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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, April 14, 1919, LAST EDITION - 3:30 P.M., Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1919-04-14/ed-1/seq-5/

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J 1 HE OGDLN 5TANDARU: UGUEN, UTAH. MONDAY, APK1L 14, 19E9. 3 Hf
I mA &
I LET US FIX IT
We give the right kind of service; guarantee
I satisfrction and beat possible prices.
Your patronage is cordially solicited.
Auto Supplies. Electrical Supplier, Repairing pSSk7
and Wiring Motor j j'wPpJ' 1 g Ulqvt,
CHEESMAN EUECTRIC AUTO PUPrLT
2064 Washington. Thone 325-320. rtHtBBi
S. H. Shriner J. J. Donorlcl
OGDEN AUTO RADIATOR CO. SAVING Til ES
Radiators, Fenders and Gas Tank WEANS
Repalred- SAVING MONEY
AJ1 Work Guaranteed.
Our Rubber Relinmg Froccss has
2320 Hudson Av. Ogdca, I'Uh. attracted the attention of hundreds
PHONE 201. of automobile owners in Northern
1 ' Utah and in other states.
B ' '
, . tuim On Hudson Ave. Ry the Allmmbi-a.
E Your Storage Battery Is somethtnf
like your wife service depend! Bring Us Your
I upon attention received Let W BROKEN WINDOWS
B test your battery regularly. We And Old MtrTbrg We Will Repair
II . . Them Just Like New.
I flCeTSSL GRIFFIN PAINT CO. I
Phone 530. 2310 Wash Ave.
Ogden Storage I We Repair and Overhaul your Au- U
Uj . , r-i I tomobile at a Reasonable Cost, t
'u JtdIICry V0. Oxy-Acetylene Welding, Soldering. I
Tire and Battery Service, Ignition, H
Starting and Lighting. Diamond E
WiJIard Service Station. Tires
I STEW ART GORHAM
I 2406 Grant Ave. PnO.VF 016 2217-19 Washington Avenue
euHsonAT. 4ig 24th St. Phone 463
STOVE REPAlRSnd WAT ERJACKET S
for any range r.-.ade. Stoves exchanged. Agents for Quick Meal w
' Ranges, and Colone Pipeless Furnace
m 1 SUMMERILL STOVE REPAIR I
HOME SEAMSTRESS CAK
MAKE THIS
Here is a charming afternoon
frock of black Batin, 'I he gown It
self Is of black satin, and ilieie are
well-bandied bits of ornamentation
in the insets of blue and gold em
broidered ribbon on bodice, cuff
and skirt A rolling collar of crisp
.' 1 1 i t e organdie, and a dainty
tucker of the same add a touch ol
distinction to a airupie but effec
tive gown.
THOMAS JEFFERSON HONORED, j
PARIS, April 12 The overseas j
alumni of the University of Virginia to
i day unveiled a tablet marking the
oi the forme! residence pi Thomas Jei
ferson. at the corner of Avenue
1 bamp8 ECiysee and ltu dc Berrii thi
ot casion celebrating 'he hundredth au-(
adversary of his founding of the unt-
ersit) A distinguished gathering
marked the occasion, among the
peakers being Secretary of the Navy
Josephus Dank-ls.
i
I DERWILLO
The Invisible face xrv4T. Cannot
bis detected. Stay? on until you -waolt
It off. Inntantly hautlfls th com
'"vton. Absolutely haimiwu. Drug
e i blii refund th mAny If It folln. H
w announcement toon to appear In
this paper.
Read the Classified Ads.
I Woman's Page i
I Dorothy Dix Talks I
ANGEL CHILDREN AND OTHERWISE jj
I By DOKOTHY DIX, the World's Highest Paid Woman Writer.
An ordinance is to be passed in New
nk Cit imposing a tliff fine upon
landlords who discriminate against
'children as tenants Heretofore it has
bern about as eas for the traditional
camel to go through the eye of the
(needle as it has been for a family pos
sessed of a bunch of little olive
' branches to get into a first class apart
mi m house.
Little Bobbv and Little Susie have
been distinctly persona non gratia
Nobody but their own particular par
ents desired their society. No roof
longed to shelter their homeless
i lie.id?. No rented doormat, had "welcome-'
written on it for them. Pome-
Iranian pups might find a place for
their be ribboned baskets in the tow
eling mansions of the cliff dwellers,
but there was no room lor baby 'cra
dle. It has been the custom to comment
biMerh upon this,arid to say that
there was no crime that a New York
apartment house manager would not
'condone except the crime of having
children. Also it has been the fashion
I to picture the landlord who bung out
'the "No Children Allowed" sign as a
I coldblooded Herod who was ready to
j murder the innocents in order to pro
j j vide himself with childle?s ten.mt--j
All of this is most unjust. The fault
Is not with the landlord who is not
willing to allow children in his houses,
but with the parents who permit their
children to be such hoodlums and van
dalfl lhat they wreck the houses In
..hu h they live, aud depreciate the
value 61 all real estate in their immedi
ate vicinity.
The theory that all children are an
jeia who bless the place where they!
..bide, and add to the joy and happi
jness of all about them, is a pretty j
I conceit Unfortunately, hdwever, if
has small basis in fact One small
child will damage a place more In a
week than an adult will do in five ,
years. And one leather lunged infant j
Will do more to spoil the rest, and
peace and quiet of its neighbors than a
dozen brawling, quarreling, drunken
men would. Hence the popularity of1
childless tenants and bachelor opart-j
' ments.
I This is not because we do not love,
children There is nothing else in the
vorld that so appeals to the heart of i
humanity a- v little child, and when (
we find one that has been properly,
'reared, that has been taught self con-1
Urol and consideration for the rights I
of others, we are aH ready to fall down
land worship before it.
j But. alas, a well raised child now
,adays is on infan' phenonomen which J
i few ol us are ever privileged 10 behold,
although we would gladly travel miles)
and pay out good money 10 see one.
The modern child isn't brought up b
the hand, especially by a molher'3
hand, for mother is too bus doinp Die
society act, or the philanthropic stunt
to have time to bother with a trivial
matter, such as teaching her own cbil
dren morals and manners.
Or else she is so wrapped up in ber
children that she cannot, correct their
faults, because vn, js so blinded by,
her infatuation lhat she cannot sco
I when her own offspring do wrong. I
And between the mother who neglecU i
her children and the mother who cod
dles them too much there is rm)1
choice so far as results go, and the
i general public is concerned
The neglectful mother lets her thii-
I dren wreck and ruin and nuke life
I hideous for all about them, bet Wise
: she is too much occupied with her own
affairs to care what they are doing so
long as they are out fioin under her
1 feet,
The over tender, mother lets her
children go theii devastating wa l
i cause In her eyes they can do no
wrong, and nobody should object to
I being sacrificed lor the little dears'
, pleasure.
The neglectful mother -ends her
ehildien out. in the halls of an apart
ment house io howl and shriek so
they won t disturb her morning nap.
although she knows they will wake a
dozen other people up The over ten
: der mother calls the nervous invalid
below her a crank because he objects
to her little Johnny playing that ih
sofa is a bucking broncho he is riding,
thereby bringing the chandeliers on
the sick man's bed.
Neither woman stops to consider
other people's rights when they inter
fere wilh th pleasure of her children.
Neither one teacher her children any
consideration for other people, or any
thing about the sacrcdness of property
rights
It is a strange and inexplicable
thing that women who are honest
themselves, and who have a fine sense
of personal honor do not inculcate
these virtues into their children's
minds. They would not themselves rob
yon of the value of a pin. nor would
they mutilate and destroy your prop
erty, but i hey will let their children
ruin hundreds of dollars worth of your
possessions without lifting a staying
hand, or uttering a word of reproof.
More, tbey are offended if you object
and make an etfort to salvage your be
longings. I heard a woman say not long ago,
"I am so sorry for Jane. She works
so hard taking care of her house and j
DEBS ENTERS HIS I
PRISON TERM AN
UNTAMED SPIRIT;
-
MOUNDS VI LLE. W. Va.. April 13
Eugene V. Debs, many times Social
ist candidate for president, entered ihe
West Virginia penitentiary here late
njflay and began serving his ten car
sentence foi violation of the espion
age act. As the prisoner stood In the
doorway of the penitentiary he said j
'I enter the prison door a flaming
revolutianiftt, my head unbent, my I
soul unconquerable."
Debs answered the required ques
tlOns put by the warden who assigned
the prisoner to cell 51.
Debs Issues Statement
Prior to retiring to his cell, Debs
issued the following statement, ad
dressed to Socialists of America:
"AS I am about to enter the prisou
doors I wish to send to the Social
ists of America who have so loyally
stood by me since my first arrest,!
thl3 little mescage of love and cheer.
These are pregnant days and promis-j
mz ones. We are all on the thresh
hold of tremendous changes. The,
workers of the world are awakening
and bestirring themselves as never bo
fore. All the forces that ai- playingH
upon the modern world are making
for the overthrow of despotism in all
its forms and for the emanfepatipn of
the masses of mankind.
"I shall be in prison in the days to
come, but my revolutionary spirit will
be abroad and I shall not be inactive.
"Let us all in this supreme hour
measure up to our full stature and
work together as one for the great
cause That means emancipation for
us all.
' Love to my comrades and hail to
the revolution."
I
i her four children. I would like to ask !
I her to come and bring the children and
spend a month with me this summer,
I but ihe children simply wreck' the
place. They draw pictures with pins
on my old mahogany, and pill gravy
on my rugs, and finger print the walls
'and do so much damage that I can't j
afford to have them. Last time they
were here it cost mc four hundred dol
lars for repairs when they went away."
Said another woman: "I would love;
to go out in my automobile on a covin- j
try ride and fill it full of children, but.
I can t do it because they divert them
selves by kicking all the varnish off
and smearing candy on the upholstery
and the mothers sit by and neer say a
word."
All of these are common exper-l
lences. There i.n't one of us who
wouldn't rather have a spell of sick-j
ness than a visit from the average
mother with children. Yet there is!
some one particular child so well bred.
Iso courteous and sweet, whose coming
we hail with joy and delight.
So it Is up to the mothers to lift
! (he ban on children and make them
once more desirable citizens.
THE OUTBURST OF EVERET TRUE j
j tcK;
I Tet- you (I -- DON'T KNOW ABOUT 1 H'-
rve. gqt ch that mix nin call up Kg-
tNC- THe 'PHONG COMPACT TO QWQ B I
Ttte TlMe, N iMPose oti Thi JeujectrA m..
THY H4ve To sgu. not To gyg
SEES PETERSON
OF IHM DIES
BRIGHAM CITY, April 13. Nels
Peterson, one of the early settlers in
Utah, died at his home in Brigham
City yesterday, tollowing a paralytic
stroke which later developed hemor
rhage of the brain. Mr. Peterson had
boon asufierer from asthma the last
fourteen months, until which lime he
had enjoyed excellent health.
Mr. Peterson was born ;n Denmark,
March Z, 1848. and embraced the
Mormon faith when 25 years old. He
arrived in Utah on July 24. 1873. and
located at Huntsville. where his par
ents were residing During that year
he married Mrs. Maria Koerner. who
i emigrated from Denmark at the same
time as he did. Mr. and Mrs. Peter- j&
son came to Brigham City the follow g
Ing year and continued io make this My
city their home.
Mr. Peterson hail been instrumental g?
in the upbuilding of the cominumtv W
and. since joining the church, was an j
arduous w orker For several years he S
was connected with 'he old Co-op Mf?
store, having charge of the shoe de- H
parttaetai It
He is survived by the following sons
and daughters, his wife having died H
ten years ago: Axel and Edwin Peter F
son and Mrs. Lettic Minson of Brigham
City; Henry Peterson. Bradley, Cal.;
N. J. Peterson. Ogden; Oscar Peter
son, Mrs. Nels Jensen. Salt Lake; Mrs.
Henry Rose, Park Valley.
Funeral services Will be held In the
Second ward chapel at 1 o'clock to- J
morrow afternoon. Burial will be in I
the city cemetery. H
The man who can refrain from re- lH
peatinz 'he cute things his first baby !H
says is a wonder.
D01NfjS 0p jjjg McD(JFFS
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THE XATZIES - It Was Just the Chance Alec Wanted A FULCcbcGsEE0v h I
AO S UERE ' ) YOU HRVE OWED ML ( NQ RSKNG YOU f THRNK GOODNES6 ! TXEReS
V --7r tfTY CEVTS FOR MORE ) FOR THE L)5T TAfE WHEN NO OF foi' T
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SAY POP! - Uncle Silas Finds an Exception " By C. H PAYNE I
p -"r I ' tt r :rrCT73 RTnIT" ( 1 r 1 ceTiTTI I
PPut YeR maT3lc$) to . ont SAV, T3esiw H - cry j -ptTtca,
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