of Itself will drop the propaganda.
00
THE PRESENT FEAR.
'"How your boat tears through the
water!"
"Don't speak of It, plcaso, or in
these war tax times, they may charge
me for the water rent."
I THE TASTE
YOU LIKE
B j that superb, smooth, rich flavor free from all
P j trace of bitterness. j
HEWLETT'S
LUM ETA
TEA
J Japan Breakfast I
win Ufquy
iLS TO IKE
8 OEM UP 1
FREIGHT
i
According to advices glvon out by
W. IT. Chevers, goneral agont of tho
Union Pacific, western railroads are
making every possible preparation to
obsorvo "Freight Moving Week" Jan.
1-1 to 21, inclusive, in a manner that
will caueo commendation nllko from
tho government and the public and
further prove that the railroads of the
country aro unreservedly "back of tho
government."
Tho question of expediting freight
shipments being taken up vigorously
by Secretary McAdoo. federal director
general of the railroads, In rcsponBO to
tho urgent call for an educational cam
paign to awaken shippers and tho pub
lic in general to tho necessity and im
portance of tho prompt loading and
unloading of freight cars. In response
to this insistent domand, Secretary
McAdoo, by proclamation, definitely
fixed tho week of Jan. 14 as "Freight
Moving Week" for tho purpose of
omptying loaded freight cars at their
destination, thus releasing thousands
of cars for other immcdlato use.
"Freight Moving Week" Is fixed ono
week In advance of tho dato that tho
new demurrage charges go into effect
under government orders. It should
not be overlooked, railroad men assert,
that tho following week tho progres
sive demurrage charges up to $10 per
day will be in force, so that it will be
decidedly to tho advantago of shippers
to develop a regular practice of prompt
unloading of freight cars from day to
day.
In his proclamation, Secrotary Mc
Adoo appeals to tho people of tho
United States to obsorvo tho week
with strictest attention to tho benefits
which a complcto national co; operation
will effect. Ho also requests tho gov
ernors of the states, public utilities
commissioners, mayors of cities and
towns, state councils of national do
fenso, tho fedoral and state fuel and
food administrations, the chambers of
commerce and other business organi
zations, business men and shippers
generally, trucking companies and all
railroad employes to organlzo locally
and niako a supremo effort during this
week to unload freight cars, to remove
freight from railroad stations and to
clear tho way for a moro efficient op
eration of the railroads of the country.
He declares that an earnest and unitod
pull all along the lino will achievo
wonders.
Every railroad has takon part in
bringing the matter to tho attention of
tbo shiDpei-s and to the public. Of
ficials have- been asked to give tho
matter "hourly" consideration.
THIRTY CUBS IE
TO HIKE IP TO
BBSTOI
Utah will send a delegation qf ap
proximately thirty prominent canners,
members of tho Stato Canners asso
ciation, to tho annual convention of
the national organization to be held in
Boston. Feb. 11-16. Inclusive.
The largor number of tho dologation
will consist of canners maintaining
factories and headquarters In Ogden.
Among them will bo A. J. Hall, of the
Utah Packing company and president
of tho Utah Canners' association; H.
L. Herrlngton. former president of tho
stato association; and George W. God
dard, of the board of directors.
As a result of negotiations now in
progress between members of tho dele
gation and Paul Beemer, city passen
ger agent for tho Union Pacific, it is
probable the Utah party will make tho
trip In a special car. They will leave
Ogden Feb. -1 or 5. and spend two days
in Chicago, arriving In Boston Fob." 9
or 10. On tho return trip, they will
visit Cincinnati, St. Louis and Kansas
City.
M DESERTER IS
HELD by POLICE
As a result of a telegram received
this morning by Police Chief Brown
ing from Maj. George Barnett, com
mandant at the Marino barracks navy
yard, Puget, Sound, it is probable Alvln
Leraolne. deserter, will be turned over
to tho marine authorities, at Salt, Lake
City today or tomorrow.
Lemolne wa3 taken into custody by
Detectlvo A. B. Jensen about ten days
ago as a slacker. Investigation show
ed that he deserted from the navy,
August 23. Ho is about 28 years old.
Georgo Walter Lemolne. a younger
brother, was arrested at the same time.
The brother established tho fact that
he was only 20 years of age and was
released. They are natives of Arkansas.
DISASTROUS FIRE
OCCURS IN WINNIPEG
WINNIPEG, Man., Jan. 11. Fire
early today destroyed the Endorton of
fice and storo building In the heart of
Winnipeg's rotail district, causing loss
estimated at moro than $750,000.
Twenty degrees below zero tempera
ture which provailed when the flro was
discovered, hampered the work of tho
firemen. Three firemen were injured.
OVERBURDENED.
How does It happen that a prohibi
tion community Is obliged to arrest
people for intoxication?"
"Well," said Uncle Bill Bottletop,
"It's another phase of the transporta-
Itlon problem. Every now and then
somebody who wants to carry homo
a liquor supply from outside territory
undertakes to bo his own demijohn."
uu
B A sure euro for Insomnia la to have
I someone knock at the door and toll you
r 1 to. set. up, . . .
PROUTV CSSE SET FOB
MOIMY MOilK
II POUCECOURT
II. It. Prouty, charged with having
liquor in hlB possession, will bo ar
raigned In municipal court Monday
morning. Prouty Is manager of tho
Wcbor hotel and is at largo on $300
bond.
Tho Prouty arraignment has been
sot several times, but becauso of
changos In tho city attorney's office
and other reasons, it has been con
tinued from tlmo to time. Judgo Bar
kor specially requested this morning
that tho attorneys agree upon some
deflnlto dato and, upon suggestion of
David L. Stlne, assistant city attorney,
tho arraignment was set for Monday
morning.
It was stated that Attorney A. G.
Horn, counsel for Prouty, probably will
surrender his cllont to the authorities
and then apply to tho supremo court
for rcloaso upon a writ of habeas cor
pus. The petition Tor tho writ will be
based upon the allegation that Prouty
already has been tried and convicted
for the offenso for which he now is
accused.
GLASS 01 M
ARE DESIGNATED
Tho following mon have boon listed
In class ono by tho local board for
Ogden city:
William Webster, James William
Greonwoll, Lenwood Clinton Drlscoll,
James Karakitsos, James Earlo Ward
lcigh, Adolph Schonwandt, George
Mocos, T. Frank Smith. D. E. Kravar
itos, Montgomery E. Cora, Alonzo
West, Joseph Crompton. Elmer Fred
erick Stromberg. Raymond Arbon,
Phillip John Hoopor, Adolph Morton
Miller, Jr., Morris Edward McNary,
Einer Nollson, Maxwell B. Lawson,
Pete Sallagolty, Warden J. Smith. Mar
vin Alma Card, William W. Bisber,
Myron F. Bratt. Arthur McGregor, Sam
Tulutcs, Eugono Christcnsen, Daniel
Traseth, William Vaughn, Clarence
Wheelwright, John Zilvarshoon. Law-
renco Baxter, Fred A. Brophy. Walter
Brucsch, Walter G. Cooke, John
Uhalde, J. Reginald MInson. Orestc
Puccini, George Pappas. Sam Vilas.
Knapp n. Allen, Clarence Waterfall,
Fred T. Stone. Gust Asslamakas,
Frank L. Tribe, John E. Visser, Robert
L. Purrlngton, Victor John Elliott,
Harold T. Yeaman. Spolcos Voutseo
tc3. Byron W. Nalsbltt. William Tel
ford Grecnwell, Thomas E. Myers.
John Murty Dwyor, Dorser Frank Eg
glnton, Louis Shortey, Vern Bullougb.
Stanley Powers. Russell Thomas. Au
gustus Elwood Cross, Peter C. Shernor.
Fung Wah. Lawronce BennettI, Samuel
Alfred Sailer, Daniel William Knight
on, Lawrence Nielsen. Seth Henry At
kinson, Hyrum Smith Price, Andrew
Vandenberg, Fred S. Gurniss. Edward
E. Krooncke. Ross Portor. Jame3 Mills,
Bently Shields, John Brophy, Georgo
Mortimer Watson. Leo Thomas Doan,
John L. Thompson. Glenn Killings
worth. Walter Lcroy Wilson, Frederick
Franklyn Ayers, Walter McMIIlin, John
Udlng, Ells Lnrson, Ross Leo Smith,
Bruno Ewald Schmall, Carl R. Smith.
Walter E. Woolsey, Chester H.
Thomas, Vincent Patrick Carney, Wal
ter R. Donaldson, John A. Dreehouse,
Lawrence Lesley ' Huston. Albert
Zondervan. Jose Baralnca, Hyrum San
ders, Delbert S. Whipple, Vincent L.
Cosgravc, Robert Mitchell, Cleo Moore
Allman. James Ray Pack, John Mull
dor, Glen McHenry, Charles Ra.Muond
RIddlough. James Ishinael Rivers.
George William Tillett, Joseph S.
Johnston, 'Mclvin Frank Barton, Ar
thur H. Jesperson, Seymour Leon
London, Sylvester Swift. Howard Hud
man, George Everett, Val Allen Bruwn
lng, Bryco Swartfager, Arthur Perklnn.
Gcrritt Van der Vlles. Edgar Por.'s,
Christ G. Glannoullos. Leland Do1
Thomas, George N. Morphls, Paul A.
Wardleigh, Nick Greelman, Orson L.
Broadbont, Clarenco Preshaw, Albert
C. Coonlcy. Singleton Brown, Rudolph
Joseph Kollehner. Clayton Grlswold,
Francis Nelson Brown, J. R. Williams.
'Howard Charles Hocking, Gustjf BUxt.
j Gaston Irigary. Harold L. Tribf-, Por
j ter S. Tillotson, Harry Slater Reed.
1
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
1 M. E. SUMY
SCHOOLS '
Homer A. Selp again has been elect
ed superintendent of the First Metho
dist church Sunday school organiza
tion. Tho annual election of ofilceis
was held at a recent meeting at tho
home of W. A. Middleton, Pecry apart
nionts. In addition to SupL Seip, tho follow
ing officers were chosen: W. S. Cart
wright, assistant superintendent; MIus
Laura Kirkpatrlck, secretary; Miss
Edna Middleton, treasurer; Miss Nina
Butts, librarian; Mrs. H. Dominoy, or
ganist; and H. Dominoy, choirstor.
.Primary department: Mrs. J. J. Lin
lone, superintendent; Mrs. W. S. Crav
ens, assistant superintendent; Miss
Irene Daily, secrotary; Miss Mabel
Rowso, organist
Cradle roll: Mrs. Harry E. Whito,
superintendent; Mrs. Dodson, assist
ant. Home department: Mrs. Ralph Grif
fin. Missionary department: Mrs. W. H.
Bennett, superintendent.
Tomporanco dopartmont; O. L. Lem
on, superintendent.
Reports wore made by the various
department chiefs, including- the offi
cers and teachers. The Sunday school
is in a healthy condition and growing.
A BLOW.
"What's the matter with your wife?
She seems all broken up lately."
"Well, slip had a terrible shock."
"Why, what happened?"
"She was assisting at a rummago
salo. She took off her now hat and
somebody sold It for 30 cents."
' .. j
rmmum-" ii. mum.
:-c important 'J
to business '' I '
you Ve interested in ef- V'r' S jl '
ficiency; getting bigger , ' Ml limi m
and better results in the l I f
shortest time. ffjj jl
apply this principle to " rijS 1
clothes buying; you can jgS
come here any day, choose copyright Han schoffner&Mano m
one of the finest american M
or foreign weaves; be fitted perfectly in a Hart Schaffner
& Marx suit, and wear it away with you all in, a few.v V I
minutes, and you save money. . -: " -
' r that's efficiency. '. . . r. . m
- -Tl -. you can get the same ''quick action" in high quality 1
5 furnishings, hats, shirts; try it. m
jl
The home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes fl
JJJla1-aJ , n-! u-UlBJll ii H Jl TTF""1 rn""' " 1 " " MH..l. 1 -B ,l'.lfca---.. r.-..-ii ri.rrf- irwmTriAAM
imjJO --iMwmii nifi-"',J"m'M I 'HI I ' " '' '-"i""-' yg-,TrT--L-T-."BM-jf77.' j;-r;r"i-- liTI'lftgl ffH '
OBJECTIONS AREMADETO SOME
OF HE ORDERS ISSUED BY THE
DIRECTOR GENERAL OF ROADS
That confusion may not result from
tho industrial change occasioned by
the proclamation of President Wilson
placing American railroads under gov
ernment control and naming Secretary
McAdoo as director-general, exper
ienced railroad men are "intimating"
that it would be wise for tho director
general to remain absolutely within
tho lettor of law.
The suggestions arc mado with the
assurance that the railroads, as patrio
tic corporations and as individuals, are
eager to lend every possible co-operation.
Precedents and law, it is urged,
should govern In order to prevent lr
remedial confusion, at the close of the
war. The Traffic World, responsible
railroad publication, discusses the
proposition confronting Secretary Mc
Adoo with remarkablo candor and
logic.
"The language used by President
Wilson." says tao Trafnc World, "in
taking over the control of the rail
roads; tho insistence of Director-General
McAdoo that he supercede the In
terstate Commerce commission; his
order as to tho transporting of freight
by tho shortest route, regardless of
the shipper's legal right to instruct as
to routing; tho over-riding of demur
rage rules in order to roliove conges
tion in the east; together with all that
Is appearing int he public prints as to
what the director-general intends to do
or has the power to do, Indicate that
tho public Including Mr. McAdoo
himself and the president, whose agent
he is thinks the director-general has
' powers which we are not convinced he
has, and which wo do not believe he
can have without legislation specifical
ly conferring them. Thoso who appar
ently take the other view merely as
sert that these powers exist or com
placently tako them for granted, but
no ono, so far as we have noticed, has
ventured to say whence they are de
rived." Tho editorial takes the position "that
the presldont and tho director-general
can, generally speaking, do only the
things that It would have been per
fectly legal for the railroads them
selves to do before tho government
took over the railroads, and he can do
none of the things that wore illegal."
The director-general, according to
this logic, merely succeeds tho execu
tives of tho roads. Ho can do all the
things thoy legally could have done,
but can do none of the things thoy le
gally were barred from doing.
"For instance," tho Traffic World
continues, "the director-general may
abolish down-town ticket offices; he
may dismiss or hiro more mon; he
may Btop advertising for passenger
business when passenger business
ought to bo cut to the bone; ho may
mako one road a freight road and an-'
other a passenger road; he may use
passenger equipment for hauling
freight; he may pool facilities; ho
may decrease the salaries of railroad
presidents and increase tho wages of
BWltchmen; but without additional
legislation he may not violate tho
law prohibiting tho pooling of traffic
or earnings; ho may not increase, or
reduce freight or passenger rates. In
short, ho may do nothing in violation
of any law on the statute books with
out specific authority so to do. Tho
law must first be repealed or amend
ed. That Is the common -sense,
straight view to take and. though, it is
only a layman view, we believe It is
sound legally."
Tho editorial closes by declaring
that it does not desire to appear out
of sympathy with the government and
with what the government Is trying to
accomplish. It insists that it is in full
sympathy with the purposes of tho
president and believes bis action was
absolutely necessary. It also states
that many of the things which the gov
ernment is trying to do, although in
violation of the law, may be necessary
and if necessary should be done.
"Wo believe thoy should bo done by
changing tho law," the publication
concludes. "Instead of by ignoring it.
We are at war, to bo sure, and war
will accustom us to many things here
tofore strangers to us, but it seems to
us that we have not yet reached the
point where laws must be ignored or
violated certainly not until some ef
fort has been made to alter them to
fit our necessities."
It is probablo that this stand, taken
pretty generally by railroaders, result
ed in Secretary McAdoo's recent order
countermanding a former order stop
ping solicitation for business. The
question, between the railroaders and
the Secretary is whether the shipper
has the right to solect his own rout
ings, regardless of government owner
ship. It is admitted that government
shipments arc entitled and should have
precedence over all lines at all times,
but so far as individual shippers aro
concerned. It is argued, they aro en
titled to elect as to routings.
no
PACKAGES CI BE
Sffl TO FRANCE
It was announced by Postmaster W.
W. Browning that permission to for
ward packages to soldiers in France
did not end with tho Christmas holi
days, but parcels, meeting all Inci
dental requirements, may be mailed
as formerly.
Such packages must be inspected at
the homo office, after which thoy are
forwarded to New York and redirected
to the addressee overseas. Tho rules
that were issued governing Christmas
parcels remain In force.
uu
I CHURCHES I
Li
ELIM LUTHERAN Corner of
Jefferson and Twenty-third street,
Arthur E. Olsen, pastor. Sunday school
10 a. m. Swedish services 11 a. m. En
glish evening service 8 p. m. All are.
cordially invited.
oo
When a man gctq .full It's a good time
to toko his -bust mcasuro.
KILL TI BOOSTER; IS
TlflEGIH j
ESEG1B J
The Standard's offer to furnish any t
advice desired by prospective poultry j;
raisers, who are sincerely anxious to
jolp the nation-wide drive for a
greater production of eggs, already has $
been accepted. j:
A communication received today in- $
quires as to the most profitable breedj!?
of chickens. It does not state, how-!
over, whether the prospective chicken JH
raiser is entering the industry forW"
"meat" or for eggs.
Regardless, however, It is a qucsp
tion that nas never been satisfactorily
answered and probably never will be
convincingly replied to. It all depends h
It on wishes to keep a few chickens ij
for eg3 only, it i3 advisable to try one;
of the non-setting or Mediterranean 0
variety, such as the Leghorns. If onefj
wishes to breed for meat only, it would 1
be wise to try one of the larger meat- jf I
producing breeds. Jf. 1
But if the prospective raiser wishes
to breed for both eggs and meat, one? 1
of tho American varieties will give the'';
best returns. Among the American
varieties, the most popular at the;
present time are the Rhode Island ,
Reds, the Plymouth Rocks and thoj
Wyandottes. '
The small non-setting varieties ji
probably will stand more abuse by 4
over-feeding and not take on too muchij'
fat as will the larger breeds. )
Beginners again are warned against ji
expensive poultry houses, too largo
flocks and useless roosters. Kill and a
eat the roosters. They are worse than
usole3s except for breeding purposes, I
and do not undertake to raise moro I
chickens than you can handle con-1
veniently and properly. But ''
Every homo should raise a eWbB
chickens. ?
Read the Classified Ads. jVI I
' IB-. B SiijB
A Great Show This Week jjm
"A FIRESIDE REVERIE"
A Delightful Musical Comedy. jfl
Those Funny Boys
WILSON BROS. ill
The Lieutenant and the Cop. l
PARSONS & IRWIN I
A Message From the Front.
OTHER GREAT ACTS jfli
Don't Miss This Bill. all
3 SHOWS TODAY
15c 25c 35c. iljl S
Matlneo at 3 P. M. jlj

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