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The advocate. [volume] (Charleston, W. Va.) 1901-1913, March 30, 1911, Image 4

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;IHEA?VOCATE
' riJBI<tSHBD BVBRT THURSDAY
; , Bt Tus ADVOCATE) PUB. CO.
**?? W?
SSf - '
' ; ^q. Pythian Building, Chariton,
W. Va,
Home Phone 92S.
The Advocate Is entered In the
Poet-ofBce at Charleatom, W. Va., a*
?econd class matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Three months $0.5?
liftix months 1.00
year 1.B0
THIHSn.VV, .MARCH UO. i<>if.
HKPUIJUCAN MLI'NICIIWL TICK FT.
Election Monday, April 17. U?ll.
Vol* Member Board of Affair*.
O. A. PETTY.
For Member Common Couneif.
First AY aid ?
R. S. .TARRETT
E. J. RICHARDSON.
'Second Ward?
S. P. RICHMOND.
S. C. BUTLER.
Third Ward?
GEORGE MEDLEY.
F R 1 T Z N U N N 10 N K A MP.
Fourth Ward ?
E. A. RtPLEY.
.1. GLUCK.
Fifth Ward ?
PHILIP NEARMAN.
J. FRED ENGLBRT.
Sixth Ward ?
EDWARD B'.'RDETTE.
F. .1. DANIELS.
Seventh Ward ?
C. H. GKBHART.
L. D. V1CKERS.
Eighth Ward?
A. K. SCHERR.
LEROY CLFuMENS.
Ninth Ward ?
FRIEND COCHRAN.
O. A. DEVINNEY.
Tenth Ward ?
JOHN ISAACS.
C. W. EAGLER.
THE CITY KLECTIOX.
^ With a Republican. Democratic.
Socialist, Independent Republican,
Peoples' a-.id Citizens" ticket in
field to choose from on the
^th of next month. surely
110 shade of i>olitical opinions will
be without representation in the
municipal election, nor does any lack
ad hermits, now. in fact, there is such '
a diversity of opinion, as reflected by '
the tickets named, that the average
voter will experience considerable
difficulty when the time comes to
make a selection.
As The Advocate sees it. the plai-.i
duty of the voter, tired of the man
ner in which the city's affairs have
been conducted during the past two
years, is to catt his ballot for thai
candidate for the Board of Affairs who
stands the best show to win. It is
very generally conceded that Mr.
Bedell will have a walk over. He is,
therefore eliminated. But another
must be chosen, and either he or Mr.
Bedell will in the course of time be
come mayor.
It is within the power of the Re
publicans of the city to select til*
other man. if they will uuite their
lorccs. The question is whether they
will do it or not. Many of them are
opposing the regular Republican nom
inee because he fell from grace dur
ing the last campaign. Others have
allied themselves with the Citizens'
or People's party because lie does not
take a stand on the liquor question.
Neither oi these objections, reduced
to its last analysis, lias any weight.
ll the gentlemau who heads the Re
publican ticket was so objectionable.
xs h> not the forces now opposing
mm because of his ??irregularity" put
up a candidate against him in the
primary election? To the writer's
personal knowledge, strong support
w*s tendered another If he would eon- -
sent to run. H0 feared, even though
he should bj nominated, lest the elec
tion officials selected by the Demo
cia?ic ling ta\or the present incum
bent. He refused, and it was doubt
less this consideration which prevent
ed other candidates from coming for
ward. This fear, however, did not de
ter Mr. Petty, lie was willing to take
his chance and won (he nomination
by default. Hovhig won without op
position in the primary, can any Re
publican repudiate him?
The liquor question has no part noi
puree] in the present campaign. Giv?;,
an opportunity last fall to record their
witjjies as to a "wet or dry town." the
voters of Charleston gave' tlu- saloom
over a thousand majority. True, it
w?s 6iot a municipal election, but pro
hibiten was the paramount issue, and
prohibition lost. And' there is a strong
er reason why the liquor question
should not be injected at this t'me.
By act of the recent Legislature, the
people of this city will soon have an
opportunity to settle this matter at
the pells when the complexion or
parties and the personality of candi
dates will not perplex.
This paper had hoped that after the
disastrous defeat of laat fall, the while
Republicans would get together and
piesei.t a solid front to the Demo
crats at this election. This they liavp
tailed to do. So it again becolaies the
duty of the colored voters to\ save
what they of the wreck \hh-h
threatens. They can best do this by
voting the straight Republican ticket.
The terms of settlement of the lire
men's strike Qn the Queen & Crescent
Railroad are a distinct victory for right
and the Negro. By the agreement en
tered into Saturday last, the strike I*
declared off at once, the strikers arc
to be reinstated within llfteen day*
with seniority standing and rights, no
prejudice; Negro fireman are not to
be employed, north of Oakdale, Tenn.
The precentage of Negro fireman on
the Third District, between Chat
tanooga and Oakdale, Tenn.. hereafter
shall not exceed **that of January 1.
It'll : Negro fireman are not to have
more than half of the passenger or
preferred freight runs, and. are not to
I be assigned to these runs unless en
titled thereto by seniority and fitness
l'oi such service, and any question
that shall arise and caiAiot be settled
by the road and the men can be ap
pealed by either side to Judge Martin
A. Knapp. of the Commerce Court.
The contention of the strikers was
that the services of Negroes as fire
men should be confined to local and
slow freight trains and on yard en
gines.
llad they been successful the eco
nomic progress of the Negro would
have been seriously impeded. As it
is, considerable harm has been done
The relations between the white and
black firemen have been irreparably
strained, and the movement tovl>ar the
Negro from all but menial labor has
be*n forwarded.
Speaking to the Negroes of Atlanta,
last month. President Taft said: "The
secret of the solution of the problem
01 the South is education, primary
pud industrial". At that very time
this strike was on. and industrial edu
cation. one. of the President's factors
in the solution of the South s problem
caused it. The whites saw that in
dustviallv educated blacks stood in
their way to lucrative employment,
and Wiey forthwith attempted to i ?
moye the stumbling block. This loads
to the observation that industrial ed
ucation, the accumulation of '"'wealth,
uprightness nor meekness, nor all of
them when exercised only by the Ne
gro portion of the population of th?
South is a solvent of the problem of
the races. It begins to look as if
greater results would be accomplished
if the whites could get the benefit, cf
seme of the advice which every speak
er seems to feel duty bound to give ^
Negro audience.
XO SKIWUA'EION.
By a vote which was so overwhlem
ing as to be almost unanimous, the
Negro Methodist who make up the
?Washington Conference have decided
against withdrawal from the mother
church. In the reasons assigued for
so voting the question of finance does
not appear, but it had its weight none
the less.
The one hundred ami forty-five who
voted against separation have eviden
tly compared the condition of the ex
chequer of their denomination with
the condition of the exchequers 01
those denominations composed wholl *
of and dominated by Negroes. Tile
comparison was anything but favora
ble to the latter. There was a fatness
of liabilities juul a leanness of asset
which guve them pause.
Sepaiation from the ma/a body
meant a diminution of receipts and an
increase of disbursements. Another
establishment would call for bishop.
and other high-salaried officers. The
denominational schools would be de
pendent wholly upon the Negro church
es. and there was a probability thai
the property of these as well as of
the chu.chcs would revert, by a strict
construction of the law, to the parent
organization. I.> there any wonder
then that Rev. Lyon's proposal me',
such a Waterloo?
? ... ? i -?? ? i ? ? _ __
If it had been Jack Johnson
whom he ossaulted. instead of Booker
Washington. 1*1 rich, who is lauded
as a hero by some, would be mouned.
as a iuartyr.
imicivBA'is \\j> roiyiKis.
Editor J. C. Gilmer. of the Char
leston. CW. Vaj Advocate is o I the
opinion that Washington City is shy
on business genius, but when it conies
to getting up swell banquets, it is
"there with tiie goods." ? Florida Sen
tinel.
The eloquent "Quill Driver" of the
Advocate is "eoin'in some mob." He
seems to think that w?< ore taking the
opposition of the Advocate to the
l?di tor's Conference to heart. W ,
didn't know the Advocate really op
posed it. We are glad to have the
fact acknowledged even at this lan
date. Belated honestly Is better than
no honesty at all. Truth to tell as far
as we wore able to discern* the Advo
cate was a "fence-rider" in this mat
ter. It blew hot and cold. It seemed
j J.o veil its real intention, if any it
had, with conjunction and modifying
clauses and finally completely lo*t it
self in the meshes of the subjunctive
mode on this question. But as out
friend says "Lot the dead bury ?b"
dead." Now lets see if he is willing to
follow his own injunction in this mat
ter.
Our old friead S. B. Moon baa rob
bed us of the honor of a further reply
in his article on another page, "n
titlod "Knockers and Barken?."
"Wo are just now and here concern
ed with another little matter accredit
ed to and acknowledged by the Advo
cate In the last issue it bewailed
the fact of certain presentations on
students registered aft the West
Virginia Colored Institute 4Ui v the
Fail term of 1910* Ten States and Africa were
N * r A
represented.
^ ? ? > \ ?? ' v-V
Begins Jim. 4tb, 1911
1
Is the largest and best equipped school
in the state fpr the education of the
Negro Youths, i .
1 4 courses offered. The school is in the
most flourishing Negro community in
the state. Healthful climate. No
Saloons.
j * ?
^ ** ar *
iirther information address
BYRD PRILiERMAN, Pres.
0
i Institute, West Virginia
the program at the closing of tho
Braniwell school. McDowell County
was so firmly imbeded in (lie miiwlof
the gentleman that ha.11 .accredited
Bramwell to McDowell County when j
il. is in Mercer. In an attempt to
rectify the matter the Advocate goes
on to take a slap at Kimball saying,
"Kimball is in Mercer County," whop
the fact is Kimball is in McDowell
County. It might be bene^cial for
tlie editor of the Advocate, who is our.
very good friend by the way. to lay
off a day avid make a trip over on this
side of the mountain and take a look
around as the boys say. Some where
we read in a book that there are fifty
five counties in the state ol West Vir-i
ginia and that would make fifty-four
more outside of Kanawha. While
none of them could j>ossible compare
with Kanawha, yet some of them are
what you might call "real light down
good communities both in point of in
tellect and general standing," as Bill
Nye wag wont to say. Of course if a
visit can't be had from our good friend
Geographies can be had for $1.25 and
State Histories are cheap, to say
nothing of thp fact that either of
them, we doubt not. can be had for
reference out of the State Library,
merely for the trouble of the getting.
We might feel to pardon any other
man from making mistakes similar to
these, but a mavi from the County of
Kanawha. NEVER! ? McDonald Times
FOR BISHOP II. C. KANSOM. i
Since some weeks ago The Age sug
gested the propriety of derating to
the Board of Bishops the Rev. Reverdy
C. Ransom. The Negro press has
been rather free in its comments re
specting the Bishopric, and. led by the
able Charleston Advocate, whose edi
tor is neither tool nor fool, many
good men have criticized the Age for
presenting New York's great preacher^
Tho Advocate resurrected a lot of old
charges against, Dr. Ransom and chal
lenged us to disprove * t hem, when it
is established everywhere among law
abiding peoples that, it is no burden
upon the accused to prove his inno
cence. The accuser must establish
the guilt of the accused. We do not
fight over this, and we are pleased to
meet the challenge of the Advocate,
and of all everywhere who may hon
estly inquire into the fitness of Dr.
RoTrsom for a high office in the ehureti
exaggerated, as he himself says, out
of all proportion to its warrant. Ou:'
silence under lire and questions has
been duo to our desire to gather and
present the facts involved in the dis
pute.
fn another place in this issue ol The
Age in a statement from Dr. Ran son)
which covers the disagreeable matter
which ir the substance of the contro
versy. it must have beeM painful to
Dr. Ransom to go over the happenings
ol t)i (j period when good men stirred
up anger bv grievous words., and the |
rare was feverish with criticisms. i3 fi -
ler i ban Ti e Age could ever do it. by
pleadings ov eloquence or advocacy. |
f Jr. Ransom, in simple lar/guage, stai*.;s
his own case. Let every honest man
read what he has written, and then
ask himweif it the preacher deserves
the respect of bin fellows, and if. hi*
qualities of mind ? and heart being
everywhere conceded, he deserves pro
motion in the great church whose fore
most pulpiteer In* is.
What are the farts? Dr. Ransom
was not unduly intimate with any
white woman, on a train or an?whet??
else, brutal white iih.m did set upon
him and b"at him. not because he
spoke courteously to a woman, but be
cause lie was a passenger in a pull
man car. The conductor of the tran,
thought powerb's? to interfere, ad
vised Dr. Hansom to call upon him for
assistance if he should decide to take
his grievance's to the courts. He was
i not drunk when he got to Normal. Dr.
j f>.Mjnej)J. never a1 brave mau ? but
green be the grass above his grave
did not tm*<J Dr. Hansom, ami. in
fluenced by flic newspaper reports ?f
what had occurred, was a f fa id Do
meet him ut all. But why ko over all
t his?
It there be other words necensarv.
I -
read the letter from a man who never
tells a lie either in Georgia or Ill
inois UiiEolicitcdly Bishop Turner
wrote Dr. .Ransom that Councill, sick
L'.uo death did not want to die with
out repairing a grave injury he had
done to Dr. Ransom. Through Bishop
Turner Mr. Councill requested Dr.
Ransom to come again to Normal. Dr.
Ransom properly refused.
If Dr. Ransom has been in other
?
places as effective in his public and de
nominational work as he has. been hi
his labors in New York, his record* is
beyond reproach. The Age jffesems
him for -the Bishopric, because we
know him in his private and public
life to be a gentleman, a Christian, a
lender, and the greatest preacher his
church, or any other church, may now
claim. In respect of : this, The Ago
may have misgivings as to other nici
and forces, but we know that John C.
C'lmer, of the Advocate, in whatever
hri has written with respect to Dr.
-Ranwm, has sought only the truth,
for he deals justly with mt'.) and pro
blems. The Age does not recede from
its position in believing in and in
sisting upon a clean ministry.
Baltimore, March 21) ? According to
the opinions expressed by leading
members of* the Galilean Fishermen,
the outlook is most hopeful tor the
order, after the receivership lor the
National Grand Tabernacle shall have
been lifted.
Attorney* C. C. Fitzgerald and W. C.
iMcCard. the receivers, havje just re
turned* from Hampton, Va.. where
they went to loqk into the affairs of
ihe endowment department of the
pruer. the $22,000. liabilities caused
Grand Treasurer Joseph P. Evaps to
apply for the receivership. National
Grand Ruler Columbus Gordon, of this
eity, also expresses himself hopeful of
the future of the order.
GahJean Fisherman have a bright
future.
THE CRISIS
Edited by W. E. BURGHARDT DUBOIS
Circulation: November, 1,000; April, lbfOOO
....... 1
? j? i
- . i
rial fester Edition -!
Ready March 27 Cover in Three Colors
H
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STORER COLLEGE
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~ Founded in 1807? r~
More than 400 men and women have graduated hei\3. The oldeit
school in the state for Colored students. Magnificent location. Eleva
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BUILDINGS BEING ADDED TO OUR PLANT THIS YEAR. The regu
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Our Library catalogued according to the Dewey System, is one of
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FIRST GRADE CERTIFICATES ARE GRANTED TO THOSE MEM
BERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASSES WHO ARE RECOMMENDED
TO THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. Storer is interdenominational
in its faculty and student body. Jts whole influence is toward Christian
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