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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1902-1910, June 28, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058398/1909-06-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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I NO GUESS WORK I
S I WEATHER FORECAST I
STANDARD ARE GENUINE DISPATCHES AND GUAR Lbffl
ANTEED BY THE GREATEST t rn taitbar UTA THE HTHE WEATHER INDICATIONS ARE
NEWS GATHERING ASSO J I ALLY FAIR TONIGHT WILL BE AND GENER TO
CIATION IN THE WOFyLD + MORROW
I 39TH YEAR NO JD2 I I OGDEN CITY UTAH MONDAY EVENING JUNE 28 1909 I I PRICE FIVE CENTS I
H THEORY ADVANCED THAT LEON
LING MAY ALSO BE A
I VICTIM OF MURDER
This Line of Reasoning Necessitates Rejection of Chung Sins Story and
Draws Attention to Trunk Shipped to SchenectadyIf Leon Is
Dead Police Say They Have One of the Murderers and
Can Lay Hands on the Other Immediately
Now York Juno 28 FaiiureAo find
any trace of Leon Ling caused the
police to give some attention to the
theory strongly revived today that
the missing man may not have killed
Elsie Sigel and that ho was himself
the victim of the same hand that kill
ed the girl
Tills line of reasoning necessitates
tho rejection of the story told by
Chung Sin who said he had seen Leon
in the room over the Eighth avenue
restaurant where Miss Sigels body
tiat Leon was killed It IB regarded as
probable that his body was placed in
a trunk as was the girls and this has
drawn attention to the baggage check
ed to Srhcnectady near whore Chung
Sin was found and rechecked by a
Chinaman from Schcnectady to Cleve
land
What about the theory that Leon is
dead Police Inspector McCafferty
Has asked today
Well if Leon is dead we have one
of the men Uiat killed him under ar
rest and uc can lay our bands on an
other In five minutes he replied
A story that Elsie Sigel might have
been murdered in Washington was
cxohcd from statements In an anony
mous letter which Louis Fook a Chi
S naninn who has given some assistance
to the police In their work on the case
today reported having received Fook
S says the writer of tho letter which Is j
in Chinese declares that Misg Sigel
and Leon Ling wero seen in Washing j
ton un tho afternoon of June 9 The
authorities were not IncHed to place
much credence in the letter I
Now York Tune 28 Evidence that
Lon Ling the converted Chinaman
male more than one desperate effort I
to dispose of the body of Elsie Sigel
after lie had jammed It into a trunk
In MR room in Elglgii avenue was
brought to light Jast night Chung
j Sin his room mate has established
the fact that tho murder was com
mitted about noon OJI June 9 Wit
j nesses now have bdon found by the
police who declare that before Leon
Ling tried to dispose of the body in
Newark the following day ho first
employed a large touring automobile
in which he placed tho trunk at 2
II m on June 2 Ironi the Eighth
avenue house he rode with the trunk
In the motor car to a laundry in Har
S lem conducted by a friend of his
who is a member of the Chinese High
Treason society known as the Gee
Gon Tong of which Leon is also a
member With him he also had three
suit cases in which it is believed
were Elsie Sigels clothes The laun
dry man icfused to keep the trunk
but did take the suit cases and the
police expect to obtain them
The trunk was kept in this laundry
until 11 oclock at night when Leon
Ling is said to have employed a taxi
i enb to take him and the trunk to I
Newark a distance of about eighteen
miles from Harlem Jn Newark as
has already been discovered the I
Chinese friend of jeon who con
ducts a restaurant tnere also re
futed to accept the trunk The fact
that this man and the Harlem laun
dry keeper refused to have anything
to do with the trunk has led the po
lice to believe that they had knowl I
edge of its grewsome contents I
Earls In the morning of June 10
Ling employed a Newark hackman to
bring him and the trunk back to New
York The police have additional
I evidence that Ling attempted to
I leave the trunk at several other
Places but failed and took it back
to the room where the murder was
committed and where it was found
more than a week later
I These discoveries upset the po
lice theories than Ling was the man
I who sent the telegram from Washing
ton on Juno 1 to Elsie Slgols pa
rents In this city But a Chinaman
did scud that telegram from Wash
ington and this convinces the police
that Leon Ling who was in this vi
I cinity on that date trying to dispose
of the body had at least one accom
plice
I
New York June 2On the ninth I
da after the discovery of Elsie Si
gels body and presumably the eight
eenth day after the crime was commit
ted the New York police arc obliged
to admit tonight that they arc as far
as ever from the whereabout of Leon
Liner
I1ntThe
The most significant fact of the case
Is that there is nothing to indicate
when or where Ling left the city
Every house In Chinatown has been
searched room bv room and every
wall and floor sounded
The Information coming from New
ark yesterday that Leon Ling left the
trunk In a restaurant there has been
i substantlallv confirmed with slight
alterations in details and hours but It
only makes tho case more puzzling It I
appears today from the books of the
Lawrence Cab company that LI Sing
the restaurant keeper did accept tho J
trunk and that he kept it in his place i
for twelve hours although he has de
nied it But police investigation
shows that the trunk was taken to
Newark between midnight June 9 >
and 1 a m of June 10 and remained j
there untlltheafternoonl the 10th I
This places the time of the murder a
day ahead of the time previously fixed i
by the police and on the same day
that tho girl disappeared from home
OLD MAN SEEKING V
SLAYER Of I
ms SON
GAVE LAWYER 50000 TO TELL
HIM WHO DID THE DEED
He Now Demands the Knowledge or
the Return of the Valuable
Stock I I
New York June 23In a further
effort to puolicly reveal the Identity
of his sons slayer Henry Dexter
ninetysi years old multimillionaire
and former president of the Amen
cap News company has brought suit
in the supreme court here against
John H Badger an attorney at Ma
lone Now York Mr Dexter alleges
that he turned over to Badger 50000
of the American News companys
stock on Badgets representation that
SlfiEL MURDER ATTRACTS I
CROWDS TO CIIIATOWN
< f
r
Xew Yo Juno 2SSuch crowds
have been attracted to Chinatown and
2 Its restaurants and other resorts I
through the publicity given to the i
murder of Elsie Sigel that additional I
V police have been detailed to that dis
t trict it Is said that never before
T liayj the Oriental eating houses been
Po > crowded and most of the callers
have been overheard discussing the
murder mystery Dealers in several
cases have also done an cnormoilB bus
i focBs and additional sightseeing aut
omobiles have been pressed into ser
V vice
SULLIVAN DEFEATED BY CAPONI
Butte June 2lPuttIflg up what
wa probably tho worst light In his
t carper in the ring showing uttdr Ina
bility to judge distance lacking a
P nch lo hurt his opponent when ho
landed and boxing much Flower than
nial Montana Jack Sullivan was de
bated by Tony Caponi Jn their 20
round boxing bout at the Holland rink
last uipht Caponi proved to be much
i Hie faster and harder hitting man qf
the Plr and while he had a clean
l ° ad In ovcry round with the possible
jweption of the ninth when Sullivan
r V niake
held him about even be did not
ho impression on the figh public that
r5 expected He is what might he
tow > d a slow thinker and whim UP IB
M enough with his hands and feet
4 hen ho gets started it takes him a
t hCig time to mal p up his mind what to
his plans
Q Ijcfiro IIP can execute
ulHvnlJ was in creat distress in the
Ft round and find Caponi uBedhtis
S ed as well as Me handr lie could
I i r
T
have ended the bout then with a clean
knockout He put Sullivan down for
I the count of nine with hard rights
and leftfi to the Jaw but when the
I Butto man got up Caponi alow him to
clinch until he recovered from the ef
fect of The punches and then Sullivan I
finished the round as strong as Ca
poni A crowd of about 2000 people wit r
nessed the bout and all went away
satisfied that both men did their best
throughout the battle Sullivan was a
disappointment to his friends while
Capon did not appear willing to take
a ohunc He used a peculiar cover
veiv similar to that employed by Her
rora When he thought he was in
danger Caponi doubled up his arms so
hat bIB Jaw was protected by hlu
gloves and his arms and elbows kept
any blowj from reaching him In the
4kitclii11 This method of defense
proved very effective and Jack was
unable to break through it I
ILL HEALTH WORRY
V AND AWFUL TRAGEDY
V
Quinov Ill JUliO 27 George Gur
ney today shot and killed his father
DrV fjeneca Gurney aged 7fl yearS
I vouncM bis slsterinInw Mr Seneca
I Gurney Jr aged 37 and then killed
himself
I V Breakfast had been announced
I whont Goorge Gurney called Mrs Gun
nov to his room saying he was not
well She expressed sympathy where
non lHL fired at her D Gurney at
tempted to jo to her aid airl was shot I
down HI health and worry are sup
6C to have affected Gurncysniimi
ro5e
ho gave this stock believing that
Badger could establish the slayers
identity a belief that he still enter
tains
1 do not caro for the stock so
much said Mr Dexter but I want
to force Badger to toll what ho
knows find 1 figure that ho must now
do KO 01 return the stock to me
Orlando P Dexter was a victim of
the feud which had existed for many V
years between the owners of great 1
hunting estates in the Adirondack
and the residents ot that neighbor
hood The Dexters had prosecuted
many oldtime residents for trespass
ing and maintained armed guards to
keep the unwelcome visitors out
Since Orlando Dextors murder his
father has had a standing reward of
10000 for the conviction of his slay
er and has spent a largo fortune in
seeking evidence
I
TRAIN GOES iNTO
onc NEAR
V DENVER V 1
CAUSE IS DISPLACEMENT OF
RAILS BY HEAT
Three Coaches of Eastbound Denver
< Rio Grand Passenger Leave
Track None Fatally Hurt
V
Denver June 28giSht persons
were hurt none fatally late yester
day afternoon when three coaches of
the eastbound Denver Rio Grande
passenger train No 6 known as the
SanFrancisco limited went into the
ditch at Sednlia twenty miles from
Denver rho wreck was caused by
the dsplacement of rails as the
result of Intense heat
A few hours later the engine and
two coaches of a Colrrado Midland
passenger train were derailed at Mis
sissippi avenue inelde the city limits
of Denver presumably the result of
heattwisted rails The passengers
and crew escaped with a shaking up
Yesterday was the hottest day In ten
ears in Denver the thermometer
reaching 98
V I
TEN MILLION DOLLARS MOVED I
TO VAULTS IN OLD CITY HALL I
San Francisco June 28Earl this
morning a dray loaded with ten mil
lion dollars In gold coin was driven
down Market street in thin city from
the temporary quarters of the city
treasury Inthe California Safe De
posit Trust company building to
the vaults In the old city hall Four
teen of the finest truck horses that
could be secured drew the valuable
load and twentyfive mounted police
men guarded the caravan John E
MhDougald CIty treasurer occupied
tho seat beside the driver v
The east wing of the old city hall
where the vaults are located Is the
only part of tho building left by the
wreckers who have made a thorough
job of the work started by the earth
quake and fire of 1906
UE BREAKS BLOOD
VESSEL AT A I
BALL GAME i
EXPECTS MANTO MAKE A GLO
RIOUS HOMERUN
Gives Wild Yell and Falls Head First
From Bleacher and Writhes
Upon the Ground
New York Juno 2SWHd with en
thusiasm as Dan MrGcehani captain
of tho visiting team in a game be
tween Elizabeth and Allentown yes
terday hit a long drive over the left
field fence Martin McPherson fell
Into convulsions when the umpire
called It a foul
Thinking the hit a home run Mc
Pherson gave a yell like a maniac
and rolled from tho top row of the
bleachers stand head first to tho
ground and lay there writhing A
physician at the game took McPher
eon in charge and had him rushed
to tho hospital
It is feared he will die having burst
a blood vessel
AGED CUSTODIAN OF THE
NEW YORK CITY HALL DEAD
New York June 2SMartln J
Iveese whoWascustodjanoMhe New
i
I York City hall for 28 years died yes
terday In a hospital aged 72 years
Marty Reese achieved fame in many
ways not the least of which was in
the sensational capture and arrest of
Boss Tweed He had been a crip
ple since the Battle of Bull Run in
which ho was wounded but he con
sidered himself too much of a patriot
to even ask tfor a pension
BOY HAS A NARROW
I ESCAPE FROM DEATH
Salt Lake Juno 28 Caught be
neath an overturned buggy which a
frightened horse was dragging along
the street Herbert Cronin 16 years
old a driver for the McCoy stables es
caped death by a mlrcle on Sunday
afternoon Ho escaped with severe
bruises and concussion of the brain
which rendered him unconscious for
hours but DrJ Mllleron his physic
ian feels confident that the boy will
recover
I
THOUGh T
SON WAS I
I
DEAD
I
Nevada Woman Re
cognizes Him in alter
II
at New York Hotel
I
I
New York June 28ilrs Robert
H Burnham of Reno Nevada and
several friends went to the hotel
Astor yesterday for afternoon tea
Tho party was assigned to a table
and a nicelooking young waiter was
directed to take their order When
Mrs Burnham got a good look at him
she recognized In him her son who
V
had left home eevrral years ago and
S of whom no tidings had been receiv
ed Mrs Burnham calmly ordered
what she wanted and the waiter
went away
As soon as the meal was served
the waiter took his station nearby to
await further orders Finally Mrs
Burnham left the table to go lo the
retiring room and once there the
waiter was senior
As he entered the door of the
room he rushed up to Mrs Burnbam
crying Mother And this removed
all her previous douots Her mother
ly instinct had not proved untrue and
she was again in the arms of the boy
she had been mourning as dead
lULLED ON
WAY TO
WORK
Wife of Man He Murdered
a Year Ago Does
the Shooting
New York June 281n revenge for
tho alleged murder of her husband a
year ago Mrs Louise LaBartia today
fired four bullets Into Dominico Versa
gin fatally wounding him
Mrs LaBartia was arrested
The shooting took place on the side
walk at Spring and Sullivan streets
as Vorsagia was on his way to work
Mrs LaBartia was waiting for him
and when he approached her she open
ed fire with a revolver
Mrs LaBartia declared that Vcr
sagla murdered her husband a year
ago and that she had appealed in vain
to the police to punish him
SURVEYOR ATTACKED BY
CHINESE AND KILLED
Pekiu June 28Hazrnh All a sur
veyor jn the Indian service and Mr
Soweiby interpreter both attaches of
the meteorological expedition under
Limit Clark an American officer were
attacked June 21 by natives twenty
miles south of Lanchow Hazrah AH
was pursued three miles and killed
Sowerby was rescued by Lieut
Clarke Mr Douglass of the India ser
vice Messrs Grant and Colonel Colt
man interpreter Mr Deltow a
draughtsman and an Indian
Sir J N Jordan British minister
asked the Chinese foreign office to
protect the nembers of the expedition
and to investigate the attack and
yesterday the report of the viceroy
of Kan Su was received The vice
roy who was removed from office
Juno 23 because of his inability to
promote reforms protests against the
members of tho expedition taking the
law into their own hands to rescue
their comrades This protest has boon
submitted to the British rulnistcr
BANKERS VARNED TO WATCH
V FOR TWO COUNTERFEITS
New York June SThe local sec
ret service has sent out warnings to
bankers towatch for two dangerous
counterfeits One IK a ten dollar bill
purporting to have been issued by the
National Union Bank of Baltimore
anti the other a counterfeit ten dollar
national note on the Germania Bank
of Sao Francisroo V
BoUi arc said to he very clever Imi
tations V
VIOLENCE OCCURS ON SECOND
S L DAY OF CAR STRIKE
I S V IN PITTSBUR6 V
I
Strikebreakers Chased Away From Car Barns by Union Sympathizers
Deputy Is Badly Beaten and Shots Are Fired usiness Is
Partially Paralyzed Motorman Forced to Walk Ten
I Miles to His Home V
PItlsburg Juno 2S4The first real
violence In the car strike situation
occurred shortly after one oclock
I when fourteen alleged strikebreakers
I were chased away from the Rankin
car barns by union sympathizers A
fusillade of shots was fired at tho
strikebreakers as they emerged from
I the barn Deputy John Englert was
badly beaten up by the crowd at the
entrance of the barns Men In a near
by plant joined In the chase after the
strikebreakers running them over a
milc V
milcFour V
Four alleged strikebreakers wore
badly beaten during the trouble A
number of shots word exchanged but
as far as known no one was struck by
the bullets
The police reserves were called out
hut tho mob had dispersed before
their arrival
A long parley between Mayor Ma
gee who threatens io uso his plenary
powers to end the street car strike I
and the executive strike committee
lof th motormen and conductors ad
journed this afternoon with the strike I
situation unsolved I
Tho union men are reported to
have agreed to all of the mayors sug
gestions for an amicable adjustment
of affairs with the exception of the
reinstatement of the discharged men I
after proper hearings
The company officials contend they
are willing and anxious to adjust the
matter at once but that the union men
have refused them the opportunity of I
arbitration I
Pittsburg Juno 2SWilh business
paralyzed to a partial extent through
inadequate train service Greater Pitts
burg entered today into the second
1
day of its street car strike I
Rioting it is feared will follow
any attempt of the car company to op
erate Its cars
The outlying barns have taken the
attention of the authorities from the
downtown districts Special deputy
sheriffs and extra police remained on
duty all night at these points
The feeling of the union men and
their sympathizers is evidenced by the
fact that late night a crowd of more
than five hundred persons gathered I
within half an hour at the Hcrron Hill I
barns on hearlpg a rumor that the
company would endeavor to take out a
car The police dispersed the gath
ering
Tho saloons remained open today
Drector of the Department of Public
Safet John florin stated he saw no
reason to close orderly places until the
situation became more tense
The entire police force of Great
er Pittsburg is being held in reserve
at Its prclnct stations
Queer equipages hauled the office
employee of downtown Pittsburg to
work today Many large concerns
have already engaged rooms for their
clerical forces at downtown hotels
The grievances of the Union men
include the charges of discrimination
against union employes demands for
positions for discharged men longer
lunch times Installation of bulletin
boards In car barns annoucing lay
offs and shorter runs
Pittsburg June 28 Following three
joint conferences yesterday afternoon
and last night between officials of
the Pittsburg Railway company and
National President M hon of the Amal
gamated Association of Street and
Electric Railway Employee and the
District Grievance company all nego
tiations looking toward the termination
of the street car strike in Greater
Plttsburg were declared off
The strike is now on in earnest
Beginning this morning bunks were
placed In all tbo car barns to house
the strikebreakers expected hone
later In the day Officials of the com
pany say they are prepared to pro
tect these men
An official notice was sent out by
the company lato last night that all
places of the men who quit work Sun
day morning will be held open until
Wednesday at 12 oclock provided any
old employee of the company wish to
return to work
The police have announced that re
servo are now on duly at all precinct
stations ready for immediate service
Tho sheriff has sworn in deputies
and has placed men at tho various car
barns throughout the city
Yesterday was quiet throughout
Greater Pittsburg No cars were run
and there was but plight show of the
feeling of the uniop men
Many amusing Incidents marked the
first day of the traffic tieup Mem
bers of an orchestra the drum bass
viol and smaller instruments were
found asleep on an cast end lawn car
Jv yesterday morning They had play
ed at a rlauce and when they found I
they would he forced to walk home
look an alternative and lay down to
rest on the grass camping out until
this morning I
I Motormon and conductors suffered
also One motormap who left his car
at the HomewocJd barns was forced to
walk ten miles to hls home in Brookline
line S
S MacThere was one phase oft the strike I
which caused even the officials of tbo
Pitt Ba when I
Pittsburg Railway company
word was received that the horse car I
Hnp In Sarah treet was also tied up I
Its only oplirativp V the driver of the i
rnulcp had struck In sympathy with j
the union men I
Thirty thousand dollars a day is the I
estimated loso Buclained by the PlttB 1
f
VS t i 4
I burg company by reason < Jf the strike
It Is conservatively estimated that the
Union Traction company in a single
days operations in the greater city
and environs lakes in 500000 fivecent
fares in addition to carrying freight
ONLY ONE CAR MOVED IN
CITY OF PITTSBURG
Pittsburg June 270n account of
tho street car workers strike today I
only one car moved In Pittsburg and
its suburbs That car carried United
States mail People generally walked
Shuttle trains on the railroads drew
light patronage
I The day was marked with hut one
clash between strikers and nonunion
men Two negroes applied to the su
perintendent at tho Homewood car
barns for situations and were set upon
I by union sympathizers and chased
from the district The police were
notified but no arrests were made
The taxicabs of the city did a tro
mendous business and were allowed to
exceed the speed limit
At many of the churches services
wore dispensed with Rev Dr A I
Fisher of the Wylio avenue Baptist
church an aristocratic congregation
referred to the strike In his morning
service saying I
If these men both union and offi
cial had loved each other as Christ I
taught this strike which now engulfs
this city would never have occurred I
I believe these poor striking motormen
and conductors are only asking what I
these wealthy street railway operators
could have granted without straining
a point I pray God that no violence
may attend this labor struggle as
marked Pittsburg by a trail of blood
during those unfortunate days of the
Homestead strikes po
CLOSING QIOTATIONS 01
VCRLDS MARK TS
INSIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN
OPENING PRICES OF STOCKS
New York June 28 Opening prices
of stocks showed insignificant changes
and small business was transacted
Advances In Union Pacific and Read
ing had the most influence on the
speculative sentiment
There was no show of interest in
the market until Just before 11
I oclock whjn a rise of a point in
Chesapeake and Ohio had a tonic ef
fect and the trade Is building up the
leading stocks Pacific Mall declined
1 and Wabash pfd advanced L
A firm tone was due to sympathy
with the strength of a half dozan
stocks Wabash pfd rose 1 5S Read
Ing 1 14 American Malting pfd 3 1S
and Northern Pacific and Toledo St
Louis and Western pfd 1 Atlantic
Coast Line receded 1 11 and Wheeling
and Lake Erie 1st preferred 1 Lacka
wanna sold at an advance of five
Bonds were steady
I
NEW YORK STOCKS
STOCKSI
Amalgamated Copper 81
American smeltIng 90 38
American Smelting pfd 110 78
American Sugar Refining 124 7S
Anaconda Mining Co 4878
Atchison Railway 116 11
Atchison Railway pfd 10G 3S
Baltimore and Ohio 117 58
Brooklyn Rapid Transit 89 58
Canadian Pacific 182
Chicago Northwestern 182
Chicago Mil and St Paul 153
Colorado and Southern 57 18
Denver and Rio Grande 48 12
Denver and Rio Grande pfd SC
Erie Railway 36
Illinois Central 148
Missouri Pacific 73 V
New York Central 132 31
Northern Pacific 151 M
Pennsylvania Railway 136 3S
Reading Railway 156 3S
Southern Pacific 131
Union Pacific 193
United States Steel 66 34
United States Steel pfd 121 38
Wabash Railway 21 5S
Standard Oil company CS7
Chicago Livestock
Chicago June 28 Cattle Receipts
estimated at 18000 market stead > to
10c higher beeves 520a730 Tex
as steers 475a620 i western steers
475a6 25 stockers and feeders 53
GOaS50 cows and heifers 2COaC50
calves 550a750
Hogs Receipts estimated at 28000
market 5c at lOc lower light 730a
790 mixed 745a810 heavy 755
aS10 rough 755a775 good to
choice heavy 775aS10 pigs 620a
710 bulk of sales 770aSOO
SheepReceipts estimated at 20000
Market lOc lower natlve340a570
western 350a565 yearlings 5 75i
690 lambs native 500a790 west
ern 525a790
Kanf36 City Livestock
Kan pas JC1 ty June 28CattleRe
celptfi 9iOOO ketsrong for grass
ers weak Native steers 525a7 00
native cows and heifers 5260a6SO
stockers and teeders3 35Oa50bulls
275a500 calves 400a750 west
ern steers 500a700 western cows
300a500
Hogs Receipts 4000 r market 5c lo
lOc higher Bulk of sales 745a7SO
heavy 760a790 packers and butch
ers 730a785 light 735a775 pigs
575a700
SheepReceipts 10000 market
steady Muttons 425a550 lambs
600aS40 range wethers 400a525
range ewes 375a475
Wool
St Louis June 28Wool unchang
ed territory and western mediums
22 l2a2St fine mediums 20 l2a26
fine 13a21
Sugar and Coffee
New York June 2SSugarRaw
steady fair refining 342 centrifu
gal 96 test 392 molasses sugar 3
57 Refined steady crushed 565
powdered 505 granulated 495
COFFEEQuiet Rio No 7 7 34
No 4 Santos 9 1S
Metal Market
Now York Juno 28 Copper dull
13 l4a58 Lead quiet 435a445
silver 52 3S
Vera Cruz Mexico Jnne 27 Be
cause the spectators applauded the
winner in a prizefight here today the
loser of the fight emptied his revol
ver Into the crowd Four persons
I
were wounded
IJURORS BELIEVE JEALOUS
WOMAN DID THE KILLIN6
St Michaels Md Juno 8Tbe
coroners Inquest Into the death of
pretty Edith May Woodlll was resum
ed today with several of the jurora
still convinced that there was a large
clement of truth In the letter left bj
Lame Bob Eastman declaring
there had been a party at his bunga
low and that Mrs Woodill had been
slain by a Jealous woman
The jury met In tho lonely little
bungalow itself within eight yards of
the grave to which the body ofNpaat
man was consigned early yesterday
It Is not believed now that a definite
verdict will be rendered by the Jury
and It is certain that no matter what
maybe the outcome of todays sitting
of the inquest investigation of the
tragedy will be carried forward by tho
I law officers of the state and county
with undiminished energy
The authorities give no credence tp
a report circulated last night that
Eastman tried to Induce Mrs Woocllll
to elopo to Europe with him and that
he killed her when she refused This
report went on to state that East
I mans hiding place had been discover
1 ed and tbnt it was necessary for him
again to take to flight As a cold mat
tor of fact Eastman was In financial
straits and did not have money on
ough to take himself to Europe to pay
nothing of the girl
I After all the one striking fact Is
that Eastman following the murder
came to Baltimore rind pawned the
jewels of the woman he IB nuppopec to
have loved Indications are that ho
aUo look a considerable sum of mon
n from nor There arc many who
believe that Airs Woodl had tre
t
qucntly supplied the man with money
Returning from Baltimore after
pawning tho dead girls jewelry East
man joked with his acquaintances
showed them a large roll of bills and
conducted himself In the coolest pos
sible manner He showed no trace of
excitement until after tho Identity of
the body became known and ho was
told not to leave the county It was
then that he mado hula plans to escape
The members of tho coroners juno
who believe there may be some truth
In Eastmans letter are anxious that
the mystery of the launch containing
two women and three mon which was
seen coming out of Broad creek on
which tho bungalow Is located shall
be cleared up Three wine and two
whisker passes which had boen used
were found in tho bungalow subse
quent to the murder In spite of tho
stories of many gay parties and much
drinking at the bungalow no one of
the many persons who knew Eastman
during his several months residence
here can be found to say they over
saw tho man take a drink either of
wine or whiskey
It was Intimated today that the In
vestigation into the identity of the
launch party may lead to an arrest jL
I any moment However it 15 certain
that so far there Iii nothing tangible
to take from Eastmans shoulders the
burden of responsibility for Mrp
WoodlUs death V h
Nothing is known hero of the allse
ed discovery of a partly burned note
which is said to have warned East
man that his presence In Baltimore
I
< Continued 011 Page Five

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