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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, March 12, 1895, Image 7

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TUESDAY MARCH 112.1895
LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEP.
Weather forecast
for San Francisco and
vicinity: Occasional
light showers Tues
day morning, fol
lowed by fair : j.i
statu nary tempera
ture: light to fresh
westerly winds. This
vail give a variety of weather for
„ *„ ..»'e sailor with his umbrella and
the dude with his high hat.
Oakland held an exciting election yesterday.
President Cleveland's mother-in-law is in
Oakland to-day.
Tlie French Reformed Church has been in
dorsed by the presbytery.
Dr. Brown arraigned Dr. Heron before the
C i tionalists yesterday.
The streets and the sidewalks in the commer
cial part cf the city arc in a very bad condition,
Manufacturers all over the state write that
they will attend the convention next Tuesday.
Over 5000 persons listened to the American
Band concert in the Mechanics' Pavilion last
>. veiling.
A Whitehall boat was capsized in the bay
yesterday. The occupants were rescued by the
tug Ilazel.
Railroad time-tables are published in The
Call free of charge for the accommodation of
the public
The Grand Jury found indictments against
twelve persons on charges of renting houses
for immoral purposes.
Insurance circles were excited yesterday bva
declaration of rate war between union and
non-union companies.
The schooner J. M. Colman dragged her an
chors yesterday morning and fouled the Amer
ican ship Jabez Howes.
Leonard Grover and Leonard Grover Jr. are
being sued on a promissory note which carried
2 per cent a week Interest.
Ihe British ship Beecroft arrived at London
on Sunday, making one of the longest voyages
on record from San Francisco.
A Chinese woman who witnessed the killing
01 J. B. Forman has identified "Pitrgv" Johnson
as one «>f the three murderers.
Land Agent Mills declares Secretary Smith's
action illegal in suspending the issuance of
patents to subsidy railroad lands.
Alvin \\. Rhodes, a painter on Sanchez street,
was arrested yesterday on complaint of his wife
for failure to provide for his minor child.
To-night the Supervisors will meet and con
sider the Church-street franchise and also hear
a plan for the aid of the city's unemployed.
a new fast steam-launch, built for the Alaska
Improvement Company, was swung into the
water from Howard-street wharf yesterday.
Another attempt will be made to pass the
legislative bill nroviding tor the prohibition of
burials within "he city limits after January 1,
1900. J '
Meritorious artists and art students will re
ceive recognition and encouragement through
appropriate publications in the columns of The
Call.
Judge Wallace yesterday received a letter,
signed "Charles Wilson," threatening that if
he does not reduce his sentences he will be
killed.
Judge Belcher refused yesterday to allow
Grand Jury men to tell how the indictments
against George Lee and Albert Houston were
found.
Mrs. Blanch Dowdy of Gilrov has written to
Sheriff Whelan asking him to arrest her Chi
nese cook, charging that he tried to poison her
family.
. A firebug made an unsuccessful attempt to
burn down the residence of Jacob -Riebes, 1713
Sacramento street, at an early hour yesterday
morning.
The Supervisors will make an inspection trip
to Lake Merced to-day and investigate the
»'olma watershed of the Spring Valley Water
Company.
James W. Shanklin answers the attack on
Senator Perkins concerning the lieu lands, and
shows that his action was for the best interests
of the State.
R. Porter* Ashe's account of his guardianship
of the person and estate of Mrs. Sarah Althea
Terry has been confirmed as satisfactory by
Judge Slack.
R. C. Ryder, who got a chance to reform by
Judge Low five weeks ago, was booked yester
day for vagrancy, as he was continuing his
bunko work.
The order permitting the construction of
frame dwellings in certain parts of downtown
was passed by the Supervisors over the Mayor's
veto yesterday.
The Merchants' Association is about to in
vestigate the different systems of street-paving,
with a view of improving the thoroughfares of
San Francisco.
H. Mendelson, an expressman living at l?,(j
Shipley street, was kicked on the. side of the
head by his horse last night at Fifth and
Mission streets.
At the meeting of the Young Women's Suf
frage League last night Mrs. Anna F. Smith
declared herself opposed to military training
iv the public schools.
The Italian ship Macdiarmid arrived from
Liverpool yesterday morning after a rough ex
perience rounding the Horn. One of the
sailors died on the voyage.
James Murphy, a young hoodlum, was
booked st the City Prison yesterday on two
charges of burglary, one at 713 Webster street,
and the other at 17 Stockton street.
The Holmes Mining Company and others of
Nevada yesterday contracted to sell tailings
and low-grade ores to an Eastern syndicate,
the deal involving some $4,000,000.
Five out of six favorites won at the track
yesterday, but bettors had become wary, and
the books ;vere rather light. Ingomar easily
defeated Romaire in the match race.
John Ebred, a chicken rancher near the Six-
Mile House, and his boarder, John Furnish,
had a tight lant night, during which a revolver
was used, and they were both arrested.
Robert Woodburn is suing Dr. John F. Morse
and the German Benevolent Society for $50,
--000 for the loss of his right leg, which he
claims was carelessly and unnecessarily ampu
tated.
The argument on the legality of arrests
made under Grand Jury presentments was
held before Judge Low yesterday, and it was
agreed to refer the question to the Supreme
Court.
C. a. Hughes, an ex-waiter in the Hoffman
Cafe, was yesterday sentenced to pay a tine of
$50 or fifty days in jail for carrying iron
knuckles, the complaining witness being W. J.
Sulivan.
There may be trouble between Greece and
Hawaii because of the deportation of P. C.
Camarinos, a Greek subject and brother of D.
G. Camarinos of this city. The Greek Consul-
General has been appealed to.
Harry Hirshfeld, who ran away from his
home, 1312)6 Buchanan street, a week ago, was
captured in front of the City Hall last night by
his father, who preferred a charge of vagrancy
against him at the City Prison.
The case against Attorney A.G. Maguire, who
was charged by Mamie Conway with betrayal
under promise of marriage, was dismissed "by
Judge Low yesterday after the complaining
witness had given her testimony
William Hazel, who is wanted in New York
for grand larceny, was sent Fast yesterday
morning. He took with him all the money in
the treasury ol the Alcazar Theater, and his
ex-partner, J. P. Howe, is disconsolate.
"*C. Johnson, a rigger employed at the new
Parrott building on Market street, near Fourth,
fell a distance of forty feet yesterday afternoon
and sustained a lacerated wound of the scalp
and a possible fracture of the base of the skull.
Superintendent of Schools Moulder has dele
gated his power of naming an appointee to one
of the Hearst scholarships at the univcrsty to
Professor Ellsha Brooks of the Girls' High
School, who will name one of his pupils for the
place.
The parish mission of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church is now called St. James Parisn, Rich
mond district. Rev. H. Chetwood has been ap
pointed by Bishop Nichols as missionary to it.
The Bishop will soon appoint a warden and
secretary.
James Ryan, ex-Supervisor, was acquitted
yesterday of the charge of felony for having
acted as an election officer without qualifying.
Judge Wallace said that upon so little evidence
as was In the case the indictment should never
have been found.
The lire at 3:34 o'clock yesterday morning
was caused by a defective flue in the dwelling
at 33 McAllister street. The building was dam
aged to the extent of $400 and the contents
about $150. The house Is owned by A. Grimm
and occupied by J. D. Frazer and H. Mcintosh.
The Installation of Rev. D. Hanson Irwin as
pastor of St. John's Presbyterian Church, cor
ner of California and Octavia streets, will
take place this evening, when Rev. Dr. Robert
Mackenzie will preach the sermon. Rev.
Joseph E. Scott will give the charge to the pas
tor, and Rev. J. C. Smith the charge to the peo
ple. The moderator of the presbytery, Rev. H.
N. Bevier, will preside and propound the con
stitutional questions.
INSURANCE CASE
IS SUBMITTED.
D. M. Delmas Made a Masterly
Closing Speech for the
Plaintiff.
BOTH SIDES ARE CONFIDENT.
Much Speculation Is Going On
in Regard to the Expected
Decision.
The case of the Continental Insurance
Company against the Board of Under
writers was submitted to Judge McKenna
in the United States Circuit Court yester
day. The closing speech was made by I).
M. Delmas and half the insurance men in
town were present to hear his argument.
He set forth the claims of the Continental
Company in an able manner and quoted
numerous authorities in support of his
position.
"It may be well to advert to the fact that
this is not a trial of the points at issue,"
ATTORNEY D. M. DELMAS ADDRESSING THE COURT IN THE
GREAT INSURANCE CASE.
[From a courtroom sketch by Kahler.]
began Mr. Delmas. "The order of the
court granting this injunction is only
a preliminary one and the burden of
proof is on the other side to show
that such order is too broad and sweeping
in its effect and should be discontinued.
If it can be shown that the defendants are
guilty, then they must stand the incon
venience attendant upon a trial of the
case. Until such action is taken the pro
tection eiven by this court in its prelim
inary restraining order should not be taken
away.
"Certain facts stand out prominently be
fore the eye 3of the court in this matter.
First, a? to the formation and scope of the
Board of Underwriters. Disguise it as you
will, gloss it over and call it by what name
you please, the fact remains that its un
doubted purpose is to obtain a monopoly
of the fire insurance business of this coast
and to fix a rate of premium regardless of
the public interests involved. Its object is
to drive out all competitors. This its
members are scheming to do by means of
combinations, by-laws, circulars and other
coercive measures. Placing this argument
on a broad base we can then assert that
this organization is a conspiracy against
public policy, and I doubt not "but what
it is amenable to the penal laws of the
State."
Mr. Delmas then proceeded to quote
authorities in support of his contention.
Cases where combinations bad been formed
to keep up the price of coal, lumber, grain
bags and other articles were read and com
mented upon. The one principally relied
upon, however, was that of the Queen In
surance Company vs. The Texas Insur
ance Club. In this instance the club was
formed to keep the premiums paid on in
surance, and, like the Continental, the
Queen Insurance Company was boycotted.
The Court of Appeals in Texas held that
such a combination was against public
policy and in restraint of trade. "I hope I
nave" established the fact," continued Del
mas,'that a combination of this sort is
against the policy of the State, if not ame
nable to the "penal laws.
"A boycott is a somewhat similar com
bination." By means of persuasion or in
timidation it seeks to exclude a person
from business relations with his fellows.
Such persuasion and intimidation have
been brought to bear in this case and have
we not also a similar combination? Is not
the object of the Board of Underwriters
the raising and keeping up of the fire rates,
and have not the salient facts sufficiently
proven that an injunction is necessary?
In this instance the court will not stop at
words and phrases in forming its judg
ment."
Mr. Delmas then took up the authorities
quoted by Attorney Page and after a care
ful analysis pointed out that many of them
referred to business transactions and were
not combinations, boycotts or conspira
cies. "For instance," said he. "John Doe
spends the summer months at the Del
Monte Hotel and makes his home at the
Palace during the winter, paying for the
accommodation $3 a day. Supposing the
manager of the Palace goes to him and
says) 'Mr. Doe, if you can arrange it so as
stay with us all the year round, I think I
can see my way toward making a reduc
tion of fifty cents a day in your bill.' That
is a business transaction and is notjigainst
public policy. The Del Monte "will of
course lose a customer, but it has no
remedy in law."
In conclusion Delmas asked that the
Board of Fire Underwriters and the Fire
men's Fund Insurance Company be per
manently restrained from intimidating
the agents of the Continental Insurance
Company and that the issuance of circu
lars and passing of obnoxious by-laws be
prohibited.
"Can your Honor imagine," said he,
"that these defendants had any other
object than to cripple the Continental In
surance Company? They were injuring it
in two ways. They would say to one man:
'If you insure part of your property in the
Continental Insurance Company you can't
do business with us, and if part of your in
surance is placed with one of the members
of the board you cannot place any other
part of it with a non-intercourse com
pany.' These fifty companies which form
the combination have their agents out all
over the country and their instructions
are, 'Get business away from the Conti
nental Insurance Company at any cost.'
In such a case I think the Continental In
surance Company is entitled to protec
tion." -. . s - ' N
Just before Delmas began his argument
Attorney Page apologized to the court and
to W. 8. Duval, general manager of the
Continental Insurance Company, for cer
tain uncomplimentary remarks he had
made in a previous session. He had used
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 1895.
the expressions in the heat of argumenl
and said he was truly sorry for bavin
done so.
MISS BURROUGHS IN "JUDAH"
Draws a Crowded House at the Baldwin
Theater, and Scores a Hit.
We are living in an era of psychological
plays era in dramatic history when
the intelligent theater-going public sit j
patiently night after night and listen to
the discussion across the footlights of that
great principle of social life— the relation
of one sex to another. "Discussion" is
about the best word that can be applied,
for the modern psychological play is not
usually played in the best acceptance of j
the term. It is more or less a theatrical |
"discussion" of themes which were consid- ;
ered years ago hardly proper for the basis '
of any dramatic work. Whether this be a
healthy condition of affairs may perhaps
be demonstrated later on. But such plays
lack "snap and go" and have too often the
Pecksniffian atmosphere. However, they
enforce some obvious truth. They
lay stress on the moral responsi
bility of man and woman. All their
teachings are in the right direction even
though the plays be a trifle too didactic, j
They expound a great many theories, but, |
! in brief, they wind up by showing that ;
j "curses, like chickens, come home to !
I roost."
The large audience that assembled at the
Baldwin Theater last night had two dis- j
tinct motives desire to hear Mr. Jones'
psychological doctrines as they were told in j
j the lines of "Judah," and to see Miss Marie j
j Burroughs in the role in which she made j
I her first great success— that of Vashti
' Dethic, the fasting girl. Miss Bur
| roughs received an ovation from her ad
mirers, her charm of manner and her
beauty appealing to everybody in the house.
At the close of the second act, the
i strongest in the play, she received three
; curtain calls and was laden with floral
tributes. It was an honest demonstration
f of approval for some excellent acting,
j Vashti Dethic gives Miss Burroughs a
HARD POLITICS OUTSIDE AM ELECTION BOOTH.
[Sketched by a "Call" artist.]
wide scope for her talents. She grasps
every opportunity offered her, and without
over-acting the slightest scene presents a
character almost perfect in every phase of
dramaturgy. Her diction is remarkable
for its purity, and her grace and ease arc
fitting accompaniments to it. In her
scenes with Mr. Herd she made a deep
impression.
Mr. Kellerd played the role of Judah
Llewellyn, which "E. S. Willard made
prominent some years ago. His make-up
is very much like that of Mr. Willard, and
all through the play he shows that he has
followed his predecessor's work closely.
Last night Mr. Kellerd played the role
with his usual earnestness. His chief
fault was in making the part a little too
serious % A minister who would condescend
to fall in love with a girl who was only a
swindler at the best might be possibly
more of a man of the world.
Louis Massen had rather a thankless
part as Lord Osgai by. The love scene be
tween Sophie Jopp (Miss Marion Abbott)
and Juxon Proll (Theodore Brown) was a
capital bit of work. It lasted for a few
moments only, but it made an excellent
impression. •;, ii'
Miss Burroughs will appear all this
week, and Sunday night at Mr. Morgen
stern's benefit, in "Judah." On Monday
evening next the comic opera, "The Fenc
ing Master," will be given here for the first
time.' Cv
The sale of seats for "The Fencing Mas
ter" .will begin at the Baldwin Thursday J
A large number of orders for seats have j
already been received. I
At the Grand Opera-House.
The general excellence of the performance
of the military melodrama, "In the Ranks,"
and the large houses it drew last week, in
duced the Morosco management to continue
it for this week also, and last night's perform
ance was attended by a large audience.
The pray will be remembered as one of tho
most popular that that popular actor, E. J.
Buckley, produced here some years ago. The
performance at Morosco's does not at all suffer
by comparison. Mr. Blinker is a very efficient
actor and does all his work well, and in the
new leading lady. Miss Hall, this enterprising
theater lias found a new favorite. The rest of
the long cast is given by good people through
out ana the whole performance is well acted,
while the exceptional advantages of the Grand*
Opera-house as to stage offers excellent oppor
tunities for the stage effects and mounting.
Stockwell's.
The "Black Crook" and "Humjity Dumpty"
were presented to a large audience at Stock
well's last night and will continue during the
balance of the week. This was the first at
tempt ever made to combine these two pieces
with full companies, and the innovation made
a decided hit. Ther«. was a wealth of costume,
color and effect. ■'-.■ -:.>■.
DAVIE OAKLAND'S
NEW MAYOR.
James k. plersol and r. Wilson
other Successful
• Candidates.
A QUIET BUT HEAVY- VOTE.
Nelson Attributes His Defeat
to False and Malicious
Rumors.
Oakland, March 11.— Oakland held a
quiet election yesterday, but the vote was
unusually heavy.
The election was peculiar, as up to a
week ago it was considered that Nelson
was a sure winner. He had nominations
from Republicans, Democrats and Non-
Partisans, and in view of recent Non-
Partisan victories his election was consid
ered certain. Davie had the one nomina
tion of his party, the Populists, but he was
not nominated without friction, which it
was thought would injure him.
In the past week, however, Nelson stock
has gone down and Davie has been all the
talk, and the vote of yesterday shows that
there was foundation for the change of
sentiment.
Davie is elected Mayor ol Oakland by a
safe majority.
John L. Davie, the new Mayor, is of
North of Ireland stock. He was born in
Saratoga County, N. V., forty-four years
ago. Educated in the public schools
and finally graduating from the Coun
ty Academy, at 15 he left home and
struck out in the world for himself.
In 1877 he went into the meat business in
the California market, and from that busi
ness he again drifted into the stock busi
ness. He moved to Lassen Coanty and
settled on a Government claim, where he
; built himself a house and split rails for his
: fencing. He was in that locality from 1879
| to 1884, when he sold out and came to Oak
i land, where he bought into the coal busi
i ness, at Tenth and Washington streets.
j Since, his arrival in Oakland his career is
well known.
As he said last night: "My whole Oak
; land career has been a consistent battle
against the encroachments of the Southern
Pacific. I was led into the fight against
'■ the corporation through the excessive
; freight rates charged me.
"I am sure the "people of Oakland will
| never regret electing me as their Mayor,
I for 1 shall certainly, to the best of 'my
ability, try to act out my pledge so often
i repeated."
The new Mayor, under the last change
' in the charter," will be a member of the
Board of Public Works, which will have
for its other members the City Attorney
: and the City Engineer. For the former
oflice, James K. Piersol, a well known at
torney, has been elected, defeating Gary
Howard, and for City Engineer Arthur K.
Wilson was the choice over G. F. Allardt,
,T. B. McMath and Ross Morgan.
Mr. Piersol, who is called an "anti-gang"
! man, is a veteran of the 'ate war. He is a
| Pennsylvanian, and served through the
! war, Afterward he studied law, and seven
j years ago came to Oakland, where he has
i since resided.
Mr. Wilson is an Oaklander. He gradu
j ated in the Oakland High School, after
I which he took a course in the Boston
! School of Technology.
' While the votes were being counted in
I the Third Precinct of the Sixth Ward last
I night at 10 o'clock 11. D. Hoturham, who
was a defeated candidate for Councilman
! in the ward, proceeded with a crowd to the
house where General Kelley lives, at 700
Franklin street, and a rock was shortly
thrown through a window. Kelley' s wife
; narrowly escaped being hit. Then the
; general came out in his nightclothes and
the two leaders abused each other until
i Officer Cooney came up and dispersed the
! crowd.
Mr. Nelson, who was defeated for Mayor,
' was seen last night. He took his defeat
philosophically, but was surprised at the
outcome. He laid his defeat, he said, to
the malicious statements circulated about
his being a railroad man. Regarding his
successful opponent he would only say:
"It is evident that Mr. Davie has more
friends than myself." ./
Vote counting is going on slowly and
some precincts will not be finished before
morning; so it is impossible to get figures.
For Mayor, John L. Davie will be elected
by a plurality of less than 1000. R. W.
Snow is chosen Auditor for the fourth time
by 400 to 500 plurality. Gilpin will
have something like 500 votes tospare for
Treasurer.
j Piersol will have as much majority as
: Davie for City Attorney. For City Engi
; neer Arthur Wilson will probably secure
the largest vote of any man elected. His
plurality is estimated at 1200. For Coun
cilman-at-large the returns are uncertain
J. R. Capell is surely elected and John F.
Towle, Daniel Moulton and Heitman prob
ably. The friends of J. V. Bassctt are
claiming he will get in.
The Board of the returns are uncertain
■11 is surely elected and John P.
iniel Moulton and Heitman prob
e friends of J. V. Bassett are
tie will get in.
ird of CouncCmen will probably
be: First Ward, T.:K. Mott; Second, Dr.
Mehrman ; Third, Waiter Manuel ; Fourth,
Con Brosnahan- Fifth, Dr. Buckland;
Sixth, William Watkinson; Seventh, W.
A. Dow.
The Board of Education at large will be
j Dr. Myra Knox, George C. Edwards, J. W.
I Evans and, probably W. Matthews.
In the First Ward, C. J. Stark; Second,
i Webb Pierce; Third, C. Z. Reed; Fourth,
Dr. MacMulian; Fifth, W. H. Friend;
, Sixth, Daniel Ford; Seventh, E. A. Moody!
=
j "Girofle-Qirofia."
"Girofle-Girofla" as given last night Is one of
! the brightest operas produced at the Tivoli for
| a long time, and the Tivoli production is one
; of th.? best presentations given in this city.
Leeocq made for himself a name anion;; the
j most famous of light opera composers, and
■ "Girofle-Girotla" was one of his best works. In
> addition to a clever score, full of melody, the
j composer got a bright libretto, abounding in
| action and well-conceived situations, ana these
' with the modern revision in lines that the Tiv
oli people know so well how to do made a
noticeably able performance.
The honors of the evening were due to Miss
Plaisted. Rarely has she done anything which
for sustained brilliancy will approach her per
formance of the dual role last night. Her
drunken scene especially, in which she was
nicely assisted by a bevy of pretty pages, was
admirably done.
As the father, Don Bolero, Mr. Hartman was
very funny, and made his usual success.
Mr. Bunnell, who has been doing character
parts recently, and doing them very well, was
an excellent Mourzoud and Mr. Branson was
in admirable voice and spirits as Marasquiu.
The other leading roles were taken by Miss
Liddiard as the shrewish Aurora and Alice
Nielsen as Pedro and the smaller parts were
well cast.
The chorus did exceptionally good work, in
cluding the Pages' Chorus already mentioned,
and all the people were full of animation.
From Lecocq the Tivoli goes to Genee, pro
ducing next week his masterpiece, "Nanon."
The Metropolitan Society.
The orchestral concert to be given at the
Auditorium to-night is made up of popular
compositions. To-morrow (Wednesday) after
noon at 3 o'clock will be given the public re
hearsal of Thursday evening's concert. The
programme for this rehearsal will include
Beethoven's seventh symphony,' Tschaikow
sky's suite "Casse Noisette (The Nutcracker)
and Greig's overture, "In Autumn." Popu
lar concerts will be given Friday and Saturday
evenings. The last concert of the season will
be Sunday night's popular concert, devoted to
the work's of Irish composers and Irish na
tional music.
The Orpheum.
The bill at the Orpheum, • which includes
Lydia Yeamans-Titus, was supplemented with
three new acts by Magee and Crimmins, La
Begolancita and sisters and the Brothers For
rest. There was a large audience.
The Wigwam.
"Pocahontas," a new musical burlesque,
was presented at the Wigwam last night and
will continue one week. There was a large
house and the piece was well put on.
The finest of fine baking is secured with
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder. It is
marvelous.
ONE MURDERER IDENTIFIED.
"Piggy" Johnson May Be the
Slayer of J. Benjamin
Forman.
The Police Having Good Success
in Ferreting Out the
Crime.
It is probable that the murderers of J.
Benjamin Forman will be caught by the
police. It is believed now that "Piggy"
Johnson is the man who struck the death
blow. Detective Ben Bohen and Officer
George McMahon, who is virtually a detec
tive on Barbary Coast, have been working
on the case with considerable success, and
they have hopes of landing all three of the
murderers. Forman has been positively
identified.
J. Kelly and Theodore Johnson called on
Sergeant Flanders yesterday and stated
that Forman had been recently employed
at the grading camp of J. W. Ferris at the
corner of llivoli avenue and Stanyan street.
They had been with him for a while after
he had been paid off Saturday night.
When they left him he had about $20 in his
pockets. It is therefore probable that the
murderers secured very little from Forman
as he must have spent most of the money
during Saturday night.
Bohen and McMahon have found four
witnesses to the murder. They are all
Chinese, but one of them is quite an intel
ligent woman. From the statements of
the witnesses the three murderers must
have lured Forman into Cum Cook alley.
Here he evidently wanted to leave them,
but they objected. As he put. out his hand
to shake hands with one of them another,
supposed to be "Piggy" Johnson, hit For
man three or four violent blows on the
back of the head and neck. The man in
front seized Forman by the ears and pulled
him forward, as the "third man rifled his
pockets. Forman fell heavily to the
ground and the three men ran off.
The Chinese woman was taken to the
new City Hall Prison last evening to look
at "Piggy" Johnson and Billy Madden,
the two suspected murderers. She could
not recognize Madden, but Johnson she
positively identified as the man who struck
the deadly blow. So positive was the
woman that the officers are satisfied they
will land the trio of murderers in jail.
Johnson was taken back to his cell, but
Madden was released.
Dr. Rachel, who conducted the autopsy,
says that heavy blows of a list would have
been sufficient to bring about the causes of
death. The wounds on the neck are such
as could be made by either a heavy blunt
weapon or a powerful fist.
The police do not believe the case to be
one of deliberate murder. Robbery was
the main object of the men. It was prob
ably the intention of the men to stun For
man, so as to rob him and prevent him
from giving an alarm, but not to bring
about his death. The men could not have
secured much more than ?1 each, but they
will have to answer to the charge of mur
der if caught. "Piggy" Johnson's case is
believed to be strong against him, and he
will probably be held for trial if the devel
opments the officers expect to-day do not
change the appearance of the case.
NEW TO-DAY.
The
WORST
Yet!
hHßhmm
This is the worst that has
so far been said of ROBERT
MANTELL CIGARS "I
quit two-bit cigars to take
up with the "Mantell" for
economy's sake; but I like
it so well that I smoke twice
as much now as before. So
i've saved nothing*"
mmVtmß^mmEal
Sold by all dealers— cts
straight, 2 for 25 cts and 3
for 25 cts— according to size
THE W ERTHEIMER CO.
- ■•-■■•-•..
WHOLESALE DEPOT,
13-15 BATTERY STREET
400,000 TREES.
PRUNE, PLUM, PEACH, PEAR. CHERRY,
Almond, for sale at 3 cents each. F. O. B. Terms
to suit you. No better trees grown. Address, Sao
ramento River Nursery Company, Walnut Grove,
California.
NEW TO-DAY. '
WE IKE
YOUR DOLLAR
HAVE A DOUBLE
PURCHASING POWER !
As we sell to you di-
rect and thus save you
all go-between profits/
I As we sell to you di-
rect and thus save you
all go-between profits, j
In plainer English, we
are the manufacturers
selling direct to the
consumer at the iden-
I tical same price we
I formerly charged the
I dealers. We find it
I far more profitable-
I as we take chance of
I financial loss. Listen
I to a few words of
I sound advice and see
H that your dollars do
I the service they were
j intended for and buy
B clothing for man, boy
gg or child from
HYAMS, PAUSON & CO.,
25 and 27 Sansome Street.
Wholesale Manufacturers
Now Selling at Retail.
x-^-"l^\i I *" Ir'n^^ «iv iJ
A. Big- Saving
In Ready Cash Can be Made if You
PAY FOR TREES WIM THEY BEAR.
We offer these terms to close out our
SURPLUS STOCK OF
200,000 aches, Plums, Pears & Almonds,
PRICE ONLY &EACH, F.O. B.
NO BETTER TREES GROWN.
Address H., care Sacramento River
Nursery Co., Walnut Grove. Cal.
The
NEW
LINE
1
I OP
j STANDARD
] PERCALE and
■i OUTING
1 SHIRTS
I STANDARD
PERCALE and
OUTIMj
SHIRTS
■ '- ■
I <d Is pronounced
\ I***.^1 ***.^ '•>' oocl dress-
s mpii in ■-. ■ imSb crs as the very
I TRADC " best ff>r CQr .
¥ "\T TJ rectness of
i n.D. style, good
J mark. taste and pret-
I IU IfO "The" prices?
S o^lylvSr; A little lower
i v — tpiality for
\ quality — than
!^0 any other brand.
—quality for
quality — than
any other brand.
s All dealers.
NEUSTADTER BROS.,
Manufacturers,
SAN FRANCISCO.
AN OLD LIGHT RENEWED.
SAN HSIIjIE DEVICE.
A Candle-stick,
A Lamp Chimney,
Make the
DAISY LANTERN.
Will withstand a hurricane.
Cannot Blow It Out with
Hat or Fan.
For sale hy all Wholesale
and Retail Merchants.
Sample by mall, 25c.
KENNEDY'S Novelty Agency,
Oakland, Cal.
PALACE_ HOTEL.
THE PALACE HOTEL OCCUPIES AN EN-
tire block In the center of Ban Francisco. It Is
the model hotel of the world. Fire and earthquake
proof. Has nine elevators. Every room is large,
light and airy. The ventilation is perfect. A bath
and closet adjoin every room. Ail rooms are easy
of access from broad, light corridors. The central
court, Illuminated by electric light, its immense
glass roof, broad balconies, carriage-way and trop-
ical plants are features hitherto unknown in Amer-
ican" hotels. Guests entertained on either the
American or European plan. .The restaurant is
the finest in the city. Secure rooms in advance by
telegraphing. THE PALACE HOTEL,
S»a Francisco, Cal.
NEW AMUSEMENTS.
BALDWIN THEATER.
AL. HAYJIAN «fc CO. (Incorporated), Proprietors
Second and Last Week of the Beautiful
and Talented Actress,
MISS MARIE
BURROUGHS,
Supported by Her Own Excellent Company, pre-
senting Henry Arthur .loins' Powerful Play,
JTJJDA.IZ
By Arrangement with E. S. WILLARD.
ONLY MATINEE SATURDAY.
JEI^SLIME^jS^. ! f:
MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 18,
Dei-Coven and Smith's Charming Opera.
"THE FHCISfI-BISTER,"
Presented by a Strong Cast and a Care-
fully Selected Chorus.
Same Production as Given in New York City,
Where it Ban Over 250 Nights.
Original Scenery, Costumes and Properties Carried
Intact. Increased Orchestra.
Sale of Seats Begins Thursday, 9 A. M.
MOROSCO'S
GRAND OPERA-HOUSE.
The Handsomest Family Theater in America.
WALTER MOROSCO.... SoIe Lessee and Manages
THIS EVENING AT 8,
Second Week and Regular Matinees.
EXTRAORDINARY PRODUCTION .
Of Sims and Pettit's Great Melodrama,
IN THE RANKS!
Great Success of MAUD EDNA HALL.
Evknino Prices— loc, 25c and 50c.
Matinees Saturday and Sunday.
Seats on Sale from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m.
STOCKWELL'S THEATER.
S. E. A. Co Leonard Grover, Manager
Matinees Saturday and Sunday.
The Two Greatest Shows on Earth Com-
bined in One.
$3500 Expenses This Star Week.
HUMPTY DUMPTY
AND THE
BLACK CROOK.
ENTIRE DOUBLE COMPANY.
Two Clowns. Tho Star Dog Circus.
The Monkey Circus.
A Great Army of Specialties.
The Glorious Pageant,
"The Shower of Gold."
Positively No Free List This Week.
Prices Just the Same— loc, 15c, 3Jc,
35c. and .">Oc.
ALCAZAR THEATER.
SUCCESS ! SUCCESS!
NEW YORK COMPANY
"37 DOT 33
C7Xj3E33\GC3isiKrCS:-A.XJ
OASm
HISS ROSE STILLfIAN as IZA.
THE BISTERS O'BRIEN
Late of theAlhambra Theater, London.
DO NOT PAIL TO SEE THIS SHOW!
Prices— 5Qc and 25c.
CALIFORNIA THEATER
Ai- Hayman&Co. (Incorporated) Proprietors
AGAIN T~ CROWDED
A I HOUSE.
HOYT'S REST COMEDY,
A TEMPERANCE TOWN
L. R. STOCKWELL as Mink Jones.
Specially Selected Cast From Hoyt's
Theater. New York.
NEXT MONDAY
EMILY BANCKER in "OUK FLA"."
Mp.h. Ebxestike Keeling Proprietor & Manager
SS^iliSJ ONE WEEKOHLY
Grand Production Lecocq's Masterpiece,
GIRQFLE--GIRQFLA
Monday, March 18— "NANON."
: In Preparation. : :Look PRINCESS :
: BLUE BEARD JR. : : On i for NICOTINE:
Popular Prices— 2sc and 50c.
ORPHEUM.
O'Farrell Street, Between Stockton and PowelL
GREAT AND PRONOUNCED HIT OF
OCR NEW COMPANY !
LA REGOLANCITA AND SISTERS,
In Their Famous Fairy Ballet, for Two Seasons
the Craze of New York City;
3— THE BROTHERS FORREST— 3
Eccentric Musical Comedians, Direct from Europe;
MAGEE AND CRIMMINS,
In the Greatest of All Burlesque Boxing Acts:
Lydia Yeamans-Titks, Dklacb & Debbimont,
and Auklk Purvis Oxhi, comprising the
GRANDEST SHOAV IN THE CITY !
Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Opera Chain
and Box Seats, ode
W I WA M Corner Stockton
* ¥IU,V nl "' and Geary Sts.
GREAT SUCCESS OF THE
■ First Production of the Fascinating Musical-
Burlesque,
r»OCA.j£IOI>JTia.S :
By ALICE YORK and a Magnificent Company.
sas^- Reserved Seats, '25c; Opera Chairs, 35c;
General Admission, 10c.
MECHANICS' PAVILION.
jMOWSTjJII
MUSICAL FESTIVAL
PROMENADE FAIR!
AMERICAN CONCERT BAND!
ALFRED RONCOVIERI, Director.
IT_iI_iXJSTI?/A.TH!ID 2-ITJSIO.
ADDED FEATURES:
Turkish Theater! Royal Marionettes
Mystic Illusions ! Foster's Tamale Grotto !
TO-NIGHT— OF DEATH.
Programme Changed Every Night.
Popular JPrioos :
General Admission with reserved .->■ at.... 20 cents
Season Tickets for Adults $2.00
Season Tickets for Children $1.00
(Entitling holders to the series of concerts
ending April Ist i.
Family Coupon Book of Fifty Admissions $5.00
American Night Next Friday.
METROPOLITAN
MUSICAL SOCIETY'S MCSRTS
AT THE AUDITORIUM.
Herr FRITZ SCHEEL, Kapellmeister.

LAST -V^T^33E3Kf: !
TMWHT— CONCERT !
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND TUURSD AY
EVENING.
SYMPHONY CONCERTS.
BEETHOVEN'S SEVENTH SYMPHONY.
Tschaikowsky's Nutcracker Suite.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17.
IRISH NATIONAL NIGHT.
PRICES: Admission to Popular Concerts, 25c;
Admission to Symphony Concerts, 50c; reserved
seats 25c extra.
Seats on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s dally,
9 A. M. to 5 F. M.
RUNNING alTlflffi, > RUNNING
RACES! SMISS RAGES I
CALIFORNIA MM CLUB RACKS,
WSMTER MEETING.
BAY DISTRICT TRACK,
COMMENCING .SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1394.
Races Monday, Tuesday. IVodnesday.
Thursday; Friday and Saturday—
■or shine.
Five or more, races each day. Races start at 3
p. m. sharp. McAllister and Geary streetcars pass
tbe gate.
Weekly Gall, $1.50 per Tear
7

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