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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1902-1910, June 23, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058398/1910-06-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Evening Pap r Is the Paper I WEATHER FORECAST
of Today The Morning lJ THE INDICATIONS ABE THAT THE WEATHER
t tfl a 1t a r WEATHER WILL BE FAIR TONIGHT AND
Paper of Yesterday FRIDAY TURE 1 LITTLE CHANGE IN TEMPERA
1
f CHTIETH YEAR NO J50PRICE
FIVE CENTS OGDEN CITY UTAH THURSDAY EVENING JUNE 23 JJO Entered as Second Class Matter atthe Postoffice Ogden Utah
I FIGHT
IS OFF
1 Langford and Ketchel
Will Not Meet at
1 Reno July 4
1
San Francisco Juno 23The Lang
for dKctC hel fight was declared off to
flay by Promoter Tom ODay of Hea
I ler O Day who hoped to stage the
battle at Reno July 4
I c Reno Nov June 2Torn Flana
Anils big blue eyes grew round with I
surprise when the Associated Press
informed him early thlR morning of
tlte reported reconciliation between
Jaclc Johnson and his deposed man
fisH Georgo Little
Now youre chaffing me no
3 laughed It was an uneasy laugh
thrugh and be soon became aerlous
For a few minutes Flanagan was
completely nonplussed Then he
straightened his broad shoulders and
smiled
You may say for mo that I am glad
to hear that Johnson and Little are
H friends once more He spoke slowly
as If weighing words
I am for Johnson first last and
for all time I want him to win this
fight and whether I am hlR manager I
or not does not figure In the matter
Juhison will find me working here
for him when he arrives in Reno Ill
stay with him as long as lie needs
meHe
He was asked If ho had a contract
with Johnson Yes here IR my con
tract Flanagan replied and he Plo
duced a slip of paper containing the
signed statement Johnson recently
gave to the press at San Francisco
announcing that Flanagan had been
appointed to assist him In looking af
ter his business Interests You see
he went on this is more a bond of
friendship than anything else That
was all I asked for
Aside from the local Interest in the
comings and goings of big Jim Jeffries
the particular angle of the fight sit
uation that engages Renos attention
T today is the controversy waging over
the proposed LangfordKotchcl con
i test Tex RIckard and the local com
mittee in charge the building of
T r the arena for the main battlq are open
ly opposing Promoter Hesters pro
ject They assert that the middle
L weIght match If staged on or before
July 4 is likely to draw patronage
from the big fight Or at least to cut
dfiVn tlib sixlo of the higherpriced
tickets
I Its tho JeffriesJohnson fight that
will bring tho visitors to Reno RIck
T ard said last night and ita not right
j for anybody to try to cut In on us
wIth a rival affair They can have our
I nrenn for their fight the minute Jef
filcs and Johnson get through wjth 11
I I I think they ought to bo satisfied
J with that offer
On tho other hand Hester and his
I follow promoter Billy McCnrney say
their plan is thoroughly legitimate
I Vc dont want to hurt the big fight
Hester asserted today But we are I
certainly going to pull off our scrap
if Its possible to do so on the morn I
ing of the Fourth
According to Hosier a site has
len selected and arrongemenvs alp I
t being made to begin work at once on
an arena I tho KetcholLangford
po proves a success he declared we
i plin to bring the Tommy Burns
Lanpford match here on Labor Day
Il RIckard and Hester had an argu
1 mcnt Inst night over a longdistance
tplcphtic message Richard clafmod
to have received from San Franclsoo
from Joe Woodman Lan fords man
V ager According to Riclard Wood
man told him that there was no chanco
I 1 nf ingford meeting Kotchel in Reno
on the morning of the big fight as
I 11 Woodman had no Intention of
ti cutting in on tho JeffriesJohnson
r fight
s fightWhen Hester learned that Rlcknrd
statement he
f hail made the above sttement
f colled up Woodman and claimed to
have received a denial from him pf
1 any Intention of call off tho match
There was talk at midnight that
Hosiers contest might be held at
t Gohifleld on the Saturday pr edlns
July t Heeler however said there
vat nothing in the rumor
I t
t CHINA MAY SEE
i A REVOLUTION
Victoria B C Juno 3Xows of
unrest In several district of China
wan brought yesterday by the Tamba
Marti Many ominous symptoms of > lm
prmling troubles are reported from
tho Ynugtse ale and it was feared
an uprising would occur in connection
with tho opening of the Nanking pxhl
bltion on June 5 with the result that
r troops were sent and several worships
ant
f ships assembled for protection There
I was no sign of trouble however apd
1 file exposition has been very success
r ful
Foreign ministers in Pekln have re
eiMved a letter from a high Chinese
I military officer of thy Yangtze vale
t dated from Shanghai stating that a
great rebellion against the Manchur I
Ian dynasty Is on tho verge of begin
ning and the writers warn foreign
tTb that those who show any practl
tfiil Bvmpathy with the ruling dynasty
would bo treated Q enemies their
lives forfeited and property destroyed
vhUe those who maintained a neu
tral attitude would be protected Pe
t Wi authorities denounce the letter as
a forgery
1 CONVICTS STRUCK FOR
SHORTER HOURS OF WORK
t Dllnglnm Wash Juno 23Forly
fcnvlcta employed on the state road
I work at Gravel just across tho SkTiglt I
ff > unty line ten olio south of Del
Mfigham went ou Btrkc yeslerdaj de
Il
manding an elghthour instead of a
tenhour day Superintendent Mlllo
appealedI to the sheriff of Skaglt eoun
ty and Mount Vernon Accompanied
nl by two deputes he listened to > a
vtIWhen 1
When tho sullen convicts refused
comlet
to return to work unless grant
shorter hours the superintendent lit i
Jn
ed the men up under armed guard
and then informed them they would
ho oblifjed to remain In prison tel
hours a day or go l prIon
G A R PROTEST
Houqulam Wash Juno 23At the 1
state encampment of the G A R yes
terday a resolution of protest against
the placing of a statue of Robert E
Lte In statuary hall at tho naUonal
cnpltol was adopted
CAPT CODY
i
IS INJURED
Falls With His Aeroplane
From a Height of
100 Feet
1
London June 23CaIl F S Cody I
the aviator while making a night at I
Aldcrshot today fell from a height
ol 100 feet and was seriously Injured
His aeroplane was caught In 1 gust
of Wind becoming unmanagaeablo
plunged to the ground Cody was pin
ned beneath tho wreck
Captain Cody an American by birth
is employed by the British war de
ptirtmont to teach its officers aeronau
tics
WORLDS MARKETS
MARKET DULL AND
HESITATING AT NOON I
eW York June2SThe opening I
trend of prices of stocks today was
upward but only languid Interest was
manifested In the dealings American
Cotton OH rose 111 and Louisville
Nashville and Consolidated Gas 1
Selling orders nt concessions began
tQ make their appearance In Amal
gamated Copper St Paul Union Pp
clflc Reading United States Steel
and other active Issues the whole
market receding below yesterdays
close Fractional recoveries follow
The upturn of prices in whet at
tho opening of that market weighed
heavily on stacks hex was somo
profittaking following yesterdays
dee The dull and hesitating tone
was the result United States Pipe
fell 312 Minneapolis St Louis
214 and Northern Pacific 1
Bonds were firm
New York Money
Now York June 23Money on I
call steady 2 12 a3 per cent ruling I
rate 2 78 closing bid 2 78 ocerod
at 3 per cent I
Time loans steady firmer GO days
per cent 00 days 3al4 6 months
4 l4a4 12 per cent
Prime mercantile paper 1 34ri5 per
cent Sterling exchange weal with
actual business In hankers bills at
13825 Commercial bills 84al2
Bar silver C35S Mexican dollars
44 Government bonds otead > railroad
road bonds firm
Chicago Close
Chicago June 3CloBO Wheat
July 9 7S Sept 9 18 Dec
97 78a96
Corn July 58 78 Sept GO 1Sa
14 Dec 58 l4a38
Oata July close 30 lIaHS Sept I
38 5Sa34 Dec 39 12
Pork July 1240 SepL 2267 12 I
Lard July 1245 Sept 1247 1s2
a1250
Ribs July 1297 12 September
1257 12
Chicago Produce
Chicago June 23ButtorStead7 I
cremerles l227c dairies 23
2Co
2CoEggs Steady receipts 12419 at
mark ethics Included 15 1216 l2c
firsts 13c prime firsts 19 l2c
Cheese Steady dnries 16 l4i7i >
j 1 12c twins 15c young AmerIas
15 1215 34c long horns 15 12Q1
lr 3 le
Omaha Livestock
Omaha June 23 Cattle Receipts I
2200 best send others ion to 15c
lower Native 450SOO cows and I
heifers 3GOG50 western 350ff
I 365 cows and heifers 375Q550
canners 275 < Q425 stockers and
feeders 3505 7ii calves 4 OOQ >
800 bulls stags etc 75575
Sugar and Coffee
Now York Juno 23Su arRaw
firm Iulco ado 89 test 374 cen
trifugal 9G test 121 molassts su
gar SO test 349 Refine Veady
crushed 585 granulated 15
powdered 525
Coffee Spot quiet No 7 Ro S 14
8510c No 4Santos 9 Clc
Metal Market
New York June 23LcadQulot
I spot 440a450
I Bpt 1200
Copper firmer standard spot
al220 July 121212a1230
Silver 53 58c
MINING STOCKS
I SELLING lOW
I SALT LAKE June 22 Nevada
Hills Bellng down as low as 150 was
the feature of the morning session
Outnlde of that the transactions were
i few and fir between with a down
ward tendency of tho market Tho
yolrnvj of business amounted to about
IOOC
MOROS ARE
PURSUED
United States Troop in
Search of Eight
Murderers
Seattle Wash Juno 23 Mindamu
Mores have murdered Dutch traders
on an Island off North Borneo under
conditions which may develop Into an
outbreak so serious that a tfemonairn
ntemonstn
tion by troops from tho military sta
tion at Camp Jolo may be rcciulrcd
according to a report brought by the
steamship Tnmba Marti
When the Tamba soiled reports had
reched Hong Kong that a party oC
eight Moros from the TawlTaw
group of Islands being drIven by
storms to an Island of the Celebce
group had murdered three traders
nnd made away with 10000 pesos
worth of loot
A Dutch gunboat gave pursuit and
found the murderers on Manusmanca
an iBlnnd of the Philippines Notice
was given by the officers In command
of a company of Philippine scouts at
Bonga and a attempt was made to
capture the outlaws On the arrival
of the troops the Mores withdrew to
the center of the island From tholi
retreat word was sent hy the head
men of the tribe to the effect thai
the men wanted would not submit to
arrest and that the entire population
te entre IopnaUon
of several hundred would resist In
resst
vaelon
Notice of this was ant to the mili
tnt at Camp Jolo who Immediately
dispatched two companies of the
tlO
Third Infantry to aid tho constabu
lary The result had not transpired
at last reports
Manusmanca where are the out
laws their relatives and tribesmen
has little communication with civil
ization I Is described as a low and
I flat Island of about thirty square
miles It Is covered vUli dense Jun
gle and a swamp covers a large area
near tho center
I Is reported that tho natives ol
the Island arc well armod
DEATU CAME TO
1M SUDDENLY
Tho following account of the sud
dendeath of Frank Shaw formerly of
Ogden Is from a Belllngham Wash
paper ef Juno 20
Stricken by heart trouble the Rev
Frank Shaw an ordained Methodist
minister of this city fell dead on tho
railroad track at Blanchard at about
920 oclock last night while running
to catch tho passongqr train for this
city Tho preacher was carried into a
hour nearby restoratives applied
and physician called but death came
before his arrival Organic heart dis
ease IB given as the caiiHe of his
death
Mr Shaw was an ordained local
preacher of tho Methodist Episcopal
church and a mnmber of the Trinity
church of this city He took an active
part In tho Billy Sunday meetings
hero and was recently appointed to
preach at Blanchard In Skagit
county After the service there last
night ho started for the depot intenJ
jOb to take the 920 oclock train for
Belllngham Before reaching tho de
pot he saw that he would have to run
to catch the train He started down
the track and after running a short
distance was seen to suddenly sink to
tho ground Persons with him carried
him Into a nearby house where the
restoratives were applied and the
physIcian called
This morning George W Mock find
the Rev Earle Naftzger of the Trin
ity church went to Blanchard on tho
Owl train and brought the body to
this city where It now lies at the un
dertaking parlors of Mpck Hill m
Elk street
Mr Shaw was the proprietor of
Shaws Bargain Store 1315 Commor
clal street He came to this city last
August from Ogden Utah He was a
pioneer merchant of Denver Colo
having been engaged In twglnoss in
that city for more than twenty yean
Ho was a member of a Denver lodge
of the Ancient Order of United Work
men and also belonged to Whalcom
Woodmen of
camp No 5198 Modern
America of this city Mr Shaw Is
survived by his widow and one son
I
I James D Shaw who was associated
with his father In business here al
a son William D 11roshlhIK In
Seattle and one daughter Mrs F N
Hess of Omaha Neb HP also leaves
three sisters Miss Ellen Shaw of Vic
toria B C who came to visit her
brother last Thursday after a separf
titian of more than thirty years also
I Miss Rachel Shaw and Mist Hannah
Shaw of Mauchester England whore
also resides ono brother John Shaw
The absent son and brother of Mr
abtent been notified of his death
have
I Shaw nOUled
Slu1
and upon their arrival here funeral
announced It
arrangements will be
I wi
IK likely that the body will bo shipped
to Denver Colofor Interment Mr
Shaw was a little pastt 57 years of age
at the time pC his dcatu
FIRST DECISION OF
NEW US COURT
WASHINGTON June 22rhe new
United States courL of cUBtoma appeals
StateR decision today
its first tday
peals gave HI
appeals from
were appeiis
All cases decided WCTf
1 C board of appraisers or
I the general
t decisions of the pnlted SUUos circuit
150n8 ot New
I court of the second dlatrictof lev
I York f
YOllc
was1 tovcrBed In two
The court W toerller
In thrco The
afflrmud thrb
I
I cases and afr
I court met withif full bench
The rule of tho now courts pro
1 ir
1
cedure Is much tho same as that in i
1 tho supreme court Several cases I
disposed of wcro appeals from Chin
sso merchants In New York Sun I
Quong On imported Chinese cabbage
from his native canton and rolled It
up In sail There is dlrferene lu
I duty on vegetables In their natural
state and vegetables preserved 1 r
Sun maintained that ho put sal on
the cabbage merely to flavor it and
that ho had no though o prcnervlnq
It and thereby making It liable to R
lower rate of duty Tho clruclt court
held that On had preserved the cab I
bage never tho less and tho court
of customs appeals affirmed that de
tc
clsion Strong Yuon Shlng Imported
dried duck flesh salted preserved In
peanut oil and canned I Is a
Chinese delicacy He contended It
ought to bo assessed a drosccd poul < I
try The new court had export
sample the canned duck and affirmed I
the circuit courts decision that It wus
far from being In the doss of dressed
poultry 1
In another case the court wan cull
ed upon to detcrmln the difference
between a yam and n genuine sweet I
potato Justice Barber In n opinion
reversed the circuit court of the
I southern district of New York and
hold the yarns are dutiable The I
I court also held that when Chinese
shoes are olabonxteh embroidered
they are dutiable a embroidery and
not s3 common shoos
I BAD CONDITIONS IN
CONGO FREE STATE
EDINBURGH Scotland Juno 32
Tho Commission on Missions and Coy
rDon1 concluded Its report pre
en tOd to the Worlds Missionary Con
fetenco today with nn assertion that
the claims of humanity and the
rights of missions have bon so fla
grantly and continuously violated by
the government of the Congo state
now taken ovor by Belgium that an I
appeal for action should be made by
the conference to all the powers which
are signatories to the General Act ol
I Berlin
The Congo Question I
Wo have no hesitation In asking
the conference to make a decided pro i
nounccmont upon the Congo Ques
tion the report says This new
state came into being under conditions
which make the whole family of na I
lon more directly rosponslbe for Its
existence than is usually the case
they did not merely accept an accom
plished fact but lent an active hand
to tho accomplishment This makes
It doubly Imperative that the confer
ence should present a full weight of
Christian sentiment effectually voiced
t overcome the natural and usually
commendable Indisposition of govern
mentn to meddle
medle
The commission heads tho list of
HP findings with an expression of grat
itude for the large amount of mutual
helpfulness found to exist between so
many missions and governments Con
cerning the right of entry for Chris
tian Missions the report says
Results of Enterprlseo
Inasmuch as the results of mis
son rr enterprises are now so evi
dent nnd have extended over so long
period that their yenoral beneficent
effect is demonstrated we think that
it may reasonably be asked of all
Christian governments that they I
should use their good offices with
those of other nations for the free
admission and exercise of missionary I
I
endeavor where such admission is not
now granted and further that such I
Interposition may be justified to the
oernmcnt not on grounds of rail
gina but upon tho broad ground of I
humanity on account of the beneficent I
Influence of missions and upon the I
common right of mankind to receive
such benefits
The report continues In view of
the enormous influence exorcised by
Christian nations over races of less
developed civilization and lower ma
terial power we would express the I
earnest hope that a growing sense of
responsibility for the right nee of this
influence may control tho actions of
both governments and Individuals
and in particular we would express
our conviction that where territories
peopled by such races are under tho I I
rule of Christian powers tho prime
duty of such powers IH the education
and development of these races
I Native Christians Under Disabilities
Evidence having been laid before
I us that In many countrioa occasion
ally even In countries under the con
I trol of European powers native
Christians lie under disabilities both
i In regard to the exorcise of their reli
gion and In regard to their cull stat I
us we would emphasize the fact that
Christian teaching inculcates respect
I for tho civil authorities of their own
land an the duty of Christians and
would affirm the reasonableness of
woul
I granting to Christians all the protec
tion rights and privileges of loyal
and lawabiding citizens We would
further urge that Christian powers I
phould not only adopt this rule of ac
tion in all countries under tholr dl
Tact contra or subject to tholr polit
ical Influence hut should also make
friendly representations on the sub
ject to such other powers as have not
removed thane disabilities
While fully recognizing tho duty
and right of the civil authorities of
every country to lay such temporary I
restrictions and conditions on the I
movements and settlement both of
their own nationals and of foreigners I
within and across their borders as
a e demanded In the Interests of In
tcrncl order and international peace
we think It well to record our judg
ment that It Is not wise for tho civil
jower to allocate areas of work to
different missions unless In confer
ence with and with the concurrence I
of tho missions concerned
I Rccomncnd ton of Commission I
We recommend to the conference I
that it take stepr for the appointment
I of a committee composed In part of I
International jursts of reputallon to
draw up a brief statement of recog
nised principles which underlie the
relations of missions to governments
which slaaenimit after having re I
ceived the endorsement of the lead
inir missionary societies or a represen
tative board of missions may be pub
lished for the information both of mis
sionaries and of government officials I
who may be In contact with mission I
work
r J R Llr Xl
r T l i biii
BEEf TRUST
4 REJOICESI
Judge Landis Quashes I
the Indictment of I
Grand Jury I
II
Chlcagp June 23 Judge Landis In
the United States district court her I
today sustained the demurrers of the
KocalJed beef trust tothe indictment
charging 3 Combination In restraint of
trade A new grand jury was ordered
to renew the Investigation of the
packing companies I
Tho Indictment drawn on evidence
secured by agents of tho federal gov
ornment was against the National
I Packing company and Its ten sub
r sidiary companies charging violation
oftho Sherman antitrust law
Smiles handclaps and congratula
tions were exchanged when Judge
Landis announced that the Indictment
would not stand but the demonstra
tion came to a sudden end when the
court aded
Call a special gran Jury venire of
seventylive men for July 14
This body will be ordered to hear
testimony with a view to finding valid
indictments against the packing com
pany The Indictment quashed today
failed to show In tho view of Judge
Landis that any offense had been
committed within the last three
years
om APPLE CROP
fROM THE WST
SPOKANE Wash June 22
Buyers for commission houses In I
New York Chicago Boston Phila
delphia and other large distributing
centers traveling in the Northwest
ern and Pacific states estimate that
16000 cars or from 9500000 to 10
000000 boxes of apples suitable for
eastern markets will bo shipped
from commercial orchards In Wash
ington California Colorado Oregon
Idaho Montana nnd Utah this season
I is also estimated that between
3000 and 4000 cars will bo required
to supply tho local and European
trade
The market value of tho crop In the
I several states is placed at from 27 1
000000 to 129000000 at present
I prices which are likely to advance
because of the decreased crops In
Ohio Missouri and other central ap
plo states Buyers say that the Pa
cific and New England states will
supply tho bulk of the apple crop
this year The last statement Is
borne out by United States govern
ment reports for Juno Just received
In Spokane
Washington is given first place
with an output estimated at 4850
cars of which tho Yaklma valley will
contribute between 2000 nnd 2250
ars Wenatcheo valley 1800 to 2000
cars other districts In eastern Wash
ington Including Walla Walla and
Spokane valleys SOO oars Western
Washington 300 cars Colorado In
I cluding 2500 cars in the Grand al
lay 4000 cars California 4000 curs
Oregon 1200 cars Idaho 750 cars
and Utah and Montana 750 cars
Eastern Washington Is credited with
tho largest Increase In acreage and
crop In tho country
Arrangements arc being made in
various parts of the district to hold
several thousand cars in cold storage
I until early next spring Four ware
houses arc being equipped In Spo
I kane the shippers saying there will
ho aharp advances in prices nil over
the country before the Christmas
holidays
Irrigation Company Articles of In
corporation have been filed In the
count clerks office by Joseph Chez
attorney for the Little Missouri lr
rlgution company of Pleasant View
The company Is composed of prom
inent fruit growers of Pleasant View
and has a capital stock of 9000
r
BANKERS ELECT
THEIR OffiCERS
I
W S McCornick of Salt Lake President and M S Browning ofl
Qgdcn VicePresident Banquet at The Hermitage Mcr
Delightful Affair Bankers Pleased
After spending a brief time at tho
State Industrial school this morning
the men who handle the money ot
Utah mot at 1 oclock this morning
in convention and resumed the work
begun yesterday
The bankers were in fine spirit for
the work at hand and they entered in
to the labors of the convention with
er n greater vim than they did yes
torday As coino of the said It
seemed that the trip to tho Hermit
ago last evening and the partaking of I
the delicious viands were inspira
tions and impelled thum to greater ac
tivity
The present gathering of financiers
is virtually the first meeting of bank
era In Utah and nevor before In tho
history of the state have BO many
bankers been assembled In a deliber
ative conclave of any kind Former I
Governor Hober 1 Vela tho vet
eran banker W S McCornick and I
others stated Inst night that It was
surely tho strongest and most thor
oughly representative gathering ot
bankers and businessmen ever as
I sembled In the western country Ev I
er city from Logan to St George
IB ropresent In the convention and
almost every bank of Utah has a rep
I resentative hero to tike part In tho I
I convention
I Splendid results have obtained so
far and todays work will close OHO I
I ot the moat successful conventions
held In the state The bankers say I
they 110 really felt the importance
I of 1 convention where they could get
together and discuss tho needs of the
I banks and the urgent action required I
ou their part In behalf of tho money
interests of the people until this con
vention assembled
The election of officers was held I
this forenoon with tho following results
sultsW
W S McCornick Salt Lake presi
dent
I dentM S Browning Ogden first vice
I President
L N Stole Brigham second vice
f president
C H Wells Salt Lake secretary
ti Msuror
Executive Committee M Whit
more Price Joshua Greenwood Fill
mole J T Farrer Prove I
During the recess hour the mem
bers of the American Bankers asso
clalloii met and elected W S McCor
nlci vice president for Utah and W
of the nominat
W Rltor a member nomlnatj
ing
qommlttco
Interoatinr discussions wore had on
IDtlrostn
topcs of Interest to bankers and hey I
woio entered Into with much earnest
I nets Tho subjects discussed were as
follows
Universal System of Exchange By
T W BoyoivSult Lnko
Cbnervntlonu on tho Fowler Bill
By John pjugrtwOgden
he Latest Addition to Sisterhood
Uy P W Oloon Prlco
AU AnnaltfHlBof the Central Bank
Alla1JRlsof
Idra By W Montaguu Ferry Salt
Lctc
Lrt
LctcSome Undeveloped Resources By
M S Browning Ogden
After attending to minor business
of a miscellaneous nature this after I
nrxin the convention will adjourn for
I
ted that Pov
oic year It laanticipated thCt
will bo the next place of nwtins I
Lopin has bOii a strong bidder for
tit convention but at noon today the
convouton
feFro5ontntlvc8from that city with j
d rOlcntat the contest in favor of
rivo J
1ivoLi tr
I
Tn
J toP V N1 1 tnl ba liiluy 11
The banquet at the Hermitage last
night was one of the most elaborate
social functions of the season being
participated by about 150 peoplo
Tho little hours dawned before the
festivities wore over and those who
participated pronounced It the event
of the convention
At the banquet board A n Hey
wood president of the Ogden Clear
Ing house was toastmastor and
speeches wore mode by a large num
ber of tho bankers and others Antony
those who gave appropriate toasts
were former Governor Helter 1
Wells Judge Joshua Greenwood W
S McCornick Mayor William Glas
maun M S Browning Judge I I I
Roiapp Frank J fallen W W Rlter
David Ecclcs and others
The party was taken to the Hermi
tage In special trolley cars and In au
tomobiles The menu card was a
tempting one and those having
charge of the dining room were the
recipients of praise and congratula
tions from the guests
Thoso who wore present at tho ban
quet were A J Lewis Snlina
Utah J F Tolton and wife Beaver
Utah W F Earls Salt Lake Mr
and Mrs Wm C Wright Ogden
Mr and Mrs W F Rltor Salt Lake
John Welsh Farmlngton Utah D
A McMillan and wife Murray
Utah
Mr and Mrs G H Tribe Miss
Mabel Tribe Mrs Nellie E Both
I Loland Tribe W S Fitzgerald B G
Blackman and wife Win GInsiriaim
and wife Patrick Healy and > wife
John Pingree Hcbcr t Wells
J E Shepard and wife Logan
Charles R Mabrey Bountiful W H
Brercton Provo D Johns Zolem
I Mldvale F C Jensen Mt Pleasant
I R B Porter and wife Mrs That
D Dee J D DIxon and wife 1 11
McCargar Henry II Rolapp and wife
I 0 A Parmley Mrs J W Young
I Long Beach California James Chip
I man C W Buchholz J M Wilt
more James PIngree
II E Halverson 10 L Smith Kent
merer Wyo I A Moyes and wie
W S McCormick Salt Lake Mr I
and Mrs Ralph E Hoag J S Clark
Farmington Utah Jas M Petteraon
Richfield
Mr and Mrs D A Smyth Mr and I
I Mrs CA Henry Mr and Mrs A B
McIntosh Mr and Mrs C H liar
I ton E R Miles Jr Gy Smith P P
I Dyrcng Manti City J L Solan and
Miss Ellen Wilson Salt Lake City
George A Golf and wife N J Han
sen and wife C H Wells Salt Lake
G M Whltmoro Nophl Guy Bolog
nese Bingham Hyrum Hay ball Lo
gan Gao P Edwards Goo A
OBrien San Francisco S A Whit
nCr Salt Lake G F Thatcher Lo
gan James Andrews and wife St
George
John Lynch and wife A n Hey
wood Af Beutty Denver Pearl
Andrus St George W F Olson
Price A P BIgelow and wife
J E Shepard and wife A M
Fleming and wife Logan AV T
Davis Bingham J P Corn Hyrum
David Ecclcs Wlllard Scowcroft and
wife Harold Pecry James G Bur
ton 1 D EvanH David Mattaon
Guy Lewis Richfield l
A O Packard Sprlngvllle Joshua
Greenwood Fllmore Thomas P
Page Rlvcrton N P Ipson George
G Hendricks Richmond I
Continued on Pago SIx
ml Hb
a er bC df wlf vit
SLAYER
CAUfliT
Charlton Arrested on
Landing in New York I
Confesses
I
New York June 2iIorter Char
ton husband of Mary Scott Castlo
Charlton whose body was fount stuff
ed in a trunk which was taken from
Italy recently was arrested
Lake Como Ial recenty WIB 1
rested ns he stepped from the steam
thlp Princess Irene in Hoboken to
day Chailton at first denied his
Identity but after being given the
third degree admitted he was the
husband of Mrs Charlton He then
made a signed statomonl confessing
UP murder to the Hobolcen police
I The police later minounccd that thu
statement signed by Charlton was a
I confession that ho had slain his wife
Charlton sold that while he and his
wife were having supper together at
I wie villa on Lake Como they had
engaged in 1 violent quarrel
Chnrlton said his wife who was
one of the best women In the world
had an ungovernable temper called
him some vile names and that fin
ally when he could stand her abuse
no longer he attacked her with a
wooden mallet
The young man said he struck her
over the head three times killing
her instantly he bellows
Charlton said he then placed the
body In a trunk which he threw Into
the water
While Charlton was being sweater
he became
under the third degree
infuriated and drawing a revolver
tried to shoot Chief of Police haycs
He was disarmed and a few minutes
later confessed the crime
The police were watching for tho
arrival of the steamer Deutschland
this afternoon as it had been report
ed that Charlton sailed en that
steamer Some officers however
were sent to watch the docking of tUo
Princess Irene Three of them took
ip positions on the pier where they
could watch everybody leaving the
ncscl
I Pup officers had a description of
Cliarltoii and when they saw a man
resembling him leave the ship they
placed him under arrest
Captain Scot the brother of Mrs
Charltou who had come to Hobokon
J r today1 to aid the Ilohuiaiupollcc in
1 Identifying the suStJfct fronPrtTi
J utschland vas summoned to the
pier when Charlton was ai rested
Caplaln Scott took ono glance at the
prisoner and Immediately recognized
him as Charlton In the meantime
tie patrol wagon had been summoned
from the station house and the pris
oner with the three detectives nnd
Captain Scott was hurried to head
quarters
Charlton traveled Under the name
of Charles W Coleman of Omaha
though the name appeared on the
passenger list as John Coloman
The accused was utterly broken In
spirit after his arrest and it was ap
parent ho had lost much weight on
his flight from the scene of the
crime
Charlton denied flatly when placed
under arrest by the detectives that
ho was the man wanted and took the
officers to his cabin to provo that
I his name was Coleman Us assort
ed that he lived In Omaha and had
never heard of Charlton or his wife
When asked If he could produce
letters to prove that he had received
any money under the name of Cole
man the joung man said he could
young
his
not A search was made through
clothing and effects but the officers
faHel to find a single letter or pa
per bearing his name
Charltons trunk was found on the
pier C and that bore the single Initial
Satisfied that they had the right
man the officers with Cbarlton se
curely manacled started for pollco
headquarters It was then Charltou
began to break down for he wavered
and almost fell and tho detectives
had to let hll sit on the pier to re
cover himself Charlton turned whit
and suffered an attac kof nansuau as
tho officers carried him to the patrol
wagon
Capt Ccolt brother of Mrs Charl
ton materially assisted the officers
materlal I
In effecting the capture of Charlton
whose careful description he hadgiv i
en Captain Scott took ono glance ac
the prisoner and said Thats Charl
ton
tonCapt Scott hud obtained a ten
days leave of absence Irom his post
t an dwas watching all Incoming ships
WIthin half an hour after llsarrest I
the following I
Charlton had signed folowIng
statement
J My wife and I lived happilly to
gether She was the best woman In
tho world to me hut sho had an un
governable temper So had I We
frequent quarreled over the most
trivial matters and her language to
me was frequently so foul that I
knew sho did not know the meaning
of It
The nigh I struck her she had
been quarreling with me She was
In the worst temper I had over seen
her In I told her it she did not cease
1 would leave her and put a stop
to It Sho stopped for a little while
and started again
I took a mallet which 1 had ijfied
to do household repairs and struck
her three times I thought site wni
dead I put the body In a truuK in
which I also threw the mallet 1
About 12 oclock that night T
brought the trunk to my houseand
dragged It down to a sniall pier and
throw It overboard 1 left the follow
ing night nnd wont to Como and
from here to Gonoa where I took
tho steamer Irene three days later
The room where I killed her was
an outdoor sleeping apartment
Signed Poner Charltou
J
Father Hurres Away I
Washington June 2Pnul Char I
b
ton law officer of the bureau of in
sular affairs of tho war department
an soon as ho hoard that n mn said
to be his son Porter Charlton had
been arrested left bin office In Uif
war department and departed from
the city presumably for Hoboken
THREE flRlS
WUO ARE
VISER
The three prottty HtfJo damsels
giving their names a Teddy Klloy
Frances Williams and Billy Burk
who donned boys clothes last night
and attempted to hoard an outgoing
freight train for Reno Nevada but
were thwarted in their plans by the
bib policemen who took them to jail
wore released this morning by Chief
Browning and told to go homo and be
good girls
By tho time they wore called Into
the chiefs ofllco today tho novelty of
their adventure had worn away and
tho acrlous side was before thorn
I Tho young man Earl Leslie vho
seemed t be coaching the glrla still
languishes in jail and In nil likeli
hood he will be charged wIt vagran
cy The officers blamo the boy for
Inveigling the girls Into the position of
i trying to be romantic and the girls
trng
themselves feel that he shoull be
punished
I
IIARION NLMINATED
BY ACCLAMATION
DATON Ohio Juno 22Th Demo
1 oratic party of Ohio goes into the
state campaign this fall with Judson
Harmon CIB its candidate for governor
and president The Democratic state
convention today endorsed him In the
1 strongest terms for the presidency
after i had renomlnated him for
by acclamation
governor
nccamalon
I Tho belief hold by many delegates
I that the governor will resign shortly
term
after tho beginning of his new
bsnnng
I In order to become candidate before
the next Democratic national conven
tion waR voiced by former Governor
James E Campbell Tho exGovernor
was Introducing Atlee Pouuoreno of
Canton tho nominee for lieutenant
Bovcrnor
goverorNeblous Promotions
Hero Is the man ho said who
will bo lieutenant governor tor six
months and Uio gov rrO a yertr
and six months both o the < K nebul
Otis promotions however wore ac
complished against the earnest pro
tests oi their beneficiaries
Governor Harmon made a futile re
quest of the resolutions committee
that they omit the presidential en
dorsement resolution saving that bo
Is making his political fight on state
Issues and does not want national issues
suos Injected In to the coming cam
pain He was told that it could not
be prevented
Atlee Pomercne who himself was n
candidate against Harmon for the
nomination two years ago almost angrily
grily demanded that ho be not com
pelled to make the sacrifice a he
termed It of accepting the nomina
I tion for second place Although his
name was not placed in nomination
he received nearly enough votes on
tho first ballot to nominate him Ho
formally withdrew but on the second
ballot beforo the roll call was com
pleted the nomination was made un
namous After conference with his
friends ho announced he would accept
cept
ceptTho
The proposition to endorse n can
didate for United States senator
which was suggested by William J
Bryan was defeated receiving but
251 out of the lOOfl voles The sen
atorial indorsement plan has ben
successively defeated in the state
centrl committee tho rules commit
tithe resolutions committee
tee a loluUona commitee
A move of great importance In
Ohio was made by the convention
when it endorsed the proposal for n
constitutional convention a question
which wH b voted upon by the peo
ple this fall
Tho following Is the ticket nomi
tho with
nated to make campaign wih
Governor Harmon
Lieutenant governor Atleo Pome
reno Canton
Judge of tho supreme cout
Maurice U Donahno of Now Lexing
ton and James Johnson Springfield
Attorney general Timothy Sho
gnu Yellaton
Secretary of statcOhnnIo IL
Graves Oalsharbor
Treasurer D s Creamer St
Clairsvillo
I
I
JOHNSON IN
MORE TROUGH
SAN FRASJCISCO Juno 22For a
time Into today it appeared that one
of tho principals In the July S battle
at Reno would ho missing because
Jack Johnson refused to bo arrested I
for exceeding the speed limit In his j
racing automobile
Johnson told Mounted Policeman
Lewis that lio could only arrest his l
dead body but when Lewis with thn
asolfalonco of two other patrolmen
battered down the door or the room
which the champion had locked him
self the fighter Tiurrendercd as meekly
a any ordinary violator of the specil
te apl
regulations
Johnson had been down town secur
ing transportation for the
trnnlforlUou te members
of his camp and wan speeding for his
quarters at what Lewis claimed as
a mHe clip when tho latter Ul <
tempted to halt him Johnson laughed
derisively at Iowis and shouting On
yqjirTvay uust kid was lost in a cloud i
USt
j
w
mIir

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