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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, August 04, 1919, LAST EDITION - 3:30 P.M., Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1919-08-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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jj 4 1 HE OGDKN STANDARD: OGDEN, UTAH, MONDAY, AUGUST 4, 1919.
1 -.ji
Uemb: of the Audit Bureau of Circulation and the Aiooclated lnn.
The Associated Press i3 exclusively entitled to the U6e for republication
of all news credited to It not otherwise credited in this paper and also tha .
local news published herein.
I FIRES IN OGDEN.
Again The Standard directs attention to the large number of mys
terious fires occurring in Ogden, and urges an investigation and a pub
lic report.
If the police department is not equal to the task the merchants and
other organizations of the city should be called on to assist in going
j to the bottom of the fires.
Before more serious losses are suffered, the big men of Ogden
should begin to outline a plan of action and see to it that vigorous
work is performed in bringing thi incendiarsm to an end.
So for the fires have been in isolated spots and weather conditions
have not been favorable to a quick spread of the flames, but later, if j
a fire gets well underway in the heart of our business district, with a I
heavy canyon wind prevailing, a perilous situation will develop rapid-j
,M ly and a conflagration may follow.
Let us not tiusl to luck, but proceed to guard against possible
losses by encouraging repeated conferences and organized effort.
It may be that we are unduly disturbed. Still whatever safeguards
be taken will do no harm, and prcvcntic measures should prove worth
jUT l while.
I lb
MAURICE'S ARTICLES ON THE WAR.
In a scries of articles, Major General Sir Frederick Maurice main
tains that the great victory over the Germans was attained through
General Foch's surprise attacks, planned far in advance.
We doubt the accuracy of this statement, first, because neither
General Foch nor any of the allied commanders werr- masters of the
situation up to the time- of the cornier attack of July 18, 1918' and
the allied armies were being driven back, and further back.
Finally, when the Germans created a sharp salient from Soissons
to Chateau Thierry, after having formed a deeper, broader salient
pointing toward Amiens, not onlv General Foch, but many writer:
not connected with military establishments, saw an opening for a
mighty counter blow.
Foch deserves great credit for the energy and secrecy with which
he gathered his forces along the west side of the salient from the
Marne to the Aisne, but the dash and spirit put into that attack was
in great part due to the presence of the Americans, and, after all, it
was that irresistible forward moement that counted most.
General Maurice has a habit of referring to the number of divi-
sions Which were in action at different points. Why these military I
I writers insist on a term so indefinite is not made evident.
An American division at war strength numbered from 27,500 to
j 47,500, while German and British divisions were reduced to as low as
, 8000 men. One American division was equal to two or three Ger
man divisions.
One of the great contributing causes of the German break down,
after the mighty allied offensive started, was the loss of equipment.
One of the French staff makes this review of die German collapse :
The German army, after three and a half months of re
peated reverses, was enormously weakened in men and material,
broken in spirit and absolutely incapable of recovering its
strength. This lamentable condition of its forces was patent
to the eyes of the German high command, to whom it was ob
viously irremediable in face of an enemy that was fully resolved
to take every advantage of the unceasing growth of its reserves,
drawn from America, to keep up the struggle without the slight
est thought of a truce.
The discouragement of Germany sprang not only from her
knowledge of her own desperate situation, but also from her
realization of the situation of her adversary. The latter was
bringing into action every day artillery lavishly furnished with
munition and ery superior to her own. The allied aviation had
won unquestioned supremacy in the air, and the German intelli
gence service, whatever its shortcomings may have been, could
not possibly have failed to become acquainted with the fact that
at the beginning of November, the allies had reserves available
to the equivalent of about eighty divisions, which number could
only continue to increase.
On October 3, 1918, Field Marshal von Hindenburg wrote to
Prince Maximilian of Baden, who was then imperial chancellor,
as follows:
"Berlin, October 3, 1918.
"To the Imperial chancellor:
"The supreme commander of the army adheres to his request,
formulated on Sunday- September 29, 1918, for an immediate
offer of peace to our enemies.
"In consequence of the collapse of the Macedonian front and
of the diminution of our reserves for the western front which has
resulted therefrom; in consequence, also, of the impossibility we
find of making good the very serious losses that have been in
flicted on us in the combats of the last few days, there no long
er remains any hope so far as it is possible for a man to judge
of compelling the enemy to make peace.
"The enemy, on his part, is daily throwing fresh reserves
into the struggle. Nevertheless, the Geiman army remains firm
and is triumphantly repulsing all attacks. The situation, how
ever, is becoming more cniical every day, and may force the
high command to take decisions involving very serious conse
quences. "Under these conditions it will be better to cease the strug
gle, in order to avoid useless looses to the German people and
their allies. Every day is costing us the lives of thousands of
brave soldiers.
(Signed) "HINDENBURG. Field Marshal."
"TURN DOWN THE LIGHT. "
These Were Roosovelt's Last Words.
(By Dr. A. S. Condon.)
"Turn down the light. A star of brig-hter rnv
Will guide ray feet aright
Through mystic solitudes of this strange way
To where there is no night.
"God save my country in this fearsome stress
Of perils manifold !
Hoar Thou Thv ohildren's meanings of distress,
nr mtv 'g hand withhold
"Would T could tarry longer in 1 ho Keld
Among neglected sheaves!
Mv gleaners reap a more abundant yield
Than Reason now perceives,
"O. T .mi loath to ;jo ! The word of Harm
Threatens the ihmno of Right!
But now, as no 'or before, I lower my arm
To Death) Turn down the light.
Ogden. Utah.
RIOTING IN LIVERPOOL.
N'ows from England and other parts
of r. irnpo should he studied by our pre.
pie so as to avoid the pitfalls which
are causing distress across the ocean
There is restlessness, uneasiness and
even hysteria. Chi-ir. (kit pfrio-X sC
unrest, the American laborer must
keep a mental bnlnnce.
Here la a dispatch from Liverpool,
telling of all night riots and alarming
condii mns :
LIVERPOOL, Aug T Liverpool
is In the grip of Holliganism. For
two nights the city has been given
over to riot and pillage. Scores of
shops have boon smashed and ri
fled At one place along the lines
of docks the gates were broken
open, and the mob Btorined the
huge food warehouse, carrying off
stocks of bacon, ham, lard, sugar,
rice and tinned stuffs.
Intermittent looting has contin
ued in various parts of the city
throughout the day. Soldiers have
been called out to protect proper
ty, but m most eases the rioters
offered no resistance and ran
when the troops arrived.
There has been a raid on a
sugar factory, and there was an
amazing scene in the Vaux Hall
district when the mob smashed
their way into a beer bottling
and looted it Men, women and
hr made their way into the
Sin. bj and emerged loaded up
wtih bottles of hor and stoat.
The3e wero opened and consumed
in the roadway, th empty bot
tles being smashed on .the gran
ite Bt reels, which were a mass of
broken glass.
Oiher rioters came out with
'cases of stout and beer, which they
carried away. Barrels of beer were
rolled into the main thoroughfare
and broached in the open. The
crowd drank and danced in the
road.
Scenes of that kind are disgraceful
and injure the cause of the masses.
Generally these disturbances are due
to false leadership on the part of the
working classes. Men who have no
sincere attachment to labor unions, oft
en worm their way into thop organi
zations and, becoming radicals, lead
QOMPERS PLEADS
FOR GREATER j
LAB ORRIQHTS !
AMSTERDAM, Friday, Aug 1 (BtI '
the Associated Press) Samuel bom
pers. president nf the American Fed
oration of Labor and head of wjM
American council to the lntcrnaUoniSff
trades union federation In session
heie, pleaded for greate- rights for 3
bor today. His address followed thl
report ol a committee which said ll
could not accept the charter givpn
bor in the peace treat: as a full eiT3
preesion of the workers' demands
M r ( Jomp' i drmundi d thai ahJ
should noi bo n ;un1of aa an artjria
of commerce. He urged also that J
seamen's act be enacted to pern
'or to ' o- w r..n ihev wore
i o ', II, plcided for thti
equalit) of women an: m-n and th
abolition of voluntary sc-niccs.
German d legates dlspM. d Mr Gmm
pcrs urgunv nt. which, they said, mad
il ippear Europ' 1 I - r- .ini.-.ns were tgej
Conservative They demanded that ttm
workei ti ra r--.i'ixation of twH
Berne conference's program, includin;
Ihe regulation ol rloidrcn'.-; educatlojl
women's labor, -horiei hours, SundM
rest and he ip i ; ion or home ,n j
duslriefl ,
W A. Appl n. Mi.- new prfirifnt
of the organization. 10K corr pnn.
here thai r ,h unfortunate
that the Germ m hould have !irupn
tO que :on tho 'leel-i; ; ion of Hr-rr
nbacl on Germany's war rcsnoal
Bibillt s . which, v h n r ceptod b Hum
Legjcn and 1 1 1 1 Huber, had broken
down ma iv. barriers and had 'opene2 II
the way to i eeonr ilia'.ion." j N
"Partial n-pudiat mi nf ih.vc stateJ l
'i' "" " nimed'. 1
.. USplclOU a : ' " hat (jwj
man wa Insincere,"
therinloniiBtgto ThisT3 !
ihe time for union men to throw J I
lae lead nd seek counsel from tat I
quiet, con home owning mtm I
bera of their organizations. j
K p awry i : om .irike as loJ I
as po ildo and it;: t lo the rondtaQ,
pr jsure o( Hie justice of vour del r
I
man da to bring results quite as coofl
as would come from striking. j t
00 1 I
Read the Clarified Ad ' K
Read the Classified Ads.
, h
.j
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optimism, but cleverly portrayed drama humor, true ' ' ' 'NBl tki
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