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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 10, 1895, Image 11

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ORIENTAL COMPETITION
Measures to Meet a Threatened
Invasion of Cheap Asiatic
Labor.
COOLIES OR THEIR PRODUCTS?
Manufacturers and Producers and
Labor Commission In
terested.
The importation of Japanese manufac
tured goods and its effects upon home in
dustries are now agitating the Manufac
turers' and Producers' Association and the
Labor Commission. Diverse opinions are
entertained upon the subject. All agree,
however, upon one thing, and that is the
American laborer should be protected
againsr a reduction of wages that would
necessitate a mode of life not in keeping
w ith a free and independent people.
This afternoon the Manufacturers
and Producers anticipate quite a lively
meeting, when they shall discuss the Jap
anese invasion ana devise some method of
dealing with the problem tiiat tsconfront
ing the producers on this coast. Julian
Sbnntag of the Giant Powder Company.
> hatrman of the committee, will report on
that occasion what course is deemed ad
visable.
When seen yesterday he said that the
committee had not yet outlined its course.
that he thought it probable that the
ng would result in Congress being
■1 to appoint a committee' to inquire
Japanese importation to see if it is
:etrimental to home interests.
■lames Sproule of the Sunset Seed Com
pany, another member of the committee,
said that he recognized Japan as a con
sumer of American poods and would not
on that account be in favor of unlimited
restrictive measures. "I do not believe,
i. in allowing anything that tends to
depress American wages, and 1 think that
Mjme legislation ouzht to be passed to
an equality of cost for the imported
and home-made article, and where that is
ise I do not think the home product
nugnt to suffer. At least that has been
eoiy of the Manufacturers' and Pro
- Association, and we hope before
have the people of California give
r reference to all the products of this
State."
While the association has devoted its
attention to the greater grievances of home
manufacturers, such as tne p otest against
the introduction of Eastern goods manu
factured by convict labor, convict iabor
products of this State and cheap labor
poods from Japan, it now purposes to turn
its attention more particularly to the pn
vate consumer. An effort will be made to
have families agree to patronize home
product wherever possible. A fair is to be
jiiven in Alaraeda County next week with
this purpose in view. Each woman visitor
will be a^keii to sign anagreement to favor
California manufactured goods, and alittle
badce in the form of a metallic bookmark
will be given her as a souvenir of her alle
giance to home industry.
The<Labor Commission takes a very dif
ferent view of the Japanese question. Com
missioner Fitzgerald thinks that the im
portation ot Japanese goods is the lesser
evil when compared with Japanese coolie
immigration. He says that little Japan,
with its population of 50,000,000 people,
bas a surplus of cheap labor that it cannot
employ, while it can keep its manufacturers
at work, and that if the importation of
rse-made goods were restricted by
.'duty or otherwise the immigration
ot vJifcap . Japanese labor could not be
stopi
• meae would come here," continued
the Commissioner, "and make the goods
here for even lower wages than they re
ceive in their native country, for their de
sire for education and the opportunities of
residence in America would make them
willing to work for less than what they re
ceive in Japan— from 50 cents to $3 a
month. There is a guarantee company in
Japan that agrees to have each Japanese
properly landed on these shores and to
keep him in work for three years after he
arrives, and all for the sum of-$lO.
'At a school the coolies are taught the
answers they, are to make upon arriving
here.
'The sending of cheap goods I realize is
a serious problem to the manufacturers
here, but the invasion of Japanese labor is
more serious. The country is in a posi
tion where it has to provide for its cheap
laborers, and it must send them to
America, while it does not have to send
its goods here." •
lii an analysis of tne Japanese and
1 :iinese labor question in California being
•pared by the Labor Commission occur
these sentences:
The Oriental , who formerly gave England,
i'rance and America cause for felicitation that
they would forever be importers, are to-day
not only not importing their own goods, but
«re manufacturing them, and have become
exporters oi the surplus in competition with j
America and Kngland.
One matter that has perhaps never been
noticed is the possibility of an East India in
vasion of the California labor market. The I
prejudice is general among the native of Ilin- j
dostan to crossing the sea.«. as it results in a j
loss of caste. But the establishment of a new j
steamship line requiring business in the way j
ol coolie importation to be made for it might '
disclose the fact with startling suddenness that '
thousands upon thousands of the natives of
AsSatM India vionld avail themselves of the op
portunity to reach the Pacific Coast of tlie
United State*, and that the fear of loss of caste |
would cease to be universal. This is a feature i
to be considered in the framing of an exclusion ;
act and of a memorial to Congress. The popu
lation of India is estimated at 240,000,000,
and it is awakening to modern condition^:
The Aryan in the struggle for existance has
reached the highest level of humanity. On
the Pacific Coast the workers of his race are j
by lack of an exclusion law brought into com- j
petition with, n Mongolian - farming class
evolved under the conditions of earnings out !
of which it feeds and boards itself for 12J..
cents a day. The manufactured articles that
the white man buys are protected by a tariff,
but there is no protection for his labor, and
when he shall go under from inability to meet
Asiatic conditions and maintain himself on a
plane of American civilization the schools and
'lurches, the business, manufacturing and
professional classes go under with him. for the
bulk of the community, even where earnings
are low, is the foundation of the edifice of
ivllizatiotc.
Who and where are the person? that ad
vanced funds for an extensive and systematic
introduction ol coolie labor? The imprison
ment of an Asiatic whose time does not count
formuCh will not tend to break up the system
if the financial backers of it are out of reach.
It would be sound policy for the combined
savings bank depositors of California to see
that none of their money was loaned to any
landholder employing Japanese or Chinese
labor, for a vaft amount ol the loans made by
savings banks are from the savings of white
people not themselves land-owners.
MRS. DEMPSEY'S BENEFIT.
Sporting Men Selected to Look After
Her Interest*.
The friends and admirers of the late
Jack Dempsey gathered in strone num
bers last evening at the Windsor Hotel for
the purpose of discussing plans with a
view of tendering to the widow of
the "Nonfcariel" a grand testimonial
benefit.
After a lengthy discussion it was decided
to give an entertainment on the evening
of the 27th inst. at some cheater, which
will be hereafter agreed upon and desig
nated. A Tetter was received from the
s<'< retary of the Letter-carriers' band offer
ing music free for this occasion, which
offer was accepted. The following com
niitteis were then appointed :
<'hairmfin, L. <r. Flanigan: vice-chairman,
J. 1.. Mitchell; treasurer, .fames <iilleran ; sec
retary, J. .1. Jamison.
Executive committee — James <;illeran, J. J.
Groom, .). C. Veulcin and M. A. 'Jurist.
i'jimuce cownnuee— Joliu Ferguson, J. L.
Mitchell," Jesse Marks, Joseph King, W. Rice,
Frankie Jones, P. J. Tobin, G. R. Liddle', 0.
Coakley, A. J. Martin; P. F. Xolan ; and 6.
Lundy. •". I
Hall committee— J. Chesley, W. May and J.
Casey. ■ . „: ■
Printiue committee— Orndorff,' Charles
Bereen, \V. K. Ingram, E. Layton and W. \Y.
Madden. , * '
Talent committee— John Morrisey, 1 C. Phil
lip«,A. Grepßains, Billy Jordan, I. Friedlander,
John Welsh, K. Foster, T. Sharlcey, W. Ken
nedy, Professor Barney Augustus Farley, Pro
fessor Walter AVatson," E. Homan, H. Levy, G.
(ireen, I). Needham andrß. Macredie.
The various committees will convene
on Wednesday evening at the same place
and complete arrangements for what cer
tainly will prove to be the greatest benefit
that "has ever taken place in this City.
The entertainment will consist of vocal
and instrumental music, gymnastics, fenc
ing, wrestling ana boxing.
LADY DOUGLAS SUMMONED.
She Will be Asked the Whereahout9 of
the Tamily Goods.
Collector J. J. Raver feels that he made
a mistake in having an order of examina
tion served on Lord Bholto Douglas and
that the latter* spouse is the one who
holds the negotiable securities belonging
to the family. He has accordingly decided
to see if she* will jump int o the breach and
pay his claim against the noble Douglas.
Shi' was served with an order of examina
tion yestcruay, returnable before Justice
Cook to-morrow at 2 p. m.
In case her ladyship fails to divulge the
whereabouts of sufficient collateral Raver
has other cards up his sleeve which he be
lieves will bring Sholto to terms.
SHE WILL SWIM NIAGARA.
Miss Millie Viola, a Daring Aero
naut, Arrives From Aus
tralia.
Expects to Make Her Perilous Passage
in a Barrel Dropped by a
Balloon.
Miss Millie Viola, a pretty and vivacious
young American, who was formerly an
actress, but who has now turned aeronaut,
is in the City en route for the East. She
arrived on the last Australian steamer,
and, being a globe-trotting young woman
in search of a new experience, she is oa
her way to attempt in a barrel the danger
ous passage of the falls and whirlpool of
Niagara. And in order to add to her sen
sations she has made arrangements to be
dropped, barrel and all, into the river from
a balloon. As the attempt on the great
cataract cannot, however, be made till the
Miss. Viola, the Actress AVho Will Swim
Niagara.
ice melts in the spring. Miss Viola is now
resting after her long sea voyage and will
tinish her journey to Niagara by easy
stages.
"I have been just crazy to go over the
falls," said Miss Viola, last .night, "ever
since I heard four years ago that that man
Graham nad done it. He was knocked
senseless, you know, and otherwise in
jured, and I almost hoped he would die,
so that I might be the first to do it success
fully. But 111 be the first woman to do it,
anyway, and I'm going to bet every cent
I've got that I don't get hurt a bit. You
don't think betting is wrong, do you?
'Yes, four years is a long time to wait
for the chance, but until now something
always prevented. We had engagements
ahead for balloon ascensions, and then,
too, I wanted to see everything, since I
have had enough of the colonies and want
to stay in America for the rest of my life.
'Peculiar!
"Yes, indeed, the colonies are peculiar.
Take New Zealand, for instance. There
the women all wear bloomers and your
hotel closes at 10 o'clock: and if you are out
after that hour you must stay out all
nieht. Their laws are snch, too, that if one
does anything that attracts a crowd one is
arrested and lined. We, my sister and I,
made .several ascensions there. One time
she came down among the Maoris. They
thought her the angel from heaven which,
they say. will come to help them drive the
British from their land ana they hurried
her away into the interior. We had to get
the mounted police and call out the volun
teers before we could get her back.
"On the way to this country we stopped
at the Solomon Islands, where the can
nibals are. There we had to wear thick
veils, because the native? are very anxious
to possess a pakeha wahena (beautiful
white woman), and will go to any lengths
to secure one. I made one ascent there,
coming down on the roof of a house,
which gave way and let me through.
"Shall I make any ascents here? I
rather think not, though I may if things
tret too dull. I hear there is to be a balloon
race here soon, and, if so, I may challenge
the winner."
Major Clemens, who is arranging for the
Niagara event, states that Miss Viola will
be suspended by gutta-percha bands in the
center of a huge cask and this will be
weighted at one end that she may make
the journey in an upright position. Rob
ert Earlston, the aeronaut, who safely
landed tne captive balloon which broke
loose from the World's Fair grounds at
Chicago, is with Miss Viola ant! will have
charge of the balloon from which she will
be dropped into the Niagara River.
COOKED BY SCHOLARS.
Appetizing DJshe* Prepared by Harri
son School I'upi l».
Yesterday afternoon Miss L. McElroy,
principal of Harrison Primary School, and
the teachers gave a luncheon to some of
the members of the Board of Kducation and
School Department officials. The lunch
was cooked and served by ten girls from
the iSouth Cosmopolitan .School who have
been for the past year receiving instruc
tion in cooking at the Harrison Cookery
Center under the instruction of Miss Kate
E. Whitaker.
The whole affair was a brilliant success,
the dishes well cooked and the service ef
fective. The guests were in a happy mood
and passed many encomiums on the lunch.
The menu was: Bisque soup; crisped
crackers; chicken fricassee with force
meat balls; whole wheat mulh'ns; biscuits;
mashed potatoes; Brussels sprouts; Christ
mas plum pudding; lemon sauce; cocoa
nut cakes; coffee; tea.
Among those present were Dr. Clinton,
Mr. McKlroy, C. Hawlev, C. Murdock. M.
Bateodt, C.B. Stone, Professor Herbst.
In the fourteenth century H0.000,000 peo
ple died of the black plaque in Europe and
Asia.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1805.
CROOKED RACING WON`T GO
The Judges Declared Bets Off
on a Hurdle -Race at
Ingleside.
TWO JOCKEYS SUSPENDED.
If J 0 C and Three Forks Were
"Meant" They Did Not Demon
state the Fact.
The Pacific Coast Jockey Club will not
tolerate jobbery on its course at Ingleside.
This fact was forcibly demonstrated yes
leniay. Steeplechasing and hurdle racing
is very popular with the spectators, and
realizing this fact, the club intends to give
the "leppers"' ample opportunity to win
some of its fat pursea, but the rank jobs
that have gone through in the past will not
be connived at.
The last race on the card yesterday was
a mile and a sixteenth over four hurdles.
There were eight entries, with the Elk
horn stable's fine jumper J O C an 11 to 10
favorite at post time, backed down from 2
to 1. Three Forks was a mildly backed
second choice, with all the others rank out
siders.
When the Hag fell W. Clancy on Mor
gan Gat 10 to 1 in the betting took his
horse out in front, and never very hard
pressed won easily from Bedford, a 6 to 1
chance, by four lengths, with Rob Roy a
good third. At the first jump Gold Dust
stumbled and swerving into Cicero both
horses fell. Johnson on J O C kept his
mount back in the bunch until the stretch
was reached, when lie came strong and
would certainly have finished second, but
made a slight mistake over the last hurdle
and partially unseated his rider. After
seesawing on the horse's neck Johnson
finally alighted feet first on the ground.
Goodman could not or would not extract
any speed from Three Forks, never being
prominent.
The race had a dusty look about it to the
officials in the stand, and after weighing
the facts, they declared all bets off amid
lusty cheering from the crowd that gath
ered" around the stand. Johnson and
Goodman, the riders respectively of the
tirst choice and Three Forks, had their
badges taken up and were ordered off the
grounds. Entries from the Elkton stable
in whose colors J O C runs, and the Ari
"THE CALL" RACING CHART.
'Tenth Day of the Pacific Coast Jockey Club Meeting. Weather fine.
1 Ingleside Track, .-an Francisco, Monday, December 9, 1895.
QI^Q FIRST RACE— Five furlongs; maiden two-year-olds; allowances; purse 9400. Time, 1:05i,i.
i Horse and weight.
%
Str.
Sin.
Jocvers.
Betting.
Op. ci.
«^i*!
331 Alvcro 105 2 <
343 Hazard 109 1
1376 Lucille 1051 4
3.7 senator 81and... .109! 7
Globe 105! 5
315 Muoero 100 6
353 SiuFalta 100: 8
323 I'cixotto 1051 3
347 Addeladl 100 9
3 2
1 3
5h
63
8
4 h
7
22
9
•A
lh
5 3
6h
8
i*
2 4
v ■
9
3 3
1 Ms
4 2
5 h !
76
6 1/0 !
» !
2 3 !
9
1 li (horn
86 Macklin
3 I H. Isom
4 L' R. Smith
.14 C. Slaughter....
(i ID cochran
7 3 Molntyre
8 2 Two Bits
9 Tuiim
4-5 7-10
6 6
4 12
10 12
6 90
4 7
30 100
12 30
300 200
Fair start Won driving. Winner, Santa Anita stable's b. g. by Gano-i.ilita.
SECOND RA
; purse $400. Time, 1 :'2O.
In<lpx. Horse, age and weight
154 Kicardo, 4
348 SchnitJi. 3 1
339 Rico, a
.'UK ' Repeater. 3. ....
231 W. 1.. Mnnson, 6..1
348 Patriot, 0 1
336 -tldnSauer. 3. ..-.,...■.
4
s I
1
•J
« ........
5
7'
V*
I
% I % I Str. j Fin. \ Jockey* jo£ f: L
6 4 i 4 1»/2 4 2 1 1/2 jCochraD...'. 3 5
2h 3 1 aVi 8 2 W. Martin 6 7-2
lh 6 3 51 3V, Mclntyre. V.';:.. .6.-10
4 1 '2 h ■ 3 h 4 lV a i.arner.....^... i 3 9-5
7 5v3 ' '60; 61/, Mcllußh,'.;. ;.V. 10 40
3V 3 H/, IV§ BID 1UMm....n... 3 7-2
62. 7 7 7 ißiley 50 100
Good start.
Won driving.
Winner, S. K. C'app's eh. g., by
THIRD HAf
Time, 1:191;,.
Horse, age, weight.
Fin.
1 3
3 b
3h
44
6 1
64
7 2
8
_ Jockeys. o?. eUin ri.
T.Sloan 3 3
! Bergen . 10 '"' 6
R. Isotn ! 3 5-2
Macklin , 8 r'; 8
Cochran 6 9-2
Garner....... ». 6 " 7
Me In tyre 13 40
Piggort 10 30
Jockeys.
342 Remus. 4 101 , 3 I
348 E. 11. Shirley, 5 .104! 2
•-'O7 lieali/ation. 4 101; 1
(344) t'erniel, 4- 101 5
250 Mamie Scott, 3... 95' 4
Minnie (.Ve. 6 98' 6!
300 Myron. 3 93 1 8j
321 Conrte, 5 101 7!
5h
6 h
1 3
2h
Sh
4 h
8
7
2 3
5 1
1 li
3 2
6 2
8
4 I/,
1 2
42
2 i/ 3
3h
6
7
8
5 h
Good start. Won easily. Winner, Elmwood stable's hr. c, by imp. Brutus-Lada.
1 FOUKTH KACE— Six farlongs: selling; pnrse ?400. Time, 1:17V4-
Index. Horse, age, weight, fit. 14 I Vfe j % Str.
L ' ! 1 ,
(33H) Babe Murphy, 3... 99 1 1 12 I 12 Ift
330 Gallant, 3 99 3 1 3 1 2 ha 2 h
(352) Chartreuse, 4 98 4 6 34 34
(332) Toano, a 110 1 5 4Vi S 4 3
[Little Mid. 5 104 2 a h 4Va 6
Index. Horse, age, weight.
1 6 Cochran
2 IL-i R. Isorn
310 T.Sloan
4 4 Hennessy
5 iPrlce
Betting.
Op. . 01.
6-5 13-10
3 7-2
3 6-2
5 6
30 100
Good start. Won easily. Winner, L. Ezells b. f.. by Klias Lawrence- Princess Glenn.
<<T) FIFTH BAI
l-i. 2iO3i/ 4 .
; over four hurdles; handicap; purse, $400. Time,
Index. 1 Horse, age and weight
ndexJ Horse, age and weight' St. j Std. j 1/4
357 ' Morgan G. 3 125! 11l ;11 Va
316 Bedford. 4 129! 4|3 1 4 1
310 Koh Hoy, 3 125 5 i2h *2 4
357 Three Forks, 4.. ..133! 7 53 6V*
1878 Ali Baha, 4 144 3 42 !3 it
(357jJ0C3 144 6 6 6
3J6 GoldDust.s 128, 2 8*
:-(.-)l ci.-ero. H.... 145 8 7-
*
3/ 4 ..
1 4
6
2 2
56
3 3 '
♦Va'
Sir. j
| Fin. Jockeys.
1 5 I Clancy
2V3 'McCullough
36 |E. Finn
46 ;Goodnian
6 IJ. Mara
** I Johnson
Higgins
■li'inark
Betting,
'p. Cl.
1 1
6
2 1
6 3
3 4
4 2
!
1 4
6
SI
5
3 2
4 h
10 10
15 60
8 -.'5
3 11-5
3 20
8-5 11-10
12 20
15 60
*Kpll at first hurdle. **Feii last jump.
Good start. Won easily. Winner, W. fovington's b. jr.. by
"THE CALL" RACING GUIDE.
To-day's Entries at the Ingleside Track, With the Weights, Best Records and Pedigrees.
In races where the horses have no record at the distance to be run the records at the next nearest
distance are gtveu.
Abbreviations— F., fast; Fa., fair; 11., heavy; m., mile; f., furlong; ♦, about.
FIRST
Best
record.
I
i;Tk.
Index.
Name.
! Dist.
Owner.
348
356
354
566
354
359
342 i
348
356 1
362 !
Road Runner... 110
P0d1ga..... 103
Charmer 103
Allahabad i' 98 '
Fl PI i 98
IdaSauer.. ..... 100 !
Hy Dy '103
Outright | 98
■ Braw 5c0t ....:. 103
May Day 106
'ON'D RACE— Five fu
1:41% ,1 m •
1 :23 6 f
, 1 :42 ' 1 m
no rec. ..;...■..
1 :29 % 6 f .
no rec. ...;.'.:.
1:41% 1 m
1:41 ;lm :
1:26% 7 1
1 :41 1/4 1 «n
104
103
1 100
*03
F . C. Kerr
H..JA. Berry
F. .IKncino stable
L...JW. D. I'.andall
F. . ;E. Tierner
'Aberdeen stable
F. .J. JI. Shields
!H.. A. Smith
IF. . B. Schrieber
|F. .A. P. Miller
LToe Dnniels-Mihs Hooucr
I'owhattan-Cadis?a
Wildidle-Turb»n
Hyder AU-Florirte
, llldalco-Vrnicitv
Joe Uookfr-Addio O'Neil
! Hyder Ali-Aidie Warrua
: Flambeau-Imp.' Amelia
Imp.MUlloihian-HlnScratch
John A-Lowena X
92
81|
112
104;
two-year-olds.
Best
Record
Lbs'Tk.j
Lbs
i Dist.
322
277
353
353
337
334
350
393
58
331
355
315
350
Toneno ■
Imp. Endyinion
; Kasel
Kowalsky
Therese
Riot
Walter J
Beatrice Mara..'
, Salisbury '..
Don Pedro...:..
Elsie .....:.
ValiPiite
Pearson..
Moran
. VVm. Pinkerton.
i«:-(
]«tl
106
flOB
106
10b,
102
103
*ios»/4 i
:50
■51 Vi
1:16
j :49-%
i : 561,4
no rec.
I :G0 i
1 :56y2 j
1 :04«/4
no rec.
no rec.
I :O4V a
4V 2 f
i •Va m
fa™
6 I
M m
4%*.
i ! Santa Anita .stable.
100 1... Atkin <fc Louridice.. ;
1(»9 X... Woodlawn stable. . .
|118 H.. K. ( orrlgan '
i 90; Fa. jA. B. Spreckels
1M F... | Arizona stable !
105 ¥... F. AlcDermott i
...SiiiitaMonica stable
Brns <t Waterhouse :
108 F.. Kncino stable
102 t... Urns & Waterhouse
112 H.. X. S. Hull
........ J5. Srhreiber I
— I — !J. O. Brown ACo.i
|lia| 11.. & C. llildreth !
„..
' J. H. Fenton-Li7.7.ie P
: Enterprlfte-Sapientia
Ben Ali-Kzzii,
Isaac Murpny-Derochment
Imp. Idalium-Mercedes | ,
! Portland-Rebuke <
i Imp. True Briton- LIIHe S "
Imp. Waßner-Ranette
Hacine-Imp. Flirt
Imp. San Pedro-Belle \V
Fellowcnarm-Elsle S
Jim Brown-Viola .
; imp. <^rpat Tom-Drift
Patten-Louise Forrest
j.^hunnon-Fannle Lewis
V 2 m
4i/a f
5 1
sf '"
THIRD
Index.
Best
record.
I'cdlßree.
Name.
352 ! Polaskl 10511:40% 1m
355 Belleßoyd I 8111:29 |7f
349 Charmion Jllll 1 :27V 4 i7 f
345 Rr.,l Will 1011:01 5f
339 olive.. 104 im : 7l
354 Montalvo 108 1:34 7f
349 U)ur Maggie 105 I :3«|i/4 7 f
356 May McCarthy. -103 :l:13i/ a 6 f
356 ISligo 'lO31:48V 2 !7 f
96 F... Owen Bros Capt Al-Uold Cup
104 F...1J. P. Atkin !E1 Klo Bey-Sylvia.
95 F... D. Miller Tyrant-Unit
98 F...A rizona Stable Jim Gore-War Banner
91 F... K. Corrigan i Apache-Vlrsifl
102 H.. J. (ochran Sid-May llelie
104 H.. D. A. Honig I'ost Ouanl-MarKiiPrlte
9!>!F... B. c. Holly HcotlanderParldes
103 H.. S. y. n lldfcth linp.MrPlfkwk-k-Henlopen
FOURTH RACE-One mile.
Namp.
I Best
1 Record
Dist.
Lbs Tk. Owner. Pedigree.
103!H.. lMcNanghton<»Miiir Falsetto-Ktnelda
108, F... ittlmwood sik Farm Fjnp. Brmus-Bonnle Jean
111 I EL. IP. Dunne j Hanover- Deceit
87 H . . jAI Smith i Flambeau-M ozelle
109 X... U. B. Morris & Co.. i Hampton-Ornament
Inde.r.
(349) Basso ! 103 1:46
351 Peterthe II 103 1:4214
:r.2 All Over I !03 1 :80*4
354 Kckeri i 100 1 :37
830 Imp. Star Ruby 103 1:42- |
|1 m
1 m
|1 in
FIFTH RACE— Five and a half furlongs;
' -. ■:• > . ■:, >i[ Best |
ndex. Name. -. Lbs | Record Diet.
282 i Bernardo....;.. I 111 j 1:08 | BJ^ f -
248 Imp. Amarina. 114 no rec. .......
217 Brown Dick 1 114 ........
(685) Lucky D0g...... 114 1:44 1 in
889 The King....... i 114 no rec. ........ '
314 Billys ........: 114 1:11-4 51/2 f
332 Mustesa .....:. 11l 1:10 5Va f
157 Bellringer....... 11l 1:161/% « f
345 Service „ 114 1:181* « f
282 a ugsie.v. ;...;.-. IU(I:9B#Tf
.Name.
11l
11» F... Pleasanton stable..
— — L. siianer .'.........
— '.... Terrace stable......
120 H.. B. A Waterhouse..
.... .... Klkton sitible.......
106 H. D. A. H0n1jr.. .....;
108 H.. D. Dickey........:.
106 F... S. c. Hiidreth ......
1 137 Fj.. B. Schrelber.. '...;.. '
101 U.. I. J. Williams...... ,
120
Owner.
1 Imp. Cheviot-Sweet Pesrsrv
K«>lia-.\madine
Jnip. strachino-Frazola
Imp. liareliin-Lou l.amer
Imp. The Kake-Telc&lco
RHinhlcr-YouiiK Duchess
Bachelor-hy Wade
Trou btiflor- Boscobelle
Im. Wondlands-Ijady's Maid
,ilydcr An Auraction
Ppdlgree.
zona stable in whose silk Three Forks
sports, will be refused in future pending a
further investigation.
Outside of this one unpleasant feature
the racing was good. The track is drying
fast, but is still too heavy for any fast time.
The attendance was good, and as three of
the first choices won the bookies did not
have much the best of it.
The talent all seemed to think Alvero a
good thing for the maiden two-year-old
race, and heavily backed at 7 to 10 he won
in a drive from Hazard, who made all the
running through superior riding on
Chorn's part.
The Corrigan entry Repeater was backed
down from fours to 9 to 5, but could finish
no better than fourth in the second race at
six furlongs. Ricardo, overlooked at sto
1 in the ring, showed plenty of sDeed to
the wire, and passing Schnitz the last few
yards won by half a length, with Rico in
the show.
The betting on the next race, also at six
furlongs, favored none of the entries in
particular, Remus and Realization both
closing at threes, with more lengthened
prices against the others. Passing Real
isation, 'who led almost to the stretch,
Remus won easily by three lengths.
Bergen brought E. H. Shirley up and
nipped the place from Realization the last
few jumps.
With Hymn, Olive and George Miller
scratched, "the fourth event, also a six
furlong spin, looked a cinch for Louis
Ezell's speedy mare, Babe Murphy. The
money did not go into the books on her
until the odds reached 8 to 5, when she
was hammered down to (i to 5. Breaking
first at the start, she led all the way ana
won with ridiculous ease by four lengths.
Gallant took the place from Chartreuse in
a drive.
Track and Paddock Items.
"Squeak" Allmark, who had the mount
on Cicero in the hurdle race, had his
shoulder dislocated when that horse was
thrown by Gold Dust.
Among a party of e?ght that arrived
j from the East last evening and registered
at the Palace Hotel was George E. Smith
j (Pittsburg Phil), th« noted plunger. Mr.
{ Smith is accompanied by his mother, who
i pays California a visit for the first time.
j Sam Wulford, a well-known Eastern form
i player, journeyed west with the plunger.
i Sam Doggett, one of the crack riders of
I the country, who is to do the riding for
I Mr. Smith's stabie, is due to arrive to-day.
Frank Van Ness, the owner of the
i jumper J O C, stated last evening at the
I Palace Hotel in a conversation with some
turfmen that he had a bet down on his
horse, and that be nave Johnson orders to
i go to the front, as it was a short race, and
i he did not want to take any chances.
; Either the horse was not himself, or the
i rider did not want to carry out the orders.
Mat Byrnes, trainer for the Montana
■ millionaire turfman, Marcus Daly, will
, arrive at Ingleside track this morning
I with a string of fourteen racers that will
carry the colors of the "copper ring." Bal
lard, the well-known Eastern jockey, will
come with them.
Bob Smith, who was here some two
years back with the black horse Cyclone,
that won several races at the Bay District
track, rode Senator Bland in the opening
race yesterday. Bob is now in the em
ploy of Marcus Daly, and at the termina
tion of a race in the East during the past
summer, when he put up a highly credita
ble finish on imp. Batbampton, caused the
Eastern press to inquire, "Who is Bob
Smith?' His English style of riding even
caused some of the Eastern turf writers to
surmise that hewasaruled-off Newmarket
jockey that was riding in this country
under an alias.
Riley Grannan backed Patriot, who
pulled np lame in the second race and
also caused the tumble in the odds against
E. H. Shirley in the following race.
Jerry Chorn's enforced rest on the
ground was not without its effect. He
rode with something like his accustomed
vigor on Alvcro, the Santa Anita young
ster.
Mamie Scott received substantial sup
port to win the third race, and, at the
weight, looked to have a royal chance, but
she made a very shabby showing. It could
hardly be said she was outclassed, for the
mare has traveled in faster company than
that of yesterday.
M. F. Tarpey, quite an extensive breeder
of the thoroughbred, attended the runs
yesterday. Mr. Tarpey did not overlook
to have a bet both ways on Gallant, who
was raised by that gentleman. The well
known horseman says that he has some
weanlinjrs at his farm by imp. Islington,
own brother to England's great racehorse,
Isinglass, that, judging by their appear
ance, will be able to hold their own in any
company when they face the flag. A year
ling by Flambeau from Not Idle also
promises to develop into a great racehorse.
A DUCK-HUNTER'S PERIL
By Good Swimming Charles Dietz
Saved Himself a Trip to
Jordan.
The Sportsman Had Either to Strike
for His Boat or Get Stuck in
the Mud.
The Mallard Club and its friends en
joyed gooa shooting last Sunday on the
Suisun marshes. Lloyd Eaton, one ot the
prominent members of the club, who had
been enjoined by the Teal-Cordelia Club
from trespassing or. their preserve, said
that the pleasure of the first day's duck
shooting subsequent to the decision ren
dered by Judge lkickles whs very near be
ing destroyed by an accident which befell
Charles Dietz, the popular "Bill Nye" of
the club, who by a stroke of good-luck
saved himself from drowning.
Mr. Dietz gave the following interesting
account of his duck-hunting experience
on Saturday night last:
After leaving some of my friends at the ark,
I departed in the company of a man named
Jersey for a station known as the I)rawbridge.
where we expected the arrival of some more of
the boys later on. 1 rowed down in my hunt
ine skiff with the outgoing tide, and Jersey,
who was in charge ol "the provision boat, lol
lowed soon afterward.
The iide was running out fast and strong,
and, as my boat struck hard against the land
ing, 1 made an attempt to grasp a pole which I
thought was within easy reach, but, like will
o' the wisp, was further away from me than I
expected.
Well, the result of my mistake was an in
voluntary bath. I went down head first and
came up in the same position, but my boat
lamp, which 1 had lighted, was out and the
boat had drifted with the current. I was be
wildered and my only hope, as I thought, was
to recover the skiff. I was alraid that by swim
ming fur the shore I would stick in the soft
mud and go down and out. You, possibly, can
imagine my predicament with rubber bools on
and also tolerably heavy clothing. Well, any
how, I struck out for the l»oat, and I can as
sure you it was the hardest work of my life to
reafh It. In the struggle I went under water
three time.", as my boots were fast becoming
lull and dragging me down.,
Jn the last few yards before I got my fingers
ou the boat, all kinds of thing* shot tt rough
my mind. I was completely exhausted and
every inch I gained ceemed to me a mile. But
I got there finally with botii hands, and no oc
topus that ever existed could have held a
tighter grip than did old Bill Nyo when he got
his lingers on the last straw.
My feeble shouts for help were heard by
Jersey, who had already made a landing and
was wondering where on earth I had taken
wings to. Well, to make a long story short, I
was rescued and relieved of about two gallons
of overflowed marsh-land water. Altogether my
escape from a watery grave was almost miracu
lous under the existing circumstances.
Mr. Dietz is an excellent swimmer, and
had it not been for this acquirement he
would certainly not be in the land of the
living to-day.
NEW TO-DAT..
"7
Ciipid and Psyche.
A book for you — a book
that appeals to all that is
good : and true in manhood
and womanhood ; that points
out , a path which will lead
all men ; and women to a
more happy, healthy condi-
tion, can be had free. It is
called "Three Classes of
Men," and it deals with the
perfect development of man-
hood. It exposes the ruin-
ous errors of indiscretion and
points'out a means of quick
and permanent cure. It
gives proof of the wonderful
cures- by Dr. Sanden's Elec-
tric Belt, the modern life-
giver. It is free ; get it to-
day and be cured. : . - i
SANDEN ELECTRIC CO.,
.632 Market Street, San Francisco,
Opposite : I'aluce Hotel. 1 • ORice'honrs,'. 8 'to' 6;
evenings", Bto 8:H0. Hu'ndays, 10 lo 1." - „ - , ' j
• , i'ortlHnd (Orefou) otlice, j.i Washington aU
YOUR EYES OPEN,
Keep your eyes open if you would get on In
the world. Opportunity is for the alert and
ready. • •
Keep them open for a, eh ance', to . help some
poor- fellow who is crushed by misfortune.'
Who knows when you may want help yourself?
Keep your eyes open when false friends, by
lies and flattery, would entice you into some
act that would make you blush with shame in
the future. '. .. - .
- Keep your eyes open to see the least change
for the worst in your health. A sound mind
and good intentions are a mere mockery when
harnessed to a feeble body. ! . ....
■;Keep your eyes wide open in this month of
suddenly changing air. The least cold may
carry the possibility of a loug sickness. Re-
member what short work Dufl'y's Pure Malt
Whiskey made of last season's' cold. -, : It surely
will do as much for you now.
jj Keep you eyes open for signs of undue waste
of tissue, loss- of appetite and for other evi-
dences of a debilitated system. The circulation
should be quickened and the nerves re-
enforced. ■ Duny's Pure Malt Whiskey is your,
strongest ally iv regaiuingyour old-time vigor.
Keep your eyes open for any medicinal stim-
ulant as reliable and helpful as Duffy's Pure
Malt Whiskey and you will simply waste your
time.' There is, in fact, but one whisky uni-
versally used in families and institutions and
highly commended by doctors. That is Duffy's.
deaf to all appeals in favor ol a substitute.
SFA \c o
DOCTOR SWEANT
737 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.
Opposite Examiner Office.
This learned specialist, well known by his
long residence and successful . practice oh the
Pacific Coast, guarantees a prompt and' perfect
cure of every case he undertakes. Thousands of
genuine testimonials on h'le in private office.
FREE TREATMENT SS p p s r on wl
office on Friday afternoons.
VnilMP lICU i{ you are troubled with
lUUiiu lYitli night emissions, exhausting
drains, pimples, bashfulness, aversion to soci-
ety, stupidness, despondency, loss of energy,
ambition and self-confidence, which de-
Drives you of your manhood and absolutely un-
fits you for study, business or marriage— if you
are thus afflicted you know the cause. Get well
and be a man. - ■. ■
MIDDLE-AGED AND OLD MEN ass.SK
of you troubled with weak, achine backs and
kidneys; frequent, painful urination and sedi-
ment in urine; impotency or weakness .of
sexual organ?, and other unmistakable signs
of nervous debility and premature decay.
Many die of this difficulty, ignorant of the
cause, which is the second stage of seminal
weakness. The most obstinate cases of thii
character treated with unfailing success.
DRII/ATC diseases— Gleet. Gonorrhea, In-
T niIMIC nammations, Discharges, Stric-
tures, Weakness of Organs. Syphilis, Hydrocele,
Varicocele and kindrea troubles, quickly cured
Without pain and detention from business. i
pi|T(l DDLJ which poisons the Breath, Stom-
uMlHillin ach and Lungs and paves th«
way for Consumption, Throat, Liver, Heart,
Kidney, Bladder and all constitutional and in*
ternal troubles; also Rupture, Piles, Fistula,
treated far in advance of any other institution
in this country. -■- ... ' • .', -
BLOOD AND SKIN P e i s e^r»
Syphilitic Taints, Tumors, Tetter, Eczema and
other impurities of the bloocl thoroughly erad«
icated, leaving the system in a strong, pur*
and healthful state. '-"./;
I Af)|CQ if you are suffering from persistent
LnlllLU headaches, painful menstruation,
leucorrhcea or whites, intolerable itching, dis-
placement of the womb, or any other distress-
ing ailment peculiar to your sex, you should
call on DR. SwEANY without delay. He cure*
when others fail. * „
■«l/D|TC your troubles if living away from
IB ill I L the city. Thousands cured at home
by correspondence, and medicines sent secure
from observation. A Book on special disease*
gent free to those describing their troubles. I
OFFICE HOURS: 9 till 12 a, M. and 2 till
5 and 7 till' 8 p. m. Sundays, 10 till 12 only.
Address F. L. SWE ANY, M D.,
: j>~ : 737 Market Street, San Francisco. Cal.
AUCTION SALES. .
TIMOS
AT AUOTIOISr.
THIS DAY,
Tuesday ..........December 10, 1895,
I 'Atll a. it. and'2:3or. M. \'.;;*V'
AT SAIiESIIOOM, 16 POST STREET.
—ALSO — —
TURKISH RUGS AND CARPETS. |
ALSO
French and German Art Goods
WILL K. FISHEB & CO., Auctioneers.
AUCTION SALE.
HADJI EPHRAIM BENQUIAT'B
COLLECTION OF
High-Grade Oriental Rugs ! ;
WILL BE SOLD
TO-NIGHT AT 7:30. ■
; AT ;■';
GOLDE3 GATE HALL, 629 SITTER ST; j
Rugs on Exhibition from 10 A. M. j
to 6 P. M.
, - EASTON, ELDKIDGK <fc CO., .
, . - ■' ' ..- . ■ . ..Auctioneers..
REFEREE'S SALE!
at mm.
.: SATURDAY. .", .
Saturday.....'. .....December 28, 1895;!
■ ■ At 12 o'clock noon, at Salesroom of ■
Q. H. UMBSEN & CO,, Auctioneers
• 14 Montgomery Street. ■ •
MURPHY-GRANT PROPERTY,
Northeast Corner Bush and
; .. Sansome Streets,
Lot 137:6x137:6, and brick and iron improve-
merits. Subject to a lease with Murphy. Grant
A Co., expiring December 31,' 1896, for 2200 per
month, total monthly rental' of property being
$3275.- ■.";.-■' ■ . .'/.'... .'. .. ' .
OUSTAV H.UMBSKN, Keferee.
[ Farther particulars please apply to ■'
} (5. H. I'MBSKN A CO., ..
[ Auctioneers, 14 Montgomery street.
AUCTION SALES.
«WE¥!
SALES iriUCTIOS. -
; : £ffr fei £a
- Salesyard, Cor.Van Ness Aye. and Market St.
At 7:30 p. m..
UNDER CANVAS and by ELECTRIC LIGHTS.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1895. :
■sr:E-A.n.xjx:KrG-s. ;
Get of imp. Mariner, bobrante, imp. Midlothian,
imp. Martenhurst, etc. Also twenty-eight Noted
Brood Mares, among them the dams of I>ON OA-
RILLO. EL UAYO, DARE. SAM LEAKE, SO-
BRANTE. SEASIDE. SEA SPRAY. MOLLIKK,
. REJECTED, etc., together with the \ve!l-knowu
stallions. „. ." ' ' • • . .
DIPORTED MARINER AND SOBRANTE,
PROPERTY OF
ESTATE OF COL. H. I. THORNTON.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1895.
Yearlings and Year-Olds, ,
Get of SALVATOR, SIR MODRED. DAREBIN",
MIDLOTHIAN, MAXIM, MABTENHURST,
TYRANT,' TORSO, CALVADOS, ST. AN-
DREW, FITZJAMES, etc., property oi ;' . ;*■
RANC'HO DEL. PASO.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18.
IT JEI -A- H. Xj IKTGS,
Get of IMPORTED MIDLOTHIAN, IMPORTHB
. MEKRIWA AND PEEL, property of
r JAMES B. CHASE, ESQ.
Catalogues now ready.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19.
The Todhanter Thoroughbreds,
COMPBISIN'O
15 Brood Hares and 11 Yearlings.
The brood mare-s comprise such noted ones a*
HAIDEE (dam of Rey Alfonso), EDA (dam or
Chas. Quick), Li'/./.IK IDLE (dam of Jimmy Duffy*
I and Princess First), KATIE A (dam of Tigress)*
I LIZZIE HOOKER, ANNIE ROONEY, etc. -
The yearlings are from these mares and the gets
I of imp. Merriwa and f rince of Norfolk.
Also two trotting bred yearlinirs by Silver Bow.- .
Catalogues now being prepared.
• KILI.IP & CO., 'Auctioneer*, •
j ,' ' " 30 Montgomery street.
ATlJXllsil^lTT^TiYE AUCTION
SALE OF OIL PAOTMS,
j Tlie Most Noted Gems and Select Col«i
lection of the Latest Artistic I-;il>oii ■
of 'the Well-known Artist, Norton*
Bush./;.-,'.::;; !Zi':>'.- '":'.' :^Q'
All lovers of Art are cordially invited to ' lrispec*
i the collection on exhibition at our Art Salesroom^ •
19 MONTGOMERY STREET,
On TUESDAY, December 10, and ..
WKDNESDAY, December 11, 1895*
To be sold at a Peremptory Auction Sale '■
. . without limit or reserve on
THURSDAY.
■ Thursday December 12, 1895y
j Commencing at 11 o'clock a. m.,
TO close estate of NORTON BUSH, deceased.
ThesefpietuVes are chosen studies from all parti*,
' of the world. Callfornians are proud that the brusnf
i of Norton Bush has perpetuated and made famou.4
I her unsurpassed scenic and floral beauties. Houl
and feelinsr follow every stroke he has placed on
canvas. The offering is limited In number and cant -
never be duplicated. The oniy opportunity -thai^
, those who appreciate his work will have of adrtina
to their collection. Catalosues can be procured a -3
I our offices. ' BOVKK, TOY <fc CO..
Auctioneers, 19 Montßomery Street.'- Z
WILLIAM BUTi'ERKIELD will conduct thq| .
i sale. ' ' _. .
f At Auction
TUESDAY,
TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1893 i
At 12 o'clock Noon-.
| At 638 Market Street, Opp. Palace Hotel. j :
REFEREE'S SALE.
THE MAGNIFICENT
| MANSION, :;
j With Large Corner Lot, being: th«.
Southeast cor. of . O'Farrell ancg*
Cough streets. Lot 60x137:6 feet*
with an L on southeast corner,
30x34:4-1/3 feet. vK-- '• . :
The subdivisions of this mansion comprise Salor*.
Parlors, Reception and Dining Rooms and j GrandK
Hall, which open together, making one grand room,) ■
of the entire floor; Kitchen, Butler's and othe&l
Pantries, Servants' Rooms, etc., on first floor an-t J
nex; fine large Bedrooms, Dressing-rooms, ,-Bath-]
rooms, Toilets, t-tc, on second floor: space for> '
three large rooms attic; Storerooms, Coalroom,,
Wineroom and Laundry in basement; basemen!!:
cemented; large, handsome grounds; streets bitu-
i . minlzed and basalt rock; roti t walk cement stone. I
Surroundings cannot be excelled. Neighbor^
are of the first-class order. Car accommodations.'
not excelled. : -. V
N.B.— To examine this property please obtair*
card from the auctioneers. -. • ■ i
KASTON, EIiDKIDGE & CO.,
638 Market street. Auctioneers.
■■■'wsi'ir'ir'if* test
An unrivaled collection of TURK-
ISH and PERSIAN varieties is
now on i ,; -. , (i
EXHIBITION
GOLDEN GATE HALL, '
625 Sutter Street. !
It forms a Wonderful Display.
i FLTTG-iS I
i The stock of HADJI EPHRAIM
; BENGUAIT. :.;•: It contains . many; !
" Rare Antique specimens, 'all very
valuable and of Great Beauty,
■ : , Jt€-,1-J.;*larB&:
: . The delight of connoisseurs and
collectors, were awarded 5 Medals
at the World's Fair. Every piece
is guaranteed as represented.
AUCTION SALES.
These gems of Oriental Art will be ■
■:.. „ sold in .
GOLDEN GATE HALL,
""i W. '.: V. ': 625 Sutter Street, %
ON TUESDAY, 10. 1895,
At 7 ;30 o'clock Evening.
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY,
" -a l December 11 and 12,
. . :,. .;, At 2:30 o'clock Afternoon,
<_ 7:30 o'clock Evening. :• :
. - FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,
' i* ] At 2:30 o'clock Afternoon. ! ,
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, . "■.
< • .V ..- At 7:30 o'clock Evening. , > --■
EASTON, ELDRIDGE t & CO., "'. ■
- f .;/.-. : -. -Auctioneer*. „
Catalogues at O. HALL'S. •
■' N.B.— An opportunity of a lifetime to .
. secure Gennlne.Works of Art. - ,: .-, n .
'" ' ' ■ . .. . . ' . -- — — ::
11

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