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Cooper's Clarksburg register. [volume] (Clarksburg, Va. [W. Va.]) 1851-1861, December 24, 1851, Image 3

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Annual Report of the Sooretary of War. [
The Annual Report of the Hon. 0. M.
Conrad, Secretary of War, occupies four
columns of the National Intelligencer.?
It is a well written document, but as ma
ny of the foots connected with the move
ments of the army, whioh it specifies, have
heretofore been published, we must
limit ourselves to furnishing an abstract
of the more important recommendations
and suggestions whioh it makes.
The Secretary seta out with a column
and a half devoted to the subject whioh,
he says, has most engaged the attention
of the, Department during (he past year,
viz : t)ie defence of Texas. Now Mexico,
and tho Mexican Territory adjacent to
our oWn, against the incursions of the
neighboring Indian tribes. .These Indi
ans, it is remarked, unlike their race on
this' part of the continent, are actuated
not so much by hostility to the whites as
by motives of plunder. The Secretary
goes on to detail the steps taken to bring
these Indians to subjection, Congress hav
ing failed to authorize the raising of an
additional mounted regiment, as recom
mended, the regiment of mounted rifle
men on the Pacific was dispensed with
there, in view of Ihe supposed peaceable
character of the California and Oregon
Indians, and ordered to Texas. Several
outbreaks have, however, lately occurred
among these Indians, but treaties have
since been made with them. Chains of
military posts were nlso established by
the fifth Infantry from Arkansas west
ward into Texas, and in New Mexico the
same thing is being done by Col. Sum
ner.
A* post lias also been established at trie
junction of the Gila and the Colorado
and examination is i?> be mndi: by the l'u
eii ?: commander, a.- to the ptaeiicabili'y
of another atill higher up he (iihi. Thi.
i* all done looking ' I ;i practicable '
?*hk to '.i.e leli i?e?- of o.u own territory
hii i ci Mixieo. and the Sec re arv
, well remark^
I'hi Unied Siu.le* l.uvc thus endea
vored to fulfil. to their tullest extent, the
. obligations imposed upon them by their
la'e treaty with Mexico. It surely, was j
never contemplated that the entire expense
and responsibility of defending her terri
tory against these incursions should de
volve upon us. The language of the trea
ty 'Admits of no such construction, and, if
it did, it would require of us what it
would be obviously impossible for us to
perform. As the United States have no
right to station their troops within the
limits of Mexico, how is it possible for
them, entirely, to protect her against
tribes, most of whom occupy the vast de
sert lying between the two countries ?
All that we can do is to make common
eause with her ; to make her wrongs our
own ; to chastise, if possible, the tribes
by whom they are committed ; to compel
thom, whenever it-is possible to do so, to
make restitution of Mexican prisoners and
property ; and finally, in our treaties with
them, to guard the interests of Mexican
ci'izens as carefully as those of our own,
and to punish any viola ion of the one as
?eveieiy ? wi do ha o""'le o ! er. I i
manifest, fcjo, ihat wliaicvn et or s we
may make for the pro ee ion oi Mexico,
will not only be fruitless, bur absolutely
prejudicial, unless they are aided by cor
responding efforts on her part. " The
number of our military posts, the vigi
lance. activity, and courage of our troops,
all tend to drive these marauders from
our border towards that of Mexico, where
they can carry on their depredations with
almost certain impunity."
An idea too seems to have been abroad
among the people of Mexico, that this
Government was bound by its treaty with
Mvxico , to ind< mnify citizens of that
V"""1 ''v. who might sustain losses by dc
pt i ! . ion = of the livliaits, ami the (Secre
tary rays thai from information that has
? reached the Department, there can be no
doubt that, in some instances, tales of
, depredations have been invented with a
view of bringing ficticious claims for
damages against the Government.
It appears that the entire force station
ed on the Pacific amounts to only seven
hundred and thirty-six men. This force
is deemed entirely inadequate for protec
tion, particularly in Oregon, and the Gcn
cral-in-chief of the army, therefore, con
siders not only an additional regiment of
cavalry, but alto an increase in the rank
and file of the infantry and artillery as
indispensably ueccssary.
Ti'e < u ire number of men borne on tlie
i' '< 'f the nr?ny, amoun' to 10,538;
w.iich, according to the usual estimate,
will furnish ai i tie olive force of not more
tiiHu , ')00 mi n. When U is considered
ua- |!ii- ru.i.i force is scattered over a
iron ier of ?-e\e<ral thousands of miles in
ex.en , ?... intuiHoiency w.ii U> apparent.
Ihe report then goes on 10 -t ow >he
-causes which have produced the enorm
ous increase in the expenses of the army.
These causes principally, are?that near
ly one-half the army is stationed on our
remote frontier; the military posts are
removed far is the interior of the country,
from navigable rivers, or on the Pacific,
where they can only be reached by an
overland journey of hundreds of miles or j
? fc.v a sea voyage of thousands?and the
military posts, instead of being situate in a
productive section of country, as formerly,
are now, for the most part, where but
few supplies can be obtained.
The couai-quonce i,, that while In 1845
tho coat of transportation (of troopa
I?n"d'uP/>''e,) w"? , $130,053 52
In 1*50-51 it amounU>4 to 8,084,408 51
l .5? fcV"",r the co?t of forage wni 60,764 30 1
la,t,,r u wna . 1,287,327 91
sea 8reat increase in this last item ari
tionBii^ wnly from the causc8 jus' men
of anim*lUl- *ll? from thc Srcat increase
if." -hi Mr;d?"" i
.847 and in nt 1045' "mounted only to
Tho great distance whioh trooD8 h
??w t0 be transported, in JP,0 a j
from the several posts, is anotL? ifem
tending largely to swell the expense. j!
may be that the expense of the Quarter
master's and Commissary Departments
have been increased by mal-administra
tion on the part of the numerous agents;
?nd to ascertain the facts, a rigid scrutiny
fi?s been directed. The department has
?k^,0ns -? k?*" *'8 apprehensions in
je(j Parll*ular are not altogether unfoun
stwtemeHtH carefully prepared by
hfe different bureau, of the depar-m.nt
l ^fPP*"'ar' 'lft le irinrea'ied i xpen li ure*
i ? 1 Ce ul mg flom our IUjWjy ac_
Attention is called to the adequate ap
propriation made to the Quartermaster's
Department at the last session, which will
have to be supplied at the present session.
The Secretary, to carry out the wishes
of Congress, to reduce the expenses of
the army, has cut down the number of
enli*ted men in the ordinance department
to the original number of 260 from 687,
the number in service during the Mexi
can war. Six of the eight Light Artille
ry companies existing during the war,
have been dismounted. The original
number was four. Two of those dis
mounted, however, will be remounted so
soon as means arc^ provided. The num
ber of clerks and others fVom civil life,
employed in various capacities, has been
greatly reduced. The cultivation of farms,
by troops, at the frontier posts if success
ful, will also considerably reduce the pre
sent expenses. Various other reductions
too tedious to mention, have likewise
been made ; but the Secretary says it is
not to be disguised that a great laxity of
expenses and disregard of regulations ex
ists in the army?to remedy which, the
department, seconded by the superior of
ficers, has exerted itself, and which has
so far been successful that the Secretary
has the satisfaction to announce that the
estimates of the department for the next
fiscal year are considerably below the ex
penditures of the present and preceding
years.
Thn expenditures for the support of
the army for the fiscal year en
ding 30th Juno lust, were $9,060,268 58
The estimates for Iho next year ore 7,898,775 83
Showing a reduction of
$1,161,492 75
I '
is
There are some other measures of econ
omy which the department would have
carried out, had the aid of legislation not
been necessary to enable it to do so.
Authority is asked for the Executive
-o abolish useless arsenals ; and the pre
vious recommendation for power to enlist
nun specially as.teamsters again renewed.
Ihe removal of obstructions in the Red
lliver and the Kio Grande is also sugges
ted, as a matter of economy.
Hut whatever reductions Congress may
make, says the Secretary, the expenses
must continue to be enormous so long as
it is necessary that so large a portion of
our troops should be stationed on the
frontier. He therefore suggests that ev
ery facility and encouragement should be
aflorded to the formation of a local mili
tia, in which our new possessions, like all
the Mexican States, are very deficient?
On this subject, the Secretary remarks:
"As the first step towards the accom
phshment of this subject, I would recom
mend that the Executive be authorized to
distribute arms among the inhabitants.
I am fully persuaded that the advantages
that would result from the adoption of
this measure, in familiarising the people
with the use of arms, in inspiring them
with confidence, and in encouraging the
formation of militia companies, would
more than compensate for the trifling ex
pense that would attend it. The very
fact that the inhabitan s were known to
b. armed, would tend to in:imidate the
i In lians. The distribution should, of
| coiir-e, be made with such precautions as
would prevent their being sold or couvcr
! ted lo an improper use."
The Secretary is of opinion that policy
and humanity both require that we should
employ some other means of putting a
slop to these depredations than the terror
of our arms. We should trv the effect of
conciliatory measures. There is no doubt
that the Indians are frequently impelled
to commit depredations by despair and
hunger.
The Indians are often compelled by the
wlillUH to lunvu l??a wlual, fiHWUn
ishment to cattle and game, and seek re
futfu in arid plains and mountains. This
is particularly the case in Texas. The
United States, as the owners of the pub
lic domain, have always acted on the
principle that the aboriginal race had at
least a right of occupancy in the soil, and
when it was needed for settlement this
rig? hfts been extinguished by voluntary
sale. Texas, on the contrary, as the ow
ner of all the vacant lands within her
limits, acknowledges, it is said, no such
right; and she has, from time to time,
j taken possession of the territory occupied
by the Indians, laid it off into counties,
I and proceeded to survey and sell it.?
Nothing could be more calculated to alarm
and exasperate the Indians, and to bring
about collisions be w. en them and the
u tine ;e':lers, than t e adoption of this
jKMiej. Ilia' such has been and must
continue o be its consequence, there can
be no doubt. It would seem, therefore,
to be to he advan age of both Texas her
self and of the Uni'ed Slates, that these
lii'.lian.i snould be left in undisturbed pos
session of a small portion of her vast ter
ritory.
"Ihe Secretary, therefore, recommends
measures to be taken to furnish, for a se
ries of years, food and other necessaries
to such Indians as will abandon their pre
datory habits and cultivate the soil. Au
thentic information, recently received at
the Department, leads to the belief that
these tribes are far less numerous than
they are supposed to be. and he has no
doubt (laying aside considerations of hu
manity ) that it would be far less expen
sive to feed than to fight them.
The Military Academy, which the Sec
retary visited last summer, is highly com-'
mended. He also visited the national
armories at Springfield and Harper's Fer
ry, and says he cannot speak in terms of
too high praise of the order and regulari
^ th*' PreVR'} at those establishments,
and of the admirable economy with which
they are conducted;
The operations of the Bureau of Topo
graphical Engineers have been various
and important during the last year.
The survey of the northern lakes, and
various other surveys, are referred to as
in progress, and an increase in the num
ber of topographical engineers and com
missaries recommended.
The site for the military asylutn, near
aslungton, has been purchased, and as
innV M J*1? t't'cs ,iave been exam
carlio aPProved, the agreement will be
earned.,n,0 cffect
Ihe c a.* , .
list of disabled no? gating a retired
economy of .he
The act giving additional pay to the of
ficers and men stationed in California i,..
expired, and it ia recommended that 'it be
continued m force, and also be made to
include New Mexico.
fJh>L:rH olofes by referri*>g to the
fact that fho number of arms distributed
to the several States, under the act of 1808,
are based upon the number of their "ef
fective militiabut, in consequence of
the imperfect returns, the distribution is
very unequal. It is therefore recommen
ded that the number of free white male
inhabitants in the several States, between
certain ages, hereafter be the basis of
distribution.
0f the President iu Relation
* to the Promethus Aflair.
The following U the President's mes
sage, and the naval instructions, in the
matter of the outrage upon the^ Prome
thus sent into the Senate on Wednesday:
to the Senate of the United State,.-I
have received a resolution of the
adopted on the 12th instant, in the follow
'n^?eso!t#<f That the President of the
UnUedXtes be requested to communi
cate to the Senate, if not inconsistent with
the public interest, any .inf?raft"?"^
Executive may have received, respecting
the firing into and seiiure of the Ameri
can steamship Prometheus. by a "
i war in November last, near
Grevtown, on'the Muaquitto coast ; and
SKSS-? b*".br b/, t:
Fxecutive to ascertain the state of the
facts, and to vindicate the honor of the
C?InlInswer to the request. I submit to
the senate the accomp&nying extracts
from a communication addressed to th
Department of State, by Mr. Joseph L.
White as counsel of the American and
Atlantic and Pacific ship Canal Company.
SSLI'SJKS
.(ructions, such as the occasion seemed to
demand were immediately despatched to
Se Minister of the United Statesnn Lon
don Sufficient time has not elapsea io
'??'-??? :ir? rs-'". m5
at? 'the ' "p rose n't moment be inconsistent
with the public interest to communicate
those instructions. A communication,
however, of all the correspondence will
be made to the Senate at the earliest mo
ment at which a proper regard to the
n,:?r7?:isrn??ru?"
given to Commodore Parker, comman
ding the home squadron, acopyof which
SO far as they relate to the case of the
Promethus, is herewith transmitted to the
Senate. [Signed_] MillardEill*or*.
Washington, Dec, 15, 1851.
Sir : The President has learned that
?t> Finnish brig-of-war, the Express. ly
fng^n^he harbor of Sar.Juan de^Ntca
American ateanws^Promethus, while in the
aCt 0f,1ddPthlmetopTy'certain'demands
3 dtotemponcCgCesr, and claimed
by persons processing to act under the
?,.thoritv of the local Government, lhe
1 particulars of the.affair will be found in a
Fetter of the agent of the Promethus a^
1 ready published in the newspapets of New
I York, a copy of which is herewith trans
'""whatever may have been the merits of
the question between the captain of the
Promethus and the authorities of Nicara
gua. the United States acknowledge no
rights in the Government, or a \essel of
Great Britain to cxcrcise any police^ or
supervision over American? "ewJiMt'ves
sels in Nicaragua or elsewhere out of the
: Br0^htTonntranry. the first articles of the
Uo^^on^evweL O.e OuUcd
herBritanic Malesty, relative to
Sua signed April 19th, 1860 of which a
copy is?also enclosed, expressly excludes
each of the contracting parties fr0? 1
ming or exercising dominion over Nicara
gua? Costa Rica, the Musquito coast or
anv rart of Central America. You will,
therefore, as soon as the Saranac shall be
i n all respecU ready for sea. proceed ?n,
I her to San Juan ie Nicaragua, for the
; purpose of affording protection o A? '
jean commerce and interests on th at coast
against any such interference for the fa
tare, and on your arrival there. you will
notify the officer in command of her
Britanic Majesty's naval forces in that
harbor, or on that coast, of the object of
your visit; at the same time you wdl as
sure the local authorities of the port that
the United States will not justify the non
payment of any lawful and proper duties
on the part of their merchant vessels, and
that they desire the most fnendiy rela
tions with the Government of Central
America, and will ?
their part the stipulations of the treat) re
ferred to. ^ * ? * * *
I I am, very respectfully, your ob't ser
VRIlt Will. A. Graham.
To Commodore F. A. Parker, Comman
ding U. S. Home Squadron, 1 ensaco
la.
Lieutenant Watkin's Proposal to
Explore Africa.
This young gentleman, a native of Vir
ginia, but who has been for several years
on the African coast, submitted some
months ago to the honorable Secretary of
the Navy, a proposition to explore the
African rivers which enter Jhe ocean
within the republic of Liberia, in the hope
of making discoveries of great interest to
science, to commerce, and to humanity.
Lieutenant Watkins is intimately acquain
ted with the settlements and people of Li
beria, has become in some measure inu
red to the climate of Africa, has studied
the dispositions and habits of the native
tribes, visited different points along more,
we believe, than two thousand miles of
the coast, and in his self possession, cool,
good judgment, winning manners, as well
as in the ardor of his zeal in the great en
terprise in which he desires to engage,
! we discern the best qualifications for suc
cess. We are gratified to know that bis
plan meets with interest and favor among
the high officers of our Government.
Lieutenant Watkins, if authorized to;
proceed under the authority of our Gov
ernment. will find many intelligent citi
zens of Liberia ready to accompany him,
men thoroughly acclimated, who have al
ready penetrated some two or three hun
dred miles into the interior, and are ac
quainted with many of the principal chiefs
who govern territories bordering on that
Republic. We trust that the views of
Lieutenant Watkins will be promptly met
by our government, that he will be aided
by one or more small steamers, and coa
bled to go forth with each volunteer lovers
of science, such supplies of all kiuds, and
such means and attendants, as may con
duce to insure his success. An expedi
tion of this character will bring to light
information of great value, prove of essen
tial benefit to Liberia and the colored
race, and reflect high honor upon the
American Government and people.
Result in the State.
Below we give a table of the vote for
Qovemor, thus far received, whi?h is as
nearly correct as we can bow make it.?
It shows that Johnson's majority is 8,146
?and thirty counties to hear from.
Accomse.
Albemarle,
Alexandria,
Amelia,
Amhvit.
Appomattox,
Augu*U,
Barbour,
Bath,
Bedford,
Berkeley,
Botetourt,
Brooke and Hanoock,
Brunswick,
Buckingham,
Campbell,
Caroline,
Charles City,
Charlotte,
Chesterfield,
Clarke,
Craig,
Culpeper,
Cumberland,
Dinwiddle,
Elizabeth City,
Essex
Fairfax,
Fauquier,
Floyd,
Fluranna,
Franklin,
Frederick.
Gilea,
Gloucester,
Goochland,
Greenbrier,
Greene,
Greensville,
Halifax.
Hampshire,
Hanover,
Hardv,
llarnaon
Henrico,
Henry,
Highiati.!.
Isle of Wight.
JetFei.-on,
Kanawha,
King George,
King William,
King and (Jucen,
Lancaster.
Lewis,
Loudoun,
Louisa,
Lunenburg,
Madison,
Marion,
Marshall, ,
Mecklcuburg.
Middlesex.
Monongalia,
Monroe.
Montgomery,
Morgan.
Nunscmond.
Nelson,
New Kent.
Norfolk County,
Northampton.
Northumberland,
Nottoway,
Ohio,
Orange,
Page.
Pendleton,
Pittsylvania.
Pleasants.
Powhatan,
Preston.
Princess Anne,
Prince Kdwurd,
Prince George,
Pulaski,
Putnam,
Randolph,
Kappaliannock,
Richmond,
Kitchio,
Roanoke,
Rockbridge,
Rockingham,
Shenandoah,
Southampton,
Spotsylvania,
StutFord,
Sussex,
Taylor,
U?M.hur,
Warren.
Washington,
Wayne,
Wetzel,
Wood,
Wythe,
York.
Norfolk City,
Petersburg,
Richmond Citv,
Williamsburg',
Johnson.
64
1079
456
81
1?S
693
1807
800
185
1008
900
080
880
890
442
977
250
OS
871
664
846
834
614
00
878
148
208
00
944
00
417
414
1879
00
07
834
289
414
ioa
400
973
688
433
S95
UO
89S
415
608
864
00
2->4
150
125
23
465
645
226
406
611
400
00
514
15$
550
520
451
2S3
439
432
191
11T0
117
100
216
908
815
8S5
117
00
183
818
C50
8
27'J
150
2"4
O0
00
845
115
1012
2516
1S61
410
638
160
220
231
as
840
214
240
400
00
168
188
787
707
916
68
46.055
87,910
Scmcsaa.
00
1178
70S
00
00
#58
8019
00
19?
Ml
?77
465
00
186
453
1805
00
184 .
881
852
879
89
464
17
813
150
269
8
907
96
460
00
1116
160
00
158
919
78
86
00
788
588
811
5S8
90
298
188
96
938
1076 "
111
O0
00
00
268
1695
00
218
? 72
00
SO
274
105
00
703
624
290
600
617
155
928
173
00
176
1410
237
79
00
164
126
182
470
00
208
00
265
70
00
43.
45
156
00
1124
474
266
474
620
00
74
827
00
105
00
234
00
18 *
00
277
830
586
1753
44
37,910
Joliji.son'a mnj. 8.115
The following counties, which in 1848
gave Cass 592 majority, are yet fully to
hear from, viz : Alleghany, Boone, Brax
ton, Cabell, Carroll, Doddridge, Fayette,
Gilmer, Grayson, Jackson, Lee, Logan,
Mason, Matthews, Mercer, Nicholas, Pat
rick, Pocahontas, Prince William, Raleigh,
Russell, Scott, Smyth, Surry, Tazewell,
Tyler, Warwick, Westmoreland, Wirt,
and Wyoming.
The Whig papers report large gains in
Russel, Tazewell, <fec. For instance they
state that Russel, which in 1848 gave
Gen. Taylor 163 majority, now gives Sum
mers 8U0 majority. There must be some
mistake in this report.
Thus far we hear of 31 Democrats and
13 Whigs elected to the Senate; 6 dis
tricts yet to be heard from?and 73 De
mocrats and 52 Whigs elected to the
House ; 27 members yet to hear from.?
Of these twenty-seven the Democrats will
secure at least 12.?Richmond Enquirer.
Arrival or Lola Montm, Couktms
or Laxdsfkldt.?This woman, who has
obtained an unenviable notoriety through
out the world, on account of her romantic
disposition and singular conduct, arrived
this morning [Friday,] upon the Hum
boldt, accompanied by her agent, Mr.
Edward Willis, brother of N. P. Willis,
and several servants. She left l'aris to
meet the Humboldt, and travelled by way
of Calias and Dover to London, where she
remained two days to take leave of her
friends. She stated in conversation with
us that many bad things had been said |
of her by the American press, yet she is
not the woman she has been represented
to be ; if she were, her admirers, she be
lieves, would be still more numerous.?
She has been very lively during the whole
passage, and 'the does not appear to be
very favorable to Kossuth, whom she
thinks is an austere and distant man.
Lola is not a masculine woman, but
rather slim in her structure; she has a
face of great beauty, and a pair of black
Spanish eyes, which flash fire when she is
speaking, and make her, with the spark
ling wit of her conversation, a great favo- j
rite in company. She has black hair
which curls in ringlets by the sides of her
face, and her nose is of a pure Grecian
cast, while her cheek bones are high, and
give a Moorish appearance to her face.
[.V. ? Tribune.
a jewel of gold in a swine's mouth,
so is a fair woman without discretion.
The Tariff and the Farmers..
The Albany (New York) Knickerbock
er?a Whig paper?makes the following
just observations oil the eondition of far
mers under the present tariff:
Gkzeltand Ratmond.?From the non -
sense which we find in the Times and Tri
bune, we should certainly think that
Cireeley and Raymond, very seldom went
to market. Ta uphold their high tariff
notions, they make use of some of the
most preposterous arguments to be met
with out of Bedlam. The Times of Tues
day insists that the free-trade iniquity of
1846 is gradually impoverishing agricul
turalists, converting our farms into thistle
patches, and our planters into paupers.?
The checks with which their statements
are made shows that brass is a metal that
enters very largely into the composition
jf those who believe that" Lowell ia the
centre of the world, and Massachusetts
the rest of it." The Times insists that the
farmers are now being " mined." Let us
examine the market:
The price of beef during the past sea
son has been higher than it has Deen be
fore for twenty years. Daring the tariff
of 1842, pork was put up at Cincinnati
for two and a half and three cents a pound
?it is now worth four and a half and five
eents. Oats, under the tariff of 1842.
sold at twenty-eight cents a bushel?last
winter they brought forty cents. Barley,
which once sold in our market for fifty
four cents a bushel, is now selling in New
York at seventy-eight and eighty cents.
Poultry, twelve years ago, sold in Albany
at six and eight cents a pound?it now
sells for ten and twelve cents. Ham,
which sold under the tariff of 1842 at pri
ces varying from four to seven dollars a
hundred, is now worth from nine to eleven
dollars. With the exception of flour and
wheat there is not one dingle article which
our farmers sell that they do not get "first
rate prices" for: and when you take into
consideration the fall which has taken
place in the price of every article which
the agriculturalist buys, it is at least ques
tionable whether the raising of "bread
stuffs" is not as profitable to-day'as ever
it was. As we said before, the man who
thinks the farmer is being ruined^hould
just hang a basket on his arm, and visit
the market. An hour's experience is
worth all the philosophy that was ever
spun.
tw ' Do you retail things here ?,' ask
ed a green looking specimen of humanity,
as he poked his head into a store on
Main street, the other day. ' Yes,' was
the laconic reply. 'Well, I wish you
would re-tail my dog?lie had it bit off
about a week ago.'
JtW ' Oh ! my dear, how came you so
wet?' inquired an affectionate mother of
her son.
'Why, marm, one of the boys said I
darsen't jump into the creek, and by gosh,
I tell you I ain't to be dared.'
Northwestern Virginia Academy.
Thb D?siun of the Institution is to afford the
best possible opportunity for acquiring ? thor
ough English, Clastic*], Matbamcticnl. and Mer
cantile Education.
The Covrse or Instruction embraces every
branch taught either in the Common School or
College. Students will bo furnished with every
facility to prepare tbotnsclves for any of the pro
fessions or pursuits of life.
Tut OovsBNiiK.NT or lilt Academy is mild,
though firm? avoiding severity as far us possible,
and yot requiring order, industry, aud obedioueo,
as essential to success in study, and to meeting the
just expectations of friends and patrons. Dili- |
gent and constant caro is used to induce and
strengthen habits of pure morality und virtue.
No sti'dent will bo allowed to continue in the'
school, whose conduct is found to be subversive
of these. or of good ordsr and government.
The Yeab is Divided into two Sessions of
twenty-two weeks each?beginning with the last
Monday in April and October, respectively. Each
session is closed with a public examination of the
various classes, at which all the students are re
quired to bo present, accompanied with such othor
literary exercise as usually pertain to the occasion
after which there is a vacation of four lveeeks.
Thb bates of Tomo.v run Sxffio.v are as fol
lows, vis:
Orthogr^-'y. Reading, Writing. A-c. ?5 00
oeographv. Grammar. Arithmetic. Ac.. 7 00
History,jChemistry. Philosophy, and oth
er Studies in Mental, Moral, or Natural
Science. 9 00
Latin and Greek Languages, or tho higher
Mathematics, 12 00
All rnr Text-books used in this institution can
be had in town, on reasonable terms. Students
are received at any time, but it is exceedingly de
sirable that they should be present at the opening
of the session when tfci classes are first formed.
Good Boardixo can be had, in privtlj families,
at about f 1 60 per week. Provision is made so
that those desiring it can board themselves at per
haps one-half of the above. \
Ax excellent 8ett or Am-abatcs in the de
partments of Electricity, Philosophy, Astronomy,
Optics. Magnotism. Ac., belongs to the Academy,
and affords great advantage to the student of those
branches.
There is a Literary Society in connection
with the Institution, whose exercise* of Compo
ition, Declamation, Oration, Criticism and De
bete, are in many respects of great importance
and utility te the student. It has a respectable
and growing Library to which all the members
have free access.
The Laws or the Academy require each stu
dent to attend Public Worship on the Sabbath at
such place as himself or parents may select. The
Scripturea arc daily read with prayer, at which all
the stud'-nts are required to be present. While
nothing of a sectarian character is allowed in the
Instructions of the school, pirents are assured
that earnest efforts will be mad? to inculcate from
tho Bible tlios- lessons of Duty and Moral Obliga
tion which, no l-ss than M-ntai culture, are es
sential to individual and social hnppineeeand pros
perity.
The undcrsigued would call attention to the
claims of this Institution on the patronage and fa
vor of the public. At almost every session since
its organisation it hae sent out a greater or less
number of well instructed and disciplined young
men, some of whom are honorably end usefully
employed In the varioue avocations and pursuits
of life, others, with credit to theraeelvee, hsve
graduated at higher institutions, while perhaps a
majority of the young m-u irara-diitely on lea
ving us become actively and profitably engaged in
Teaching. Tho low rates of tuition?the central
location of the Institution in a region ?min?ntly
healthy and essy of acC'-ss from all points in con
nection with its superior educational faciiitiee, ail
unite to commend it to the friends of souad In
struction, und to young men especially who wish
to be prepared for the worthy end Intelligent per
formance of their ports In lift. We have the
pleasure of stating that the present
and future prospects of the Institution are alto
gether of the moot encouraging character
ALEX. MABTIN, Pwncifal.
fessr&rfe i ofu.s--.rT?
K. T. M~>?e. See. \ ?*??
As Esuorajst roK.Luj?8iA?r?Efforts Art
being made to raise by subscription $400 i
to purchase the freedom of Jerry Crospen,1
a slave at Portsmouth, Va., who is desi
rous of accompanying his liberated pa
rents to Liberia, in the tirst packet of the .
31st instant. The sum of $122 75 has
already been collected in New York, and
the slare's father expects to raise $100 or
more in Virginia.
Nxw CouirrrarEiT.?A new and very
dangerous couilUrfeit was pat in circula
tion in Lou svile, Ky? on the 6th inst.?
It was a ne'w $10 note on the Bank of
Louisville, dated Dec. 1, 1861, and hard
to detect, bein^ like the genuine in every
respect, excepting the words ?' Bank of
Louisville," which occupy a shorter spacc
than the genuine.
THE MARKETS.
[coRkxcTko vkxklt ro? tbi uatmi.1
Baltixobe. Dec. 10,
Bur Cattli.?number of Cattla olimd at the
scales on Monday, amounted to 1450 heed of
beer**, 590 head oC which were eold to City butch*
en and packers, at pricoa ranging from 8 60 to
$3 75 per 100 lb* ou the hoof- equal to 4 50<i>
$7 85 net, and averaging S IS groea. MO kft
over. The balance (710) ware driven to Phila>
del phi a.
Houa.?W? quote live hoga at 600<361i V 10?
lba.
White Wheat, 90(9100 | Kye,
Rod, " 8i<3S0 Oata,
Corn, 52<g54 | Clover Seed, $4,8T}{|
THE -MAILS.
The Eastern Mail arrive* at Clarkaborg on
Sunday*, Wednesday* and Friday*, at <.o'clook,
P. M , and depart*, Tuesdays. Thursdays and 8at
urdaya at 6 o'clock. A. M.
The Wiarini Mail arrivea on Monday*, Thura
day* and Saturdays, at 4 o'clock A. M., and da
part*, Sundaya, Wednesday* and Fridaya, at 7
o'clock. P. JT
The Uniontowx Mail arrive* daily at 4o'clock,
P. M.. Monday* excepted, and departs daily at 9
o'clock, A. M.. Sundays excepted.
The Wiston Mail arrive* on Monday*, Wed
nesdays and Fridays, at 4 o'clock, P. M.. and de
parts,'Tuesdavs. Thursdays and Saturday*, at 10
o'clock. A. M.
The Bcoehamnom Mail arrives on Tueaday of
each week, at A o'clock, P. M., and depart* on
Wedncaday at 6 o'clock, A.M.
Tho Bkvxrly Mail arrivea on Monday of each
week, at 4 o'clock. P. M., aud depart* on Fridays
at 7 o'clock, A. M.
The Bhixnstox Mail arrive* on Saturday of each
week, at 11 o'clock. A. M., and depart* at 13
o'clock. M., of aame day.
tar The Tost Office is open from 0 o'clock A.
M., till 9 o'clock, P. M.. every davexoept Sunday,
when it is open from 9 to lu o'clock. A. M., and
one hour after the arrival of each mail.
K. BRUKN, P. M.
Short Notice.
A IX persons knowing themaclve* Indebted to
1 V me either by note or account,'are requested
to come forward immediately and aeltle theaime,
us no further indulgence can, or will be given.?
Such a* do not caiT by the 1st of January, may
expect to find themaclve* waited on by the proper
officers. BENJAMIN RUST.
Dec. 34, 1851?2t.
NOTICE.
AT the solicitation of my brothor, and uthcrs.
I have been induced to remove.my office t?>
tho West end of town. 1 may hereafter bo (baud
ut my room in the dwelling (if Jno. C. Campbell,
on Turnpike ntreet. and nearly opposite the store
of Mr. E. l'rilcliurd.
Information as to my location can be had by
enquiring at the Foundry.
I shall give strict attention to practice iu the
various brunches of iny profession, and will en
deavor to (five satisfaction. l>y zealous attention
to all who may favor me willi a call.
6. F. CAMPBELL, M. D.
Dec. 22. 1S51.?8m.
Notice to the Peopled*Har
rison.
/ 1 ENTLEMEN -As one of your Del<?g*u?i,
V J I shull tike great plounuro in attending, free
of charge to uny iMiainesa you may winli to have
attended to iu uny of the I uhlic OlBceg in Rich
mond. THOMAS L. MOORE.
December 12th, 1*51.?3t.
FOUND.
MY ion found in the streota of Clurkaburg on
Monduy, lite t-th inst., being the day of (ho
olectiou, a small sum of tneney. I shall retain It
for thirty daya, to enable the person who lost it to
reclaim It by proper statements. I shall pay the
editor for inserting this notice out of the money
so found. DULANY SMITH.
December lltli, 1651.?3t.
A Lot of Very Superior
CARDING MACHINES
VRE now bring innnufucturrd at the (iood
Intrut Machine Hliop, by the proprie
tor IRA HART.
Also, now on hand, a few of his unsurpassed
CO K.N and COB CitUHIIHltS. 1. H.
Clarksburg, Dec. 17th, 1651.?tf.
13. S. JONES, & Co.,
CORNER of Fourth and Rnce streets, Pub
lishers of the Model Architect by Samdm.
Sloan, Architect to be completed In 34 monthly
porta.
The above work is designed to meet the wishes
not only of those directly Interested In buildings,
but of all who desire the advancement of tills no
ble art in our country, and w.ish to cultivate their
tastes and acquaintance with architecture. The
handsome manner in which they are prepared and
embellished, renders It a lustful ornament for the
drnwingroom, while ita accurate delineations give
it the highest practical value.
Nos. 1. 2 &. 3 now ready for delivery.
Price?50 cent*per number. Address as above,
post paid. decl7 tf.
Oils, Tallow, Urease, and
Ohio mineral Paint.
OAABARRELSMACHINEKY OIL. Prieo "6
t/UU eta. per gallon.
2540 gallons Do do
in casks of various size*. do
200 bsrrels boiled paint oil. do 55
5000 gallons do do do
In t asks of varions ?iic. do do
850 barrel? tanners' oil. Various kind* and qual
ities. from 85 to <0 eta. per ration.
1500 gallons in cask* of varion* ?U?*. Variou*
kind* and qualities, from 85 to 50 cent* per
frallon.
50 Tons Tallow Oreaae. for heavy bearings, and
coarse machinery, in barrels or cask*, of any
consistency required. Price 6 rent* per lb.
160 Tons Ohio Mineral Paint, In barrel* at the
lowest market priee.
Machinery Oil, warranted not to chill in the
coldest weather, and considered by tboee oaing
it equal to Sperm oil.
Boiled Paint Oil, equal to Linseed oil, other
than for white.
I am constantly reeeiving large supplies of the
above named article*, and my motto is, " Small
profit* and quick return*."
n. T. POXD,
St Water *t., (under the Pearle at. House,)
New York.
New York, Dec. IT, 1851?tf.
New Clothing: Store.
The subscriber has just opened
at hl? store-room In Clarksburg,
Immediately opposite "tie burnt
district," a large and fashionable
assortment of' ReadyOdads Clo
thing, which be pledge* bhr
to Ml at *ueb noutm-t Jew pri
ces, that those who calf, eon not
is fail to go their way rejoicing la
of bargains sever before obtained
place. His stock consists principally of
Coats of everr description, Vest*, Pants, Sblrtt,
very cheap; Drawers, Flannelaad Cotton Under
shirts, Cravats, Glofl^ &c? &c.
Also, a large aaaortmeat of Boots, Shoes, Hat*
and Capo; all of which will be sold st prices here
tofore unknown to the people of CUrksbur)
the surrou
constantly
now* to the people of Clarksburg aad
ndtng country. Always on hand, aad
receiving frecn the ciUee of New York
and Philadelphia, a new aad comf
of Winter Clothing, la supply the |
Tboee who wish te eeve their ir
door wcsiF of the law office of J.
formerly occupied by Cot. O. D. <
XYER SONNEBORN.
Clvksljorg. Mr. R. 1
Attorney at Laws
CLARKSBURG, HARRISON CO., VA.
Office. Un ouo li> rctofore oc'Upiod by I ? I. U? u.
C undoll.
t . & t. S. LEVviS, -it
Attorn ios at Law,
CLARKS8URQ, VA. ,
Ilobensack's Worm Syrup.
TDKtnoatsafe nr.J tiffe. tual remedy c\cr disco*
vered for tho destruction of worm* either in
Childris or adblt?. ?o safe and plenaUit
that it can be given to tbe qm| tender infant.?
The hundred* of enrea performed daily by thie
Pvrup should satisfy all of ita ttnprecodenteql vii
toe*. aa BO parent will be with nt It uuer once
giving ita trial. TlfraCTnpUj^^^HpW*,
?ttd not composed of Calomel. Wormve.l, and
Castor Oil, and called vegetable its many are,
bat U entirely vegetable, and *aeommende.l bv
tbe bead physicians of Um country, and i* all
caaea where It does not perform according to tW
recommendation*, the money is returned. X
wonld ftmher say, do not le*- your children go to
saafc!zas;A?.tins,'.xf,ns
^m^alnta^Wh" in
with blaehee* nSv (Wr^ p&lstMiteMM,
bloated stomach| ftver, audden Starting In Uislr
aleep. theh U >onr time to n*e tbU remedy, it bs
Inft for tale by ovary respe t?ble atoMkeepcr .In
tbe eovaty, where yon can obtain, a pampulol of
It* wonderful com, aa wll
Hobcnsack's Liver rllft/ ?
? IP composed of root, and plan**,
for dt?e??ei of tba BilWiarv organs, Liver oMh
plaint Ac., congeation of tfca known Kf
exist, from an inclination to vomit, being present,
bitter teste in the month, yellow furred tongue,
and thirst, tbe akin hot, and tba palss I fall u\ a
bounding, an extra supply of bile I* lb* cm tec.? I
Let the afflicted attend to it in time.
will remove all symptoms in two ??
Femalo rill, they are unequalled in oh*
either total or partial, tbey have been
Femalo rill, they are unequal!)
either total or partial, thay hi
Inestimable benefit, restoring the functional de
rangereenta to a healthy action, purifying the
Blood, and other fluida, ao a* to effectually put to
flight all oompiainta which may aria* fTom female
irregular!tlaa?aa headache, gladlneaa, dittlDauof
sight, pain in the aide, back. Ao.
Price 96 cents ner box, with fall direction*. Us
esrefal and a*k fur nomtxsAcs's Ltvca Pilu, aa
they arc the only gcuuine. all other* balng a baa*
imitation. Preparod at llcbenaack'* Laboratory,
Philad.
Aoknts.?A. F. Barne*, Clarkshnrff; Joseph J.
Winters, Bridgeport; Smith A Co., l'runtytown;
Smith A Co., Fettornian ; C. Dotaon. Weal Union;
William Rtagga. Rtaggsvllln; J. M. Borewati,
ParVeraburg ; Joe. Btoaly. Middlebouma.
Houne and Lot for Sale*
The undersigned offers for sal* ids
, tho 1
Til
real estiite in tRo town of Clarksburg!
[iJIiK<Sp comprising TWO LOTB on Turnpike
aBMHaatreet, on ono of which Is a very con
venient aud comfortable Dwelling llouaa, with
suitable out-buildings; and on the other, aa at*
cedent School-Room or Somlnary building, which
might, If desirable, be converted Into a very com**
inodloua snd convenient Store Room. The aitU
stlon is pleasant, and the terms will be reasona
ble. Apply to the subscriber,
C. Qt'ILLIN.
December 3, 1861.?If
IUfSUHA-WCE!
STATE MUTl'AL FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY, of Harrieburg, Pa., and it
Pbllad.
Capital ?98&,000.
Tlili Company will iniure to a_ limited amount
therein. It inaurra upon lit* atock or mutual eye
tum ; and after pnyiug loaara and expeoaee, divi
ding tho pruliti, among the laeiubere.
omcxM.
Jno. P. Rutherford, Pree't., I A. J. OHIft, Sec'y.
?tat* xxrncai?cr*. (hypertnUilon.)
Hon. A. L. Ituia), See. of tin, Commonwealth*
Hon. Joel Jonca, Lulu Mnyor of Pliilad.
Hon. John M. Illckrl, Stule Trcuauror.
Ilou. larurl Painter, Cennl Commiaaionar.
Jamoi M. Weir, Eeq., Cteh. of HarrUburg Bank.
A. J. Jonca, Eaq., P. M. HarrUburg.
Gilxjct i. Cuoomuli., t
Ganaral 111*11 ranee Agency, No. 14S Chaanut
atreet, U. B. Hotel Building*, Philada.
H. P. TAYLOR, Ag't for Va.
Clarkalmrg, Nov. 19th, lb51.?-3t
New Tall & Winter Good*.
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Piluburg, my rail
and Winter Oooda, of all kinda. to wit:
Clothe* Caaalmeree and Satineu, ?f-ell eolurt
and atylee.
Fine Sllka of all color* aud *tyl*. AI*o, )ave
etyle of Woollen Oooda for Ladioa I>raeaei.
Calicoee from 6 to 1? eta., of aupariar ttyl*.
Alpaca*, M inline, Caihmeree, ck.
IIatb and Caw of the iatMt atyle.
Hoxkxt*; Silk, Braid and Pearl.
Uhooxbib*; Superior Y. 11. Tea, Black do.,i?
porlor Coffee at ota.
Boora A fluor* ; a euperior atook of all kind* tor
Lodloe, Gentlemen and Boy*.
Uuifcva-wAHk , a good aaaorttnent.
Cottom Yabm ; all Noe., Batting, dte.
Iron 4 Nana | aleo, a good lot of Iron and
Nail*.
Uabd-wabx ; a good aaeortmoot.
Alao a fine aaaortment of Sadolxbv.
All of which I will aell Cheep for Caah or ecujt
try produce.
M.TOWXXM.
Nov. IStli', 1M1.
Tin Notjcb?'Thee* who hare etandfng ae
counu and notee unaettled will pleaaa oall with
out delay and aetttle them, or by the lat of Jut-,
uary next, without regard to pereona; ltd thoee .
who fail to aettle by that time their aeeomata
will be traniferred to meet my debt*. 7'
K. rOXTKIM.
Not. ISth, 1SS1. ff if 7? *
N. B.?All kinda of grain will be received oa
debta or for (rooda. . B. f.
NEW C)OOI>?!
C1HARLES LKVV18 reepeotfelljr informa tl.e
J public that he ho* re-upcord hie good* in
the room nearly oppoeite the " Democrutv print
ing office, third door above Bernea' Drag Store,
where be hee juat received lite New Nnuply of
Winter Oooda, to which he invitee the atteo*
Uon of bia former friende and onatomere nod.the
public generally, lite atock uoneieta, la pert, ef
the following:
Prime from 3 to IS Cente
Caahmeree, Alpaecaa, D- Jjalnee, dtc., very cheep.
Woollen and Caehmere Shawl*.
Black Dreee Silk, Lodiea' Flannel Shirt*. ,
Black French Twilled and fanev colored Clethr.
Satin, fancy colored Bilk and other Veetinge.
Men'e Flannel I Shirt* and Drawer*.' !
Cotton Varu,Brown* Dlearke4 UoUene* DrtWage
A largo eieortment of BOOTS and BU0E8.
Fine Cloth, Piuah and Otaxed Cape..
A veriety of Silk, Moleekin, Angola and Woof
HATS, very low. With the neiui aeeortment of
OaocsajH, Habowabs, QiwtwtMM, Datoe and
Mxwciar*, Boom, BranoxcaT, dtdtc.
He invitee the public to examine hie eteek
which will be found ae lew ae any in the conn
try.
All kinda of prodace taken In exchange for
goods
N. &?Tlioae indebted to him will pleaa* call
end if paeelbie pav him?by ae doing they
confer a laeting favor. '
December 3. 1851?ly.
1? IHE PUBUC'!
friend* and prompt ne** of a t.uun of rojr cus
tomer*. I have been enabled to anhMtluU) iny
Tool*, Mechninery, Stock, dw., which were de
atroyed by Are on the ffib of May, laaC My Ma
chinery la now new. of the vnt* utut tumor*.
unr, and not inferior to any la aee. With theM
JOB-WORK will be doaa very prompt!r i
at greatly raduood prieea. Uoce?-t>reeT?<? oi
every kind at the ehoertoet notice- the comma
elxe of whieh rlli.be m?de w tr>i ct*. per foot.-*
1* abort 1 will any that Moxxv cad u ?a?#? a v
: ?*AUM wira ma, and that fact eati be a?l^|i*h
ed by trying me o*f?, and If MlWartli
ia not ?i?eo, I wttt not eek a rctom. fhbft
no knk>r ry 1 wiU no what I bat.
who have niuutii willed their claim* air. ?
the fir*. And aa I yet gre
request all tboee knowing
raaka payment at their
Thie will mora effectually l
? mw rcmovad njr Rnop TV "in i
yard, to the aortb end ofBeap
naTif. I however will, ha
be open the old groaodop^ a;'

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