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The Calhoun chronicle. [volume] (Grantsville, W. Va.) 1883-1984, January 26, 1922, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85059591/1922-01-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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PHDFESSIONAL CARDS
A. E. Kenney
LAWYER
GRANTSVILLE - - W. VA.
LORENZ C. HAMILTON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Prosecuting Attorney.
Grantsville • • West Virginia
Elliott Chenoweth Robert F. Kidd
Grantsville, W. Va. Glenville, W. Va.
CHENOWETH & KIDD
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
GRANTSVILLE WEST VIRGINIA
Practice in all the Courts of the State.
Citizens’ Phone. L. K. Phone.
Bruce Ferrell
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
GRANTSVILLE WEST VIRGINIA
A. G. MATHEWS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Bank of Grantsville Building
GRANTSVILLE WEST VIRGINIA
BEE HOPKINS^
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW AND JUSTICE
OF THE PEACE
Collections a Specialty.
MINNORA - - WEST VIRGINIA
J. A. Morford
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office in Bank of Grantsville Building
GRANTSVILLE, WEST VIRGINIA
All calls promptly answered.
dr! ray morford
DENTIST
Office In Bank of Grantsville Building
Citizens’ Phone in Office
and Residence.
GRANTSVILLE WEST VIRGINIA
DR. H. A. PRICE
DENTIST
619j/2 MARKET STREET
PARKERSBURG, W. VA.
Dr. L. A. Hicks
Veterinary Physician and Surgeon
Citizens’ Phone.
Calls Answered Promptly.
CHLOE.W. VA.
COUNTY
DIRECTORY
OFFICERS
Judge Circuit Court, W. H. O'Brien,
Ripley, W. Va.
Clerk Circuit Court, L. L. Ferrell,
Grantsville, W. Va.
Prosecuting Attorney, I.orentz C.
Hamilton, Grantsville. W. Va.
President County Court, C. P. G.
Haught, Sycamore, W. Va.
Commissioners County Court, C. A.
Witt. Grantsville, W. Va., and R. A.
Board, Cremo, W. Va.
Clerk County Court, S. T. Waldo,
Grantsville, W. Va.
Sheriff, George A. Richards, Grants
ville. W. Va.
Assessor, Creed Yoak, Millstone. W.
Va
Surveyor, Dwight Shock, PennBboro,
W. Va.
Superintendent Free Schools, T. C.
Cain, Bighend, W. Va.
TERMS OF COURT
Circuit Court, third Tuesday in
April, August and November.
County Court, first Monday in Jan
uary, April, July and November.
Do You Need Any
OB PRINTING
Today?
|If So, Send or Phone
Um Your Order NOW
i
If you believe in home
trade— in a home newspaper
— in boosting your town —
advertise in this paper
We can also do your job
work quickly and satisfactorily
mill itufr.vik, »i.
You Say You Can’t j|
Advertise?
That's what others have
said and all of a sudden
found some competitor
was doing what they
thought they couldn't do.
And getting away with it.
Get the bulge on your
competitors by telling
your story in an attractive
manner so it will be read.
You'll get the results.
We Are Anxious to Help
IMPROVED
ROADS
WAR SUPPLIES FOR HIGHWAYS
So Far Approximately $150,000,000
Worth of Surplus Material Has
Been Distributed.
(Prepared by the United States Department
of Agriculture.)
Approximately $150,000,000 worth of
surplus war materials, turned over by
the War department to the Depart
ment of Agriculture, were distributed
through the bureau of public roads to
the vurious states for road-building
purposes up to November 1 last.
Under the Wadsworth-Kahu bLll this
surplus war material is sent to the
states with the sole provision that It •
be used only for road-building pur
poses. A vast accumulation of ma
chinery. equipment, supplies and mo
tor vehicles that was to have been
used In France has thus been diverted j
to a useftil peace-time purpose.
Included in the supplies distributed |
among the states are 27,108 motor
vehicles, mostly trucks; 172 locomo- 1
tives of various sizes; 25,000 gross
tons of rails; more than 4.500.000
pounds of powder; and nearly 10,000 j
tons of TNT.
A compilation showing total deliv
eries of war material to the various '
states up to July 1, lust, places (lie
value of machinery, equipment and
supplies so delivered at $30,048,779; of ;
motor vehicles, $74,730,568; and of
spare parts, at $11,731,424. The total
value of deliveries to the states up to
that date was $117,110,771. That tig- |
tire did not Include material1 to the
value of approximately $11,000,000,
which was retained by the Department
of Agriculture, largely for forest road
i
Army Sectional Bridge Erected Over
Davidson River, Plsgah National
Park.
work, which Is not done by the states.
Also, It is believed that the states have
received, in addition to the amount
above mentioned, approximately $5,
000,000 worth of material shipped by
the War department from the various
army camps and not reported by the j
states as delivered.
The value of deliveries of surplus
war material for road-building pur
poses to the states is in detail us fol
lows :
Alabama .$ 2,587,740
Arizona . 2,041,401
Arkansas . 2,025,000
California . 8,687.500
Colorado . 2,627,640
Connecticut . 643,500
Delaware . 412^600
Florida . 1,483,900
Georgia . 4,271.600
Idah<> . 1.474,000
Illinois . 5.462.000
Indiana . 2,942.920
InM . 2.871,000
Kansas . 2,691,600
Kentucky . 2,011,900
I*ouliilana . 1,472,100
Maine . 973.500
Maryland . 1,066.160
Massachusetts . 899,800
Michigan . 4.648,320
Minnesota . 3,190,100
Mississippi . 3,273,320
Missouri . 3.669!%t0
Montana . 2,400,400
Nebraska . 3,847,660
Nevada . 1,182,300
New Hampshire. 412,500
New Jersey. 1,657,900
New Mexico. 2,133,440
New York. 6.919.520
North Carolina. 3,003.920
North I>akotA. 1.447,360
Dhio . 4,194,900
Oklahoma . 2,112,000
Oregon . 1,662,000
Pennsylvania . 4.384,600
Hhode irland. 229,900
South Carolina. 1,768,820
South Dakota. 2.3*S,900
Tennessee . 3.156,500
Texas . 7,101,240
Utah . 1,333.500
Vermont .. 529.100
Virginia . 2,990.400
Washington . 1.391.500
West Virginia. 2,251,400
Wisconsin . 3,942,000
Wyoming . 1.230,900
Total .$117,110,751
Sign* to Guide Motorist*.
Throe wordl#»ss signs to guide mo
torists have boon adopted for Massa
chusetts highways. Hanger points are
marked h.v 111r**#* diagonally parallel
lines. nn Intersecting road by n T laid
on its side find n eross. The warn ini's
will be plnced 20) fort from the points
Indicated,
Work in Pennsylvania.
Pennsylvania constructed (IIS miles ,
of modern durable type highways this |
year, breaking the world's record.
Money Spent in Missouri.
Approximately $f»,oo0,000 was spent j
by Missouri during the first nine !
months of 1921 <»n the const net Ion of I
highways, under federal nnd state aid I
work, according to a state highway |
bulletin.
Plan Maximum Quietness.
Recause street noise Interferes
with the health of persons who must
work with their brains, highway en
| glneers in New York are planning
i pavements that will assure a maximum
1 o? Quietness
CRAMPS, PAINS
ANDBACKACHE
St. Louis Woman Relieved by
Lydia EL Pinkham’s Veg
etable Compound
St. Louis, Mo.—“I was bothered
With cramps and pains every month and
fmmmillimmmilu-'? tockache and
w 5V w u^u aa &
could not work. My
mother and my
whole family alwa 3
took Lydia E. Pink
ham’s Vegetable
Compound for such
troubles and they
induced me to try it
and it has helped me
very much. 1 don't
have cramps any
* ■ aiimrc, auu 1 can ao
tty housework all through the month.
I recommend your Vegetable Compound
to my friends for female troubles.”—
Mrs. Della Scholz, 1412 Salisbury
Street, St. Louis, Mo.
Just think for a moment. Lydia E.
Pinkharp’s Vegetable Compound has
been in use for nearly fifty years. It is
prepared from medicinal plants, by the
utmost pharmaceutical skill, and supe
rior methods. The ingredients tnus
combined in the Compound correct the
conditions which cause such annoying
symptoms as had been troubling Mrs.
Scholz. The Vegetable Compound exer
cises a restorative influence of the most
desirable character, correcting the trou
ble in a gentle but efficient manner.
This is noted, by the disappearance, one
after another, of the disagreeable
symptoms.
LADIES—M E MILL START YOU In an ex
clualve l.usln--s-i If you will handle our Roods
.MEYERS HAND PAINTED CHINA CO.
Rox 423 - - Atlantic City, X. .J
AT THE FIRST SIGN
OF A COLD^USE
CASCARAI0 JOUININE
Demand red bei heart*! ]
Bill’s pactrall and slfaatar*.
W. H. KILL COMPANY. DETROIT
TOO
LATE
Death only a matter of short time.
Don't wait until pains and aches
become incurable diseases. Avoid
painful consequences by taking
COLD MEDAL
The world's standard remedy for lddney,
liver, bladder and uric acid troubles—the
National Remedy of Holland since 1696.
Three sizes, all druggists.
Look for the name Cold Medal on weiy box
and accept no imitation
PALMER’S
LOTION
A HOUSEHOLD
NECESSITY FOR
BURNS. BITES. CUTS.
ECZEMA AND
ITCHING SKIN AND
SCALP TROUBLES
ALL DRUGGISTS.
GUARANTEED BV
SOLON PALMER
NEW YORK
PALMERS LOTION
’ REMOVED ALL MV PIMPLES
>AND CLEARED MV COMPLEXION
FLORIDA
BY SEA
BALTIMORE TO
JACKSONVILLE
Fare
°%«ay Round Tri*>
130.96 165.73
Meals and Stateroom Accommodations on
Steamer Included. Extra charges for
promenade deck rooms.
Steamer Every Tuesday and Friday.
Make Reservations Early.
Merchants & Miners Trans. Co.
Pier 3—Pratt St. Tel. St. PauMMO
FINANCIAL
W9.88 bay* City of Wwraaw, Poland. Municipal 10.000
Mark Bond These bond* pay &% Interest on face
ralun and are a lien on the entire municipal prop
erty of Warsaw which haa a pre-war valuation of
approximately *i« 000.000. With expected rise la
Kuropean exchange following International Heo
nornlc Conference these bonds shonld be worth many
times their present value. For literature and full par
ticulars aditres*. FORKION SBCUHITIBS DHPART
MHNT, Suite £06. 612 Fifth Avenue. New York City.
£
PARKER’S
HAIR BALSAM
Remove* hanaru If-Stops 11 air Falling
Restores Color and
Baanty to Cray and Faded Hale
•Or. and |l mat Pruyctsta.
JTlseo^Chrrn^lVkj^llat^tiogtjejJfjT
HINDERCORNS Removaa Oorna, OaJ
looaea. etc., stops all pain, ensurea eomfortto tha
IS*. walking ea*v. ISo. by mall or at )iru>
gitla. HI SCO* Chemical Works, Fatohogoa, N.
5usl Out — Orrateat family entertaining de
vice In the world Oreat demand Happiness
could not tie complete without one price. It
Bernard Tllankman, 335 Broadway.New York
He Had Heard It All.
“What's ln^'ii coining off here?’’ de
manded Cnnstnble Sara K. Hiackput
ter of Petunia, hurrying up after the
accident.
“Hlanklty blank ! Mllnklty-blank !—”
returned the enraged motorist.
"Thnt kind o’ tnlk won’t gpt you
nuth’n’, young feller! I've been rhlef
of pollrp here for twenty-two years
and been cussed for everything on
forth find In the waters under the
earth by hundreds of gents older and
nio. ex|ierlenr»-(} than you nre. Now,
shut up and tell me what's the mat
ter.’’—Kansas City Star.
Tin Plate Publicity Planned.
American tin plate manufacturers
are planning to Inaugurate a country
wide publicity campaign designed to
etdarge the uses of their product.
Another “Why?"
Another expedition Is out searching
for the North Polo, but It hasn’t ex
plained why.
mm
f # k' Morning __
KeepYour Eyes
Cl««n - Clear Haatthy
IHt* for from *y» Car* Bocfc Murln* Co.OiImm.UU
w N. U., PITTSBURGH, NO. 3-1922.
^3$SS3SSSS^SS33S33SS3333<3$S$$S»
1
A BLUE UMBRELLA
By AGNES G. BROGAN
' Vm
Copyright. 1*22. Western S>w*f>aper Union.
It was a blue silk umbrella, with a
lovely white bracelet handle, and a
Blue B engraved on the white knob.
I have to be very careful In describ
ing It, for this Is part of the story.
Our new professor at college is al
ways harping on “preparedness.” and
what a great advantage It Is to suc
cess. Well, my thinking of carrying
the blue umbrella that day when it
looked like rain, wasn’t any advantage
my success; but that begins the
story.
Mother sent me down to Bailie’s
for some tuffets to match the dress
she was going to wear to the reception
that the faculty were giving for <»ur
noted professor; I hurried along, pre
ferring to walk the short distance,
and when I met Nan Paige on the way
we stopped first, and had a sodu. And
Nnn told tne of the books this Pnv.
fessor Laldlaw had written on th*
deepest subjects, and how his picture
had been In magazine*, and everything,
and I was Just wild to see him. She
suid that he looked like anyone’s
favorite movie actor, pod was nn Idol
with the women wherever he went.
But Nan said he was stern, too, and
would not stand fo.* nonsense or
familiarity from his pupils, and we
had better Impress him with our dig
nified behavior.
Nnn isn’t very dignified herself, but
I can be, on occasion. So as I walked
the rest of the way alone to Bailie’s.
I decided that I would ask mother to
let me wear the plain navy blue dress,
which makes me look so old.
Aunt Betty Is critical where men
are concerned, and is always asking
who they are, and what they have ac
complished, until Janet ik often pro
voked. regarding her own young men.
Janet has plenty of beaus. And
mother says that Aunt Betty might
have married times over, if she had
not been so particular. Aunt Betty Is
awfully pretty and jolly. But there
I stood waiting for that taffeta to he
wrapped up, and down came a shower,
outside the street grew suddenly dark,
and I was glad that I had brought my
umbrella. I drew It with some diffi
culty from before a man who stood
beside me at the counter, and stared
reprovingly at him. when he failed to
hpg my pardon. And as I was hurry
ing down the nlsle that mnn came
after me. This time lie did say "Beg
pardon,” but it was with the nffrontery
of claiming the umbrella, or trying to
claim It. for I certainly did not give
It up to 1* I in. “Beg pardon.” he began,
“you have takpn m.v umbrella, under n
mistaken impression, no doubt, that It
Is yours."
“Mistaken?” I asked disdainfully,
“I certainly know my own blue silk
umbrella. You will notice the letter
B; my name begins with Ik” The
man stood still and stared at me dis
concertingly.
“Notwithstanding the fact of your
name beginning with B,” he said, “the
umbrella is mine.”
A crowding female with two Jostling
hoys at her side came between us
Just then, and 1 fairly lnughed back
at the Imposter over their beads, then
to save trouble and publicity, I ran
out of the store, and down the
street and on to a street car; and
it was not until I had handed In my
fare that I took time to realize how
brazen that man had been. And be
was a nice looking man ton, frith fine
features that any physiognomist would
say placed him above petty crime.
When I took the tnfTeta into mother.
Aunt Betty was there, and Janet, and
they were all talking excitedly nbout
the evening’s guest of honor, whom
Aunt Betty called “a young man of
sterling character.”
Nan had spoken more concerning
(his eyes. Which reminded me of
what very nice eyes the thief bad.
For even if It's only an umbrella you
are trying to steal, you’re a thief. And
by and by when I’d got on my
second best dress, I started down the
stair. Aunt Betty was going to have
one of her friends In to dinner. And
then I stood stock-still on the stair.
For she was tnlklng to her friend In
the hall that minute, and he was my
umbrella man. Yes, really. And I
couldn't help hearing him apologize
to her for not bringing back an um
brella she’d loaned him, and which,
he Insisted, had been pulled right out
from under his arm in a store. And
all nt once I felt chilly; for the reason
that Janet had given me a blue silk
umbrella for Christmas was because
I had so admired Aunt Betty’s, and
Aunt Betty Bnlsle.v’s name, naturally,
begins with a M.
So there F stood, mystified, yet be
ginnlng miromfortahly to see daylight.
For It occurred to me that perhaps
I had forgotten to take my umbrella
with ine to Halite's store, which upon
i Inter Investigation proved to be true.
■ The two silk umbrellas with their
whiu* bracelets stood side py njde In
my (lothespress. And when I came
I gulltl|y Into the dining room, you may
i fancy my next humiliation. ‘ Flab's,"
said Aunt Hetty, "let me Introduce you
1 to M*\ I.aldlaw, the new college pro
fessor."
WtJI, I don’t know how I «»ver
should have come out if it had not
blessedly happened that Professor
, Lnldlnw Is to he one of onr family.
He’s on gaged to Aunt Hetty. And tie
really was a good sport, and left me
out of his explanations when he was
[ able nter to return Aunt Hetty’s
propei ty. Hut, ns Nan says, It was all
perfectly thrilling.
The Prattle of Children,
Four-yenr-old John W., when visit
ing hU grandparents, was taken to
Sunday se| ool. The lesson of the day
was the ever Interesting story of "Dan
iel in the Lion's I»en” anil the teacher
presented It In a manner to keep the
Interest of all the children. Hut dur
ing one of the Intervals John W. spoke
up. saying. "Yes, and I saw six little
ptgs at the very same circus."
Fifty-three railway cars were re
quired to carry the furniture of the ex
fcaisar to Holland’
LAND OF WEALTH
Potentialities of Western Canada
Abundantly Proved.
Prizes Taken at International Live
Stock Exposition Show What Land
Is Capable of Producing.
Forty years ago the first sale was
made of lands acquired by the Cana
dian Pnclflc railway. This Is but a
short span In the lives of many, and
there are those who look back upon
that period ns It being but of yester
day. Yet when one glances back It is
to marvel at the accomplishments of
that period. One of the most striking
of these Is the progress that has been
made In Western Canada since that
day, forty years ago. when nn official
of the railway placed his signature to
the document that gave possession to
the new owner of a section of land.
This was the first sign of the wealth
that In time would be added to the
wealth of the world In forty years,
this single section of land being the
base upon which the future would be
built. The potential wealth was but
In emhryo; today It Is a big, living
reality. Among the many things that
reveal this, niny be seen the winnings
made by Western Canada exhibitors at
the International Live Stock show held
In Chicago In 3921. These were so
marked In their number ns to give to
the world—the American world—a
splendid ldf'n of the excellence of the
products of the farms of the new but
rapidly developing country lying to the
north of the International boundary
line.
-in*: icsuiis ui me exnmiuon snow,
according to the Manitoba Free Press,
that in live stock and grain exhlhlts
the three prairie provinces of Canada
made something like 150 winnings.
Every animal sent from the province
of Alberta won a prize. Exhibits In
cluded Shorthorn and Hereford cattle
and Percheron and Clydesdale horses.
An Alberta-bred heifer got fourth place
In a class of eighteen outstanding in
dividuals. In grain. Alberta made sim
ply an astounding record, securing the
sweepstakes for oats, and eight or nine
prizes before even the American ex
hibitors secured a placing, and while
the grand championship for wheat
went to Montuna, the prairie provinces
took 23 out of 25 possible placlngs.
The first prize for alfalfa seed was
awarded for seed grown at Brooks,
Alberta, In competition with 43 entries.
Alfalfa-growing in Western Canada
has been Increasing by leaps and
hounds, and this victory will give it
and file dairy Industry, which is al
ways linked with it, a further impetus.
In live stock classes alone Saskatch
ewan had sixty entries and took sixty
four ribbons.
The winning of the grand champion
ship for Clydesdale stallions by a
Saskatchewan horse, for the second
time In succession, was almost excep
tional. lie was bred on a Western
Canadn farm, fitted and prepared for
exhibition there, nnd able to win over
horses shown from the studs of men
who have unlimited money to spend
on the breeding and preparation of
their exhibits. This is proof positive
that the fnrmers of Western Cnnada
are not only in a position to breed
their own horse power, nnd that of a
very high quality, but to breed horses
that will be saleable in any market
of the world.
Manitoba takes Just pride In the fact
that a Percheron stallion, first In his
class nnd Canndlan-bred champion,
was bred by Vance, of Crandall, Mani
toba. Manitoba took 04 places outside
of the grnln exhibits.
When all Is said and done, the real
triumphs nre the wins of both live stock
nnd grains actually produced In the
great Canadian provinces.
Commenting upon the enterprise of
agriculturists of Western Canndn In
sending exhibits to the International
Live Stock exposition at Chicago, the
New York Herald in n recent Issue
said: "Western Canadn is encouraging
diversified farming in a way certain
to bring an increased flow of dollars
into the pockets of agriculturists, who
at one time devoted their energies ex
clusively to the raising of grain crops."
—Advertisement.
Cotton Culture 300 Years Old.
The culture of cotton in the United
States dates back Just 300 years, the
first cotton seed having been planted
In Virginia as an experiment in
1021.
f
New Yeast Vitamon
Tablets Round Out
Face and Figure
With Rrm, Healthy Flash. Increase Energy and Beautify the Com*
ptexior. Easy and Economical to Take—Results Quick
Thin or run-down folks
who want to quickly get
some good. firm. solid fleah
on their hones, fill out the
hollows and sunken cheek*
with strong, healthy tis
sues, and build up in*
HOllOW
&4EEKS
Skinny jaw
SCBAWVY neck
eukt
cuLzr- '»
CEKCtnA
SNCHX-DIRS
llble PV Tt haniihM nimnlM Vtnll. .Vi—-*>
rrr-ai>o<l energy and vital
ity should try taking a
little Mastin'a VITA
MON with their meal*.
Mas tin's VITAMON is •
tiny tablet containing
highly concentrated yeast*
vitamincs as well as tha
two other still more im
portant vitamins# (Fat
Soluble A and Water Sol
the nerves, builds up the body with firm flesh and tissue and often completely
rejuvenates the whole system. Ouick, gratifying results. No gas caused.
4 P * drawn looking or lack energy and anduranot
Uke Mastins V1TAMON—two tablets with every meal, then weigh and
measure yourself each week and continue taking Mastin s VITAMON regularly
until yoii arc satisfied with your gain in weight and energy.
vt Wh.U® ,th® «',Inarkahl* health-building value of Mastin'*
Vl-IA-MUN has been clearly and positively demonstrated in cases of lack of
energy, nervous troubles, anemia, indigestion, constipation, skin eruptions, poor
complexion and a generally weakened physical and mental condition, it should
not h* k., -l ~ L—ing their weight increased to normal.
You can get Mastin'* VITAMON
Do not accept imitations or substitutes,
tablets at all good druggists.
VITAMON
Wt ORIGINAL
AND
CCMUINL
iT»Abi?ET<S
VtAST
VlTAMINt
TADLC.T
Arc Positively Guaranteed
to Put On Firm Fleshy
Clear the Skin and Increase
Energy When Taken With
Every Meal or Money Back
Isn't MASTIN'S isn tVITAMON
DISTEMPER AMONG HORSES Successfully Treated With
Spohn’s Distemper Compound
At this time of year horses are liable to contract contagious
diseases—DISTEMPER, INFLUENZA. COUGHS and COLDS As
a preventive against these, an occasional doss of “HPOIIN’H’*
la marvelously effective. As a remedy for cases already suffer
ing. “hPOlUi’S" Is equally effective. Give It as a preventive.
Don’t wait. «0 cents un<l $1.20 per bottle at drug atoms.
81*0 IIN MED it AD COMPANY GOSHEN, INDIANA
! r.i tu:i* i
“Didn’t Zeke Dawdle get religion
when the Rev. HI Roarer held his last
revival In Chiggersvllle?"
‘,Yo8,,• said ’Squire Wltherhee, “Zolce
hit tli’ sawdust trull and had all th’
sisters cryln’ over him, hut I noticed
Mrs. Dawdle didn’t seein th’ least bit
wrought up. She says Zeke has been
gettln’ religion regularly for th’ past
20 years, but It never has taken
hold of him strong enough to make
him support his family.”—Birmingham
Age-Herald.
MOTHER! MOVE
CHILD’S BOWELS WITH
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP
Hurry, mother! Even n sick child
loves the ’fruity” tuste of “California
Fig Syrup" und It never fulls to open
the bowels. A teaspoonful today may
prevent a sick child tomorrow. If con
stipated, bilious, feverish, fretful, luis
cold, colic, or If stomach Is sour,
tongue coated, breath had, remember a
good cleansing of the little bowels is
often all that Is necessary.
Ask your druggist for genuine “Cali
fornia Fig Syrup" which has directions
for babies and children of all ages
printed on bottle. Mother! You must
soy “California* or you may get an
Imitation fig syrup.—AdvertIsement.
Wrong Diagnosis.
Doctor—What you need to do, sir, is
to relax. You are overworking your
self. Too much work and worry will
send any man to his grave years be
fore his time. Remember that. Your
bruin is overworked. Now, Just what
Is your occupation?
I’atient—I am a member of congress.
Doctor—Let me examine your pulse
again ; 1 must have made a mistake.
Sublime and Beautiful.
One of the professors says Zulu
women are more beautiful than the
women of this country; but the pro
fessor’s announcement doesn’t settle
It. Beauty is a matter of personal
opinion. Home people think Airedale
dogs are pretty.
What A»-e We Coming To7
Knlcker—Now It is n debt holiday.
Rocker—Some day we shall have to
take a holiday.
Crepe Hanger.
“I>1<1 you call on poor nibbles at the
hospital and cheer him up?"
“I cnlled,” shId the tactless man,
“but I don't think I cheered him up,"
“What was the matter?"
“I'm no good nt carrying on a con
versation In a sick room. Ilelng at a
loss for something to say, I remarked
that a real estate firm was advertising
a bargain sale of cemetery lots."
SHE IS
“FULL OF PEP”
THEY SAY
She Is Good-Looking and Gay
and Is Always Ready for
a Good Time.
Why la a girl popular? Look around
and see what a good time the good
looking ones have all the time. Men
seek them out and ask them to parties,
dances and entertainments. And
notice that It is not the doll-face
type real men like most, but the red
blooded girl with “pep" and happy
good nature. Any girl who is tired
and languid and has a poor complex
ion and dull eyes can Improve her
condition and he far happier If she
will simply take dude's Pepto-Man
gan until she has put her blood lute
good condition. Red blood means
“full of life" and “full of life" usually
means happiness.
Try dude's Pepto-Mangan and see
how much better you feel. Doctors
have used It nearly thirty years for
weak, run-down people. It helps
them get well. Sold In both liquid aut
tablet form. Advertisement.
Innovation.
“I understand you have some sur
prising costumes for your musical
show."
“Yes." answered the manager. “Ws
are going to dress the show girls so
that nothing is visible above the
ankles."
It has to be admitted that conceited
people are often as valuable to society
ns modest ones.
Taste is a matter of
tobacco quality
We *tate it as our honest
belief that the tobaccos used
in Chesterfield are of finer
quality (and hence of better
taste) than in any other
cigarette at the price
LiggtU Gf Mytri To bate* C*.
9
Lower Prtcea
20 now 18c
10 now 9c
(Two 10’«—18c)
esterrield
CIGARETTES
Turkish and Domestic tobaccos—blended

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