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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1902-1910, March 17, 1910, Image 4

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4 lHE DAILY STANDARD OGDEN UtAH THURSDAY MARCH 17 ISZO
I i wqr 1Enrutug taU ttrD
I
Publlohed Dally except Su ndnyo by William Glasmann
i L To Subscribers by Mail I I
Ii
I Every few days wo got a letter from some of our subscribers
who say Wo dont understand how tho government can stop a
newspaper from sending Its paper on credit If the paper wants to
do a credit business
j
i Tho government does not object to the credit system at all
But It does say that only actual paying subscribers shall have
tho benefit of the postal rates of ono cent per pound which means
four costa por month Dally papers more than three months In
arrears must pay 30 cants per month or ono cent each day
I
Unless the subscriber wants to pay the 80 cents por month
extra tho paper must bo discontinued That Is why tho Standard
must Insist on prompt payments Do not let your pnper run behind
I
hind more than three months
1 I
I SAYS THE CLARK ROAD IS BLUNDERING
i
I I Maintaining that the Clark road from Salt Lake to Los Angeles
I I originally made a great mistake in locating its line without taking
i into consideration the hydrographic characteristics the San Fran
i I cisco Call says the San Pedro is about to repeat its blunder
i The extraordinary ill fortune of the Los Angeles ancl alt L 1JiQ
railroad tells us that civil engineers have yet much to learn in re
I lation to the making of surveys for the location of roads says the
Call It becomes evident that there are many physical character
istics to be taken into account besides grades From the accepted
i engineering standpoint the Los Angeles and Salt Lake road was exceptionally
ex
i way These have been regarded as the first essentials of low cost
I operation Harriman spent millions on the Central and Union Pacific
I without being able to make them of equal facility with the Salt Lake
line
I I uBut now we find eighty miles of the Salt Lake road washed out
The damage is so great that the property goes out of operation for
nearly a year and rebuilding must be undertaken at enormous cost
As these washouts are only tho culmination of a series of like dis
asters in past years it becomes evident that the engineers must find
a new line in safer territory It is demonstrated that a costly mis
take was made at the start in determining the route
I Engineers operating in mountainous regions can not safely pro
ceed without advance collection of hydrographic data It is a fact
+ that in the semiarid regions of America floods are more dangerous
because less expected than in places where rainfall is normal The
1
Southern Pacific spent 3000000 in repairing washouts in the Sole
I I dad canyon on the road between this city and Los Angeles before it
1 was discovered that the original survey had located the line in an un
I I tenable position The Salt Lake road for lack of hydrographic data
is now found in still worse case and is seeking a new line The ques
11 tion is whether to run the line by Pioche Nev or through the St
t George valley Utah A comparison of the relative advantages of
f these routes gives the following data
The St George route would be an agricultural line through a I
Mormon valley where semitropical fruits are raised and which was i
x settled by Brigham Young sixty years ago Tho other would take in I
the mines of Pioche and it has been agreed that the agricultural
valley would produce far greater tonnage than the one mining camp
How it will be decided yet remains to be seen but St George seems
to be favored b to tho physical characteristics of the route and
its traffic possibilities
It may be noted that this comparison takes account almost
i wholly of the trade potentialities of the rival lines but pays slight
I or no attention to the hydrographic characteristics
l Having made its first blunder the Salt Lake route is in a
r
position where it is forced to risk the making of a second grave mis
take The road must build through the Meadow Valley wash to save
d > several million dollars of equipment and there is no other possible
route open to the engineers except at tremendous outlay and at great
cost in time and prestige
Had the Clark road waited until a more secure route could be
constructed the Southern Pacific would have had its line opened via
Keeler to Los Angeles and once having established traffic in that
direction the advantage all would have been in favor of what is
known as the Aqueduct route as the distance from Ogden to
Hazen and thence to Los Angeles by Keeler is not much greater than
i f that from Salt Lake to Los Angeles by the Clark road while the
Southern Pacific route is immeasurably superior in climate conditions
and scenic attractiveness
I
CENTRAL PACIFICS EARLY HISTORY
i
Charles Edward Russell writing in the April number of Hamp
tons Magazine of the Central Pacific which
i ho characterizes as the greatest steal ever perpetrated on the United
States government and in support of his charges says
The four projectors of the road Collis P Huntington Leland
Stanford Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker divided among them
selves in stock land l tsfroni the government government bonds
and bonds which the government guaranteed and donations from
California counties the sum of 149000000 for which they did not
pay ono cent The total of the government subsidy which Hunting
ton by clever lobbying got from congress Mr Russell declares was
60000000
How the figures were juggled to turn most of this immense
subsidy into the pockets of the four promoters is explained by Mr
RUBS as follows
The bill provided that tho government should issue to the road
1000 six per cent bonds for every mile in valley or level land
16000 in bonds for every mile in the foothills 32000 in bonds and
for every mile in tho mountains 48000 in bonds Mr Russell al
leges that the company charged the government at the mountain
MUSIC ONE OF IMPORTANT NECESSITIES OF LIFE
I The popular interest in music has increased from year to
year sinoe the creation of man and modern nations are now devot
ing millions of dollars for the advancement of music It has seemed
to herald the progress of civilization leading and followed in all
branches of the worlds activity harmonizing in war maintaining
peace dominating our pleasures and enthusing our business
Today we look upon it as one of the necessities of life and find its
charm one of the few things which all mankind have always loved
Selected and grand opora music is the demand of the day and the
Ogden Music Company has inaugurated a series of concerts with
out cost to the public and offer productions by such world famed
vocalists as Harry Lauder Farrar Caruso and others
I
Their hut Victrola Concert was held March 4th last proving
a complete success and they have therefore decided to offer another
entertainment of the same class without cost to the public Thurs
I day Maroh 17th at 816 p m and cordially invite the attendance
of yourself and friends
T rate 48000 a mile on thirty miles of level or nearly level ground
near Sacramento and at the foothill rate 32000 a mile for many
miles of level building in the valley east of the Sierras
Abating nothing of admiration says Mr Russell speaking of
the completion of the road for the physical performance it is
time now to reflect that it was also a monstrous triumph of greed
fraud and corruption i that it might have been a blessing instead of
a blight to that rich country of which it was esctatically called the
Gateway
rr How much toll do you think they took
From the day the gate was erected and closed down to the
present year first Mr Huntington and his associates and then their
successors have taken and divided more than 600000000 in unjust
tolls all from the people of the United States who so kindly erected
the gate across their own y
In the course of his article Mr Russell describes vividly the
race for a junction between the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific
the roads now attempting to merge
The act of 1864 he says had authorized the Central Pacific
to build eastward to a junction with the Union Pacific wherever
that might be At first the four partners had assumed this junc
tion would be far to the eastward allowing them good mileage and
many fat bonds but the swift advance of the Union Pacific began
to annoy them and by 1867 they were thoroughly alarmed The
Union Pacific was approaching the mountains If it should thread
them first the Central Pacific would lose the fattest part of its
contract with the government also the best of the joint haul when
he roads should be united
There ensued the maddest chapter in all railroad history The
two roads entered into a race tearing into the work before them re
gardless of any question of cost working day and night with relay
gangsIt
It was the wild romance of railroad building Winter came
on the terrible Sierra winter with its phenomenal snow falls but
to the worlds amazeemnt the work never stopped In the dead of
winter rails machinery cars even locomotives in pieces were
dragged hundreds of miles on wagons traversing roads heavy and
badly made threatened with imminent disaster from the snow slidesa
and the storms
Talk about the present high cost of livinglisten to this
Food for men and fodder for the horses reached fabulous
prices Oats were sold by the pound at 12 to 16 cents hay was 100 a
ton and sometimes 180 for teams the contractors paid 12 and 14
a day
In April 1860 they were almost within sight of the enemys
lines Before them was Ogden the goal of the race in the great
valley between the Rocky and the Sierra Nevada ranges In the
fury of competition both companies far overshot the mark The
Union Pacific had its graders one hundred miles west of Ogden
the Central Pacific had its advance line forty miles beyond its track
layers Only the iron actually put into position counted tho race
On the last day ten miles wore laid on April 28th they struck
the Union Pacific line fiftythree miles west of Ogden and May 10th
they drove the golden spike that cemented the two roads Tho
Union Pacific had won by fiftythree miles Subsequently the Cen
tral Pacific bought of the Union Pacific at a high price the over
lapping road
GIVE ALL BOYS A CHANCE
The boys in the schools of New York City are I experimenting
with wireless telegraph apparatus and aeroplanes R They are study
ing electric forces and aerostatics with the result that youngsters
not more than thirteen years old are keeping up with the latest dis I
coveries in those two branches of investigation andexporiment
Why not encourage Ogden boys to study thosemost interesting
subjects Why not aid them to obtain wireless apparatus and model
aeroplanes
I
There is something fascinating to the boy mind in these excur
sions into the realms of the strangely new and the opportunity to I
develop along these lines may be productive of more than one I
eminently successful young man I
We are told there are bright boys and d1 boys in our schools i
There were the two classes of boys when James Watt was a stripling I
and Watt was marked down in school as among the stupid Yet
the boy who was dull in imitation proved to be a genius in original
ity and discovered the principle of the steam engine
And BO it may be among our children that while the preco
cious youngster will shine in book lore we may save some of the
dull boys from the charge of lack of brains by proving that in the
mechanical field and in original research they are preeminent
There is the mind which can memorize That is the literary
mind There is the mind which is analytical Thit goes with the
mathematical mind But beyond either is the mini which though
it suffers by comparison in school so often gives to us the man of
genius in the world of applied science or mechanics
Our schools cannot be too broad They should le wide enough in I
their scope so that if a child proves deficient in one branch of learning
that child may turn to something in which its latent talents even
though they be purely mechanical may find adaptability I
Many a boy branded as a dullard in whom confidence is early I
destroyed by a false measurement of his worth niifht be saved from
a life of condemnation and lost ambition by a befer understanding I
of a boys worth in the tender years or formative period when the
school teacher is authorized to pass judgment I
We are for schools which can find the bent of 3 boys mind and I
develop the brain cells along that line of least reristance We are
in favor of the introduction of anything even though a novelty
if the study of the same will bring results and male of boys men of j
capacity skill originalitymen of service to humanity
JUST FOR FUN
Looking Backward
I always inherited the handme
downs as a kid
Got tho old things oh
Some of em My older brothers
soon outgrew their coats and shoes
but they never seemed to outgrow
their skates Kansas City Journal
Heard In the Courtroom
Judge Arc yon sure that Ute
prlsouer was drunk officer
Mulcahy Dhrunk is it Sure ycr
honor if hed spoke through a till
phone the brlth av him ud av made
the poles sthagger Boston Tran
script
A Real Hustler
Lady to applicant YOB I adver
tised for a maid of all work Are
you nn early riser
Applicant Indndo HU 01 nm mum I
At mu laubt place 01 was up an had
breakfast ready nn the dishes washed
an put away an all tho beds made
before any body else In the house was
upSuccess Magazine
Dat cook book means all right
said Miss Miami Brown reflectively
but I bet It gILs mo Into trouble yet
WhatB the trouble
Bout every page it says take six
eggs Now de question is who IK
I l inter tAke em rum Washing
ton Star
ENTERTAINED
BY YOUN6
PEOPLE
Tho vast assembly hall of the Sa
cred Heart Academy was crowded nnd
I even standing room was at a premium
during the splendid entertainment
given by tho pupils of the school to
I Rev Father Cunhnnhan last night
nnd at which the young ladles dis
played their talents behind the foot
lights as woll as In the class room or
conservatory all of which bespoke
volumes for the excellence of the In
stitution and the training the young
j ladles are receiving under the direc
t lion of the sisters of the Holy Cross
Tho entertainment which was a
j tribute to Father P M Cushnahan
was in the form of a play in four acts
I Every detail In connection with the
i entertainment was mastered The
programs printed In green were neat
On the outside cover was the follow
ing tribute to Father Cushnahan writ
ten iby Mabel Krausa of this years
graduating class
A sunkissed shamrock Father dear
Like lovelit emeralds memorys tear
With hearts entwined we bring to
thee
O may It breathe of Erins sea
And blossom for eternity
The play entitled The House on
the Avenue was presented with tho
j following cast of characters
iMr Fields Ethel Tyler
Mrs Fields Mablo Krauss
I Daughters of Mrs Fields
Hannah Susie Jackman
Julia Marguerite Grill
I Ethel Goldie Roberts J
Bessie + Irene Mendes
Susie Loretta Clause
Grandma Fields Marguerite McNulty
Rich Ladles from the Avenue
Mrs MarvinSadle Beecher
Mrs Gordon Cecil Ragan
Cousin Hopsy Ggneriove Mc > inlty
Fanny Dearborn Gertrude Roachc
Topsy Tuny Edna Hamilton
Susanna SnowAgnes Kennedy
Tho synopsis Is as follows
Act I Sitting Room in the Fields
Cottage
Act ITThe same
Act III Dining Room In the Fields
Cottage
I Act IVThe Houso on the Avenue
The music furnished during the In
1 lermlBslons was by Miss Scott piano
I Miss Beatrice Hamill and Miss Kcck
i ler violins Miss G Malone was 111
I and Mien Hamill appeared In her
stead
Every young lady tolling part In tho
evenings entertainment did her part
with an artistic perfection that Is
rarely found in entertainments of like
kind or even In many cases by those
who have made the stage their lifes
study They all read their lines de
lightfully showing conclusively tho
careful study and preparation that had
been given to the work
I All in all It can bo said that the
entertainment was one of the most
pleasing and successful held at the
Sacred Heart Academy In many
months
Before the opening of the play Miss
Giierin extended a greeting that made
all fool that they were indeed wel
come and that their presence was a
pleasure to tho faculty and pupils At
the conclusion of the drama Rev
Father Cushntihan who had been one
of the most interested spectators in
tho hall arose and after suppressing
some show of feeling found words In
which to express to the young ladies
nnd the sisters of the school his ap I
preciation for tho magnificent tribute
extended to him After he had spoken
for a few minutes the reverend father
drifted into his usual happy vein
mingling beautiful thoughts of tho se
rious
The applause that followed the elo
quent priest at the conclusion of his
Tenmrkos was indeed a tribute from
his legions of friends in Ogden
KNOCKS ARE BOOSTS
SAYS E A BATTELL
Editor Standard The misappre
hension which exists In regard U
knocks and boosts Is to say the
least bod for Ogdon The constant
unwavering illumination of the elec
tric light is primarily due to knock
Ing of tho falling water on the tur
bines Ingenious devices are includ
ed in the electrical circuit to take
care of Inevitable fluctuations which
left to themselves would become dis
astrous boosts on the line In
shipshape order your automobile Is
par excellence a knocker When for
various reasons she starts to miss
explosions knocks she becomes a
booster
Since building operations com
menced next door to the Grant ave
nue garage nearly half the street has
been monopolized by building materi
al It is passing strange the Real
Estate Boosters havo taken no cogni
zance of this covered as it was for
weeks with the snow they have re
cently found so obnoxious Then
Attractions at Ogden TheaLre I
u I
viz
t s f +
1 r
r + t5tu t
d r ati i Ic
SCENES FROM THE GREAT DIVIDE 1
I
J
bAii A Your
I 9n i0s Easter 1
I Shoes
f You will find the new Patrician 1
I accord
i cord with tho latest Dross I
I Modes This season bcnuty is
more than ever the keynote of
c Patrician The charming sup
ple new designs may be worn
without the thought of sacrific
fi ing case and comfort
j
Easter Favorites Strap Pumps fan Pumps Tan Oxfords
Ankle Tics Oxford Tics Gibson and Christy Tics I
Prices everywhere I 350 to 400
CLARKS 9 SHOE STORE
thoro Is the Ice box and delivery wag
on of the trust buster nnd Ibo back
sliding rigs at the stable Imck
sliding since an officer has been
seen putting them whore they be
long Are the real estate men afraid
of Jeopardizing their business Thoy
hould go direct to tho Almighty
with their kick about the snow and
not needlessly offend the dignity of
the city council
According to the ordinance book
the above mentioned obstructions are
good for one hundred dollars apiece
to the city and theRe mentioned are
a drop In the bucket Why stay In
debt when money Is literally running
up hill
The smaller tax payer must pay
for his conceit that ho la a capital
let by footing most of the bills By
way of lL word for tho under dog how
ever tho cost of living should be
lowered by allowing armors and
growers to peddle tholr products In
the city without let or hindrance
Ills for the booster to project good
roads into the country When the
farmers have built them and they
become auto speedways we tell tho
farmers they may not use our city
streets to their best advantage with
out paying what Is in effect a pro
hibitive license
Tho real estate dealcru could show
their good will by breaking the poli
tical deadlock that exists in tho coun
cil Without discussion In public
session as to the merits of a question
the vote IB Invariably four to six
or six to four What discussion there
Is seems to hinge on personality It
is a neat compliment to the mayor
this game of obstruction Tho sword
cuts both nays that would knife the
mayor by sacrificing tho city
While much could be said In Jus
tifying the inlqulllous bicycle rack it I
is gone but not forgotten by a host
of bicycle users Other obstruc
tions and abuses of the sidewalks and I
roadways exist without extenuating
circumstances I thank my lucky
stars I am n knocker and an optimist
Even the power that be will bo
forced to sit up and take notice
when It comes to a post mortem ex
amination of the citys finances vic
tims of tragedies In the streets or
the consumers of poisoned candy
Signed EUGENE A BATTELL
TATSi I
AT THE LYCEUM
Ogdens pioneer vaudeville house
the Lyceum Is offering Us patrons
ono of the strongest bills It has had
In a number of weeks Ills one of
those pleasing bills with a variety of
acts that the usual pleasureseeker
delights In witnessing
KJngsbury and Munson present a
comedy sketch The Devil In Pos
session that is filled with borne
genuine comedy Miss Munson Is
versatile and does some clever act
ing In depicting the wife who wins
the perpetual love of her husband
Klngsbury Is clever and reads hla
lines very well
Tho Musical Bobsts have a very re
fined act hi which both display ar
tistic ability in singing as well as
playing upon various musical Instru
ments
While all wire acts arc similar
PaU y succeeds in pleasing In what
ho terms a comedy transformation
actBert
Bert Syphers one of tho original
Illustrated pong singers of Ogden
sings an Irish song In pleasing voice
Mrs Olive Blackburn pianist is
good The moving pictures are better
than average E T S
SAVE THE
1 EASTER EGGSI
I i I
Supplement Issued by The Evening
Standard on Saturday March 19th 1i
and teach tho children to color their
J
own eggs
4
I
SMAllPOX SCARE
AT CITY JAil
1
After suffering the discomforts of
quarantine for more than two weeks
and seeing two prisoners afflicted with
the disease taken to tho pest house
police officials yesterday had a bad
fccaro which had not altogether gone
last night on discovering what was
at first thought to be another case of
smallpox In tho city jail
I The victim this time Is Fred Stucter
whose sentence had expired and who
was about to ho released when a
rash appeared on his face causing the
officials to make a rigid Inspection and
take every precaution against allow
ing him to go before It was known
what caused the rash Tho city physi
cian was called and had the mnn re
moved to tho small outhouse not be
ing able to determine whether or not
the man had contracted smallpox un
til the case had further developed
Last night It was said that tho rash
was merely the result of the antitoxin
administered to each of the inmates
of the city Jail when the first small I
pox scare broke out Ho will bo held
until the authorities are satisfied that
there is no danger of his contracting
the disease
NOTICE OF A STOCKHOLDERS
MEETING
of the
OGDEN VALLEY TROUT AND RE
SORT COMPANY a Corporation
Notice Is hereby glen that a stock
holders meeting of tho Ogden Valley
Trout and Resort Company will be
held at the County Court House Og
den City Weber County Utah on tbo
8th day of April 1910 at 10 oclock
at which meeting a board of five direc
tors will be elected to serve till the
next annual stockholders mooting to
the hold on the third Tuesday In Jan
iiary J911 and for the transaction of
such other business pertaining to the
welfare of said corporation as may
properly como before said meeting
Called by order of Joseph Darker
President
JOSEPH BARKER Pres
CHRIS FLYGARE Sec
s
Frkby Night March 18 1r 1
HENRY MILLER
PRESENTS
The long awaited great American ployN Y Press
The Hi t
GIrO ft t F Company Spe iaL I
Divide
By WM VAUGHN MOODY
A drama of American proseLondon Daily Standard
I
Over 600 Performances in New York I
Now Crowding the Adelphi Theater London
SEATS ON SALE NOW
t
i i
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