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The Sunday telegram. [volume] (Clarksburg, W. Va.) 1914-1927, October 22, 1916, Image 1

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THE WEATHER ^
I
THE SUNDAY TELEGRAM i**?b
Fair; continued cool; Sunday ? ? ? ? ? ? ^ ^ j I v ? * ? m ? ? m AM MJ / m 1 V H I trnl Wet Vlrelnla Ik l?ni
cool; Monday slightly warmer. J ^ ^ ?*"?? -M. J-iX-i JLi X X A ? JL y tl,an that of ?7y other pSpiE
FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE BY LEASED WIRE V
VOL. 2, NO. 48. TWENTY-FOUR PAGES. CLARKSBURG, W. VA., SUNDAY. OCTOBER 22, 191(>. . FIRST SECTION PRICE FIVE CENTS
AUSTRIAN COUNT SHOT
, AUSTRIAN PREMIER IS NATURAL GAS RATES ARE TO
VICTIM OF A BULLET BE RAISED SOON IN THIS C/TY
Shot to Death as He Sits at!
Table in Room of His Home
in Vienna.
DIES IN VERY SHORT TIME
Newspaper Publisher is Mur
derer of Austria's Premier,
Say London Despatches.
(?V ASSOCIATED PRKSS)
LONDON. Oct. 21. 7:08 p. m.?
The premier of Austria has been
shot. Reuters Amsterdam corres
spondent says the premier, Count
Karl Stuergkh. was shot today by
the publisher of a Vienna newspaper
named Adler. according to a tele
gram received at Amsterdam from
Berlin.
The Austrian premier. Count i
Stuergkh, who was assassinated
while at dinner today by Ludwig
Adler, a publisher, was shot three
times. Count Stuergkh was dining at
a hotel when the publisher attacked
him. Three shots were fired, all of
which took effect, the premier dying
instantly.
NOTHING IS KNOWN YET
AS TO SLAYERS MOTIVES
(BY ASSOCIATKD FM?|1
LONDON. Oct. 21, 11:21 p. m.?
Nothing is known in Vienna as to the
motives for the assassination of Pre
mier Stuergkh, says a Central news
despatch from Amsterdam.
Emperor Francis Joseph was in- j
formed immediately of the death of'
the premier and was affected deeply.!
A special meeting of the Austrian!
cabinet was held during the after-:
noon.
END OF AUSTRIA IS
SEEN IN TRAGEDY
(?V ASSOCIATED PRKSB1
HOME, Oct. 21.?The assassination
of the Austrian premier, Count
Stuergkh. caused a deep impression
^herp. although Count Stuergkh was
Pfthe heao of the government which is
Italy's bitterest enemy. The news-.
papers comment on the tragedy as a
sign of disintegration of Austria
resulting from the war.
At the Vatican, where Pope Bene- ;
diet and the papal secrtary of state,
Cardinal Gasparrl, received tele
graphic advices, the news caused a
profound feeling, as it is thought the .
iragedv may have an important bear-*
ing on the continuation of the war.
Count Karl Stuergkh is the Aus
trian premier. His ministry was
formed November 3, 1011, and was
'reorganized November 30. 1913.
Count Stuergkh has been a prom
inent figure In Austrian political af
fairs for years. He was minister of^
(Continued on page 2, first section.)
SISLER MARRIES ,
Daughter of a Wealthy Detroit
Business Man and Will Re- ,
side in St. Louis.
(BY ASSOCIATED PRESS'
DETROIT, Mich.. Oct. 21.?George i
Sisler, star first baseman of the St.!
1 >ouis American League baseball club, j
was married here tonight to Miss I
Kathleen Holznngel. Mr. and Mrs.
Sisler will reside at St. Louis. Sisler!
and Miss Holznagel, who is the daugh
ter of a wealthy Detroit business man.
were students at the University of,
Michigan, where their romance had
its Inception.
BIBLE
Never Heard of by Several
Thousand Inhabitants of an
Alaskan Island.
<?* A..OCIATKO .*(..)
COLUMBUS, O., Oct. 21.?Several
thousand inhabitants of the island of
Nonivak, Alaska, have never heard
of the Bible, according to a report
today to the Women's Homo Mis
sionary Society, in session here.
Following an executive session. It
?was announced that an Investigation
?would be conducted, and plans were
being made for an extensoin or the :
_ Jesse Lee Home, at Unalaska island,
ft to rectify the condition.
' Dr. W. F. Baldwin, superintendent
of the mission at Nome. Alaska, will
be sent to the Island next June to In
vestigate and report.
+ +
+ PEACE ADVOCATE +
+ FORCED TO RESIGN. +
+ *
?I* (BY ASSOCIATED PftlflB) ?]?
+ LONDON, Oct. 21.?Arthur +
?fr Ponsonby, member of Parlla- +
+ inent and private secretary to *
<? the late Sir H. Campbell-Ban- +
+ nerman. prime minister, has +
+ resigned his seat owing to the ?
+ unpopularity of his advocacy +
+ of peace negotiations. Some +
+? months ago Mr. Ponsonby at- +
+ tacked the government in the +
? House of Commons for allowing +
+ diplomatic etiquette to stand In ?
+ the way of peace pourparlers. +
* * i
DEMOCRATS GET
BITING FROST
IN BARBOUR
While Governor Hatfield Draws
a Packed House and Big
Overflow Crowd.
BELINGTOx!' ? Oct. L 21.?Governor
Hatfield swung into Barbour county
today on his way toward the central
section of the state, addressing two
large meetings, one at Philippi this
afternoon where the crowd even taxed
the standing room capacity or the court
house and the other here tonight when i
the crowd overflowed the capacity of i
the local theater, many being unable to
get into the building. This afternoon |
the Democrats held a meeting here buti
only fifteen persons were in attend-;
ance.
The meeting at Philippi was pre-1
sided over by S. \V. England, brother)
of the Republican candidate for attor-l
ney general, and at Belington by J. \V.:
(Continued on page 6, first section.) |
THOUGH NOT IN THE WAR. ALBANIA IS DYING OF STARVATION
Group of starving Albanians on the quay at Durazzo, looking hopefully out to sea and praying for the arrival of
a relief ship with provisions.
Although not officially embroiled in the European conflagration, Albania is suffering from the war more
then any of the other belligerents, with the possible exception of Belgium and Serbia. Albanians are starving
then any of the belligerents, with the possible exception of Belgium ?nd Serbia. Albanians are starving by thou
lands, and unless something is speedily done it is feared that almost the entire population will be wiped out.
UNITED STA TES AT
WAR WITH MEXICO
That is the Formal Decision of
the Judge Advocate General
of This Country.
NEW YORK, Oct. 21.?Judge Ad-j
vocate General Crowder, United
States army, has rendered a formal)
decision holding that the United
States is. at war with Mexico.
A decision was made necessary in'
order to cover the legal procedure!
in dealing with numerous incidents
connected with the punitive expedi-'
tion of United States troops into Mex-j
ico. the nature of these incidenls. var
ious offenses committed by United;
States soldiers, demanding that the
Judge advocate general's o..iCe should
deline the statues of the Mexican;
campaign.
In the decision, the judge advocate
general quotes the definition of war in
Vattel's law of nations as being that;
state of affairs in which we prosecute!
our rights by force. The decision then'
recites:
"It is thus apparent that under the
law there should be no formal decla
ration of war but that under the defi-,
nition of Vattel, a state of war ex-!
ists ho far as concerns the opinions'
of the United States troops in Mexi
co, by reason of the fact that the'
United States is prosecuting its rights
by force of arms and in a manner in;
which war is usually conducted. The;
statutes which are operative only!
during a period of war have been in-1
terpreted as regulating to a condition
and not a theory.
"I ant therefore of the opinion
that while war is not recognized as
existing between the United States
and Mexico, the actual conditions un
der which the Held operations in Mex
ico are being conducted are those of
actual war; that within the field of
operations of the expeditionary force;
in Mexico it is 'time of war' within
the meaning of the fifty-eighth arti
cle of war. sine? it could not have!
been intended that under such condi-j
tions United States soldiers would be;
turned over to the authorities of Mex-j
ico for trial." f
The decision has been carefully
withheld from publicity, and there
is resentment on the part of the ad
ministration that it has reached the
public at this time for it destroys
the plea that "he kept us out of war.",
That naval officers, (not officials of I
the navy department) believe war;
actually and legally exist between the;
United States and a faction In Santo j
Domingo, is made evident by an of-!
flcial letter to the navy department'
fro rnMajor General George Baraett |
commanding the United States ma-;
rine corps, officially commending the
coolness and daring displayed by
Chaplain Leroy N. Taylor for courag
eously driving a motor ambulance
through fire swept zones and expos
ing himself to enemy Are while suc
coring the wounded.
CASE TRANSFERRED.
(ar ASSOCIATED )??????
CHARLESTON, Oct. 21.?Transmr
from tho circuit court of Braxton coun
ty to the United States court for the
Southern district of Wieat Virginia haa
been made of the case of J. S. Taylor
and others nsalnst the Royal Insurance
Company, of Liverpool, England. In
surance claims exceeding $14,000 are
involved.
KILLED Pi MINE.
(?V ASSOCIATED PMESS)
WHEELING, Oct; 21.?Mack Work
man, aged 23, of Bellalre, O., was In
stantly killed at noon today, while at
work In the Webb coal mine near here,
when caught beneath a tall of (lata, ,
+ masonic reunion.
?|s (BY ABMOCIA-rCD PNHM ?
+ CHARLESTON, Oct. 21.?Tho +
+ nineteenth reunion of O'Dcll +
+ Squire I-ong Lodge of Pcrfec- +
+ tlon, No. 3, Scottish Rile of ?,
? Free Masonry, and Clurleston +
+ Chapter, Knights of Roue +
+ Croix, will be hoi din Charles- +
+ ton October 26 and 27. A class +
+ of fifty candidates will be in- +
+ itiated, taking the degrees from ?
+ fourth to eighteenth inclusive. +
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +
FllMI
By German Submarines and at
Least Eight Lives are Re
ported Lost.
(?v .??oci.-io main
LONDON", Oct. 21.?10:00 p. m.?
The sinking of five steamships, two
British and three or neutral national
ity, with the loss of at least eight lives
is announced by Lloyds. The British
steamers sunk were the Huguenot
of New Castle, and the Marchioness,
of Glasgow. The crews of both
steamers are reported to have been
landed.
The neutral steamers sunk are the
Athens and Haudrot, ot Norwegian
registry, and the Swedish steamer1
Alfhild. Eight members of the crew!
of the Alfhild were lost and the re
mainder were saved. The crew of tne!
Haudrot were rescued.
DEATH PENALTY j
Without Trial-is Provided tor in
General Carranza's Decree
of October 9.
1?
CSV Aaior-ATIO
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J? Oct. 21.? j
General Carranza's decree of October
9, suspending constitutional guaran
tees through Mexico as translated!
and laid before the American repre-|
sentatlves on the Mexican joint com-j
mission today, provides that for near-.
ly all offenses not covered by the civil |
code summary punishment may be In-j
fllcted by the military authorities.
Interference with railway traffic, i
robbery, Incendiarism and assault in
Its various forms are characterized as
crimes punishable by death without
the formality ot trial when the evl-;
dence Is apparent. Ip no case has]
the accused the right of appeal.
REMOVAL
Of State Headquarters of Sun
day School Association Will
Be Considered.
\ IB* a??oci*t*o paimi
WHEELING, Oct. 21.?Tho semi
annual session of the executive com
mittee of the West Virginia Sunday
School Association will be held
this city October 26. It was announced
today,
The proposed removal of the associa
tion's headquarters from ?'Wheeling to
either Clarksburg, Parkersburg or
'Huntington will be among the mat
ters considered, ^
? J -wlHS ll
Finishes in Pennsylvania and
Will Speak in State of Ohio
This Week.
(?V A??OC1ATKO Pftias)
JOHNSTOWN, Pa.. Oct. 21.?William
Jennings Bryan tonight concluded a
whirlwind speaking tonr of the Nine
teenth Pennsylvania congressional dis
trict in behalf of Representative War
ren Worth Bailey and after traversing
three counties he delivered his Unal
address at Altoona, Pa.
Reiterating his allegiance to the
present administration. Which he de
clared had established an unparalled
record for progressive legislation. Mr.;
Bryan insisted that everywhere voters I
should send to Co#Tress representa-j
tives who would uphold President Wll-j
son and his policies. He also declared i
the record of the administration was |
such that it would command the sup
port not only of Republicans but all
Progressives who have the welfare of!
the country at heart.
Late tonight Mr. Bryan started west j
and will be in Ohio the greater part of j
next week.
LYNCHING
Threats Cause Officers to Spirit
Prisoner from One Jail to j
Another and So On.
(?V ASSOCIATED PRtfCT
JOPLIN, Mo.. Oct. 21.?'Threats
of lynching tonight caused state of
ficers to spirit J. B. Johnson from one!
jail to another until he had been
transferred from Webb City to Cart
hage and from Carthage to some oth^
er place kept secret. In an effort to'
quiet excitement which seemed like
ly to develop into open violence, John- j
son has confessed, say the police,
that he was the man who today held
up an Interurban electric car eleven
miles East of Joplin and killed the,
conductor, Robert Schwoltzor, of.
Webb City. He told *>ie. oflBccrs, tftey
said, that he was Intoxicated and aid j
not realize his act.
ARMY OF IDLHItS.
(?V ASSOCIATED PMCB81
PARIS, III.. Oct. 21.?Charles \V.
Fairbanks, Republican nominee fori
vice president, attacked the Demo-|
cratlc tariff policy In r.n address hete!
todi.; He declared that It cre;it< <1 an
American army of unemployed before!
the European war equal In size to1
the army mobilliod by the British em-!
pire for the war.
IX TEXAS.
t.r A.soctATCo pm.a)
SAX ANTONIO, Tex.. Oct. 21.?The,
West Virginia and a Florida Held hos
pital arrived hero today for duty with ]
the Twelfth division. A signal com- j
pany and a field hospital both from
Virginia, and a New Hampshire Big-,
nal company, are due tomorrow,
WILSON WIELDS ONLY
DISHHAG SAYS TEDDY.
<av A..OCIATID ntM
PHOENIX, Ariz., Oct 21.?
Theodore Roosevelt reached his
moat western point in the pres.
ent campaign today, delivered a
speech In which he arraigned
the present administration and
repeated hie recent declaration
that "when I was president. 1
spoke soft? and carried a big
sticki President Wilson speaks
bombastically and wields a
dlsfiVag"
? ???? +1 + ? ??? +|
- .( ? ...
DEMOCRATS ARE
CLAIMING ALL
THE EARTH ;
But Wilson Despite That Fact
Will Continue to Speak to
End of Campaign.
NEW YORK. COr"t?. 2*1.?President
Wilson will make his last spoeeh of
j the campaign ut his summer residence.
Shadow lawn, l?ng Hrancli, N. J., on
! SJiturelay, November 4. It was an
nounced at Democratic national head- .
I quartern hero tonight. "It will ho old i
I homo day," devoted entirely to New
! Jersey friends and neighbors of the
I president.
1 Vance McCormick, chairman of the
Democratic national eommittee, ex
pccts now to remain in Now York un
til election flrny, he anDounrod, to he "in
the midst of the tlnol drive for vic
tory."
Kdwin S. Harris, chairman of the
Democratic state committeo, in a
(Continued on page 6, first scctlon.)
DOES NOT EXPECT
TO GET INTO WAR
+ +
+ WOUI/IMVIUK CHASE. +
+ +
4* ?T A..OCIAT,D Nt?l 4.
+ WHEELING, Oct. 21.?Over +
+ almost a world-wide eliase, +
+ which led throudb Europe and ?
+ Australia, federal alithorltlCH ?
+ arrouted X. W. Wlttman, who ?
? represent* himself as the presl- 4
+ dlent of a proprietary medicine +
+ company of California, here ?
+ this afternoon, on the charge of +
+ fraud. He Is being held in ?
+ jail under bond of *5.000. +
+ +
+ + +++ + ??+ + + + *?+?*
By the Germans Fail on Somme j
Front and Their Losses
are Heavy.
car AMOCI1TCD **??*>
PARIS. Oct. 21.?11:01 p. m.-?
Three strong attacks against Sallly
Sallllsel, on the Somme front, foiled,
according to the bulletin Issued by1
the war ofHce tonight, the GermansI
sustaining heavy losses. They made
similar attempts between Biaclies and
La Maisonette, and were general re
pulsed. They succeeded, however In'
gaining a footing In some advancedj
positions north or Blaise wood. Thcj
French captured the wood north of
Chaulnes.
TORPEDOED '
Is a German Light Cruiser By a!
British Submarine in the j
North Sea.
'?V ASSOCIATED .*???
LONDON. Oct. 21, 9:60 p. m.? [
A German light cruiser has been tor
pedoed by a British submarine. The
cruiser remained afloat although it
apparently suffered severe damage. I
The anouncement by the admiralty j
reads:
"A British submarine Just return-1
ed from the North sea reports It tor-,
pedoed a German light cruiser or,
the Kolbeg class early Thursday j
morning. When last seen, the 1
cruiser was steaming slowly, in evi
dent difficulties, toward German.
waters."
RESCUE CREWS
Are Exploring the Jamison Mine!
in Search of Bodies of III
Fated Miners.
<?t a,.ociatkd mian
FAIRMONT, Oct, 21?Three res
cue crews tonight began exploring
Jamison Mine No. 7, where an ex
plosion last Thursday caused the
death of ten men. The crews went
In different directions In the mine as
It Is believed the victims were work
ing a long way back In the mine,
In one of the searching parties are
Pittsburg men from the United States
Bureau of Mines, state mine Inspect
ors and the Jamison (ire bosses and
foremen, together with the H. C.
Frlck Coal Company's first aid chief,
J. D. Parker.
Mr. Parker took the place held by
L. M. Jones, who lost his life by
suffocation a. few hours after ha had
entered the mine yesterday In the
hope ot effecting rescues,
That is What Wilson Tells a
Delegation at Shady Lawn
in Speech.
I ... ...OC....O ......
LONG BRANCH, N. J., Oct. 21.?
In ti speech devoted primarily to a
discussion of the need For economic
| preparedness in the L'nlted .Statu
1 President Wilson tuld n deiogatlon
of farmers, architects and engineers
hero today that he did not expert the
United States to net into war.
"I know the way in which we have
preserved peace Is oblic'od to." sold,
tile president, "Mid that certain I.'CIH,
tlemen say they wouid hr.ve taken
some other way that would Inevitably
have resulted in war, but 1 am not
expecting this country to Ret Into war.
partly because I am not expecting
these gentlemen to have a chance to
make a mesH of It."
Taking the work doae by the ad-j
ministration for tile farmers a* his
text. Mr. Wilson declared "we want
the prlvllego of representing the
whole force of the nation." He de
manded that mon be put through a
"third degree" In respect to where|
they stund with regard to love of the,
United States, and said he was gladi
the campaign was nearly over, "be
cause I am in a hurry to got down to!
business again."
"There Is a great deal of Irrespon
sible talk being Indulged In," declared
the president In discussing the cam-;
palgn.
"Men ore saying IhingB they know (
perfectly well they cannot make goodi
on and It disturbs the national coun-l
sel. On the seventh of November|
we will call time."
Mr. Wilson said the Democratic;
party had been trying to tako the
government out of control of small
groups and "square with the counsel
of the whole nation." In detail he
told of work being done to mobilize!
the industrial resources of the na
tion, saying, "one of the great lessons1
of the European war that the econo
mic co-ordination of the country Is;
just as Important as the military co
operation of It."
The occasion of the president's ad
dress was the celebration of "farm
ers day" at Shadow I.awn, but a del
egation of architects and engineers
from New York led by a band, came to
the west end railroad station by train i
and marched to tho president's sum-1
mer home to hear the address.
On Exportation of Wheat and
Flour May Be Asked by the
National Bakers.
I.Y A..OCIATKD .....)
COLUMBUS, 0? Oct. 21.?Should
the demand for such a committee
from S. V. McDonald, of Memphis,
president of the national association
of bakers today Issued a statement
through a local oflloer of the organl
xation stating that he would appoint
a committee or representative bakers
to go to Washington to ask Presi
dent Wilson to place an embargo on
the foreign exportation of wheat and
flour In an efTort to solve the high
cost of these articles and the resulting
high cost of bread.
The bakers contend that the high
cost of floor Is caused by the great
export shipment of wheat to Europe.
Yesterday they Issued a statement
that the high prices 1iad forced a
large number of bakers over the coun
try into failure.
As Well as in All the Several
Suburbs of the City of
Clarksburg Soon.
SIX CENTS IS THE ADVANCE
For Domestic Consumers witti
Two Cents' Discount and Four
Cents for Manufacturers.
(?V A..tlCI?T?D Him
CHARLESTON. Oct. 21.?An Im
portant order wan entered today by
the public lervlce com ml ml on per
nilttlnic the Clarksburg Light and
Heat Compnny to lncreaso Its rates
to both domestic and Industrial con
sumers. The Increnso permitted ad
vatires the price to domestic consum
ers to sixteen cents a thousand cable
feet, wltb two cents off when pay
ment Is made within ten days after
the llrst or each month; ten cents a
thousand for city and school build
ings and a scale ranging from eight to
fifteen cents to manufacturing plants.
The advance to domestic consumers
Is from twelve to sixteen cents and
to manufacturers from four to eight
cents where the consumption reach
es one million feet. Consumers In
the Industrial clasB arc allowod one
cent off on each thousand cubic feet
when settlement In made In cash
which reduces the minimum to that
class to seven cents.
The rates provided by the order In
volve Clarksburg. Adomston. Brosd
Oaks. N orthvlew, Stealey Heights,
and nelghborlug unincorporated dis
tricts.
MILLER ESTATE
Must Pay a Federal Govern
ment Tax Running into MH
lions of Dollars.
1ST ABIOCIAT.D
SAN FRANCISCO, Cnlir., Oct, 2J.
A federal government tax running
Into millions of dollars will bo levied
upon the estate of Henry .Miller, cat
tle baron, who died a week ngo, leav
ing an estate variously estimated
from f20.000,000 to 140,000,000 It
became known here today. The tax
will be claimed under n provision of
the federal revenue net passed by the
last Congress which provides for a
graduated (axon Inherited estatee. Es
timating the Miller fortune at 140,
000,000, state and federal laws. It
was said, would bring the total tax
on the cattle.king's estate to a sum
approximating $8,000,000. This
would he the largest ussesment of its
kind ever levied In Ihe United State*.
In the belief of officials here. ? '"i
EIGHT DEATHS
Not Including Those in Mine
Explosion are Caused by
Accidents in State.
(?Y AtBOCIATID
CHARLESTON, Oct. ai?Eighty ;
accidents In industries subscribing to
the workmen's compensation fund :
were reported to the compensation
commissioner today, one of whleh
resulted In a fatality. This brings
the'total number of accidents report
ed this week up to 472, with eighty,,
fatalities Included.
The fatalities do not Include those
in a coal mine explosion at Baraeks
vlile. ?
NEW YORK STRIKE
Is Placed in the Hands of Fed
eral Mediators by the Gen
eral Organizer. $
(my amociatib nun
NEW YORK, Oct 21?Federal
mediators have intervened in an ef
fort to settle the strike of motermen
and conductors who were employed ?
on New York's transit lines, accord
ing to an anouncement made tonight
by William B. Fttxgerald, general
organizer of the Amalgamated Asso
ciation of Street and Electric Rail
way Employes, under whose direction
the strike was called. Mr. Fltiger
ald said he had placed the strikers' .va
cate In the hands of the federal au
thorities.
NEW RECORD PRICE.
(?* AttOCIATKD Minn ? - *8
UXIONTOWN, Pa., Oct 21.?Coke
reached a new record price In the
Connellsville fleld today when an
operator sold a shipment for $7 a ton.
* ?
? SCOUTS PENETRATING +
? S0DTH OP ELYALLE. *
? ?
4? tuy AISOCIATSO fMtO :
? COLUMBUS, N. <M? Oct 21.? +
? Scouting parties from the +?
? American punitive expedition +
? have penetrated south of El- *
? valle, but for punitive purposes 4*
? only. Arrivals from Mexico re- +
? port heavy morement* of Mex- 4>
? lean coTalry southward from +
? Casas Grandes. It is (lid that *
? a large force of-Villa's follow- +
f ors are entrenched below Nam- +
? Iqulppa. +

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