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The Sunday telegram. [volume] (Clarksburg, W. Va.) 1914-1927, November 12, 1916, FIRST SECTION, Image 1

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r THE WEATHER
I T"alr Sunday. Monday pm}>aljly
V Tain turning: to snow and colder. "
VOL 2, NO. 51.
I AN A
j crew Wed
i ii tire is
I w i iff i esq
JSU L?lI L, LUUU
American Consul at Balboa Reports
Sinking to Washington
but Gives No Details.
RADICAL POLICY CHANGE
fCase Will Be Laid before President
Wilson by State Department
Early in Week.
(BY ASSOCIATED MUD
LONDON, Nov. 11?The American
steamer Columbian is believed to
have been sunk, according to an announcement
by Lloyds.
It was reported here Wednesday
that the Columbian was sending out
wireless calls for help, saying it was
being shelled by a submarine. The
calls were picked up at the time by
admiralty stations.
Nothing further, however, had
been heard of the Columbian until tonight's
statement from Lloyds Shipping
Agency.
The crew of the American steamer
Columbian has arrived at Corunna,
Spain, on life boats, says a Reuter
w despatch from Madrid.
The Columbian is under American
registry gnd sailed from New York
October 18 and Boston October 21,
bound for Genoa. It is reported as
touching at St. Nazaire France, on
November 2, leaving that port the
next day for Italy. The Columbian is
owned by the American-Hawaiian
Steamship Company, of New York,
and was built in San Francisco in
1907.
The vessel carried no passengers,
but had a crew of about 113 officers
i and men. It was under charter by
the France and Canada Steamship
Company, with offices In New York.
^ MAY MEAN A CHANGE
IN GERMANY'S POLICY
?BY ASfOCIATftw PROS)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11?The
case of the American steamer Colum1"
bian, reported sunk off the Spanish
coast, will be laid before President
(Continued on page 7, first section^
PEACE CONFERENCE
At Cardiff, Wales, is Broken Up
by a Crowd of Patriotic
Demonstrators.
- (BY ASSOCIATED PRESS)
"LONDON, Nov: 11.?A conference
at Cardiff, Wales, in favor of opening
peace negotiations, wbich had been
arranged by the National Council of
Civil Liberties, was broken up today,
the Cardiff correspondent of the Exchange
Telegraph Company wires. A
crowd of patriotic demonstrators
broke into the hall and severe fighting
resulted, although there were no
casualties. The president of the
South Wales Miners, Federation was
In the chair. Speeches were made by
James H. Thomas and Ramsey Mac
' ilaBI" Donald, members of the House of
'jjg Commons.
The delegates to the conference
WB appeared to be mostly young men of
military age. A number of women
also were present. The crowd which
wf broke up the meeting first paraded
V| - through the town, its ranks growing
5 constantly until several thousand
I persons were in line.
WEILL FiOBlHSOH DIES
In Cincinnati arrd His Body Arrives
iryCharleston for Burial
Monday Afternoon.
H (BY At0OC1ATCD P*C9?)
CHARLESTON, Nov. 11?Neill
B? Robinson, 61 years old. the first coal
operator in the Kanawha valley, died
finrlv todav in Cincinnati. His body
a arrived, here tonight, Mr. Robinson
was president of the LaFollette
Coal and Iron. Company. Tennessee,
? and was for several years secretary
of the West Virginia Coal Operators
Association. He was prominent as
I'b. Mason and had occupied the poslBf^B
tlon of master of the grand lodge of
the order in West Virginia. The
B | funeral will be held here Monday afflS
GUARDS DISARMED,
V: j (If ASSOCIATED PMU)
M EI. PASO, Tex., Nov. 11?Because
Carranza officials feared they might
8j ; be' disloyal scores of former Villa
I soldiers who have been serving as
H I customs guards in Juarez since the
I I Villa garrison; Joined* the Carranza
H Srmy were disarmed today.
H DEMOCRATS CLAIM.
I '
' Y AltOCIATtD
H SANTE FE. Nov. 11.?In a public
m statement today. Democratic state
B headquarters claims the election of
; E. C. DeBaca, governor, oyer: H. O.
B Bursum by a majority of 1,000 to
i 1,500, and the election of W. B. WalB
ton ; to Congress by' a majority near
The Republicans have not
THE
,'g;4);
TWENTY PAGES
TBr^h
I MM
| HOW SHE PAIDlS
-l?ysssss?9>
^^^^J^r-::!^^^wHftnNHa)Mw 9bR8^S|
Miss Katie Schmidt on fifth
A woman riding on an elephant d
after election so dislocated traffic at
shooed her into a side street. The ele
"I Lost." The woman was Miss Kat
Girard that Illinois would go Democr;
have ridden a donkey down Fifth av<
VIOLENT F
AGAIN EI
i
? ?? J
At Various Points on the Eastern
and Western Fronts in
the European War.
(BY AS IOC I AT CO PRCS!)
Violent fighting is again in progress
at various points on the eastern
and western fronts, but no great
change in the positions of the opposing
armies has yet been reported.
Fair weather on the Somme front
in northern France has brought more
vigorous activity by the FrancoBritish
and German forces. General
Haig's men in an attack in the Tl^iepval-Courcelette
area, London states,
have taken the eastern part of the.
Regina trench on a front of 1,000
yards. The other portion of this
trench was taken on October 21.?
Berlin admits a British gain northeast
of Courcelette, but says that only
a small portion of an advanced trench
was entered. ,
Crown Prince Foils.
Crown Prince Rupprecht failed in
an attack against the French lines in
the neighborhood, of Deniecourt.
south of the Somme, Paris records.
On the other hand Berlin states that
a French attack in the Sailly-Sailllsel
sector was repulsed. In aerial
combats on . the * western front, the
Germans brought down ten Entente
aeroplanes and .the French put five
German machines out of action.
The Austro-Germans and Russians
continue to flght'furlpusly ih the Baranovichi
region, north of the Pinsk
Marshes, and along the Narayuvlca
CHEERED AG
AGAIN IS
__- i
By Crowds as He -Returns to
Washington the First Time
in Two Months.
i
t?y a3?oci*tec> i-ncoei *
ON BOARD PRESIDENT WILSON'S
SPECIAL, Albany, N. Y., Nov.
11?President Wilson, returning, to
"Washington for the. first time In,two
months tonight,' witnessed a demonstration
at Troy, and Albany In celebration
of the outcomo of the election,
Taking for grantod that ho had
been re-elected, crowds at both, places
cheered him again and again. The,
president laughed and smiled - and
thanked them for tliolr congratulations.
Here at Albany a procession, .Including
bands, was - arranged in his
honor. -The railroad , station was
crowded and many persons 'rushed
forward to shake President Wilson's
hand, Former Governor Glynn, of
New York, who was temporary chairman
of the St. Louis convention that
nominated the president, was at the
station with other Democratic leaders.
. President Wilson shook - hands
wkomr navcrtno of Tr^?- *
V* X ill aajauj Ub *- X wj ?
''We're with you for four more
years of peace and prosperity,"
shouted one-man. "Thank you,".replied
the president. The president is
due to arrive at Washington tomorrow
night after a trip down the Hudson
river from Rhine Cliffe, N. Y., in.
the Mayflower. He -is to -board a
train in New York at 3i44 tomorrow.
CHATTANOOGA NEXT.
f?r associated nun
DALLAS, .Tex., Nov. 11?Chattanooga,
Tehn.,-was-selected as the corivpntlon,
city = fo? 1 ^7-Tor' the TJnite<T
afate|npon se4fbu of Axg
J f ' ' !s^?S^ %&$kl t&yiMlifJ: te$$
', ,,:r- -ggj ; - .;.; / ,: .; -v .,,.,.__ ,.; , _ - -. .
SUNE
FULL ASSOCL
CLARKSBURG, T
Tcaa
ER ELECTION BET |
:t* ?*
avenue, paying election bet.
own Fifth avenue, New York, the day
Forty-second street that a policeman
iphant was decorated with the legend,
;ie Schmidt. She wagered with Miss
itic. Had Miss Girard lost sba would
mue.
^GHTnvGjN i
K 1
southwest of Lemberg in Galicla.
Petrograd says that parts of trenches f
near Skrobowa, .northeast of Barano- <
vichi taken by the Germans, have
been recaptured by the Russians, but
Berlin asserts all attacks in that sec- J
tor were repulsed. j
Germans Repulsed,
On the Narayuvka front, the Ger- <
mans, Berlin claims, entered a Russian
position and held it agr inst
counter attacks. Petrograd, however,
says that German attacks in this
region were ^pulsed and that the
attackers were ejected from a portion
of a trench they had occupied. i
The Russian and Roumanian ad- 1
vance in Dobrud^Ja toward the Tchernavoda-Constanza
railway line continues.
Petrograd reports the occupation
of two more towns along the
Danube between Hirsova and Tchernavoda.
A belated official report
from Sofia admits Entente successes, 1
but Berlin continues to report no t
change in the area under Field c
Marshal von Mackensen's control, t
Unofficial it is reported von Mack- i
ensen has-been driven hack to the t
railway line., 1
Counter Claims. i
Both the Austro-Germans and the i
Roumanians claim sucesses along the (
Transylvania Roumanian frontier.
South of Predeal, Berlin records an t
advance for Arch Duke Charles, t
while Bucharest claims the capture e
nf of'a trench near Draeoalavle and T
of Mount Frurtzile, on the left bank
(Continued. on page 7, first sectionj)
JAIN AND i
MR. WILSON
SHOT RECORD ;
So Far as Traps Are Concerned j
is Broken by a San Antonio,
Tex., Woman. ;
~
(ir*>ioer?TtD rutin |
MONTGOMBEY,- Ala., Nov. 11? 1
Mrs. Ad Topperweln, of San An to- I
nio, Tex., broke all-previous trap- 1
shooting records for continuous
shooting here today, by scoring 1,952 .
out of a possible 2,000 targets, shoot? I
ing thes entire; score in; five hours and \
.twenty xnlnuteB, This establishes a
hew world's record for endurance* j
and number of shots fired over the '
trap in one single day and targets
scored.
y* > i ??
MEETING PREVENTED,
1 i _ ' ...
??V AlBOaATCO ^It6) ~ \
LONDON. Nov. 11.?-A demonstra- t
tlon arranged for this afternoon &t t
Trafelgar Square by the Worn-.
en's Social and Political Union, {he j
organization %of the militant suffra- t
gists, was prevented i by the police: i
Mrs, Emmellne Pankhnrst was to i
I nave oeeu me prominent speaicer, e
j + + + + *-4. 4, t+ + + * + ^
4? 4? *
+ STRUCK BY TRAXSf, *
+ ? c . *
?? fay associatco wni| if.
+ GRAFTON, Nov. 11.?Islnrjael
Robinson, a prominent, farmer + .
* of Taylor county,:was probably * 1
4* fatally injured here latfe today * ?
% * \
lelds oT southern West Virginia tolay
and an improvement, of condi:Iona
is expected to follow.
A meeting of the American Railway
Association is scheduled to be
leld in New York next Tuesday and
Wednesday at which the car situation
will be taken up, with prospects
if greater relief in the West West
Virginia fleldB.
Operators say that heavier movements
of coal will he made next
week than in any like period in the
last two months because of the arrival
or the promise of arrival of
:ars in greater numbers.
CAPTAIN KOENIG
0
Has No Clearance Papers Yet
and the Deutschland Will
Not Leave Today.
* i ,
. (mv ASSOCIATED SKCSS)
NEW LONDON, Conn., Nov. 11.?
.Ta AlnAAATirtrt 110.1 Kn.in lafllloH
i U VilCAiaiikiC j/apvi o ut*u >/v>vu
:o Capt. Paul Koenig, of the German
iommercial submarine Deutschland
:onight and none will be Issued tonorrow,
according to Joseph C. Comitock,
depfity collector of customs
tere. Members of the vessel's crew
n the city on phore leave said their
ressel would not leave port tonight
)r Sunday.
Humors were current tonight that
he German naval submarine U-57 and
he TJ-59 might be expected here at
ihy time to act as cdnvoys for the
leutschland.
BUREAU
"or Employment Will Be Opened
in the City of Charleston
inaFewuays.
n?? moci?tio nntll
CHARLESTON, Nov. 11.?Through
;he efforts of William Bi Wilson, bocjretary
of . labor in the cabinet of
President Wilsor^ a federal omploynent
office will be opened in ChareBton
in a few days.
In addition to a this bureau there
rill be a special division,for women
ind girlB, the'latter division, created ;
n reference to an amendment to the
aw passed by Congress creating a
>ubllc. employment service In the
Jul ted States.
iOLDIERS FOR HUGHES
Ind Totals in -Minnesota Give
That State to Republican
Nominee" by 248.
I*V ASiOOIATKO PfK.al
ST. PAUL. Minn., Nov, 41.?-1The
rote of the Minnesota guardsmen on
he Mexican border as received here *
,oday, Is as follows: . .. *
Ramsey county soldiers, Wilson,
137; Hughes, 116, Hennepin county
ioldiers, Wilson, 243: Hughes 293.
Washington county soldiers, Wilson
!3; Hughes'9. Soldiers total.for Wiljon,'
403$ Hughes." 418. " '
. This, makes the total for the state,
Wilson, 178,644; Hughes, 178;792j ,
ABSENTEE VOTE.
Cir AtSOClATCO VwcscV '
DULDTH. Minn.; Nov. 11.?A can- .
rass- of the absentee vote; In. St.: lX)uU <
>AY T]
\TED PRESS SERVICE BY LE
Y. YA-, SUNDAY, NOTE
rSTE
sure vote ~~
ALMOST ALL
i
Cornwell 2.182 Ahead of Judge
Robinson with Scventoon
Precincts rss'irig.
HUGHES CARRIES THE STATE
Howard Sutherland Leads Senator
Chilton by 5,700 for
the Senatorship.
cwv A*?ociA.Trn n*r??>
CHARLESTON, Nov. 11?With
twelve precincts missing out of 1,713
in the atate the vote lu West Virginia.
for Charles E. Hughes was
L41.105 and Frenldenl Wilson. 18 8,104.
With seventeen precincts mlSBlng,
the vote for ItobluBon was 188,697,
and Cornwell 140.879, and with
[wenty-six precincts missing the vote
for Sutherland was 140,066 and Chilton
184,966.
n&n punniu
UKri jurm
To the Southern West Virginia
Coal Fields is Improving
Encouragingly.
car associated r*stsl
CHARLESTON, Nov. 11?Better
-eturns from the western railroads
an coal cars is reported in the coal
ELEG
IASED WIRE
MBER 12, 1916,
A ME
FIRST CONGRESSWOM
MAKES HER CLOTHI
p,
X Miss Jeanni
Montana claims the honoc. of ele
history of the United States. She ii
expert in politics, makes her own clot)
cook. She is a Republican.
' t ' '
WILL C OX
SITUA7
' <
In California and Gives That as
a Reason for Not Conceding
the Election.
(BY ABBOCIATM FRKSB)
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?A statement,
showing the fluctuation of the
lead between President Wilson and
Colonel Roosevelt in California in
1912 from day to day for a month
after election and how the state finally
went in favor of RooBevelt after
Wilson was first credited with
winning, was issued here today by
Chairman William R. Willcox, of the
Republican, national committee, to
buuw precisely wny tno rtepuoncan
national committee, cannot at this
time concede the election of Mr. -"Wilson
and must await the offlcfal count
in this'and other states.
"The record shows," Mr. Willcox
BULGARIANS
VERY GR
1J__ H
By a 'Fireman Driven to Bulgarian
Coast is 'Destruction of
Russian Warship.
<BV AtaoaATKO ?HC?D
BERLIN,Nov.. ll~(By wlroleB&
to Sayvillo)-,?Connrmatlon of the destruction
of the Russian dreadnaught
Imporatritsa Maria is given in an .offlcial
report from Bulgarian headauarters,
dafed;Novomber 10, accord
mg to tne overseas Nowb Agency.
" TheMBulgarLan. statement says(: "A
fireman of the Russian drcadnaught
Imperatritsa Maria, driven to our
coast, has conflrmed the already re
ported . destruction of this dreadnaught,
which: was sunk by a mine explosion
near Sulina, of Feodossl? Idland
(at the mouth of the Danube),"
The battleship Imperatritsa Maria
was launched in 19.14,*' \li& displacement
.was 22.GOO tons and .its complement
numberon about-1,000 men,
.
+ * * * * * * -9- *
* *
* JCEAD BLOMTT OFF,
4 . +
mr >iho<U nnn 4
I
RAM
FIRST SECTION
DTCC
A*. lO O
#
AN TRIMS OWN HATS,
SS AND CAN COOK, TOO
TjriwijB *
}
Ate Rankin.
ctinp*the first conjp-esswomapMn -the'
I Miss Jeannette Rankin. She is an
lies, trims her hats and is an excellent
Recalls
ION OF
* ??read,
"that Mr.' Wilson was first in
the lead;-that subsequently this lead
was taken by Colonel Rooseyclt and
that finally the delegation to the
electoral coilego from California was *
divided, two .electors being for Mr.
Wilson and eleven 1 or Colonel Roosevelt."
Mr. Willcox had a conference with
Choxles E. Hughes today, during
which the situation was discussed* No
announcement came from Mr. I-Iughes
in regahnto his own plans. Mr. Willcox
said : afterward that he thought
Mr. Hughes would remain here until
the first of next week.' He said . Ije
did not expect oxhcial'counts from the ;
doubtful states to begin coming in before
then, and that it.would be more*
than a week at least before 'they-were
complete. He would ndt venture a
guess on how mu61v longer than that
it might take.
_I ;
> SUFFER.
EAT LOSSES
?\t, ?
At the Hand of Serbian Troops
Which Enter the Village
L.t.. ^
of Potog.
(iT Ai?o<i*T?o rnuo
LONDON, Nov. 11?9:47 p. ra.?
Serbian troops I pa series of attacks
on Friday north of the .Cerna river
entered the village of Potog three
ralleB north, of Skochlver, and cap- i
tured .600 - prisoners.. according to a i
Reuter despatch" trom Salonlkl. The i
attacks' against the Bulgarian posi- i
tlons met with complete' "success, it i s ]
announced, and the Serbians captured;::
strongly organizedr positions on the
Chuke Range by assault' and occu- <
pled the southern village, of Potog. i
The Serbians; the - despatch adds, \
Inflicted enormous losses and In ad
dlt'Ion to the 600;-prisoners, .took ten
officers Including a lieutenant, colonel,
several howitzers and fleld guns and
other material.
HEAVY FINES IMPOSED.
- -
ms&g}
CHlC^Gp;mi^'Novr:ia~-Fln?8 tptallng
more than $171,000 were as- {
sessod by. Federal Judge Landls today
ngainst Swift' and Company, packers, <
and a number of railroads convicted
of violating- the Interstate commerce <
;
f THE CIRCULATION J I
of The Snndny Telegram In ccn- | 0
I trnl West Virginia Is larger |
^ than tlmt of any other paper. J I
PRICE FIVE CENTS I
\UNK
SELF-STYLED
SPY IS NOW
UNDER ARREST |
V: . ' s-"41 ,
gg
Charged with Attempting Kto i
Extort $3,000 from Wife of
the German Ambassador.
IS HELD UNDER BAIL
Confidential Coded Diplomatic
Despatches Are Found in
Possession of Graves.
WASHINGTON, Nov, 11.?Karl
Armganrd G raves, a self-styled inter- :'v> :>|1?
national spy and magazine writer, was
arrested here today by agents of the
department, of Justice and charged VvfSfi
with attempting to extort $3,000 $?
from Countess Von TJernstortf, wife '
of the German ambassador, by threat-.
enlng to publish letters "alleged to
contain matter showing her luflrral- ' * ^|?fS
ties and falling." ?
Olllclnls of the embassy also allegoM&'S
that. Graves had In his possessionx ('^^1
what apparently were coofldenUal*>rfi^P
coded diplomatic dispatched from the'^MSS
Gorman gov^rnnffeni. to Count von I
BornstorfT. The prisoner told the j
federal agents he obtained nil the doc
umonts from persons who smuggled I
them pnst tho. British censors on
steamship Oscar II. The warrant lip-?
on which he wns arraigned tonight ||
and held on $2,000 bail for a further jg
hearing Wednesday charges him alBO
with bringing Into the District of Gdir^^nsl
urbia letters stolen in Hobokon, N, J., I
where the Oscar IT docks. I
In a statement after his arra.1gn- I
ment at which he entered a pleanot
guilty, Graves assorted that lie
had no Intention of blackmailing theVyfjjjiffl I
countess, that he objected to the use
of the* Avord blackmail, and that
papers he had In his possession, were I
"purely diplomatic" in character.
J.ntevest Aroused.
Much Interest was aroused in oil I
clal quarters at the indirect expoB- I
ure of-thermnnner In which persons 1
and ofllcinls In Germany apparently
are avoiding the British censorship
communicating with the German em- ?
The arrest of Graves furnished I
dramatic conclusion to negptiationl^j^^H
which had beep in progress for
ueiween mm and Prlnee.HatzfoIt^tKffilBB
counsellor or the German embassy. 8
Graves is said to have come to B
Washington last week and called I
the embassy. Ho was known there B
as the man who had published widl|H
what he alleged to be important ;so- 8
crots of the German war office and B
"the Hohen/.ollerns. He also was 8
known as a man who previously h |H
described himself as a member <
German socret service and later as I
cftnploye In foreign fields of the llrit- 8
seir. Officials allege that upon en 1
terlng the office of Prince " Hatzfe;
ho made It known that he had ilnfljflB 8
possession papers which today B
bl;PuKht aboatrbi^arrest One letter g
which he exhibited was to the Cou
oss yon Bernstorff from her son and |
said , according to statements made p
by federal officials tonlcht.. tharaBfeB
had' other letters that would B
"embarrassing for the count- B
should %hey be published." |
-^^-i not decipher ^the B
(Continued on'page 7, first section.. I
^ q 0 OH I S ^
r\i WhoQlInri'ftSTli^^r+hrt' D/\
^ ^yyn oirryin^ *fr I

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