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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1902-1910, October 23, 1909, Part Two, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058398/1909-10-23/ed-1/seq-12/

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J
I I
I u c
PR COOK TELLS HOW THE TWILIGHT OF THE lONG ARCTIC J 1
f
f 1 f
NIGHT ENFOLDED HIS WINTER CAMP AT ANNOOTOK
LEA VINO ESKIMOS iN A TRANCE OF SADNESS i
1
I I
o Qz FREDERrC7C z OOK
Everybody Turned Hunter
to Improve the Last Few
r J l Days of Fading Sunlight
41
I
Qf i Scene of Chase Shifted from the Sea to the Shores
t Where Caribou and Hares Were Bagged
c for the Expedition J
t
FRANCKES ABILITIES AS A CHEF GREATLY
j ADDED TO COMFORT OF WINTER CAMP
jI
Many a Holland House Spread Cheere the White Alen
Who Had Not Acquired a Relish for the Flesh
of Marine Mammals
t J
FURS PREPARED FOR THE COMING COLt
Discoverer Describes the Winter Menu Which Included
I a Supply of Pem
mican Brought from Home What Pemmican
Is Made Of
f
Copyright 1009 by the New York Herald Company
Registered In Canada in accordance with the Copyright Act
Copyright in Mexico under the laws of the Republic of Mexico
All Rights Reserved
4 1 I
> SYNOPSIS OF 6 CHAPTERS PRINTED
1n the fnrt instalment of hit thrilling story The Conquest of the Pale
printed in the HERALD
of
0
Wednesday
September
15 Dr Frcdcrich A
Cool told of tho start from OlouccJtcr
on the lirndleu of tho voyage to tko
polar seas and of the overhauling en route of the equipment needed for tho
dash to
< the pole
In a graphic manner the dlecovorer wrote a story of Eskimo lifo that I
t
has
never been i
excelled
for human
interest He told thu
of home lio the
t tragedy and comedy that I
minylv in the dreary tfistenco of tho dweller in
tho Arctic and
f of tho childlike
caocrnczs of the nuiic to rude their valuable
fur and ivoritt for tJuj timplcat things of civilization
t Tho yacht her owner Mr John R
Drudlcy the
explorer and his
t wore pictured m their party
preliminary work for the final dash
Finally after dcribinv tho various places visited in Greenland in search
of ouidu cad +
Information as to
conditions further north
Dr
Cool
of the trip across Inyloflcld Gulf wrote +
past Capo Auckland and
on toward Cape
Robertson
t
+
tt Hero oho discoverer closed the first part of leis narrative N with Etch and +
Annootok tho last point of call looming in the Icy distance
In the second Instalment Dr Cook
F described
the
then on to Anndotok ttm place voyage to Etch and i
of
t plenty which he selected as tho lose for
his
dash to the pole
In the third instalment
t Situ explorer describe the work
of
icintcr preparing his
t quarters closing toith a yraphie description of a narwhal hunt
t
Fourth Instalment
THE CONQUEST OF THE POLE
By Dr Frederick A Cook
Copyright 1000 by tho New York Herald Company
Registered lo Canada
In accordance with the Copyright Act
Copyright Iji Mexico under the laws
ws or the Republic of Mexico
v All Rights Reserved
Storms now caftie up with such force anti
frequency that it
vns
r I
I
OR vnLOGRicir A COOK
e > l
ii
f
J IJJI
m ti I
S + RIGHT qOq bV NVIVA9 Co 1 I
A CORNEA OF DRCOOKS STATEROOM ON THE 5 S oSCAR H 3
r
or
CROwpS WLj COMING DR COG uC COFEIYHACrEN
not safe to venture out in kayaks A few walruses were captured
from boats then sea hunting was confined to the quest of seal through
the young ice
A similar quest was being followed at every village from Annoo
tel to Cape York But all
sea activity would now soon be limited
to a few open spaces near prominent headlands
The scene of the real hunt changed from the sea to the land
We had as yet no caribou meat The little auks gathered in nets
during the summer and eider duck bagged later disappeared fast
when used as steady diet We must procure hare ptarmigan and
reindeer for we had not yet learned to eat with relish the fishy
liverlike substance which is characteristic of all marine mammals
Guns and ammunition were distributed aud when the winds
were easy enough to allow one to venture out
every man sought the
neighboring hills Francke also took his exercise
shoulder with a gun on his
The combined results gave a long line of ptarmigan two rein
deer and sixteen hares As snow
covered the upper slopes the game
forced
was down
near the
sea where
vc could still hope to hunt in
n
the feeble
light of the early part of the night
NO ANXIETY FOR UlIITTIn
I With a larder fairly stocked and good
prospects for other
tasty meat we were
I spared the usual anxiety of a winter
without winter supplies and tranche was
II
just the man to use this game to good
effect for ho had a way of preparing
our primitive provisions that made our
dinners seem quite equal to u Holland
House spread A
In the middle of October fox skies were
I
prime and then new steel traps WC t dis
tributed and set near the many caches
Dy this time the Eskimos had all ftban l I
Joncd their sealskin tents and were
nuugly settled in their winter igloos The
ground was covered with snow and the
sea WHJ nearly frozen over everywhere
Everybody was busy preparing for the
coining cold and night The temperature
way about 20 degress below yTo Sfevere
storms were becoming less frequent and
the air though colder was less humid j
and less disagreeable An ic e fort was
formed mid the winter sledging was lie 1
gun by short excursions to halt tho fox
traps and gather the foxes J v
All these pursuits with the work of
building and repairing sleds making dog
harness und limping new winter clothing
Itpl rill o lively interest while the great
0
I
u 11
crest which wn a to hold down the unruly
deep for so many mouths thickened and
closed
During the last days of brier sunshine
fir weather 21 cleared IIId nt n ° on 011 0 cto
everybody
y sought the freedom of
day t ho Wen for a hest glimpse of tho dying
There Wa n dlarnj of color and
fitter but no one seemed quite happy MIS
sun sank
under the
southern ice Cor
it
was not to rise again for US dava
rJlc
Eskjlno took this
ns II Kinal to
enter IL tnlllec of
suUlItt iu which tilt
bereav mht oC each family and the dis I
comfort of the
rear are enacted in dray
gentle chants or dances But to us the
unset of 1907
was inspiration for the
final work iu directing the shaping of the
outfit with which
to begin the conquest
or the
polo at
sunrise of 100S
Most expeditious have had the advan
loge of the liberal
hand
of It government
or of an ample
private fund Ve were
denied both fnvors
ors But
we were not env
cumbered
with n cargo of misfits devised
by home tl winners nor
was tho project
handicapped by the
usual army of nov
ices for while men nt best
IIlllgt be re
garded ns amateurs compared with the I
expert IDdency of the Eskimo in his
own environment Our food supply con
taiued only the prime factors of primitive I
nourishment Special fooda and lubora
tory concoctions did not OH an important
space in our larder
Nor hud we balloons automobiles
motor sleds or other freak devices We
did however have an abundance of the
best hickory suitable metal and all the
raw material for the sled and its acces
sories which was henceforth to be linked I
with our destiny I
The sled was evolved as the result of i
careful study of local environment and
of the anticipated ice surface northward
We did not copy the McClintock sled I
with its wide runners which has been
used by most explorers for fifty ears1
Nor did we abandon the old fashioned
iron shoes for German silver strips
VVIuii n Polnr Sled Should lie
The conditions which u polar sled musi
meet arc too complex to outline here
In a broad sense it seemed that the best
qualities of the best wood Yukon sled
could be combined with the local fitness
of the Eskimo craft with tough hickory I
fibre and sealskin lashings to make elastic
joints With plenty of native ingenuity
lo foresee and provide for the train of
ncinplauilily and endurance the possibili
ties for our sled factory were very good
For dog harness the Eskimo pattern
was adopted but canine economy Is
such that when rations are reduced to
workable limits the leather straps dis
appear as food To overcome this disaster
the shoulder straps wore made of folds I
of strong canvas while the traces were
cut from cotton log line 0
A boat is an important adjunct lo every
sledge expedition which hopes to venture
far from its base of operation It is u
matter of necessity even when following
the new coast line as is shown by tho
mishap of Mvlius Eridifcn for if he
I had had n boat he would himself lawn
returned to tell the story of the Danish
oxpeditiou to East Greenland I
Need for a boat comes with the changed I
conditions of the advancing season
Things must be carried for several months
for n chance use in the last stages of the
return But since food supplies are nec
essarily limited delay is futal There
fore when open water prevents progress
n boat becomes In the nature of a life I
preserver I
Foolish Indeed is the explorer who
ignores this detail of the problem Trans
port of a boat however offers many se
rious objections Nunsen introduced the
kayak and most explorers since have
nllolltcd the same device Tuft Eskimo
canoe serves the purpogc very wall but
j
T EN
fP J 95
tn < E OF I
D
21
liliRUZZ1
1900
t
HORTHAEZRIVf
f APRIL 211908
LE L A pR1123aD 908 D E EIaN1AN
a i YEA
APRIL 14 1808 0
tie
PEARY
90G e
I L
APRIL8J OS
fLO cp f S f l e 7x
H
d
1 TERQUARJ6 9 CYO K
IPSO REAcHED jail
1 UP M jK
MA t1909 4 t
DR COOKS ROUTE TO AND FROM POLE y
S Greet the Cbming
cS n
Night with Dreary Rites
Over the Years Sorrows
J
1
Family Bereavements Are Reenacted in Dramatic
Chants or Dances as the Light Fades J
v Out in October j
I
1
I BUILDING OF SLEDS ONE OF THE FIRST
TASKS TAKEN UP IN THE EVENING
How the Wood and Iron Were Selected and Dog Harnesses
Were Made of Canvas Instead of Leather to
Guard Against Canine Appetites
I
LEARNED MUCH FROM HIS PREDECESSORS
I
I i 0
II V I
Lack of the Usual Liberal
Government
Appropriation or Private Fund
Was Made Up by Unceasing Energy of Well
Experienced Hands
y
to carry it for throe months without hope
less destruction requires an amount of
energy which stamps the polar venture
with failure
Selecting n float
Sectional boats aluminum boats skin
flouts and other devices have been tried
but to all there Is the same fatal objec
tion of impossible transportation It
seems rather odd that the ordinary fold I
lug canvas boat has not been pressed into
this service
We found it to fit the situation exactly
selecting n twelve foot Eureka shaped I
boat with wooden frame The slats I
I spreaders and door pieces were utilized
as parts of sleds The canvas cover
served as a floor cloth for our sleeping
bags Thus the boat did useful senIce
for a hundred day and was never in evi
dence as a cumbersome device
I Whon ut last the craft was spread and
covered in It we carriedthe sled iu it
wo camped in it we sought game the
meat of which took the place of exhausted
supplies Without It we too would not
have returned
Preparation of the staple food supply
is of even greater importance nionns
of locomotion To the success of a pro
longed Arctic enterprise in transit suc
cessive experience is bound to dictate a
wise choice of cluilmcul Jut It does not
often educate the stomach
I From the published accounts of Arctic
travellers it is Impossible to select a sat
I isfactory menu for future explorers and
I hasten to add that perhaps our experience
I
ence will be equally unsatisfactory to
subsequent victims
I jSor is it safe to listen to scientific ad
vice for the stomach Is the one organ of
the body which stands as the autocrat
over every other human sense and passion
and will not easily yield to foreign dic
tates
The problem differs with every man I
It differs with every expedition and it is1
radically different with every nation
H 1 0
Thug when De Gcrlache forced r
Norwe
gian food Into French stomachs he learned
that there was a nationality in
gastro
nomic
In this respect as in others I was ot
helped very much by the people who wero
to line up my forces Tho Eskimo is ever 1
hungry but his taste is normal Things
of doubtful value In
nutrition
form
no y
part in his dietary Animal food
meat
and fat is entirely
satisfactory as a
steady diet without other adjuncts His
food requires neither salt nor sugar nor r
is cooking a matter of necessity
Quantity is important but quality ap
plies only to the relative proportion of fat
With this key to the
I gastronomic of our 4
lockers pemmican Will selected ns the I
staple food which also served equally
well for the dors
I Wo had un ample supply of pemmican
made by Armour of pounded drier beef
sprinkled with few
a raisins some cur
rants and n small quantity of sugar This
mixture was cemented together with
heated beef tallow and run into tin cans
containing six pounds each
This combination was invented by an
American Indian It has been used be
fore ns part of the long list of foodstuffs
in Arctic products but with us It was
the whole bill of fare when away from
game haunts
Only a few palate t
surprises
were car
ried and these will be indicated in the i
uarrative ofcamp life The entire win
ter and night were
spent with busy
hands under direction of Eskimo and
Caucasian ingenuity iu working out tho
clothing and camp comforts without
which we could not invade the forbidden
mystery of the polar basin
Although we did not follow closely
either the routes or methods of
our pred
ecessors we are nevertheless doubly in
debted to them for their experiences In
cluding their failures were our stcppiiig
stones to success
End fourth Instalment
1
iJ J = > it 1L
I w

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