OCR Interpretation


The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, February 24, 1920, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1920-02-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1hhhhh
p l
M TODAY'S METAL PRICES "' IV t jV k VV'VV j' if WEATHER FORECAST IH
S'W W YORK Copper and iron unchanged antimony 1 M If . UH wi W 4L M m mii 1 il I ji I ft Ji B MM Weather ndlcaUons for Ogden ''and Vicinity:
jjj&W N,EW 887c. zjnc 8 75c (VMj -Z' j r fcft C 'V' vv' ' Fair tonight and Wednesday; no change in temper- 1 IH
I JJJ ' 1 j FEARLESS INDEPENDENT PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER '
I -nY-No. 47 . Prlc Fivc c OGDEN CITY, UTAH, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 24, 1920 LAST EDITION 4 P. 'M. lH
IK & f& & cSa (3 i? afi. Bb tSl 5 Ql ll
HORRORS MUST CEASE ALLIES TELL SOVIETS I
I - fi e& ' eSs ' R rff. ft 4 c& A i5 ilH
, aw w r -v r -bt
I ; . ' , O
! TRADING WiTEi RUSS
! WILL DEPEND UPON
j! BEHR OF BEDS
Lj ntente Not to Reopen Rela
h tions Until Assured Horrors
Ik Have Come to End
jjj
I FIGHTING BY BORDER
I STATES DISAPPROVED
j j
j j Capture of Naval Craft by
J Bolshevik Forces at Ports
j Is Reported
LONDON. Feb. 21. The allies wlh
j declme to deal with. soviet Russia "un-
( ey have arrived at the conclusion
that the Bolshevist horrors have come
I to an end," it was announced after a
'' meeting of the allied supreme council
today.
V Tho decision of the supreme coun-
dl, 11 'as recognized, precludes diplo
I malic relations between the allied gov-
; crnmenls and the Moscow adminlstra-
! tioa in tho immediate future.
; The council expressed itself as
K pieced that the international labor
bureau had decided to send a delega-
f lion to Rtissia to study conditions, but
I it staled its belief that supervision of
cici5injcil orthfc IeriBUeor' nations. invJag:
j' the investigators greater authority.
j' The council, It was stated, decided
: that the allies could not accept the re
) sponsiblllly of advising the bordei
i su'.es to continue war against the
Bolsheviki. If the Bolsheviki attacic
within the territory -of the border
statea, however, the allies promise
"evorj' possible support."
A The capture of ice-breaking and
othor naval craft by the red forces
f vrhlcb are over-running the-Archangel
I and Murmansk sections in north Hus
, sia is reported in a soviet communique
received from Moscow today. Tho.
v statement reads:
;,' "According to supplementary mfor
'l mation from Archangel, our troops
i captured the battleship (?) o' the
(Chsma river flotilla and two heavy
anil five light ice-breakers.
"The enemy is bombarding Ghenit
' chesk (Sea of Asov) from the sea,
a "Fierce fighting is continuing
: around Rostov and Nakhitchovan (on
Iva the Don). '
fy 'Red troops have captured the for
f lificatlons of Gulitch."
,
CAILLAUX TELLS OF
DEALING WITH BOLO
'PARIS, Feb. 21 The examination
of former Premier Joseph Caillaux, on ;
i1 trial before the senate, sitting as a
high court, on the charge of having
had treasonable dealings with the
Germans and "conspiring to bring about
a dishonorable peace, was resumed to
day. t The questions dealt with the rela
I lions of M. Caillaux, with Bblo Pasha,
$. executed at Vincenncs in April 1018,
;k after being convicted of treason, and
J:; Plerro- Lenoire, eyecuted in October
t.. 1118, on being found guilty of having
.- held intelligence with the enemy.
M. Caillaux explained tha t he
v thought Dolo Pasha Innocent until cer
i tain telegrams from America were pub
i UShed. Then, ho testified, he broke
J M all relations with Bolo.
oo
Y RADICAL SOCIALISTS
OF FRANCE TO MEET
' i
' ' PARIS. Fob. 2-1. Socialists of the
no3t extreme faction will hold a large
- - majority of the delegates sent from
j P the Seine federation to the national
J i Connress to be held at Strassburg this
,! week. Of the 24 delegates, fifteen will
oq under the leadership o AI, Loriot.
wno is in favor of the immediate seiss
.J ure or capitalistic power and Its re-
s; Placement by Soviets or something
wmilnr to them. The reconslrucliort-1
, ist Socialists led by Paul Faurc, will
nave nine delegates whilo the conser
vatlves will have but one.
! ANOTHER DROP IN
EXCHANGE REPORTED
- rnN.W Y0RK- Feb. 24. Demand bills
or the English pound sterling dropped
-'iLi cents nero today, opening
Pnces being quoted at $3.35 1-4.
' nnc checks opened at tho raLc of
-p,.i for the American dollar, off 56
J!. ?n"mes lire checks were quoted
I t-i ' down 45 cenUmes.
T cent- Gerrafln mal"'k waB (lut-ed at 1.05
MM OF TIDE 1
Mil DESPITE I
RATE OF EXCHfJGEj
Exports and Imports Show, an
Advance, With Millions In
Favor of U. S.
WASHINGTON. Feb. 24. Despite
the foreign exchange situation the
trade balance in favor of the United
States increased 257,000.000 in Janu-!
ary, figures made public today by the!
department of commerco show. Both !
exports and imports showed an ad-j
vance, the value of goods sent out of'
the country being 5731,000,000 and thaij
of those received ?474,000,000. '
The exports compared with $GS2,-1
000 000 in December and ?G23.000,000
in January a year ago. Imports com
parod with ?3S1,000.000 in December
and S21 3,000,000 in Januaiy, 1919.
For the seven months of the fiscal
year beginning last July 1 exports to-
tailed $4,594,000,000 and imports $2,-
7GS.000.000. leaving a trade balance of'
$1,X26.000,000. The trade balance fori
the corresponding seven months thi
year before was $2099.000,000. '
Gold Imports for tho seven months,
period amounted to $3$.000.000 as com-!
par-Mi with ?14,000,000 in 1919 and ex-
ports 31,000,000 against 23,000,000
last year. i
Exports of silver for the same period ,
amounted to SjtOtLDcjiiuparjfa
Witfi 179.0tnT,OO0irrthe corrcspordin? '
period the year before.
oo
INJUNCTION AGAINST
SHIPS BOARD SIGNED
i
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24 Associate
Justice Bailey of the district supreme!
court today signed the formal order of I
injunction against the shipping board
to prevent the sale of 29 former Ger-j
man liners. The court consented to ;
the request of tho shipping board that j
tho ship Suwannee, which has been!
sold for 2,000,000, be excluded from
the order of injunction.
William Randolph Hearst, who
brought the proceedings, furnished a
bond of 10,000 to indemnify tho shlp-j
ping board against loss.
No notification of an appeal was giv
en by clunsel for the shipping board
but it was said a special appeal might
bo made later.
oo
PROHIBITION TEST
CASE TO BE ARGUED
i
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24 Arguments j
on the government's motion to dismiss
the original suit instituted by Rhode
Island to test the constitutionality- of
the federal prohibition constitutional
amendment will 4)e heard in the su
preme court on March 1. Assistant
General Frierson and Solicitor-General
King will appear for the government.
While the suit will be heard on thej
motion to dismiss, all tho issues In-,
volved will be argued, Mr. Frierson I
said today, and the entire case sub-j
'milted upon it's merits to the court.
A decision at this term is expected by
court officials. j
CLOSE VATCH WILL
BE KEPT UPON REDS
BUENOS AIRES, Monday, Feb. 23.
Information concerning anarchistic
activities both for individuals and for
collective action by the reds, and mu
tual warnings given to persons known
to be agitators who leave one country
for another, will be furnished as the
result of the adoption of resolutions
at the South Ameripan Police congress
here today. Announcement was made
that Information will not include data
relative to persons accused of political
crimes nor anything concerning legiti
mate labor inovomcnts or the struggle
between capital and labor.
I - rt r -
w
PAPER MILLS TOLD TO
SUSPEND OPERATIONS
1IOLYOKE, Mass., Feb. 24. Owing
to low water in the Connecticut river
orders were Issued here today for the
suspension of operations for IS hours
beginning tonight by 25 paper mills
that depend upon water power. The
coal and pulp situation is still reported
ncuto here.
oo
G. O. P. MEETING
GRAND FORKS, N. D.. Fob. 24.
committee formdd at the stale conven
tion in Bismarck, February 17, when
Non-Partisan league members were
eliminated from committeo member
ship, will hold an organization meeting
here tomorrow.
10VIE FANS MAY
BE DEPRIVED OF
JOYS IN CHICAGO
CHICAGO, Feb. 24. Owners
of moving picture theaters in
Chicago today announced they
would close their houses Feb- j
ruary 29 unless the Moving
Picture Operators' union dis-
missed its business agent and i
modified its demands to the the-
aters "to employ men who are j
not needed just so that some ;
unemployed men in your or-
ganization may be paid,"
The announcement was made !
in a letter to operators advising j
them their services would not I
Tom Malley, agent of the op
erators' union, declared film ex
changes which sided with the
theater owners would be "boy
cotted" in every theater in the
United States and Canada.
Film exchanges announced
they would cease delivery of
films after February 29.
Malley was a business- part
ner of "Mosy" Eijright, noted
Chicago labor feudist and gun
man, who recently was shot and
killed.
RED SOLDIERS BE i
RUSSIA HLLYlOTj
I
1
!
Most of Soviet Troops Neutral 1
I Newspaper Man Says After
Investigation
i 1
1
AMSTERDAM, Feb. 14. About SO j
per cent of the red army in Russia i3
not "red" at all, but is neutral, accord
ing to the staff correspondent of the
Handelsblad, G. Nypels, who has just
returned from an extended tour of;
soviet Russia. He says about GO per
cent of the officers who are largely
drawn from the trained military mon
!of the old upper class, are "czarist"
!in inclination. This leaves only about
1 20 per cent of tho soldiers and 40 per
cent of the officers, thoroughly at
tached to the soviet regime, the restj
belni: neutral or czarisL
Nypels. one of the few neutral ob-i
servers who was permitted to visit!
sovlot cities recently, writes In a se
ries of articles that he was more cour
teously treated by the Dolsheviki than
I by the Poles through whose country
1 he had passed.
In general he observes that "there j
I are two kinds of Rolshevlki." Thej
ifirot class, he says, are cranks with a
lot i,f adventurers and rascals follow-!
ing them. These people, he says, are
very vain but if one knows how to
treat them they are as was in one's
hands. Tho second class are the true
theorists, the adherents of Marx's
1 principles who are serious, well-mean-j
ing people and invariably treat one
faiii.
"They cither admit you into theit
; country and receive you very well oj
don't admit you at all' he declares.
00
: QUAKERS TO PERFORM
SERVICE IN MEXICO
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 21. A com
mittee representing the American
Friends service committee, left here
today for Mexico to make preliminary
arrangements for reconstruction work
similar to that carried on by the
Friends in Europe for tho last three
years. Arthur L. Ritchie. Moorestown,
N. J., who is an experienced farmer
and fruit grower, will study agricul
tural needs ahd possibilities with a
view to increasing food supply.
Later it is planned to send several
groups of men and women teachers
for instructions in health and sanitation
00
WILLIAM PHILLIPS IS
NAMED FOR MINISTER
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24. William
; Phillips, of Massachusetts, now assist-
ant secretary of state, was nominated
; today by President Wilson to minister
lo the Netherlands and Luxemburg.
TROUBLES PILE OP
li PUffi TO JUL
coon? perils:
I
1
I 1
United States Commissioner!
Refuses to Issue W arrants in
I Whisky Rebellion
j !
DRY LAW ENFORCER j
TO PROCEED ANYWAY j
Conditions Much Better Inj
; Iron Hill District Is In- j
I formation in Chicago
MARQUETTE, Mich.. Feb. 24 H.I
B. Hatch, United States commissioner,
today refused to? Issue federal war-'
ranis for the arrest of six Iron eoun-1
' ty officials chargqd with conspiracy
' to obstruct the prohibition law. Hatch
declared he could not act without the
'approval of Distinct Attorney Walker,
at Grand Rapids,jIich., Federal Judge1
S.eiaions, or Attorney General Palmer I
1 Major A. V- Dalrymple, federal pi'c-t
hiblvion director, for the central states,
; who asked for the warrants, notified
'Hatch that unless. telegraphic author
ity t.vissue tho -warrants war received :
Ifrom District Attorney Walker by 2
;p. in 'he, would icocied to Iron count-v ;
jwitn' ,'i companjft bffhts own men and.
nakL- the arrests without warrants. '
Commissioner Hatch, after confer
ring with Major Dalrymple. wired Dis
:tric' Attorney Walker at Grand Rap
ids asking for instructions regarding
j issuance of warrants.
Major Dalrymple said after the con
Ifereiice that Commissioner Hatch told
I him he was willing to issue the war ;
! rants but was following instructions
' from District Attorney Warner.
i Ready to Depart. j
Major Dalryinple said he, with his
; special agents and the state troopers,
'will leave for Iron River at 2:45 p.
m., regardless of District Walker's ac
1 tion.
Mr. Walker, in his reply lo Commis-sioac-r
Hatch, stated he was ready to
I authorize the arrests in Iron River
j provided facts would warrant It, but
! asked that Major Dalrymple wire u
I statement of conditions in the upper
peninsular country and lo Inform him
as to whether Grove had a search war
rant when he made the arrests.
Major Dalrymple replied that a
! search warrant was not necessary
since the liquor was found in a store
and not in a private dwellihg. j
Foreigners Expitcd. J
The foreign element in Iron county
was reported greatly excited over the
report of the use of federal troops and
j In iLany cases white Hags made from
I pillow slips, sheets and towels flew,
Ifrom windows and housetops. .Much
I home-made wine was reported to have
been hauled to caves In the hills ouj
slels pulled by men, women ami chil
dren or secreted in mine shafts, tun
nels and underbrush. Quantities of It
1 were reported to have been poured out.
I Martin S. McDonough, state's attor
jney for Iron county, who assumed 're
sponsibility for the disarming of Ma
jor Dalrymple's assistant, Leo J.
Ornvo nnil m small nrirtv nf slate con-
Stables and taking from them the wine'
they had confiscated, today was ready,!
he said, to submit "peaceably to an 1
federal arrests. j
Charges Protested. i
While announcing his willingness lo
co-operate with the federal officers,
Mr. McDonough protested against the
charges of Major Dalrymple.
Indications last night wore that Ma
jor Dalrymple's force would meet no
opposition upon its arrival in Iron
county but he left Chicago "prepared
to cope wtih the situation." He sal.l
he Avas empowered to make arrests
either with or without warrants and
that . State's Attorney McDonough
would bo the first arristed. Thirty
five rounds of ammunition was Issued
to each man of Major Dalrymple's
party.
MIXUP SHOWN IN
TARIFF UPON BOOKS
OTTAWA, Feb. 24 Inquiry at tho
customs department today disclosed
thai books printed in German and Aus
trian or any language other than Eng
llsh and French arc admitted in Can
ada duty free while books In English
ani French are dutiable. This id pro
scribed under Item 172 in tho dominion
tariff regulations In force for nearly a
quarter of a century.
Hook sellers in the United States are
reaping harvests of money by ship
ping German and Austrian books Into
Ca;mda for sale in communities
throughout the dominion whero for
eign languages are spoken, it was said.,
PROFESSOR WOULD
TALK TO PLANET
MARS WITH SMOKE
BRYN MAWK, Pa., Feb. 24.
Use of the government's sur
plus of smoke-making material
left over from the war in sig
nalling Mars was suggested to
day by James J, Crenshaw, as
sociate professor of chemistry
at Bryn Mawr college, who
served in the chemical warfare
section of the American expedi
tionary forces. Smoke screens
hundreds of miles in width, he
believes, would be more likely
to be discerned by possible
Martians than the geometrical
suggested be laid out on the Sa
hara desert.
The government has enough
smoke-making material to cre
ate a tremendous screen or spot
on the earth and this material
can be used for no other pur
pose, Professor Crenshaw said.
Ke advocated covering an area
as big as the state of Pennsyl
vania with either black or white
smoke.
Professor Crenshaw believes
tyi)iafl,bp,0SSib,la.toJ make -the
spot appear and disappear
by regulating the flow of
smoke.
iRioiscrai
RESULT Of PLMS
FOR TURKS' SULTAN
Counter-Arguments Declare it
is Unwise to Remove Him
From Constantinople
1 LONDON. Feb. 24 Agitation in fav
or of expelling the Turks from Con
stantinople, which has been a conspi
cuous feature in one section of the
press during the last few days and
i which has had the support of religious
'and philanthropic bodies, met u-coun-terblast
from another section of the
j London newspaper world today, which
! contended the question was one of
isuch importance that it could not be
settled on sentimental considerations
but must be left to the matured deliber
ations of the suprcmo'allied council.
; In a lenghty argument the Telegrapn
asserted that British slatemanshlp has
"neither the duty nor interest to expel
t the sultan from Constantinople and
! expressed the opinion that agitation to
this end will ill-inspired and Ill-con-1
sidered."
I The Dally News, which has always
been a staunch champion of the Ar
menians and a supporter of Gladstone's
demand to "sweep the Turks out of
Europe," says the real question is the
weight to be attached to warings of
Moslem unrest as a result of the ex
pulsion of tho Turks from their spiri
tual capital.
Under tho caption "a loo successful
agitation," tho Morning Post says:
"The British government by making
hasty announcement throughout India
of the decision in favor of tho sultan
has barred revision of that decision."
The newspaper seeks to show the de
cision was merely a concession to po
lltlcal agitators in Hindustan who may
not be temporarily modified by it.
i Tho recent campaign in favor of the
expulsion of tho Turks is said by the
Express to bo based on a "perfervid
'sentiment" and tho newspaper argues
there is not a single advantage to be
obtained in drawing tho sultan away
fiom Constantinople.
SINKING OF BRITISH
VESSEL IS REPORTED
I30STON, Feb. 24. Tho sinking of
tho British schooner Gwendylen War
ren and the rescue of the crew was
reported in a wireless mcssago from
the British steamer Pike Pool today.
Tho Pike Pool has the members of
the crew on board and will take them
to Hampton Roads.
The Gwendylen Warren was bound
from St. John, N. F for a Norwegian
port
SEEDLESS LOSS Of
LIVES fiSTOIISB, ;
! DOGTOR DECURES
i :
Schools Wasting "Grea't Sums
Trying to Educate Defectives
Educators are Told
'ECONOMIC LOSS 3S
I CALLED STAGGERING
; Association President Says
There are 25,000 Vacancies
! in Schools of Country
I CLEVELAND, O., Feb. 24 The lives i
'of hundreds of thousands of persons
aro sacrificed annually, human power
; immeasurably wasted and staggering
economic loss results from the failure
to apply scientific knowledge lo the
prevention of needless weakness, dis-
ease and death,, said Dr. Thomas D.
.Wood, professor of physical education
j at Columbia university, Now York, ad
dressing the National Council of Edu
cation today. The council-is composed
:of 120 of the leading educators Qt-'ho
country 'atte'ndlug thG-NnCionftl 'Edu'ca-
jtion association convpntion here.
"Our schools aro wasting enormous
sums in trying to educato chihjrffn,
(hnndicnpp'h by ilF-hrnlth.M-Dr.-:WQ0d'
icilrl "Cni'iinlv.rlTn nor pfnt nr Ifi -
; 000,000 school children of the United
States have physical defects which are
1 mostly remedial. This shows that the
'business of keeping the schol children
of the country in good physical condi-j
tion is a disgraco to the nation."
Higher Wage Agreement.
I Josephine Corliss Preston, of Olym
1 pia, Wash", president of tho National
j Education association, said a substan
tial salary increase was necessary to
I secure trained and competent teachers
jto fill the 25.000,. vacancies and re
, place 75.000 teachers below profession
al standards in ability.
Participation of teachers in school
' management and affiliation of teach
ers' organizations with the American
Federation of Labor were discussed at
I last night's session of the National
; Council of Education, meeting in con
junction with the convention of the
National Education association, which
drew approximately S000 delegates to
this city. .
Urged to Unionize.
C. B. Stillman, president of the
'American Federation of Teachers de
I clared teachers must federate and af
I filiate with labor if they were to pro
cure recognition of their rights.
I Dr. G. D. Strayer. of Columbia uni
versity, opposed affiliation, but fa
vored greater participation of class
(room teachers In school . government
land a more solidly united teachers'
I I professional organization
I At the session of the College of
'Teachers of Education Dr. Strayer
i clashed with Dean W. P. Burris of
! Cincinnati, on the Smith-Towner bill
! which provides a federal secretary of
I education and Tederal subsidy of pub
1 lie schols.
: A deplorable crisis confronts the
1 school system. Dr. Strayer said In urg
! ing support of the bill. 1
.1 Dean Burris in reply declared "mem
i'bers of the president's cabinet retain
j office only so long as they serve the
.'political purposes of the president.
1 00
! WILSON FELICITATES ,
; FRENCH PRESIDENT
j WASHINGTON. Feb. 24. President
j Wilson has sent the following message
lor felicitation to Paul Deschanol, the
inew president of France:
; "On this occasion of the assumption
of the duties of your high office as
president of the French republic, I ex
tend to your excellency my cordial fe
! hcitations. Victorious in the greatest j
j struggle known to the world, France
faces a great and glorious future and
you, Mr. President, as tho chief execu-i
tivc of the people whoso high ambi
1 tion is the maitnenanco of right and
'justice, will bo a potent fnctor in the
I attainment of theso happy results. I
wish for you an administration of
great prosperity of health and happi
ness for yourself.
"WOODROW WILSON."
00
LEONARD WOOD ON
STUMPING EXPEDITION
YANKTON, S. D., Feb. 24. Major
General Leonard Wood, majority Re
publican candidato for president in the
March 23 primaries, arrived here today
to make tho first speech of his South
Dakota campaign tonighL Before
leaving the state ho will deliver three
addresses.
ST1E.TILK H
AS SEWRTE PASSES
DISPUTED MEASURE
Railway Workers to Ask the
President for Veto is Belief
In Washington il
EXECUTIVE HAS TEN
DAYS FOR DECISION
Labor and Other Provisions ;H
Objectionable to Members of !
American Brotherhoods
,H
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24. President
Wilson Vill not act immediately on fl
the compromise railroad bill passed !
yesterday by the senate. It was an- rj
nounced at the White House today 1
that the president had directed that
'the measure be referred to the depart.- SilH
inent of Justice as soon as it reached jH
the White House from congress. """"H
The executive has ten days in which jH
to pass upon the act before It can be- IjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjH
come a law without his signature. 'H
Tho railroad brotherhoods oppose H
this section because it provides for fl
tri'parlitc labor boards whereas they ;
desire to return to the old method of
negotiation and decision by represen- 'H
tatives of the workers and the rail- ''jjjjjjH
jjjjjH
Threats of a break in the affiliated
railroad employes-prganlzatipHgrnUt'
taled today against?. immediate solUuqn :"""""""fl
of tho q;iestfons.jljo;oro'thpvrbpfesenla- iH
tives of the 2,000,000 raiiworkers con-
f erring here)ion PrQsidcnL.WJlson's pro ,
iionl WidTsettleirieht Tjf -tiiclr wngc
1 Because" of the wide divergence of
views hold by the committeemen
celled to Washington to consider the
'White House policy, executives of tho fl
organizations admitted that they did
not know whether they could hold the jH
strength they had gained when it was jH
agreed ten days ago that the organiza
tion's should affiliate to consider the
proposal.4 ifjjjjjjjjjjjjH
j Demands For Appeal.
In, every conference, it was said, de
mands for an appeal to the president
to veto the railroad bill continued to
grow more insistent. The leaders,
therefore, were confronted with the
task of explaining to the local chair-
men the basic reasons for their tenta
tive acceptance of the president's plan
The leaders also were forced to com- H
bat moves or radical elements in sev
oral directions. They said these might
lake definite form at any time.
That the general committeemen are
not all in favor of the president's prop
osition was indicated by private dis
cussions among the executives as to
courses of action in event tho plan is
rejected. E. J. Manion, president of
the Brotherhood of Railroad Teleg- "
raphers, was said to have suggested 'H
that the whole controversy be referred LH
to the general membership. This pro-
posal has not gained headway among
the other executives. It was said, but
it serves to indicate the trend of 1
thought of the leaders. !
Labor Not Satisfied.
Railroad labor is not satisfied with !
the way things are going over its wage !
i demands. Passage of the railroad bill
! by tho senate only added more bitter- '.
I'ness to talk of the union' workers. j
Arrival of committee chairmen un-
ion leaders closest to the rank and file j
1 brought out strike talk. Higher of- H
1 fleers were inclined to discount this
I .1.. ...l-.r.- rnn1illr Villi 1 H
evidence 01 "uiiwia itcuuoi h
hotel lobbies buzzed with possibilities
of the situation. There were indica
tions that the union heads who have
! dealt AViih Director General Hines
were worried lest al! that accom- 'M
plished might be wrecked. Committee
chairmen spoke frankly of the sentl
mcnt in the local groups, describing it L
thus: tl
"Their temper is not such as lo war.
rant us being optimistic."
Appeal to President.
Union spokesmen believed there was
no way to avoid a direct appeal to the , 'H
president to veto the Cummlns-Esch
measure. Thoy declared it must bo
done to satisfy the workers who have
not had a "close up" of the situation.
But as to hope that the legislation
might yet be blocked, there was little
expression. Labor's appeal to con
gross, having been rcburfod, some lead
crs were said to have assumed the at-
titudo that the legislators woro "trying
to see how far they can go by nagging
DIPLOMATS TO OBTAIN
SUPPLY OF SUGAR
BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 23. Argon
tina has lifted tho ban on exportation
of sugar to the extent that all Argon
tlno diplomats In foreign capitals will
bo allowed to recoivo small quantities
for their personal use. Honorio Pueyr- JH
redon, tho foreign, minister, has dl
rected a note to all the Argentine em
bassy and legations abroad to this of-

xml | txt