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The advocate. [volume] (Charleston, W. Va.) 1901-1913, March 30, 1911, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85059812/1911-03-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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mvmmm- ,
crows ? flits STATU
COMPILED BY MIIOiT
^ . + . . - - * ? '
Interesting Data About'
Matters Not Gerier- ?
ally Known
SOME TABLES i
THAT TALK1
. ; ... .? 1
Even flgureB are sometimes inter
? - -
eating, not only to the parties directs
ly interested but to the average
reader who g Ives sufficient attention
to matters , of general interest as t<fc
have some idea of what Is really djonq
__ by. those who have to tliirfk to accom
plish results. The recent session ot.f
the legislature added several netf
judicial circuits. In but one instance ;
was there any real objection, and irf
that, particular case no change waS '
made. A general redisricting did
not prevail nor did all the bills, seek
ing to create new circuits, pass ana!,
become laws, but a number of new. (
ones were created. ^ ;
Auditor Darst. some time ago com*
piled a list of all the cases ? -chanfc !
eery, civil and criminal ? each separ
ately ? of which he could receive re^
ports from the counties of the StaUSjf
The figure's given below are the total' 5
of all these cases, or in other wordfj,
a recapitulation of the data gathered
by the auditor, and include the casei
commenced In the various counties,
during the year ending September* ,
30, ii&lO, and also the cases that '
were decided during that period and; ,
the number pending at the end of;
that period. ' (
There are few persons who have
any idea of the number of cases that
are commenced in the courts of the
Rtat.o, or, in their own county. Jit
McDowell county 1,038 cases were
commenced during that period and
93 2 were decidcd. This was the
largest number Doth as to the nufn
her commenced and the num'ber de
cided during that year. The total
number of cases in Ohio county are
not given, for the reason that the
criminal cases were not available
. for this table, but they are not ex
pected to equal McDowell, whore
the criminal alone we^e 744. The
largest aggregate number of chan
cery and civil cases was in Kanawha,
where they totalled 538.
Omitting all the cases from Brax- i
ton and no figures of the criminal
cases front Ohio and ttaleigh coun
ties. the following interesting table
is the result, ' shewing what the
judges of the courts have been do
ing:
Cases ' Cases Cases
County. Commenced. Pending. Decided.
Barbour .... 318 207 320
Berkeley .... 100 330 97.*
Boone 139 161 157
Brooke ..... 11S 5 5 54^
Cabell 813 1085 719 *
Calhoun . . . ;' 7 6 17') 9 2
Clay 144 178 176
Doddridge. . . . 75 21 2 1 02
Fayette 4 38 5 50 34 4
Gilmer , 7 9 '117 177
Grant 26 3 7 24
Gjreenbrier. . . . 125 3 4 '5 142'
Ham psh ire ... 8 3 1 5 J- 101
Hancock 83 3 8 - 1-08
ITardy 80 85 76
Harrison .... 605 523 759
Jackson 151 2 66 162
Jefferson .... 108 7 6 3 2
Kanawha 85 2 1 25 7 77 7
Lincoln 431 214 217
Lewis 1 77 360 202
Logon 361. 254 1 07
Marion 725 69 2 4 77
Marshall .... 173 9 1 79
Mason 15 7 1 97 176
Mercer 295 503 375
Mineral ....... 118 150 86
Mingo 750 54 3 . 192
Monongalia... 394 1 78 216
Monroe ..... 1 5 1 60 91
M6h?<m ...... 53 - TTTO ? ? frt>?
McDowell ...1038 37 8 932
Nicholas .... 205 776 1 34
Ohio 379 511 297
Pendleton ... 93 1 27 74
Pleasants . . . 55 86 6 4
Pocahontas..., 162 558 148
Preston 233 3 60 1 60
Putnam 154 270 9 4
Raleigh 4 292 181 203
Randolph .... 663 650 571
Ritchie ..... 133 205 164
Roano 140 103 ? 5 2
Summers .... "35 265 21 1
Taylor 184 340 229
Tucker 37 9 570 114
Tvlcr J J 1 221 139*
Cpshur 21 4 38 1 1 76
Wavno 406 4 60 30<<
Webster .... 188 99 89
Wetzel 234 3 11 2 81
Wirt 112 119 43
Wood 7 20 291 533
Wyoming ... 283 189 94
WrCKWKHHAM TO APOUK88
MOW fCNGfjAND .noWlU/KHS
Providence, R. T., March 30. ? The
Now England Jewelers and Silver
smiths' Ass6ciatlon, which entertain
er! Preside n<t Taft last year, has pro
vided for noted speakers at Its an
nual banquet here Saturday night.
Among those who will be heard are
Attorney (Jcnpral Wlckersbam, ex
Congressman J. Adam Bode of Min
nesota and Prof!, William P. Shep
herd of Columbia University.
. - .'Va < -
mm'mnisAt ****
zrri
*
ANDERSON'S GINGHAM
DRESSES AT
500 DRESSES MUST *BE SOLD IN 5 DAYS. DETERMINED
LOWERING OF PRICES' 3o THAT NOT ONE GARMENT WITji
BE IjEFT. ?'
$12.98 Buys a Beautiful
? ?- i V 3
*1 i
*<
f
mmm mmm ,,
FOULARD OE ME8SATilk?. PARK OR EVENING SHAPES,
HIGH NECK OR IiO\V NKtfK/ SLEEVES OR K I M O N A.
SLEEVE. POSITIVELY EXCLUSIVE STYLES. COME EARLY
TO GET YOUR CHOICE.
$9.95 for Dresises Frdm $15 to $18
THIS IS GRRATEST . OPPORTUNITY" EVER OFFERED. POS
ITIVELY NOTHING LlftE IT REFORM.
Select Any Dress $15 to $18 C*Q Qt
and All Yon Have to Pay is
I ' ? "x ' aakasfaoi : A
r ? -"'.i' si;' ? r? f ?
SUIT DEPARTMENT
r '*% \ V. , *
$20.00 SUITS at $14.95
HANDStjfJf K TAILOR M$l)Eft LIGHT BLUE, DARK BLUE,
TAN, GKEt; MIXTURE, fcjLK 061X^1). HA ftlT BACK SKfRTS,
STRICTLY TAILORED, ON SAI^E
? $14.98
_ (15M SltttiECOATS
IN TAN, CRjEAM, BLUB, BijAcfc^A^D SERGE, SAILOlt
COLLARS TRIMMED WITH BLACK SILK, OTHERS PLAIN. OX
SALE *. "v > . >r ;.r V , ? .
$12.98
? AIL HATS TRIMMED FREE -
?' ? ' .> ? '* sj t
= ti ? . ? 1 ? ; ? ? '' 1 ! ..
BUCK HA
JfH i *A ? ?? v v JA* ?
SHORT SILK KIMONOS AT
:$5 Beauties at
i ONE WOULD THINK IT WAS THK ENt> OP SUMMER 'InI
STEAD Or ? BEFORE EASTER, THE WAY WE'RE
THESE NEWEST ANI> CLRVI'IREST SPRING HATS. BUT \V
KNOW OUR BUSINESS ? BEEN AT IT FOR YEARS AVI> SHOt'fcjnttr
EVERY PEI/TGHTEU CUSTOMER NOW MEANS A HALF P055E# ?
NEW CUSTOMERS IjATEH ON. , ':?jN
NSflV HELMET MODtSW, PLENTY. $<{.<><) MANY PLACl
THURSDAY, FRIDAY ANi> SATURDAY
$1.25 AND JHl.oO SAITXlRS IN THE IxATEST TURNUP Olj
STRAIGHT
. ?????
$5.00 SILK MESSi^JJENE
SKIRTS, ASSORTED
shades;
y ON S VliE
L. ~u
$2.98
liOOK AT OUK I .INK
OF 08<> OOWXS.
\VORTH $1.50 ANY
WHERE.
30-IN C H TAFFETA ,
. $1.00 YARD KIND,
BLACK ONLY,
W11ILJ3 IT LASTS
79c
LAAVN KIMONAS,
FULL LENGTH,
ASSORTED COLORS,
. ON SALE ,.r. .
69c
Ail . J !,
PURE JjINESX TAkVjIS
DAMASK, 04 ANI) 70-IN
WIDE* WORTH r?9c,
ASSORTED PATTERNS,
? OX S VliTC
39c
nHHMBHI
75c KMHROIDEKY AT
40c. BE A1 IT J FU ti
SKIRT FliOUNClNG INT
DAINTY PA'rTERKS,
ON SALE AT
49c
?
$5.00 SILK PRINCESS
SI/IP8,
WIIITR ONIiY.
OX SAIjfO AT
$2.98
KAYSERS
IjOSG 'silk OJLOVKS, 4 I
AIjTj OOJMJR8.
ON SA1.E ;|.
? 79c :=^i
AT BANQUET LAST NUT I
OF TIE BANKERS Of
BRBUP UBS STATE
T. J. Davis, [of Cincin
nati, Was Chief
OTHERS TOO
TOOK PART
The regular semi-yearly meeting
of the Fourth Group of West Vir
ginia Bankers enme to a close last
night with a banquet at the Kanawha
hotel at which about forty members
and guests were present. At tnu
conclusion of a very delectable menu,
Senator W. E. Chilton arose as toast
master and with a few witty re
marks of felicitation anft * welcome,
in which he highly complimented the
work of the bankers of West Vir
ginia for the active part t'noy liaa
taken in the development of the
State, introduced the principal speak
er of the evening, Mr. T. J. Davis, a
prominent banker of Cincinnati. Mr.
Davis was asked to speak on the topic
of "The Central Bank,"" the estab
lishment of which is advocated 'by
Senator Aldrich in the measure
known as the "Aldrich Central Bank
Bill."
Change in Banking System.
Tn speaking of the subject Air.
Davis, who has devoted a groat deai
of time and study to ihe question
find particularly to the methods used
by foreign countries, negan his ad
dress by comparing these methods
with those of our own country. He
stated that in his opinion the bank
ing system of the United State*
would sooner or later be modeled
after that system now in use by other
countries. A close study of our pros*
ent system has demonstrated that
there is a lack of coherence, due
chiefly to the peculiar unit of action
characteristic of our banks. This
lacki of coherence is made manifest
v, hen our present system allows
credit t*> pile up until there is not
enough available currency to reserve
against it; a crash comes, each bank
tries its best to protect itself and a
panic is the result. .Mr. Davis fur
ther stated that to correct this evil,
there must be a central bank, or
"fountain head," as it were. Thfi
principle is included in the Aklrich
bill, which provides for a central
bank in which every bank in the
country lias an interest. This cen
tral bank is to have the power to Is
sue Its own nolo acceptable any
where. The 'bill further provides
that the United States be divided
Into fifteen districts, each bank to
have a vote in electing a part of the
directorate, regardless of ifs capital,
while a certain number of the direc
tors are to be elected by these t>anks
according to the number of shares
held by each bank.
To Have Hi# Directorate.
The central bank is to be capital
ized at $150,000,000 and is to have
a directorate of 4u members. The
President is to select the governors
and several directors, and part of
the directorate is to consist of farm
ers and other commercial men not
bankers, it is further intended chat,
the various sub-treasuries of the
country bo made branches of this,
central 'banly ahd that in tinre of
need a message to a sub-treasury will
be answered *03; an amount of cur
rency to meet the emergency. All
of the banks arc to deposit their
gold Jiera, creating the " largest
amount of gold concentrated at any
point in the world. The scattered
condition of the gold at present
makes a severe money stringency
which results in panics. Mr. Davis
advocated p- feeling of more confi
dence among the banks of today and
said tjiat the central bank would
create this feeling and result in a
great development of legitimate en
terprises which are now retarded.
Some Other Features.
Tn comparing the system of thin
country with that of foreign coun
tries, the speaker stated that the
United States banks are not empow
ered to accept time drafts, .. Foreign
countries have this pow?r and tho
custom results in great aul to its ex
porters in placing their goods in for
eign countries.
Another good, feature of the Aid
rich bill is that it will enlarge the
powers of the national banks by per
mitting them to establish savings
banks, have trust and fiduciary rela
tions and loan on real estate. This
-propose*! bill will result sooner or
later ill a uniform banking system
for the banks of tl\o United States.
Other Speakers.
At, the conclusion of Mr. Davis' re
marks Mr. Mont J. (Jloebel, cashier of
the Fifth-Third National Bank or
Cincinnati, was called upon by the
toastm aster. ' Mr. Goebel responded
in a few words in which lie declared
himself in favor of the Aldrich bill
Senator Price was next called
upon as a "lawyer, business man and
banker." In a few words Mr. Price
spokf; of the evils which now exist in
the present day banking system and
declared himself in favor of any leg
islption which would correct theni
Ex-Governor Dawson, called upon to
balance the Democratic speech mado
by Mr. Price, briefly pointed out the
evils that now exist, and stated that
something must be done to correct '
them.
Mr. Fred M. Staunton was next re
ferred to as "The Tall Sycamore ot
Mill Creek, "#and when asked to ad
dress the assembly very nicely passed
the honor on to Hon. .7. E. Chilton.
In liis usual witty manner Mr. Chil
ton expressed himself as satisfied
with the present banking system, but,
declared that ho wanted to see son.
arrangement perfected by which tin?
people of West Virginia could u.s<?
pie vast natural resources as collat
eral where now it is worth practical
ly nothing and that it could tie used
as collateral in place of trie railroad
bonds which everybody knows were
\ ,
ji - , . ? .v
never issued with tiny idea* of beirig
paid. Dr. Robins followed Mr. Chil
ton and expressed his desire to^sea
some centralization of local banks*'
Air. Joe Hill expressed himself in a
gratifying manner concerning the in
terest exhibited by the bankers and
the pleasure their presence afforded
to- all. At tlffe conclusion of Itis re
marks Mr. Hill announced that the
next meeting of thH bankers wdul'a
be held at White Sulphur in July.
The Business Meeting.
The business meeting held yester
day afternoon at the Kanawha, was
called to order at 3 o'clock by F. M.
Staunton, chairman, and the ^follow
ing program, with the exception of
the topic "Legislation" by Mr. Mason
Matthews, president of the Bank of
T^ewisburg, was .carried out. Mi\
Matthews was unavoidably absent
and his subject wa^ placed before the
meeting for gener&l discussion. '
Other topics discussed by individ
uals, on which a general discussion
followed, were:
Interest on Deposrits--r-Keep It
Down ? John Ij. Dickinson, cashier,
Kanawha Valley Bank.
The Postal . Savings Banks. Will
They, Effect Us? ' I
Co-Operation of. Banks for Mutual
Protection ? S. VH M^iht^s, St arte
Bank Commissioner. ' ii
The Aldrich Currency Bill ? T. .T.
Davis, cashier First National P.ank,
Cincinnati, Ohio. ( t '
The election of officers for . the en
suing year was held and the follow
ing members were elected :r Presi
dent, D. I j. Prichard;- secretary, J.
C. MOrflSbti . "*'*7' ?Jr"
? ? ? . ?j.
NEW JAPANESE BATOLESiyP
Tokio, March 30. ? The new Japa
nese battleship Sottau, one of the
most formidable fighting machines of
the new Japanese navy, was success
fully launched today. The vessel
will have a displacement of 20.800
tony and will carry twelve 12-inch
guns and ten 10-inch guns in her
main armament.
CHICAGO G^AIN MARKET
Chicago, March 30. ? Wheat clo?J 1
at 80 7-S, corn 4 7 3-4, oats 30 1-2.
LEPROSY CURE NOW
CONSIDERED ONE OF TIE :
MODERN POSSIBILITIES
Washington, March 30. ? The an
nouncement ot Dr. Duval, of Tulane
University, New Orleans, that he had
successfully inoculated Japanese
dancing mice with the bacillus of
leprosy has attracted much interest
among scientists in Washington, es
pecially those employed by the gov
ernment. Such an achievement,
hardly less important than the al
ready accomplished growth of the
bacilli on artificial media, would be
a notable progress toward the dis
covery of a -serum for the prevention
of leprosy. v'' -' '? ? i .. ' i !
I.n the absence of official confirma
tion of i)r. Duval's claim, no com
ment* was offered by Washington
scientists who l;ave studied leprosy.
Dr. Duval is regarded as an eminent
ly competent and reliable worker,
and probably was assured of his suc
cessful experimentation before he
made its results public, lie had al
ready accomplished the growth of the .
bacillus of leprosy, his achievements
being of slightly later date than the
first announced by Dr. Clogg, now of
the Public Health and Marine Hos
pital Service, and ttfe subsequent
achievements by Dr. Currie and Pr/
Erinkerhoff, of the Service.,
? Doctor* in Hawflil.
Drs. Clegg, Currie and Drinker
hoff, who haye aceomplisned so much
in tfre cultivation of the bacillus
lepra, are at the Leprosy I,nvestiga- <
lion Station of the service at Kala
wao, Molokai, Hawaii, the country
.most infected with leprosy. The
problem there is acute and the sta
'tion, established in 1 9 0 ?>, has had
more and better opportunities for
the investigation of Lhf* vllsense, eas
ily the most fearful in me popular
mini}, than any other institution in
the Svorltf.
Leprosy became a public problem
in Hawaii in IS 0 3, when the spread
n di I i. in . i
}f th? disease fcmong th4 native "pop-' -'
ilation alarmed the community. i
Since 18G5 t lio policy of segregation j
iias been p\irsiied with varying de- I
groes of thoroughness. Lepers were <
rtrst. sent to the leper settlement on
the island of Molokai in 186(5. The"
number of patients segregated there 1
$ach year since has 'Vari-ell 'from 27 1
to 558, the average being 146 and ]
tho total being 6,853 ror tne forty
years following 1S66. 1
? Conceal Disease.
When the first census of the terri
tory of Hawaii under American rule j
was made in 1900 there were 37,63a
Hawaiians, of whom 951 were lepers
in seclusion. In other words, 1 in 40
person* was a leper. How many per- ?
sons suffering from the disease con
cealed the fact cannot ne known. I
That they did ai.-u do conceal it and
I hat their friends and kinsmen help
them to conceal it is a fact;, they
tfr&ui the. isolation wjiich is not only
absolute, but permanent. . .
Though cases of leprosy in the
United States am not infrequent, they
are not alarmingly numerous. They
have been confined aln^ost Wholly to
the seaboard. t
The possible transmission of the
disease by flies and jnosquitoes is a
phase of the subject that is receiving
especial attention at this time. That
such a transmission is possible is be
lieved by several scientists, hut the
data now available are not regarded
as permissive of a positive state
ment.
Athletic Clubs. ? No boy can.be a
fine athlete, football, baseball or bas
ketball player, runner, . jumper, or
gymnast, who weakens his heart and
poisons his blood by cigaretee smok
ing. Prof, _ Mike Pouo.Yan,. directory
of the New York Athletic Club, gives
this testimony: "To do any athletic i
work at all, tobacco must be abso*7
lutcly tabooed. Smoking injures the , ,
nerves, softens the muscles and weak-' 1
ens the stomach." ;
Colleges. ? Tobacco and, scholar
ships are not friends. They cannot'
go together, says Dr. .T. W. Seaver,
of Yale College.
"Cut out cigarettes or ? leave
school," is the official mandate that -
has been issued by the faculty of
Cornell College. The principal of
? .* , . m /'I.;;,*
^ ??' .i,- ...
Che schools in 'Kenosha, Wis., has is
sued nn order that ail 'users of cl- '!V*v
garet.tes must he expelled from<
3chools, as the influence of the smok
ers on other boys is decidedly bad. "
The proprietors of the Spencerian
Business College, say: "We refuse
to receive users.-Qf tobacco in -our in- "*
stitution, because it is our exper
lence in teaching more than 500,
000 'young people, that cigarettes ' v
bring shattered nerves, mental weak- 'V ' .
ness, stunted growth and general
physical and moral degeneracy."
- ?- . ? ? .. WWt
SHIRLEY
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDERS ?
The kind that most men wear. Notice the
[ coed back and the (root ends. Th ay slide
in (rictionles* tubes and move as you move.
You will quickly KC why Shirley Presi
dent Suspenders are comfortable and eco
nomical for the working man or business
man.
Light, Medium or Extra Heavy Weights
? Extra Lengths for Tall Men.
Price 50 Cents from your local dealer
Or by mail from the factory. v 4
Signed Guarantee on every pair
THE C. A. EMARTOM MFO. CO;
JJJ MAIN*STR?ET, SH1I1KT. MASS. - _ '
Our BIG Sale Begins Tomorrow 2
, And Will Cofttlnue Not Ovcr lO Day^ "
Carpets ,
Rugs,
Mattings,
Linoleums ,
Shades ,
hwnings
Our purchases for Spring havo been heavy and Ave
make this sale on new, bright, dc^yable merchandise
for your spring cleaning, giving you values 25 p*?r cent
under the market value. Many items one-third off.
If you. can use a caipet, we have it. 25 per cent under.
If you need a Rug, we can give you one 2 r? per cent
under.
If you want Matting, it la yours, 25 to 50 per cent un
der. vifc': I Oc, 14c and l'?c while they lasl.
Tan you use Lac? Curtains? One-third to one-half off.
If you can use linoleums, wp have Ihe best '17 ! - 2c ?
Aiso we have the 4-yard Cork Linoleums best in the
world.
Heavy Inlaid Linoleums for Stores, bath rooms, etc.
1 000 Door and Hearth Huga, (losing less than cos' of
the yardage.
50 Full Size Room Rugs from $S.OO to $15.00. you can
save from $5.00 to $10.00 on our prices this sale on
Rugs alone.
Small lots of Lace Curtains OM3-half of regular prices.
Table Oil Cloths iOoand 15c while il lasts. 4
Floor Oil Cloths 95c for Ihe 10c grade.
Awnings for residences or stoics, send for esti/r jb n.
TC: amino our- Wilton and Velvet Room Rugs.
Men's
Wear
Men's
Furnish
ings
Wo will give you an opportunity that only comes with. ' '
one of Daniels' Sales to buy Men's Furnishings ? catch
our prices?; :pass It along ? wo have the goods lo bar* '??*
up every figure. ?
1 0 00 pieces Men'fc Balbriggan Shirts and Drawers, 25c, ??J.
<; for $1.00. 1 ' ? '-Vtfy;
1 000 pieces Men's Medium Weight Flexible Wenrers,
50 each, l pieces for $ 1 . 5 . *
Men's Silk or Mercerized Shirts and Drawers, 75c, Vw'
worth $1.50.
Large line Men's Work Shirts, ?> for $1.00; this Sate, <V
4 4c each.
r.00 Men's Dress Shirts, some with and some without <
Collars, nearly all sizes, closing 25c, these are dis
carded styles worth up to $1.00.
The best 50c Soft, Shirt. The best Silk Pongee dollar , ^
Shirt on the market.
Wool Shirts, this salo '^c, formerly $2.00, til? closed.
1000 pieces Neckwear, 50c values, 25c or 3 for 50c,
1 000 pairs Men's J-2 Hose, 4 for 25c or 4 for 50c. *
.*?00 pairs Pure Silk HalfHose, this sale 25c pair.
500 pairs' Men's Spliced Sole, this sale $2.50 dozen.
500 pairs Suspenders, 5c, 10c and 20c. . I
Vion's Sample Hat? 98c, worth up to $3.00, '
Hoys' and Ouildren's Hats and Cap-, large stock.
Ove ralls, all grades KhaUi Pants, thr best, 7 this sale, i>
,r-M
Watch This Space For Special Prices DANIELS ?|
y , L -J
v '? ' ;

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