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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, November 04, 1919, LAST EDITION - 3:30 P.M., Image 1

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1 TODAY'S METAL PRICES t )t A rfYf ft S ifti T WEATHER FORECAST
NEW ORK-Copper e.ectrolyfc 21c; led firm, II I I 1 fl I Ffllilrll T I l II 11 I wth. indication. for O.den . vtctnlt:
M 6ST':Cbd: spelter , Vf B J V JaU J4fcT U V7 Z3) VV bT -P A Tonight and Wednesday partly cloudy, warmer in
' S JP " fJ south and castoortions tonight.
L O FEARLESS INDEPENDENT PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER -
-Fo7ty-mnvear-No. 263. Price Five cent, QGDEN CITY, UTAH, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 4, 1919. LAST EDITION 3:30 P. M. jffl
til fil
UTAH MINES WORKING AT 90 PER CENT CAPACITY I
- m
Bolsheviki Claim Victory Over Russ Army I
Kenyon Introduces Resolution Seeking to End
Labor Trouble; Lewis Says Will Be Simple
Matter for Government and Operators to Re
Open Negotiations; Garfield Taking Steps to
Bring About Settlement; Utah Mines Reported
to Be Producing Normal Tonnage; Mines in
Other Districts Running With Small Capacity.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. A special presidential com
l missicn to attempt arbitration of the bituminous coal strike
jj was proposed in a resolution introduced today by Chairman
I Kenyon, of the labor committee. Without discussion, the
measure was referred to that committee.
;J INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Nov. 4. Breaking his silence
here for the first time since he was served with the restraining
bc order horn the court of Federal Judge A. B. Anderson last
Friday, John L. Lewis, acting president of the United Mine
m Workers of America, gave ou? the following brief statement
Jj in regard to government efforts to end the strike of approxi-'
m mately 425,000 soft coal miners:
"The machinery of the joint system of bargain in the
; mining industry is intact. It would be a simple matter for the
government and the coal operators again to set it in motion to
negotiate a wage agreement."
. i
SETTLEMENT OF STRIKE
WASHINGTON, No . 4. Efforts
Kr. J P --iM i : . li iiH-ni nf ill-
I utrike of bituminous coal miners wen
r ir?.fhr, ; -, ri , ( ,,,., f.n(.,- re between
I Federal Fuel Administrator Garfield
I 'nd J w. Morrow, president of the
I American Coal association, an organ
I ballon of the loading coal operators
' 01.1)1 fY
KjPr Garfield returned early today
I froia a visit to Kentuck) and scon aft
I wards . ni iu conference with Mr.
I Morrow, v.i0 uas ,m official of Ihe
j '-'! ' :.ami-nllti, ii .liiiin. i i ' war
! i.n.n, .a. i . . ..
Mu to make wen nol dii dosed in ad
I '.mce of the conference.
UTAH MINES RUNNING.
I SALT LAKE CITY. Utah. Nov. I
I yrlh coa' min''' continue to opi
I I ,ta nearly complete crows and it is
r?'"naiod they are woi king at ap
Proximately j.i per cent capacity. At
" ;' '"' ,'i'i' ial.- (J. . ' .1 a irl
HI a17"1"1' ''ondi,,ns Previ il in ev rj
nip and say the s , . ason oi
I I h 'h thsr)atehinK of additional
uoops from ( nnip Kearny. Cal . to t
'-tab fields
"' officials report a normal
' "nerd of oal r,oin -he m men bin
'I' h. 1,1 a I I XV ,
"i ar i attempt to distribute the supplv !
luaiij and in accordance with the
fenc (list Issued Saturday by the
I Ullao administration
.B, MINERS WORKING.
LiiRl1DURG' ' Nov 4 - Re-I
Jf"; -r-'ived a. ,h, depart m. nt 1
btu?nS 'day fr,Jln Jnspectow in tit"
f S "S rield 'icated that many!
I land r V ork.n:- , v.. -.. .. ,''
I 'Vnt, 'r"Dr' uFayo,u' and Somerset
iB oTh' and that mo were v. orking
other parts 0f the .Mate
thaurr,s "l sr"'r'r;" msp' '"'or, Wf.r 1
S , -:in incllna'io" return to!
rr". ' waichin the rl, ,elop
i RmTRrRnE.A" PRODUCTION.
' Cni f ,0, IA"Nov- i - - Record
I ftiues in .k Production in non-uujon i
'Wed lr district v,as
Sa lead y Pert0 while
i VorffR dJ',," of (oo United Mine
j "ince the strike was called
COLORADO MtNEO OPEN
PEN'VER. Colo . Nov. 4. Hcports r---ccHed
at the offices of the Colorado
Futl & Iron company here today indi
cated an increase in the number of men
working in company mines, compared
v Ith yesterday.
At Walsen Dear Walsenburs. whAro
troops were dispatched late yesterdav,
18a men wore working this momlntr.
while only 10 worked yesterday, accord
ing to the report.
The Fremont mine in Fremont county,
had 2t mui at worl; and was operating
today. Yesterday this mine was closed,
no workers reporting;
Other properties, except Ideal, report- '
ed Increased working forces. At Ideal j
the force at work was two less than
. st' rdii', the company said.
no
DANIELS WILL NOT
DISCIPLINE SIMS
FORNEWSARTICLE
WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. Secretary J
DanielB indicated today that no steps,
m pe contemplated to discipline Rear
Admiral Sims because of statements in
recently published articles detailing
the admiral's experience in Europe,
during the war. Daniel Connell. di-,
roctor of the Irish National bureau,
has written Mr. Daniels demanding
that the officer be called to account
for alle. d n Flections on the Sinn Fein
party in Ireland.
'Admiral Sims was granted permis
sion to write a book on his ezperl
ences In Europe,'' Mr Daniels waid In,
reply. ' The department did not en
BOr ii and is not. responsible lor any
statements in it."
on
TO SETTLE FIUME CASE.
PARIS, Nov. I (Havas.) France
has taken the initiative in prresent to:
the Washington a new proposal for
Settlement of the Flume question, ac
cording to the Echo de Paris. The
newspaper saye the move has the sup
port of Great Britain
Electors Ballot for Gov
ernors and Other
Stale Officials.
INTEREST IN OHIO
Popular Vote on the
Eighteenth Amend
ment Constitution, j
NEW YORK, Nov. 4 Electors in ;
five states went to the polls today to1
ballot for governors, while election of!
lesser officials and decisions on con j
Stltutional questions favored the vot
ers of several other states. Gover
nors are beir.R elected In Kentucky
Maryland. Massachusetts. Mississippi
and New Jersey.
The elections in Ohio are heme
watched with interest by "wet" and
"dry" advocates, as there, for the first
lime in any state, a popular vote is I
being taken on the eighteenth amend
ment to the constitution This is he
ing accomplished b a referendum on
i lie legislature's action in ratifying th
amendment Ohio also is taking a ref
erendum vote on the prohibition en-'
forcement adopted by the legislature
and is voting on two proposed consti-!
hilinnnl omanitmanti tnimfifnr r.n rm.
hi bit ion.
Kentucky. Massachusetts. New Jer-
, sey, Virginia and New York are elect-1
' ing legislatures. Constitutional ques-
'Hons confront the voters in IllinrH.s
Nebraska and Texas. Illinois and Ne-j
braska are electing delegates to con I
stitutional conventions while Texas is i
I passing on a call for constitutional j ,
convention and on six proposed eon-'
stitutional amendments. I.
PANDOLFO'S HIGH
IN II. S. COURT
CHICAGO Nov 4 Ralph Olson,
president of the First National bank
of St. Cloud, Minn., the home of the
Pan Motor company was the first wit
ness today at the trial of 13 of the
motor company official.-: charged with
using the maiis to defraud.
Mr. Olson testified concerning a
transaction whereby John Barret '
placed Pandolfo'S personal note for1
$500,000, together with a $1,000,000
Fan stock certificate, made out to Fan
dolfo, in the First National bank of
St. Cloud. The transaction took place
on May 31, 1918, and it was cancelled
in December. 1918. At that time the
papers wore withdrawn an' the bank,
received a release.
W. T. Maxwell of Little Rock. Ark .i
a state bank commissioner, the next '
witness, Identified an application of
the Pan Motor company to sell .-.lock
In Arkansas.
nn
CHILE GETS OUTLET.
WASHINGTON. Nov. A Chile has
civ.-n Ihlivia an outlet to the Pacific
ocean by ceding a strip of land north
of the province of Arlca. according to
official advices received here todS
UU '
JAMES WOODS GREEN DE D
LAWRENCE, Kan.. Nov. 4. Jamet
Woods Green, known amcng the stu
dents of Kansas university as 'I ncle
Jimmy," dean of the school of law for
more than forty years died here ni
morning,
V
Sheriff's Squad Attacked
by Women With Bricks
and Stones.
YOUNGSTOWN. Ohio, 'Nov 4 Hrick
and stones flew while deputy sheriffs
fought with enraged women when a
crowd of 150 women this morning t
tempted to prevent workers from on
teiing the YouhgStOWn Sheet nnd Tube
companj plant here.
Five men and four women were ar
reted, charged with rioting. No oni
was seriously Injured. Phots-, were fired
from 4 street In the Ohio works of the
Cnrncgle Steel company plant this morn- I
Ing and mill guards returntfl the fire.
No r.i.siu. ; 1 1. s wen- reported."
CHICAGO. Nov. 4 Union pickets j
wefe withdrawn from the streets of
;:ir.' and Indiana Harbor, Ind., todav
for the first time since the stmt of I
the steel strike six weeks ago Work r? J
entered the great steel plants unmo- I
leafed.
Colonel AW S. Mapcs, commander ot
the troops In C:ir, Is investigating let- '
tors he obtained urging th- strikers to
"lay low" until the troops are recalled.
He Satd the withdrawal of the picket.
probably .-ts In line with this policy.
oo
CABINET OFFICERS
LEAVE CAPITAL
TO CASTBALLOTS
WASHINGTON. Nov I Withsev-;
oral members of President Wilson's
Cabinet In then- home towns today to
cat their ballots, ttv cabjnel did not
hold its regular Tuesday meeting It
wa expected to assemble later in
the week, however, to discuss the coal
strike and the appointment of a com
mission on industrial unrest.
( abinet officers absent included At
torney General Palmer, who was at his
home in Stroudsburg, Pa., and Secre
tary Gla.ss, who was In Lynchburg,
Va. Secretary Baker had obtained an
absentee's ballot from Cleveland and
oted by mail.
For the first time since he has been
in the White House, President Wilson
was unablo to go to his home in
Princeton. N J.. to cast his ballot.
Secretary Tumulty said the president
"w.?s in fine shape" this morning and
would be permitted to receive the elec
tion returns "provided they are good."
The house of representatives was
not in session, having recessed so
members from stales where elections
were being held could return home.
The senate, however, continued its
discussion of the peace treaty
FOR CLOSED SHOP.
MIAMI, Fla , Nov. 4. Moie than
ninety per tent of union men in Miami
have voted in favor of a general strike
to uphold Ihe principle of the closet
shop The strike committee today se;
next Mondaj for a gvneral walkout
More than 3600 union men will be a l
fected and two million dollars worth of;
building held up.
00
-
JOY PARTY ENDS.
f NEW YORK, Nov. 4 The
cruise of U. S. S. Joy ended today
when her skipper, "Lieutenant-
Commander" Harold E, Joy was
arreGtcd for impersonating a na-
val officer. I
f "It's all my wife's fault," he I
said. "She bought me a yacht i
and this uniform with wound and I
service stripes and told me if I
didn't wear it she'd leave me." f j
Joy waa taken to a police sta- I
tion at the instance of a naval In- J
telligencc officer. He is 20 years
old- 4 i
. ' . ." j
ARE ON
DUTY
! .
Arrive From Fort Ni
agara With Equipment
for Long Stay.
BROWNSVILLE. Pa.. Nov 4.
United States troops entered Pennsyl
vania on strike duty today when a
eomnanv of Infantry arrived here trom
Buffalo.
The troops in command of Colonel
E. 1 Eans. arrived from Fort Niag
ara early in the da . They number
ISO nu n and carried camp equipment
and supplies for a long stay. It was
reported that another company would
arrive later in the day.
Brownsville is on the Monongahela
river, the center of an important min
mc field with about forty mine? em
ploying some 40,000 miners It is on
the edge of the non-union mine coun
try. Many mines are closed by the
strike, but an almost equal number
not controlled by the United Mine
Workers are to be kept In operation
under the protection of the troops, it
was stated today by the operators.
ELECTIONS IN THE
GERMAN AREAS
BE ACTED ON
PARIS. No 4 November 10 has
been fired by the supreme council as
the date when the plebiscite commis
sion created under the i;erman peace
treaties will meet in Paris to discuss
the elections in the various areas, the
political affiliation of which is to be
settled by popular vote. The United
States will not be represented even of
ficially at this meeting
Holland has been advised by the
council that it adheres to the decision
provlouslv reached not lo recognize
the duties ownership of fJerman ships
purchased by Holland after the open
ing of the war
The council discussed the'Hunearlan
situation, but made no great progress
toward a solution of tho problem of
dealing with the Rumanians who are
still occun in'; a considerable section
of the country France aus Italy have
both been charged with lukewarnmess
in supporting the position of the Inter-1
allied mission at Budapest and some!
reports of today's council session had
it that there had been no perceptible
strengthening of their attitude in sup
port of the mission. There were said'
to be looking at the question from;
separate viewpoints and not to be in
harmony with each other.
Radical Changes i
In U. S. Foreign
Trade Reported
WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. Radical
changes In the foreign trade of the
United States in spirits, wines and
liquors due m national prohibition leg
islation are reported by the depart
ment of commerce.
For the eight months ending with
August, I91, the value of liquors es !
ported was nineteen times as great as
ihe imports while in the year 1914 1
the value of Imports was five times!
he value of the exports. Intoxicat
Ing liquors imported during the Oral
igtit months of the present year to
talled 516,214 in value, or at the rate
if 774,324 for the complete year, while
:n 1917 the Import trade oi the I nited
States in this eommoditv amounted to
17.G79,132 and in 1914 to $20,347,546
Exports for the eight mouths . nd
ng With AUgUBl amounted m 9,989,
58 as compared with $5,S.S3,013 for
Q
HOSTESS TO ROYALTY
ik lllj
! V SWfiS THOMAS
. R MARSHALL I
WASHINGTON When King
Albert and Queen Elizabeth of
Belgium visit Washington, at the
completion of their tour through
the United Btates, Mrs. Thomaa K.
Marshall, wife of Vice President
Marshall, will rocoivo them - a
hostess.
the corresponding period in 1918 and
$x,417.17S In 1917 Continuation of
i his export trade is expected by the
department of the greal quantities of
liquors now in bonded distilleries and i
'customs warehouses.
oo
WOMEN AND GIRLS
WELCOME FRENCH
TIGER' WITH KISS
STRASSBURG, Alsate, Nov 4. (By
the Associated Press.) The solution
I of the many problems the world is now
facing may be summarized in the sin
gle word "work," Premier Clemence.iu
'declared in his keynote sneeeh for the
government party In the parliamentary
elections campaign, delivered here to-
i day
I The speech also was his farewell
i message on the eve of the retirement
i from politieal life which he conteni
j plates.
His address, he declared, was not a
message meant for Frar.ro alone, but
was an appeal to the enure world to
renew its labors as they had been per
formed before the war and produce
for the world's needs.
STRASSBURG. Nov. 4. This eity,
the capital of reclaimed Alsace, extend
ed n warm greeting this morning to
Premier Clemcnceau, who came here
io deliver a speech intended, it is un
derstood. to set forth the program of
the government party in the parlia
mentary elections' campaign The
premier was met by Alexander Mllle
rand, the governor of Alsace, and oth
or potables, and was cheered by
thousands of the populace as he passed
before the guard drawn up in his hon
or. A picturesque feature was furn
ished by Alsatian girls In national
costume tossing flowers as the pre
mier went by.
"This is one of the greatest days of
by life," the premier exclaimed "It
was worth living for. Now I know
I have not lived in vain."
Brushing aside M, MlHerand and
others near him, the 7S-year-cld pre
mier mingled With the crowds of Al
satians who had broken through the
cordon formed by the police, who were
not too insistent in keeping them
back Pretty girls virtually mobbed
the "grand 'old man" of Prance, who
save every appearance of enjoying
:he experience immensely. The girls
and women welcomed him in the Al
satian dialect, which the premier
does not understand, but their re
sounding kiss on his weather-beaten
cheeks, needed no Interpreter.
TWELVE KILLED -
IN WRECK OF THE
SIMPLON EXPRESS
PARIS. .Nov 4 The Siinplon ex-,
press, while ju a standstill between
Pout-sur Tonne and Sens, (about 60
miles southeast of Paris) al io o'clock
last night, was run into by a train
bound for Geneva. Twelve persons
were killed and about thirty injured
The authorities have gone to the
scene oi the wreclfc
II I
"REDS"
TRAP
ARMV5
0
Bolsheviks Claim the Yu- v,
denitch Forces Are jjj
Surrounded.
I HI
FINNS REFUSE AID.
4- t IH
IIULSIN'IFORS, Kmland. Nov. '',31
4- 4. (By the Associated Press.) IH
The Finnish government inform- m
ed General Yudenitch today that
it was unable to co operate with 4 H
him for the .deliverance of Petro- - i1
4- grad. f 1 1.
4- (This Is the Finnish reply to I jffi
teh appe.il of the northwestern "
Russian covernment for assist-
4- ance coupled with a recognition : ui
4- of the independence of Finland). ir
M-
LON DON, Nov. 4 A claim that .ne
northwestern Russian army of General m.h(
Yudenitch, which has been attacking
Petrograd, has been surrounded by ihe iQij
bolsheviki is made in a soviet gov
ernment wireless dispatch from Mos
cow dated today.
' 1 t.
The claim to have effected an en
Circlemem or the northwestern Rus-
ian army is presumably based upon IH
the successes of the bolsheviki agaiaSi
the petro.urad I,i:a-.- skov railway, by , . -which
the southward railroad commit
nirations of General Yudenitch on hi - ijjp)
Ralfic sea base are tut.
The capture of Luga and Pskov and ,-'
a comparatively short advance to '.he
southern end of LaKe Peipus, a COB
Blderable body of water reaching from ft'SH
the eiclnit oi Pskov to within tblftj IH
miles of the Cult ct Finland, would j j
iro'- :ho;u hir to a ret i r- ni -n t ,t:
southward by General Yudenitch ifQ
Noihing, however, has been received f ,
to Indicate that :h - Lap between Lrke !' j;
PelpUS an dthe ailf of Finland lias ,
: been closed or even that operations
threatening Genera Yudenitchs cum
munications in this ngion were in pro
; REDS AGAINST CHRISTIAN NAMES
STOCKHOLM, Oct 15. (By The !Lt- i
, sociatcd Press.) Leaders of Russia'. IH
BOViet BOVemnint hav.- b.inn-d th-1 criv- LIJ
ling of hnstnoi nun.., lo ctuldreii it ih
lepertcd, because they are considered IH
r. ilnl-.-'n of tlv n-i. nonary system." 7m
It i expected nn order will bo issued
soon forblddtri; tle.n usi- .-nml"i . ore t t
to be substituted. Thus three children Stj1
of ,-i f,n;,l! n jne.l l'.-tkoff ma in I yf
tun- I- known I. iko.i one, two ind 44
three." respectively.
To Sipport Yudenitch.
HELS1NGPORS,- Finland. Monday, IH
Nov. 3. The Pinnish cabinet was In IH
-( - ion di- u the letter of General IH
Manni eini formerly commander oi
the Finnish army, in which he urged
i hat Finland embark on blstilities j,JjB
against the Bolsheviki to support the IH
campaign ot General Yudenitch againsi
Petrograd The le tor has caused Wmj
greal Interesl throughout the counti.
Tho recognition of the independence ()ff-,
of Finland by the northwest Russian
povernment offered as a return for
Pinnish assistance in the campaign IM
against Petrograd Is otherwise' with- IM
oul i ondltlona Hifl
.Mi Gulevltsch, the representative of
the northwestern government at Hep rji
ingfors through the Pinnish govern H
ment, has called upon all Russians In
ing in Finland to Join General Yud
4-44-4-4-4- 4-4- R
SUGAR FOR VOTERS. 1$
NEW YORK. Nov. 4. A three- I
pound package of sugar was glv- 4- Rj
en today to each voter in the 17th II
4 electiop precinct of the second 4-
assembly district on the lower H
-f i-st side by "Jimmy" Kelly, Dem- jjf
4- ocratic leader. The gift was made II1
4- without regard to political pref- -- HI
4- erences of the voter. -4- I'pM
tt4-4-tt44-4-T4-t.

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