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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, December 04, 1919, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1919-12-04/ed-1/seq-12/

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1 THURSDAY, DECEMBER ,v. gllg Cifldglt gtattOaril OGDEN UT4H I
I MILES GOODYEAR CABIN, TOE
FIRST HOUSE IN UTAH, BEING
MOVED TO LOT ON Q T H STREET
IOgden's oldest relic, ;i little log
cabin built by Miles Goodyear in 184.',
two ears before the pionerc came
to the state, and oriemalh 'ocated
near the Weber river at the foot of
1 ', what is now Twenty-eighth street, is
io be moved from the real of '.'le rosi
d-'iirc of Mrs Mjnerva She 1266
Washington avenue, v.'iciv it was
placed for safe keepinc several yers
hko. to a lot on Ninth street it the
reei of the fire station where will
be covered with corrugated iron fori
protection from storm-, until a final
place in the city can be arranged I
where it w ill be preserved as one of
the most interesting relics of the
state.
The cabin Is the property of (he
Daughters of the Pioneers of Ogden
and these ladies have persuaded the
city to have the little old home taken
especial care of until a "final resting
place" is secured.
At present the organization has its
many interesting relics in a special
room in the Carnegie library ouilding
but no place has ever been found for
tho log cabin, which lor yeaa lus
weainerea tne storms nni is sui in
lair condition.
Early History.
Tbe cabin was discovered by Cap
fain James Drown In charge of a com
pany of the earliest, pioneer and the
property was bought b Captain
Drown from Goodyear in the autumn
HIV 1847 when Goodyear, who by ,i
HI grant from the Spanish government,
owned all property from the Weber
river to Hot Springs md from the
lake to the mountains, part of which
is now Ogden e.ty.
When Captain Drown discovered the
cabin it was surrounded bj a fence
formed of logs anrl it was within this
1 enclosure that, the iir.t Fourth of
III Woman Is Beaten
j SALT LAKE. Dec. 4 Severely beat
en on the head and body with what
Mlj examining physicians believe to bo a I
1 fractured skull and with a bullet I
wound In her richt side, Mrs. Blanche
Riley. 30. is at Holy Cross hospital in
a critical condition She may die. was
I f the physicians' verdict last night.
I I Mrs. Riley was attacked in her quar
I f ters In a rooming house at 621; East
Second South between 9 and 10 o'clock
yesterday morning by an unknown as-
I :' s.-uiant After beating h.s ictlm Into
III unconsciousness the attacker rolled up
what evidence he could of the affair
'! 1 and threw It down the chimney of an
;. dJoining building, where the police
July celebration was held in Ogden.
In 1857 Amos P Stone, father of .
I. Stone of 1642 Liberty avenue,
bought the cabin from Captain Brown
and used it as a blacksmith shop.
The building was moved from the We
ber rier bottoms to just wesl of the
tabernacle and upon the death of Mr.
Stone, Mrs. Minerva Shaw a .laughter,
purchased the cabin from ber mother
and had it moved to the rear of the
Shai home on Washington avenue a
shingle roof was added .o protect the
building.
This afternoon numerous relic peek
ers are on the ground to see the cabin
moved and to take photographs. Hug
bart Anderson is in charge of the mov
ing, and lie stated that group of peo
ple had gathered at the Shaw resi
dence and were looking over the "old
timer;." All seemed to be especially
interested in the peepholes in the
cabin which were placed thre by the
first owner for the purpose ot "spot
ting" the treacherous Indians with
whom the earh Bettlers of pgden and
he state had numerous clashes.
To Protect Cabin.
The history of the cabin would bo
one of interest to many tourists going
through the city The Daughters of
Pioneers are hoping in the very near
future to secure a satisfactory place
for all the relics which they possess
and a building in which the cabn may
be guarded from the elements
Recently Salt Lake City i --quested
that Hie cabin be brought to the capi
tal where it would be placed en dis
play with other relics of rarly days,
but the ogden organization denied the
Salt Lakers their request and the cab-j
in is to be kept in this city.
So today the little old loer cabin
with a history is to take t.-. third trip
and the Daughters of th" Pioneers are
to see that no harm comes to It.
I COAL FAMINE BEGINS TO HAVE
j INFLUENCE ON OOBEN AFFAIRS
r W RESTRICTIONS ARE ISSUED
I Alarmed by the serious . ituation
impending by reason of the i hortage
I I) of fuel due to the sink" of coal mln
I I ers. railroad officials and otherr. inter
ested in the handling of fuel in a big
way are meeting today in Salt Lake
to discuss measures to doie out the
dwindling supply.
W. H. Chevers, general agent of the
I'nlon Pacific at Ogden, is in fttend
II f. a nee.
Bf. Only vital industries will receive
fuel until the crisis is past, it is be
lieved, and it is declared likelv that
thousands will be thrown out of work
by the general shutdown
One of the first plants in Utah to
cease operations through lack 1 fuel
was the Utah Iron & Steel company in
Salt Lake.
Garficlds' Instructions.
The following order from Dr. G?r
Mil fit Id, fuel director, has been -cei.d
by railroad officials here .m l explain
what must be done to avoid Msaster
during the crisis.
"It is neeessar that coal -hall be
In used for only essential purposes. Pub
lie utilities consuming coal should dis
fl I continue to furnish power, ha1 and
R; - l'ht to non-esaential industries and
should only consume sufficient coal
j I io produce enough light, power and
Ji l liraf to nirot the actual urgent needs
of the people. Advertising sings and
lHI I display signs of various kinds. r.eecs
li PROMISES TO POINT;
I WHERE LIQUOR
I: WAS BOUGHT
Cpon his promise to go io he at-j
torney general at the Btato capital
and accompany any man that the a!
torney general may designate io the
place where he purchased the liquor!
with which he became Intoxicated,
Bl I John McGraw, arrested by 1 1 - slui ,
iff's department a few days ago upon
thd charge of being drunk, was given I
: a thirty-day suspended sentence in!
mm , the city court this morning by Judge
H J I. R. Robert t--.
In passing sentence, the poui'l re
i f erred to the fact that while drunken-,
ness is a misdemeanor it was not as
r.nle or trafficking In contraband h i
l quor He added that inasmuch as the I
defendant, had promised to show the
officers the person or persons from
j hom he had purchased the liquor, he!
would be lenient. This Is the second i
1 II time since Judge Roberts hart been on j
ihe bench in the city court that an of-
fender has been given a suspended
! sentence upon his promise to aid the,
officers in apprehending the violator)
H p of the law.
sitatlr.g the use of coal should oe cur
tailed and no coal should be distrib
uted for such purposes. Pursuant to
this policy l havt requested he rail
road administration in 'he di-tribu-tion
of coal now or hereafter in its
possesion, to limit distribution to
these essential and urgent cas'.js. As
far as practicable; until ;ho conditions
warrant a change in the distribution
of coal, will be limited to the first 'ive
classes of the priority list. Retail
dealers who distribute coal for house
hold requirements, heating hotel?,
building, hospitals, etc., should take
j every precaution to see 'hat oal is
, only delivered where it is absolutely
j required and then only in such limited
quantities that the supply ran; be dis
tributed widely and prevent suffering.
I The state and other local authorities
j can maer tally aid in inspecting and
si pi rvislng such distribution b, retail
dealers, and the U. S. government will
be glad to leave the supervision and
control of such distribution by retail
dealers entire!) to any state, county,
or municipality which may make pro
vision therefor. The distribution io
retail dealers must necessarily be ad
ministered by the railroad administra
tion in pursuance to the orders al
ready made by the United States f.-el
! administration in carrying out the pri
orities which have been prescribed un
'der the Lever act.'
found it last night
Mrs Riley was alone in the house
at the time. Joe Thompson, proprietor
of the place, had left town for the 1
day About 9 o'cloctc a strange man
entered Mrs. Riley's room, .-die loid
the police in a moment of lucidity last
night She ordered him out and he
attacked her.
She was not found until 6 o'clock
last night, when other roomeri heard
eroans coming from Mrs. Riley's room,
i i entered and found her lying on
the bed.
A physician was summoned, and af-1
ter a brief examination ordered her
removed to the hospital. A wound in
her right side was said by the doctor
to have been made by a bullet. The
extem of the injury to her skull e in
noi be determined until X-rays arci
used this morning.
on
Runaway Horses
Strike Lamp Post
1 A bit of Ice on the corner of Twentv
fourth street and Grant avenue averted
B serious accident today, when a run
away horse e kidded on the slipperv
surface and sent a runaway- team into
R liKhl pole.
The accident happened shortlv be
fore 12 o'clock when a team of horses
which were tied in front of a Japanese
establishment, between Grant and
Lincoln avenues, succeeded in slipping
their bridles The animals dashed
towards Washington avenue and at
the intersection at Grant avenue, were
seemingly headed for an automobile
which was crossing the street The
driver of the car on seeing the ap
proaching tem, threw on the emerg
ency brake and stopped his car in the
path of the horses. That the team
would miss the automobile seemed im
possible until the hoof of the horse on
the right side struck thel cy spot.
The horse stumbled and Jerked its
mate from the course, and before the
team could again pursue its mad dash
down the street, it had collided with
a steel street lamp poet. The horses
were drawing a beet wagon which yvas
loaded with 800 pounds of coal.
When the team stopped, bystanders
held the horses until the owner, a Jap
anese farmer, appeared.
FARMERS REQUIRED
TO 1SWER MH
QUESTIONS
Questions to determine data rela
tive to land and water owners ot Web
er county, in the proposed irrigation
district which will embrace the entire
county, arc berns mailed to farmers
'from the county farm bureau offices
in the federal building.
The questions are from Dr. Samuel
Forlier, chief engineer of the irriga
tion division of the United Stales de
nnr'ment of agriculture, and by G. P.
pMcGonagle, state engineer for Utsb
Bach propert v owner will be ques
tioned, the authorities in the water
project desiring first hand Information
regarding the attitude of the farmers.
Among the questions which will be
filled in by the property owners arc:
The present supply of water; oame
of the irrigation system or canal used
to water property; kind of soil, and
kind of crop
The need for additional water will
also be noted on the paper by the
farmers.
To expedite this work and collect
this material as quickly as possible, so
that the district may be formed as
'soon as possible, meetings in various
parts of the count v arc being arrang
ed. The first will be held In Ogden val
ley, Tuesday, between 9 a. m. and 5
p. m. Government experts will be on!
hand at the Huntsvllle Bchool house
to explain such questions as the farm
ers might not death understand
Meetings in Eden, Liberty and ether
places of the county will be visited'
during the remalndt r ol the week.
W. P Thomas, county farm agent,
urges farme.s to be present to fib
their affidavits with the irrigation au
thorities. He further Btates that fail-1
ure to furnish the data requ' sted
might prove inconvenient, not only to
the district authorities, but to the far
mers who neglect turning in the In
formation
"CHECKERS" at the Cozy
again today. Coming tomor
row, Tom Mix, Jas. J. Corbett,
Pete Morrison and Snub Pollard.
ELKS' MEMQRIA1 IS TO
1 BE HELD DN NEXT
I SIMMY
'The faults of our brothers we write
upon the sands.
Their virtues upon the tablets of mem
ory and love."
Practically at the same hour through
out Elkdom, the members of the order
will gather on Sunday to pay tributes
, of re&pect and love to departed broth
er. Brothers, who took up arms in
the world war and have returned to
their homes end friends, will bow '.heir
hends at a sendee in memory of the
departed brothers, including thoso who
made tho great sacrifice in the war.
The services of Ogden Lodge No. 71iJ
will be at 3 o'clock. Sunday, at the
lodge room3 on Grant avenue. U. S.
Judge Tillman D Johnson and Dean
W W Fleetwood -vs ill be the principal
speakers. The former will dellvei the
oration and the later the. memorial
add ress.
The tablet (onlains tbe names of SO
ib parted brothers since the year of
l - the ear Oi the organization of
i the lodge. During the year draw ing
'to a close nine members have died. In
the war three were taken. They were
J. Blaine Wall, Clajton B GriSwold
and Charles R. Parkinson. Those who
died this year were: Thomas H. Carr,
Bruce L. Brown, Roger W. Shield
John M Farmer, Fred J. Klesel. P ter
j Murphy, A. T. Hanimerson, I. Les i
Reynolds and A. J Hall.
J Blaine Wall and Clayton B Grifi
wold die! in France in the service I
their country.
The program for the services and
the complete list of the absent broth
ers follovs:
Organ PoBtlude.Bro. Sam F. Whitakerl
organ Prelude. .Bro. Sam F Whitaker
Opening Address and Ceremonial
Response The Lodge Officers
Invocation. .Chaplain Bro. T H Davis
Quartet. "One Sweetly Solemn
Thought" Ambrose
Mrs. Fred N Mess, Mr '.i :er Iinch-I
Clifi, MiPS Mildred YA are, Mr.
Henry ware
Mary Harrington Stevens, accompanist
Calling of the Roll. .
Exalted Ruler and Secretary
Duet, "In the Cross of Christ I
Glory" Frey
Mrs. Fred N lies, Mi.-s Mildred Ware.
Closing Ritualistic Services
The Lodge Officers
Quartette, 'Crossing the Bar"....
Barnby
Airs. Fred N. Hess. Mr. Lester Hinch
cliff. Miss Mildred Ware.
Mr Henry Ware.
Memorial Address
Bro. Y. V Fleetwood
Solo, "Now the Day Is Over" . .
Oley Speaks
Mrs. Fred N. Hess.
Oration Hon. Tillman D. Johnson
Benediction . ... Bro. John W. Hyslop
List of Departed Brotheis
1902 George L. Wade, Jonn H I
Brady.
1UCM Harry S. Howard.
190.". -Julius C. Kiesel, Jesse F Ba
ker, Samuel V. a
1907- Andrew C. Heinzer, Louis J.
Holther
1908 Charles W. Lowrey, George H.
Corse, Gordon S. Grant, Edward S.
Luty. Albert L. Howe, Sevmore L.
Clark.
1909 Arthur E. Baker, William J.
Wood. William E Marsh. Fred .rbo-
gast, William l Maglnnls.
1910 Harry E. Blaln
1911 John D. Carnahan, E. A. Lit
tlefield, J. Clinton Jones. James Lee
Nelson. Frederick A. Burt, George
Lewis, Allen H. Jeukin-
1912 James CaBey, Joseph W. Bal-
I The H. W. Jones Company's 1
MONSTER
1 Wei! Rather! j
I Too busy to quote prices on the entire
stock It would require a twenty-five! s
page newspaper to mention all the won- S
oerful bargains to be found here I
NOW!! I i
TT""N mm mm - 5
1 1 But the Bargains Will I
. Be Here-New Ones, Too ! S I
1 And Friday, and Saturday j p
I Will Se Two Big Banner Days 1 1
I ! Men's Shoes Ladies' Shoes V
I Entire Stock on Sale Entire Stock on Sale I
I . $5gV VfiVr tA :r.?;.L;ul.hM,'$,.0$6.95
' Men, here s your chance flvs PO.)0 l.lc now. Be quick ... . bl.VO M
.s truly a wonderful, bargain. For Boy Scouts Christmas gift nrtd,!Sii0eS'IflC,d rri:Se C''r m J
iSX" $5 l33.ngs, 75c and up, Ladies' and growing 3,r,V shoes dn;. lad O.Stl 1
TfiS Tu rh.Mc- -,n , 9ray and brown kid witn c'oth P?3
ji Men's tony red. beaver kid top hXKnilSSfc MirtVu ft $4 Jl? a"d value, lad.c,' beaver
M shoes, the very newest Q ftr orcd tops, up to $3 CT tual $8 value, now . $4. brown, covered Lou.s 1 A QC M
style and fad, $13 value $9.9d quality, now ... 1.65 heel to match . 3H.iJD j
m Men's black calf, medium toe Growinn airls' ahosa nhrk ihH Ladies patent button and lace Boys' shoes, 2'2 to 6, gun metal. IB lkn
P shoes; actual $13 n? Qr fan calf, sizes I U 7; 0O fir CS' $1 V3'UC' QQ "S Ca,'f' Patent l ca' W
value, now 3 .Ub regular $7 value 3.95 0.VD 00 values. $295 1
I
I Everybody's Happy i
I Our Trade-in Saving So Much! Ourselves-In Serving so Well I '
I The H. W. Jones Co. 2:'c" I
l ley, William J. Sweeny, John H. Lino
ban.
1913 R, Alexander Grant. Edward
lH. Lino, William II Bchring. Thomas
rones, Emorj E. Harrison, Petor
Mtnnoch, ll. T. O'Connell, Charles J.
Edwards.
1914 1$. S. Le Compto. Daniel J.
' Mulono, Charles M. Beason, John Kee
nan, Walter E. Read, James F. McAl
lister Vil'j Chas, W. Rorryman, James A.
Ro . Ernesl A Burton.
i 'tli -Wilfred L Anderson Thomas
Conway, Charles F. Osgood. Frank W.
, Roundtree. Fred A. Wheeler, Chas. H.
'Harrington. Thco. Sehansenbach, bam
; uel Thomas, Jesse Brandenburg.
1017 James E Gardner, Charles A.
Henry, Carl H A. Gerfling, Ralph E
TJT,.,. K I M. kali TT'.l I
i nuug, iiiui ri .1 n.-iijii, uunnni
Miller, M H. Van Djkc. George Gray,
Thomas W. Jones, Edward F. Misch.
1918 Frank L. C'hapin, Samuel J
Powell, Clayton B Grlswold, William
C. Jarman. J. Blaine Wall, Joseph H.
Thomas, Alhert Scowcroft. C. K. Mac
Bfurdy, WilliamG Wilson. Henry G.
CurUss, William Van Men. Carl A.
i hnsliansen. Ben F. Mortensen. Chas.
R. Parkinson.
l'Jiy Thcraaa H Carr. Fred J Kie
sol. Roger W. Shields, A T. Hammrr
son. Brace L Brown. John IVJ. Farmer,
P( r J. Murphy, 1 Lost or Revnolds,
A. J. HalL
, no
"Pussyfoot" Johnson says he wp3
only hazed, not mobbed, ny Briti-h
students recently. Things would nat
urally look hazy through tv-o black
eyes.
!FE IS REQUIRED TC
WfiLK BEHIND HER
mm
Comparison of thintrs oriental and
occidental vrere strongly brought out
today when a Japanese husband and
his wife walked along Twenty teurth
street towards Washington avenue
tiom were uresseu in tne gain common
to tho United Slates, tho husband
wearing a black derby, and other
I clothing of a citizen of this country.
I The wife was likewise jcarbed in a
j fashion common to tbe weaker sex of j
America and, while there might have;
I been some question as to her taste
in headgear, sh presented a good ap
pearance. The contrast was not in manner of
dress but in the age-old custom of Nip- j
pon, which decrees that a wife, when
accompanying her husband, shall
walk several paces to the rear. Not
withstanding their clothing, this Jap
anese couple continued to observe the
tradition of Japan.
oo
An optimist is the prisoner who ran
go on a strike and then hone for a
lockout.
Telephone Poles
Between Ogden And
Willard Are Down
That the recent east wind, whoso
chilly blasts nipped the ears and fin
gers of Osrdenites. upset telephone
Bervico in and around Ogden, is evi
denced in reports from the telephone
j company oflice to the effect that tne
wires blown down by the storm be
tween Ogden and Willard have not yet
been replaced.
I !t is expected that communication bv 1
wire between the two cities will be es
tablished within a week.
The wind leveled more than a score I
of telephone poles and in some places,!
broke a number of wires, necessitating)
considerable work to rest poles and
String wires.
uu
Logan's Mayor-Elect
On Visit to Ogden
Mayor-elect William HowelJ and
Commissioner-oloet E N. Banhead of
j Logan were !sitors nt the office of)
I the city commissioners at the eiiv
l hall this morning. Thev also called
upon Mayor elect Frank Francis
PEIinOSFOII f
LIGHTS PRESENTED k
f TO CITY BOM m
b-.
At the session of the board of city I "v,
commissioners this mornins: the peti
tion of residents for arc lights at the
corner of Twenty sixth street and T ! "
ler avenue and al the intersection "' IfflM
Hudson avenue and Seventeenth I 5'0j(
street, was granted upon the reconr
mendatlon of the commissioner of : .
streets. Theci'v engineer was direct- M IHJ(J
ed to locate tho spot for the placing
of the lights and notify the power com
pany I
Thu dim tOAM ,1,'rnflCil Rlll'l
to the board of trustees of the Car-
n-qie llbrarv for the maintenance o1 1 -,
I the library during tho next year. I ,, , 'r
The reslcnation of Wesley Maan 1,. pl ,
as dog tax collector was presentee i h
and accepted. , I
The sum of $10.54 1.42 was ordered s ' or,
(iiansf erred from tho general ',J"n I , , j,ot
' - Lhf outfall sewer fund IO cover tn i
yeaxwof lDic. 191 r. 191S aitf I319 mk
We can't help but wonder 'h fi1tiat ,
I Noah would do If he lived m
United States today

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