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The Ogden standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1902-1910, August 05, 1909, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058398/1909-08-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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j 1 4 r FAIRS REACH AND BENEFIT EVERY AVENUE OF INDUSTRIAL LIFE AND ARE INSTITUTIONS BE FOSTERED AND ENCOURAGED
I
h t tud1t tt
i
Entered no second lass matter
I at the Postoffice Ogden Utah
under Act of Congress March 9
1889
Published Dally except Sundays
4i by Wm Glasmann
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tUUroeott of torn tnede br the publtiktrt
crater the Olftr iigimcnt
io control Alit 20 1905
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I RAILROAD DEPOT LEADS
IN DECORATIONS
I
Time Union Depot people have set
I an example The whole building is
i being transformed with flags and
i bunting There are streamers from
f I 1 the tower and bunting and flags in
profusion on all sides
j
The old veterans as they reach Og
den may stop off by mistake thinking
thin to ho the encampment city so
4 rich and attractive and so suggestive
of encampment headquarters are the
e I decorations on the Depot No one
will regret if a few of the old boys
j t arc deceived into thinking this Is the
gelling off pointthe veterans them
i solves after seeing the city and sur
roundings will be pleased over the
mistake
fl Our business houses should follow
i
a 1 the example of the railroad officials
and get busy with their red white and
t I blueThe
The G A TL committee entrusted
I s I with the dressing of City Hall in the
I I i colors of the encampment should not
I forget that tho city building has so
1I far shown no marks of their decora
i tive handiwork
t
J i Get busy fellow citizens and young
Ii I America Get out your emblems of
I I J liatriotism e
I I
f NEW RAILROAD FROM OGDEN TO
11 I BURLEY
r i r
The Standard for two months past
I
has been calling editorially attention
to the new railroad line to be built
from Ogden north to Burley Idaho
r Railroad officials have been denying
1 that there was anything back of these
I editorial comments but yesterday the
I I I official documents were prepared in Salt
Lake City and now it Is up to the
I railroad officials to explain away their
j i denials
j I 1 Trusting to the Standards an
1 nouncement that a road was to be
I i I built hundreds of local people have
1 t I gout out along the line of survey and
have located on landmuch of It dry
r
farming land
Wlfen the road is constructed that
I part of Utah and Idaho will see a re
i markable devoloprricnU The Raft
I f river country is now enjoying some
thing in tho nature ot a boom over
t I the coming of the bands of steel
The claim is made for the road from
Salinewhich is a side track west of
Promontory station on the OgdenLu
i cln cutoffthal It will be a shorter
i route into the heart of Idaho and to
tho Northwest than tho Granger line
r Wyoming
from main line of the Union Pacific
The Granger route of the Oregon Short
I r Lino is a mountain road with heavy
I storms in winter and Hoods in early
P spring to interrupt traffic Jt is look
ed upon as a difficult piece of railroad
I to operate and not the most desirable
I i I route for passenger travel becauso of
j the unattractive nature of the country
I I i With the cutoff built from Ogdon to
Burley via Saline on the OgdenLucin
j line no passenger trains for the north
I west will be sent over the Granger
I
+ I road but all will be routed through
V Ogden to Saline and thence on north
1 f The OgdenBurlcy line is said to
I
present a minimum of construction 1
problems the greater part of the dis
tance being over a level country
Wo view this cutoff as one of the
most important railroad moves in the
I West Ogdons prestige as n business
and railroad center should bo greatly
added to by ouch a road
FEUD IN WHICH PINCHOT
IS RIGHT
The press pf the country is support
ing Gifford Pinchot in his contention
with Secretary of the Interior Ballin
ger Tho head of the Interior depart
I
ment insists that the head of the for
I est service must ccaso to supervise
tho culling of timber on tho Indian
reservations or make plans for the
protection of forests from fires on
those lands The Chicago News treat
ing on this subject says
Mr Ballinger Is able to cite a recent
provision of law to support his view
of tho matter This is simply another
indication of the powerful efforts be
ing made to break down the policy of
conservation Inaugurated by President
Roosevelt The special interests arc
not in favor of the work which Mr
Pinchot Is doing and through their
congressmen they will hamper him
wherever they can without arousing
too much public opposition
The time to save tho countrys na
tural resources is now before the
work of spoliation is carried further
Unless President Taft comes to tho
aid of Mr Plnchot and his work and
makes such an Issue of the matter as
to force both congress and the secre
tary of the Interior to assist In car
rying out the policy of conservation
the golden opportunity Is likely to be
lostThe
The Pittsburg Dispatch speaking in
the same vein has this
It is pertinent to keep It in the pub
lic mind that the preservation of the
forests and tho protection of water
power against corporate absorption I
arc of the utmost importance The
full magnitude of this may not be ful
ly grasped by the people but it Is suf
ficiently realized to recognize the duty
of an officer in immediate charge of
these resources to protest against acts
facilitating their cngrossal and em
phasize that protest by resignation if
1
necessary
It is unfortunate for Secretary Bal
Hngors position in this matter that
he comes from a state where special
and powerful interests have been ac
tive in seizing the forest and water
power resources That is not of it
self sufficient reason for charging him
with favor Ito those interests But It
is enough to warrant very close scrut
iny of acts that may break down the
conservation policy
0
SEE THE BRIGHT SIDE OF THINGS
A subscriber asks if Insomnia can
be cured explaining that she has suf
fered untold mind torture by reason of
sleepless nights Though the body and
the mind are fatigued and require
rest when Insomnia takes possession
tho brain fails to answer the call for
sleep and insists on creating a turbu
lence
Our subscriber says she has found
many people afflicted with this nerv
ous trouble and she expresses the con
viction that this paper could servo no
better cause than to aid these suffer
ers by some sound advice
Insomnia may come from overex
ertion of the body or mind long con
tinued It may be due to disease oth
er than a neurotic affliction It may
bo from mental affliction Each form
of the ailment requires slightly dif
ferent treatment The flrst essential
is ease of mind If that is possible to
obtain One nervously distressed
should cast off worry by a determined
effort to make the best of life There
should be no crying over the past as
the past cannot bo recalled there
should he no crossing of the bridges
until the bridges are reached antici
pated misfortunes are as seldom real
ized as are dreams of good fortune
Make the best of today and let to
morrow care for itself
There are people who dread tho
coming of J fall because fall ushers in
winter with its dull skies and dreary
landscape but they fail to rejoice over
tho coming of winter because it is Iho
advent of spring that most delightful
period of the year
Thoso of gloomy mind when they
see storm clouds gathering tho sum
mer time think only of the storm
Just ahead and never say to them
selves that after the storm will come
delightful days and more glorious sun
shine
And so With everything In life of
nervously depressed persons Tho nerv
ous are constantly conjuring up trou
ble and always neglecting to see the
good nil around them
As to the cure for that common form I
of insomnia which Is due to mental or
bodly strain some form of relaxation
should be indulged In Often tho body
is in need of nourishment and dieting
is the thing
An empty stomach may cause sleep
lessness In which case a crust of bread
and a glass of milk may prove to be
quieting because the blood is In small
degree drawn from the brain and
there comes a lull in brain activity
which Is followed by restful sleep
Tho person afflicted with insomnia
should cultivate cheerfulness Laugh
and be morry
I CHICAGOS SCHEME IS TO
BE ENCOURAGED
R P Cross secretary of the Land
and Irrigation Exposition to he held
In Chicago In November has1 arrived I
In Ogden for the purpose of stirring
up interest In the exposition Ho
should meet with local encouragement 1
as tho object of the Chicago gathering
is to draw attention to the develop
ment of the agricultural resources
of the West and to direct the flow of
immigration 13 the Irrigated lands
Chicago has seen the necessity of
opening to the minds of the poor of
that city of millions a hope for some
thing better than they have With
the possibilities of tho boundless west
held out to them as something within
their reach and grasp the very poor
are richer for the thought and better
citizens because of tho worthy aspira
tion kindled within them
Chicagos leading men have realized
that there must be something moro
offered the people of tho slums than
Is to be offered In the heartcrushing
struggle of a great city and the hope
killing congestion of the tenement
districts and to supply that broader
vision and to lift from their lower
classes the oppressiveness of a hope
less contest the Chicagoans have
pointed to the West and now they have
invited the West to carry to Chicago
proof that what has been told of this
magnificent land of promise Is neither
exaggeration nor misrepresentation
It Is a good thing for Chicago and
a mighty big thing for the West
ACCIDENTS ON CIRCUS
DAY
The unfortunate accident of yester
day serves as a warning Nervous
fracllous horses should be kept off tho
streets through which a parade is to
pass and drivers who Insist on hitching
skittish animals where they may be
frightened by the unusual sights and
noise of a circus pageantry are to bo
censured
The circuses has outriders who are
supposed to observe these restless
horses and warn the owners but the
warning of the circus people should be
accompanied by a command from a
mounted officer
The wonder is that more accidents
do not occur on these gala days Hun
dreds of farm teams and as many more
local rigs line the streets and one
frightened team might start half a I
dozen runaways
When the accident occurred on the I
corner of Twentysecond street and I
Washington avenue there wore team
and people enough within n block to
have made possible a fearful fatality
I as It was bones wore broken and wo
men and children were rendered hys
I terical and one death may result
A circus parade should bo policed
and the city authorises should ar
range in the future for extra men to
serve on occasions such ay that of
Wednesday
BUSINESS OUTLOOK NEVER
BRIGHTER
Morning Examiner
The country should see an era of
great prosperity with tho harvesting
of the bumper crops winch are in
sight The financial writers are be
ginning to predict a business revival
and Henry Clews In his letter of this
week says
The trade outlook is promising In
terior merchants have been buying on
a conservative basis and tho outlook
Is for a good consumptive demand for
nearly all classes of merchandise
Building is active and our railroads
are free purchasers of materials for
constructive purposes Advices con
cerning wheat and corn continue fav
orable the only discouraging reports
being from the colton districts where
continued drouth and heal havo caused
further deterioration in the condition
of cotton Money continues In good
supply at easy rates but the west
ward currency movement has already
begun and both the Interior and Can
adian banks are drawing against their
balances In New York It is not gen
erally thought however that tho crop
demands this season will cause any
material advance In money rate west
ern banks being abundantly able ID
meet a large part of anticipated re
quirements The condition of the na
tional banks appears to be exceptional
ly strong According to the last state
ment tho amount of loans issued by
these Institutions amounted to fnuSG
000000 the highest on record and an
Increase of 120000000 over a year
ago It is also an increase of G13
000000 over the minimum following
the panic The total of deposits was
1898000000 or nearly double tho
amount of nine years ago Those fig
ures show a tremendous growth in
our financial strength
Much money has been in hiding
since tho panic of 1907 and the banks
have been keeping in reserve unusual
ly large sums of money When con
fidence Is completely restored as it
Is about to be by reason of the big
crops this money will go Into circula
tion again and add to the business
revival
This fall and winter and the ap
proaching year should be periods of
unprecedented Industrial activity
60LDFILLD BROKER
ATTEMPTS SUICIDE
Los Angeles Aug 411 I OFar
rell said to bo a member of a stock
brokerage firm in Goldfield Nov shot
and seriously wounded himself tonight
in an attempt to commit suicide Tho
bullet passed through his body Just
above the heart At the receiving
hospital he said that ho was cleaning
his revolver when It was accidentally
discharged bill In his apartments
where the shooting occurred a note
was found addressed to his wife in
which he said that he was going to
end his life The physicians say that
he has a chanco to recover
Some months ago OFarrcll was In
dicted In Goldfield by the federal au
thorities for alleged illegal use of the
malls but was cleared of the charge
JURY TO TRY FORMER CHIEF OF
POLICE BROADHEAD COMPLETE
Los Angeles Aug tThe jury that
Is to try former Chief of Police Thos
H Broadhead on a charge of accept
ing bribes to furnish police protection
for tho red light district of tho city
was completed today
District Attorney J D Fredericks
followed immediately with a state
ment of the slates case
STAMPEDE TO REGISTER
Spokane Aug tThe last stam
pede of parties who arc eager to regis
ter for Indian reservation lands was
in full swing today Trains were
crowded to the guard rails landseek
ers scrambled through the windows
and hundreds were left standing on
the platforms Registration closes at
I midnight tomorrow The total num
ber registered will bo closo to 800
0001
GUILLOTINING s 1
WILL BE PUBLIC
I
I
Paris Aug 5A Sudden official an I
nouncement that a public beheading
would take place at 420 oclock this
Thursday morning In tho boulevard
fronting the Sante prison created a
II sensation In Paris which has not seen
an execution In fIfteen years Immedi
ately Immense crowds gathered at
tho scene but wore kept back from
I tho gullotlne by heavy details of police
and municipal guards
Parisian sentiment has long been
I opposed to public executions for In
the past they were accompanied by
scandalous scenes of revelry
Despite this sentiment parliament
I refused to abolish tho death penalty
In France and in view of tho revolt
ing crimes of the men executed this
morning President Fallleres refused
to commute his sentence to life Im
prisonment The victim was named
Duchemin aged 23 a butcher In 1903
he stabbed his mother and this not
resulting In her death quickly enough
he finished her by strangulation Tho
motive for the crime was robbery
The crowds wore unable to get with
in two blocks of the guillotine which
was erected beneath the trees be
side the prison wall There were
some jeers as the closed wagon con
taining the condemned man left tho
prison yard by a side street and theu
drove up the boulevard two hundred
ards to tho guillotine
Tho only spectators of the execution
were a number of officers and a largo
crowd of journalists
As the trembling wretch stopped
out of the wagon following a priest
who was holding a crucifix before
him it was seen that according to
the law dealing with parricides he
was barefootod and his head covered
with a transparent black veiling
while a cape of crude material but
half concealed his naked chest
Before the onlookers had time to
express their wonderment at title
strange disconcerting garb which
gave one the impression that the vic
tim was a woman tho flowing veil
ing fell from the head the cape from
the shoulders and the victim was seiz
ed and thrown under the knife Inl
flash all was over and the crowds dis
persed without disorder
Famous Payne Tariff
Measure Is Finally
Passed by Congress
Continued from Page One
We have a tariff commission now
declared Mr Dollivor referring to tho
opposition to the creation of such a
body They arc > experts although
they have never been appointed b
an public authority They are volun
teers aiding congress in Its difficult
and strenuous work
This commission he insisted had
written the iron and steel schedule
and the cotton schedule And yet he
said when it was proposed to have a
tariff commission appointed as a pub
lic body the mob who accepted the
mandates of this tariff commission vig I
orously opposed thd suggestion Ho
criticised the work of the members of
the board of general appraisers whom
ho spoke of as professional certifiers
Presenting a statement prepared by
the treasury department Mr Dolllver
said It showed the rates in the cotton
schedule were increased over the pres
ent law all along the line and some of
them as much as 100 per cent
And yet he added the statement
has been made hero that only minor
and insignificant changes had been
made in that schedule The American
people are being duped with that kind
of humbug and misrepresentation
Contending that there was no raw
material In tHIs country Mr Elklna
West Virginia expressed the regret
that the socalled free raw material
campaign had ever been started La
bor had been expended upon these
articles called raw material and he
believed that whenever they were
subjected to foreign competition they
should iff have been protected by the tar I I
Mr Heyburn interjected that while
he did not want to restrict any other
department of the government there
had been a new doctrine of a veto oCt
Items of the bill that ho could not ap
prove
proveWhen
When we are told that certain
items must not be placed In the bill
or the bill will be vetoed that Is a
threat that amounts to a veto of such
items said Mr Heyburn There Is
ho added no duty In this bill so high
as to offend me
Senator Warren look the floor short
ly after noon and entered upon an ex
tended denunciation of the hide and
leather schedule
Mr Warren callcl on Senators Ald
rich Galllngor and Dick to say what
they thought of the doctrine of free
raw material
All declared that they did not ap
prove of tho Idea of admitting hides
free of duty Very similar replies
were received from senators Bristow
Dolliver Oliver and Flint who wore
called on to stale their views
Never before had a tariff bill pass
ed under a storm of disapproval said
Mr Bailey speaking in opposition to
the report
You hope he said addressing the
speaker that with the returning tide
of prosperity the people will forget
the bad features of the bill
iMr Bailey reviewed the political
and industrial conditions to provo that
the Wilson bill had not been respon
sible for depressed conditions He
insisted that the present bill would
not improve conditions although the
Republicans would endeavor to spread
the idea that it would In the opin
ion of the Texas senator the effect of
tho conference was but a fair tale in
tended to catch such Republican sen
ators as Mr Clapp of Minnesota and
men of his kind
Crossln the aisle and directing his
remarks specifically to Mr Aldrich I
Mr Bailey declared that nobody be
lieved In the doctrine of free raw ma
terial adding that the Rhode Island
senator did not believe In It except
when it affected Now England inter
ests
But he said when you take the
tariff off hides the people of New I
England will still get their hides from
the western states
Washington Aug 4As though pro
testing against being called out to a
night session senators were tardy In
their attendance upon the meeting of
the senate tonight Nearly an hour
passed after the appointed time be
fore a quorum could be assembled
It was finally obtained after an or
I der had been issue to the sergeant
atarms to bring In their absentees
The entire session was consumed
r by speeches by Senators Cummins of
Iowa and Daniel of Virginia
During the evening a political de
bate was Injected Into the proceedings
and regulars and Insurgents hand
led accusations ns to tho effect their
course would have upon the political
future of their party
Whether the tariff bill about to he
enacted said Mr Hale would bo
accepted by the American people as
satisfactory and will be followed by
prosperity no one could tell But
whatever tho result should bo he was
satisfied that for ten years people
would look with marked impatience j
and frown upon any project or plan
or tribunal that would be likely to
disturb conditions I
Replying to Mr Newlands Mr Hale
declared the president would have
nothing to do with Investigating tho
cost of production at homo and abroad
Mr Beveridge then explained that
ho had been Inclined to the same view
but that Mr Aldrich having expressed
a different opinion he would resitate
to press his tariff commission bill un I
til It could be known what the fact
would prove to be
The senator will admit said Mr
Bovorldgo that the language was re
assuring to those of us who favored
the tariff commission
Too much so replied Mr Hale
Mr Hale then sent to the desk a
circular letter from tho committee of
100 appointed at the national tariff
convention held In Indianapolis last
spring for the purpose of promoting
tariff commission legislation It an
nounced that 25000 would bo re
quired to get a bill through congress
and requested ihe recipients of tho
circular to seo that their newspapers
were filled with Interviews and ed
itorials favorable to a tariff commis
sion
That is your hightoned agitation
remarked Mr Hale bowing to Mr
Boverldge and then taking his scat
I never heard of such a thing be
fore but I do not see anything im
proper In that letter replied Mr
Beveridge
Senator Gamble spoke at length up
on the bill While objecting to some
of its features ho said that as It had
met the approval of the president and
was the work of the majority party in
congress he would vote for it
NOTICE
Bids will be received until August
16th at 2 p m for furnishing SOO
tons First Quality Timothy Hay and
750000 Ibs First Quality Oats to be
delivered at regular Intervals during
a period of one ear from date Bids
will be acceptable also on quantities
less than as above stated but any
award in such case will be subject to
delivery being made at dates desig
nated by the undersigned in order to
regulate shipment of material State
prices L ob cars Salt Lake City
The right is reserved to reject any
or all bids P J Moran Box 783 Salt
Lake City Utah
CDARGES AGAINST
rDOSo BROADilEAD
Los Angeles Cal Aug 4 Sweep
ing aside all objections of counsel for
the defense Judge Davis today per
mitted Nick Oswald former King of
the Tenderloin to testify in the trial
of former Chief of Police Thomas H
Broadhead in regard to an alleged ar
rangement by which he paid city offi
cials of the Harper administration
money for allowing him to maintain a
red light district
During his testimony at the after
noon session today Oswald used the
names of former Police Commissioner
Samuel Schonck former Chief of Po
lice Edward Kern and former Mayor
A C Harper all of whom were com
pelled to resign from office when tho
expose of the alleged combination was
made some months ago
Schenck arranged a meeting for
me on the city hall with A C Harper
then mayor he testified The meet
ing was in regard to a new red light
district I had several talks with
Harper and Schonck I told them I
could get certain property on Alison
street that would pay 500 a day
Schenck said that if I could hake the
deal we Quid cut the profits in throo
parts Later Harper and Schenck in
formed me that I would have to pay
Chief Kern and Broadhead who was
then a captain of tho police 160 a
month each TOthls I agreed
Harper told me to go ahead and fix
up tho deal and I leased the property
Later I told the mayor and chief
of police that I wanted to close up
the opposition houses and they began
a series of raids on thoso controlled
by other persons
Tho testimony of Oswald was tho
first given at the trial and was begun
at the opening of the afternoon sess 1
ion the jury having been completed I
and sworn before the adjournment
of the morning session I
Oswalds testimony was not com
pleted when court adjourned to to
morrow morning
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Bids for furnishing the material and
erecting a four bent pile bridge will
be received at the office of the Board of
County Commissioners until 4 p m
of August 4th 1909 Plans and speci
fications at tho office of the County
Surveyor
By order of the Board of County
Commissioners
SAMUEL G DYE Cleric
WARSHIP DRIVEN
ON HIDDtN REEF
Seattle Aug 4A special cable to
tho PostIntelligencer from Skagway
Alaska says that the torpedo boat
destroyer Paul Jones which left Se
attle July 26 with the flotilla of six
destroyers for a cruise in Alaskan
waters was carried out of her course
and onto a hidden reef by tho today
currents in Peril Straits 35 miles
north of Sltka early yesterday morn
Ing and reached port today In a sink
ing condition
The destroyer which is in command
of Lieut M S Davis was going at
threequarters speed when she struck
the rocks The boat ran high out of
the water and nearly turned turtle
Men were thrown from their ham
mocks and several were badly bruised
by their fall
Two holes were punched In the star
board bow of the boat and the propel
lor shaft was badly bent The boat
was hung up on the reef for a short
time but the rising lido lifted her off
1
The pumps wore kept going constantly
to keep her afloat and by the use of
1f
t
A WELL KEPT
LAWN
beautyLAWN
gives added beauty to any homo and to properly cut and trim n
it buy a Lawn Mower that you know will cut the grass even
and smooth At the prices we arc offering our highgrade lines
of mowers every one should buy
ClovcrLcar 12in cut 275 ff
14in cut 300 I
ColonialJ2in cut 400
Hin cut 125
16in cut 450
Elm Park14in cut 550 I
i 16in cut 575 f
International n cut 750 I
It t 17in cut 825
19in cut 950
r 1
1i
The above prices arc what the goods cost us and in addition we
give a grass catcher with every mower This Is certainly a
chance to buy High Grade Mowers at the lowest prices over
heard of in Utah
PHONE 8 GEO A LOWE CO 0 PHONE
collision mats she was able to limp
into Skagvay several hours behind her
consort After making temporary
repair the Paul Jones left here to
night with the other boats of tho flo
tilla for Juneau
O S L EXCURSION TO SALT
Lake City every Sunday 100 round
trip Eight dally trains to and from
the Capital
SHE MAKES FFFftRT
TO END11ER lIfE
San Francisco Aug IArter at
tempting suicide and lying uncon
scious all night on a lighter of lum
ber anchored In the bay Miss Vee
Reldmasler aged 30 was discovered
still insensible early today Tho
young woman had attempted to leap
Into the bay but In the darkness
struck the lighter Instead of the water
Miss Reldmastor after being re
vived In the hospital staled she had
sought death because she had been
defrauded of a fortune of 100000 by
her two sisters Mrs Mary Records of
Oakland Cal and Mrs T D
Pothullo of Vancouver B C
Before attempting suicide Miss
Reidmaster wrote out a carefully word
ed will leaving her possessions to
local people who had befriended her
She will recover
CON 6RESSMAN
HCiIITSCHAUFFEUR
Washington Aug I Representa
tive J Thomas HeWn of Alabama be
came Involved in a personal encoun
ter with an automoblllst named John
son here today
Mr Heflin and Representative Olllc
James of Kentucky were crossing F
street together when an automobile
whizzed by them Mr James says the
driver was handling the machine care
lessly and was exceeding the speed
limit very nearly running them down
When the car stopped some distance
up the street the two congressmen
followed and took the cars number
Observing this action the automoblllst
followed and hailed the congressmen
inquiring why they had taken his num
ber and asking their names The con
gressmen said that they Intended to
report him for fast and reckless driv
ing and told him who they were De
nying tholr allegations the driver la
said to have mado some remarks that
were exceedingly distasteful to Mr
Hoflln whose rejoinder was sharp ani
to the point
The congressmen then moved away
but the automobilist it Is alleged fol
lowed them demanding that Mrllcf
Inn withdraw his statement Then tho
men fought Few blows wore struck
Mr James and Mr Heflins colleague ±
Mr Clayton who had come along sep I
arated combatants before any dam
age was dbno j
I
FIFTEEN DEATHS RESULT
IN COLLISION AT GIBBS f
Spokane Aug tThe fifteen deaths
resulting from Saturdays collision of
electric trains at Gibbs Idaho took
place this morning when Herman Gil
bert of Couer dAlene passed away
Gilberts leg had beon broken one hip
was crushed rind he suffered internal
injuries
ROLLER FAILS TO THROW
OLSEN AND BIG YOUSIFF
Portland Ore Aug IDr B P
Roller tonight failed to throw Charles
Olsen of Minneapolis and Big Youslff
a Turk in 75 minutes wrestling Rol
ler took the first fall from Youslff In
51 minutes 20 seconds on a head and
wrist lock I
1
TAFT LOOKS INTO i
tI
FREI6UT RATES I
t
r
II
Baltimore Aug tBernQnl A Ba I i
kor formerly head of the Atlantic
transport steamship line has been in o
vestigatlng at the instance of Presi
dent Taft the matter of freight
charges over the Panama railroad n I
United States government property
In a preliminary report to the presi
dent announced today Mr Baker point
ed out that in the transportation of
hides this country is discriminated
against in favor of European nations
Baker said
Mr ht
The rates on dry goods from Now rc
York to Central America In 52140 a 0
ton and from Europe to Central Amer bt
2040 The rate machinery
Ica on
pI
from New York to Guayaquil is 1240 H
from Europe to Guayaquil 1188 ni
The rate from the east coast of the f
United States to the west via the m
Panama railroad and the Paclc Mall hi
steamship line on machinery from ro
New York to San Francisco Is 3G a al
ton from Europe to San Francisco pa
1882 Panama railroad charges from H
Colon to Panama If from New York fit
8 10 a ton if from Europe 4 5D a ho
ton Pacific Mail Steamship company
from Panama to San Francisco if from
New York 18 a ton If from Europe C
764 a ton
J
t > JL t cp 3 Jl
CLA RK S 9 I I ROCK Hiwh
1 HERCULES f7 HAVE OAK hit dot
> SilO E S I SOLES arc Sin up
hut
f for
OAK SOLES car 1
wh
Used in Hercules SHoes for Chil
4 dren Are the Best Made
1
tor
ROCK OAK SOLES ARE TANNED i toi
< tho
FROM THE BEST HIDES THAT
CAN BE PROCURED BY THE GOOD
OLD FASHIONED OAK TAN BARK
4
PROCESS IT IS THE SOLE OF
THE SHOE THAT MUST STAND
THE HARDEST WEAR IT IS AL
WAYS EXPOSED TO THE MUD AND j + I
WATER AND RECEIVES ALL THE j
KNOCKS AND BUMPS INCIDENT
TO THE LIFE OF A SHOE Sii
Get cc Hercules Shoes for the Children with Oak
OF
Soles and Notice the Reduction in Your Yearly
I
Footwear Expense youi
ouit
WE ARE EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR pun
HERCULES SHOES IN OGDEN with
PEE
LARKS STORES talh hp
t lions
r 1It t
Jf
t

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