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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 27, 1896, Image 26

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26
THE STAGE
I went late into the Columbia Theater
the o her evening, which is an nnpar.ion
able thing to do. B-'ing conscious of my
ill-loins, I paused in the foyer to wait
till the curtain went dowi, when a famihar
voice struck my ear with aatonis ment.
It was Maxine Elliott's diction ; tiiere \va3
no mistaking it. I jeered through the
curtains, wondering how the fair divorcee
had been spirited there. But no! Blanche
Bates occupied the center of the stage,
Blanche Bates in the corporeal presence,
which philosophers say is a mere bubble,
ami in this case it was more true than
usual, for her underlying personality
seemed to be that of Mesine Elliott.
Miss Bates' mannerisms and gestures,
which used to be quick and nervou?, had
taken on the ruore plßcid and rum'iiant —
if one may say it of a lady— mannerisms of
Maxime Ellio.t ; her voice hed caujrht the
inflections of Maxine Elliott's voice and
her smootn, rather affected way of reeling
off her sentences, with a little gasp here
and there, as if to suggest an emotion
which she was not quite capable of ex
pressing. Strangest of all, in the interpre
tation of her part, Miss Bates' mind
seemed to be running in the Elliott chan
nels.
Blanche Bates may be an ardent wor-
Fhijier at Maxine Elliott's shrine, and in
her artless admiration have unconsciously
mimicked the (ricks of her voice and man
ner. If she has done it with malice afore
thouzht she certainly deserves to be con
gratulated on her remarkable success, but
having established her ability to do this
sort of thing, she should give it up as
quickly as possible. Maxine Elliott her
self bears unmistakable traces of having
tried to copy Ada Rohan — mO3t of the
Daly graduates are afflicted with the
Kehan gasp — ana Miss Bates may be aim
ing at tnirher game than the fair Maxine
when she plays aia Elliott. She is bright
and clever enough, though, to work out
her own salvation and throw models to
the winds.
"The Railroad of Love" in which
Blanche Bates and the other Frawleys were
playing, is one of those idyllic comedies
in which the characters live and move
and have their being only to make love,
or be made love to. There are a coup eof
fathers, and a few relations thrown in. but
the fathers have but a sinj.'l« thought —
that of seeing ilieir cbililr n wed. They
lie awake at night pondering on suitable
mates for tueir offspring, and the sole topic
of Conversation during their waking hours
is ot wedding boils and marriage sett.e
ments. Comedies from the German are
apt to be that v:ay, particularly comedies
where the Augustin Daly has had a
linger in the pie. "Th • Railroad of Love"
is as beautifully, wholly and absorbingly
given up to Cupid and bis wiles as
"Countess Gacki" is, and every one re
members tnat "Gucki" begins, continues
and enas in sffairs of the heart.
It is just like devouring a feast of straw
berries and whipped cream, to "assist. "as
the French say, at one of these comedies.
Life is depicted aa we ureamed of it at
] sweet sixlcen, but viewed in the light of
i more mature judgment, I, for one, cannot
i dispel a dire foreboding as to the future of
i ihe characters, when thoy are all married
arv.l done for. Wnat will they talk about?
What will the fathers have to occupy
| tbeir minds, when the love affairs of their
, children no longer burden them? How
i will the children while away the weary
! hours without tie assistance oi Cupid?
! In "The Railroad of Love," Cousin "Val"
' will no doubt have her hands full looking
i after that butterfly lieutenant of hers. He
! is just the sort of man who would be "to
i one thing constant never."
"The Railroad of Love" just suits the
Frawlpy company. They make love and
are loved brightly, charmingly and con
j vincingly. There is a perennial youthful
ness about them — a sort of
Men rany come and men may go,
But we make love forever,
Which charms afresh every time they do
it. You could not imagine them loving
!in the mad. misguided way in which
j Romeo and .TuJiat loved, and suffered and
; died. The Frawley lovprs are wail bred,
j polite and decorous, just as tender and
j impassioned aa ths rules of etiquette will
! permit tin m to be, but quite incapable
|of growing vulgarly despairing or ye
! hement. The Fraw'eys have had such
j long practice in polite comedies of "The
| Railroad of Love" sort that I believe they
: could compile a valuable volume for tn
i etiquette series on "How to Make Love
j With Proiriety."
To judge from the Tivoli programme,
| one would say that the theater employed
a modest and retiring Mahatma to write
its music. No composer's name is given
on the programme except
Lorraine's for that graceful music of the
baliet suite. Yes! it mint be a Ma
hatma who composed the rest of "Jack
and the Beanstalk," and he writes charm
ing music— bright, catchy and tuneful,
and yet *iot popular enough to be vulgar
or trivial. It does not matter to the pub
lic how he gets bis inspirations, but my
own opinion i 3 that he keeps up occult re
lations with such masters of operetta as
Offenbach, Franz yon Suppe, Audran,
Jotiarm Straus;-, etc. Some of these mas
ters are living and come have joined the
i. reat majority, but that does not make
any difference; the Tivoli's Mahalrua gets
out on the astral plane, meets them all,
discusses the newest things in comic
opera, and comes home laden with bright
and up-tc-date inspirations for the Tivoli's
| next extravaganza.
I have not heard Uie latest effusions of
Strauss, Audran, etc., but judging from
their earlier operettas they are not doing
much bettor work than the Tivoii'3
Mxhatma. It was natural that Delia Fox's
operas should fail a little flat compared
with "B.ibes in the Wood," the music of
"Little Trooper" for instance almost dc
scived the fate, and if you compare the
music of "Jack and the Beanstalk" with
the music in "The Brownies" — well ! as
Mra. Mslftpxop classically observes, "Ca
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1896.
parisons are odorous." The long and the
suortof the matter is that the Mahatma
at the Tivoli lia-* spoilt us by pampering
us on suoh bright, sparkling music, that
we have grown too exacting in our comic
opera tastes.
It is years since I saw a ballet
d'action, but an irrepressible longing
to Dehold one seized me alter spend
ing the other evening at the Or
pbeutn, and finding that more by good
luck than by good mana™<-in»nt Ctustnv
Walter nas all the materials to hand for
giving, not the "Excelsior" of "La Mula
aetia," but one of the many pretty baiiets
d'action that tell their stories by panto
mime, without spectacular effects. If
Adrien Kiralfy is not unworthy of his
Drothers he knows a thing or two about
putting on such productions, and the ac
complished Phoires are equal to all the
requirements of the- pantomime business.
.As for the Orpheum coryphees, they are
Retting very nicely broken into dancing,
and if only a few tucks conld be taken out
of the Orpheum s!a.:e to lensthen it Gus
tav Walter might fairly dazzle the San
Francisco public with a ballet-pantomime
such as no manager would risk the cost of
bringing across the continent. It is by a
mere chance that all the materials are
here, and I fear they will not be utilized,
but as they say in "Patience": "Such an
opportunity may not occur again."
Marie Evelyn.
Qreen-Room Qossip.
Among the many would-be artists who
tormen:ed Gustave Walter tor engage
ments on the Orpheum Circuit while he
was in New Yortc was a typical "leg it" of
the kind more often pictured in the comic
papers than seen in real life. He followed
the vaudeville manager about, and one day
cornered him in a restaurant where theat
rical people are wont to congregate. He
stated hia business, and Walter replied:
'Lets me see vat you can do; if you makes
me laagb I gives you an encageruent."
Forthwith the actor mounted a round
table and started to give "bits" from
"Romeo and Juliet.'' In his enthusiasm
he overstepped the center point of the
table and came tumbling down, table and
all. Mr. Walter laughed, but the actor is
stll waiting to be booked on the Orpheum.
Circuit.
They were young, they wore new clothes
and had other characteristics that bespoke
the wedding tour. They entered the lobby
of tha Murray Hill Theater on Monday
night. Without unlinking arms the
happy pair walked up to the box-office.
Ho asked: "Ii Mr. Myles playing in the
'Maccaroon?"
The treasurer was abont to reply when
tiio blushing bride exclaimed:
"Why. Edward, you mean Andrew
My;es in 'Macxerel.' "
•'No, Kitty," he corrected, ••you area
little mixed. It's — it's— it's — "
"It's Andrew Mack in 'Myles Aroon,'"
ventured the treasurer as ha laid down
two cardboards and said, "Two dollars,
please."
Baldwin Theater.
"Palmer Cox's Brownies" has but eight
nights and. tnrec matinees more at the
Baldwin Theater. Many amusing local
isms have been interpolated during the
past week, and for the remaining perform
ances will be materially added to. "The
Bro wines" will close each evening, as
usual with the aerial ballet, which has be
come one of the most applauded of the
many interesting features of the perform
ance. Little Gertie Carlisle, at the request
of many of her admirers, will render at
every performance commencing with this
pvenir.g's, her popular number, "Ben
Boit."
O'i Monday, January 4, Denman Thomp
son's favorite play, "The Old Homestead,"
comes to the Baldwin. The company will
biin« tiie original old Homestead Double
Quartet and a choir of twenty selected
voices.
Qrarxd Opera-j-louse
A war drama, "Acrois the Potomac,"
replaces "She" a: Momsco's Grand Opera
house on Monday night. It is the work
of Augustus Pitou and Colonel Edward
Aifnend. Colonel Alfriend is a Union
K>ldi«t <vho pays due homage to the cour
age and sincerity of the Southern soldier*.
In fact, while the hero is a M-*ssachii!-etts
man, liis sweetheart is from Virginia and
her noble young brother is in the Con
federate army. There are to be some
elaborate scenic effects, especially in the
preat batjl; scene, in which an entire
company of the First Regiment, N. G. C,
will participate. Beautiml Cora Macey,
wno played She during the past week, is
cast lor the female spy and wears uieu'a
clothes.
TiVoli Opera-House.
The holiday production of "Jack and the
Beanstalk" at the Tivoli Opera-house has
met with great success and wili be contin
ued until further notice. The three grand
ballets and tha artistic grouping of the
coryphees under the direction of Mons.
Kemonde have made qua- a hit, and so
have the fancy steps of the male dancer,
Henella. The specialties, the cow and all
the other features o' "Jack and the Bean-
Malk," are good, and Ferris Hart man, W.
H. West, John J. Raffael, Rhys Thomas,
Maurice Darcy, Fre»i Kavanagh. W. H.
Took?r, Master Jack Robertson. Jo^ie In
tropidi, Elvia Croi Seabrooke, Amie Suits,
Anna Schnabel appear to advantage in
me leading roles.
A second edition is now in preparation,
in which many new songs, dances and
jokes will be introduced.
Columbia Jheater.
This is the farewell week of the Frawley
company, and it will be celebrated by a
triple bill. On Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday, that comicaf comedy by
Martha Morton, "His Wife's Father," will
be performed. It has been in the Frawley
repertoire only a few months, bat during
that time it has proved a drawing card.
On Thursday and Friday nights and at the
Friday matinee, "The Great Unknown"
will form the bill. This is an Auguatin
Daly comedy which was successful daring
the last Frawley season. "Men and
Women/ one of tiie ocst of tbe De Mille
and Belasco .plays, wH form the bill at
the Saturday matinee and on Bnturday
night, and it will serve rs the farewell
perform* n-je on Sunday evening.
The Frawley company will not return to
the Columbia till next summer. .Shortly
they will start on a tour of the East.
On Wednesday night, the 30th inst, the
Pacific Cinst Commercial Travelers' As
sociniion wiii take a benefit at the Colum
bia Theater.
At the Orpheum.
i i
With new evolutions for the ballets and
some changes in the vaudeville end of the
programme, the bill at the Orpneum for
this week promises to be even stronger
than last. Kiralfy has been putting his
coryphees through new marches, etc.. and
the aerial ballet has some new light effects,
while the human butterflies have learned
new curves of ihght.
Zazelle and Vernon, the funny acrobats
of List week, are on the bill and Cash man
and Holcomb have new songs. Cler
inont's trained animals ara in the last
week of their engagement. The Phoites
and their clever pantomime play an im
portant part in the holiday bill. T:.e
Dunbar sisters remain.
Abachi ana Ma-ana, two new-comers,
are said to be about the best acrobats and
tumbles that Guslar Walter has yet dis
covered.
Alcazar Theater.
"The Cricket on tbe Hearth" will be
withdrawn from the Alcazar after to-day,
and to-morrow evening "Niobe," a three
act comedy by Harry and Edward Poul
ton, adapters of "Ermiuie," will be pre
sented.
The story was in some points sug
gested by Anstey's extravagant and amus
ing tale, "The Tinted Vanus." NioDe,
a fTO.OOO statue, 2000 years oid, is sud
denly brought to life at an evening recep
tion given by a wealthy New York insur
ance man, the electric wires usel in illu
minating her with incande cent lisrhts
effecting the marvelous reincarnation.
Her garments, which are decidedly an
tique in character, are replaced by a more
modern costume, and sne is made one of
the euests of the evening. Her manners
and customs are those oi ancient Greece,
and the complications arising from her
being thrown En witii nineteenth century
people provide the amusement.
The cast wilt include Beatrice Lieb as
Niobe and the other par. s will be played
by George O'bourne, Hugo Toland, Fran
cis Powers, Fi.i'ik Clayton, May Buckley,
Maude Hine, Frances Newton and Miss
Bouvier. Miss Rosella La Faille will
make her reappearance as Caroline Dunn.
/U the GKutes.
R. M. Brown, a one-legged cyclist who
is going around the world on his wheel,
has been engaged by the Haight-street
management and will coast down the
chutes and will land in the lake on his
bicycle this afternoon and evening.
Km il Markeberg wili make a balloon
ascension aud parachute drop at 4 o'clock,
and Juies Korto, the wonderful equilibrist,
will walk down the chutes on a globe aft
ernoon and evening.
The Animatoscope shows a number of
new scenes and it is rapidly becoming one
of the features of the grounds.
The San Francisco and Oakland school
children are availing themselves of the
management's vacation invitation and
pleasant days see the place'packed.
Loie Fuller's Return.
La Loie Fuller will produce a panto
mime entitled a "Paris Tragedy," as a
feature of her engagement of four nights
at the California Theater, commencing
Thursday evening. Tho dancer has re
turned this way en route to Mexico, where
she is to fill an engagement booked some
months ago and which she is under
contract to fill prior to Her departure to
Cuina. La Loie intends to make the pan
tomime the bill for her re-entree to the
Parisian stage next year. It calls for no
sciall amount of pantomimic talent and
Miss Fuller ha? secured the service of one
of the cleverest artists in this line to as-
list her in this act. Besides the panto
mime Miss Fuller will bring out new
dances, including the "Chinese Lady,"
'The Shadow Dance." etc. There will be
two matinees, one on Fr:day (New Year's
day) and another on Saturday.
"Messiah" for Gharihj.
A very successful performance of "The
Messiah was given in the First M. E.
Church, San Jose, last Monday and Tues
day, for the benefit of the Associated
Charities. A large audience was present,
and the various numbers of Handel's
masterpiece were received with unstinted
applause. A large and efficient chorus of
San Jose singers, conducted by James
Hamilton Howe, rendered the choruses,
and the solo artists were: Mme. Yda de
Seminario, soprano; Mi-s Carrie Foster
McCiellan, contralto; Mr. Frank Coffin,
tenor; Mr. S. Homer Henley, basso; Pro
fessor F. Loui King, organist; Miss Ada
Churchili, pianist.
Gircus Royal.
At the horse show at the Circus Royal
kicking, rearing and bucking horses con
tinue to be trained in a manner which
shows the power of man over the hors?,
particularly of Professor Gieason, the
King of Horse-tamers.
Where They Laugh.
There is generally some joke or point in
a play whim the audience applauds more
uproariously than all the other witticisms.
It is not always the author's most cher
ished joke, and it is very seldom the best
bit oi dialogue in the play, but night after
night the audience insists on hailing it
with delight, for some mysterious reason
which even the aclors themselves cannot
explain.
The following are the points where the
biggest laugh comes in at some of the hol
iday preparations:
A"t the Baldwin— "The Brownies."
The leader of the German band, com
menting upon the eating oi roosters, says:
"I never eat roosters! I fool him! I
eat him when he is a egg."
At the Tivoli— "Jack and the "Bean
ttalk."
The jealous queen finds the King at
Mrs. Simpson's dairy, and, knowing him
to b • a great flirt, the following conversa
tion ensues:
Qu?en In tropodl— Where is the milk
maid you came to see?
King llartuian (very absent-mindedly)
— The milk is maue down at the pump,
my dear.
Dramatic Brevities.
Walter Saniord is In London, using hli old
plays.
William Gillette is to supply Henry S. Dixie
with a new play.
Louis James has just finished a disastrous
tour in the Sonth.
There will be special New Year's day mati
nees at tbe theaters.
The ballet of "Cleopatra" will shortly be
presented at the Tivoli.
"My Friend from India" it to be produced in
London on January lti.
"Jack and the Beanstalk" was written and
arranged by George £■ Lask.
The Lyceum Company, with its entire new
repertoire, will be one of the bummer attrac
tions at the Baldwin.
The receipts of the Coghlan benefit will be
held in trust by Charles Frohman, Abe Hum
mel and William Perzel.
Nat Goodwin will play a New York engage
ment after all. He will use hU new play,
"An American Citizen."
Modj:ska's coming tonr under the manage
ment of Al Hayman & Co. will extenu over a
period of but four weeks.
i Joseph Hawor th will leave the cast of "Sue"
and come direct West to join Mod jeska. He to
to pay lead with the star.
Annie Suits will shortly sing Lottie Collins'
latest success, "I Went to Paris With Papa,"
in "Jack aud the Beanstalk."
J. K. Em mett secured a divorce from Emily
Lytton last week. Mr. Etnmett will continue
his season to the continuous house.
Lillian Nordica is said to have discovered a
wonderful tenor in Chicago, whom she thinks,
wi:h some schooling, will become famous.
W. H. Crane will come here late in the sea
son and proauce his entire repertoire, includ
ing his latest success, "A Fool for Fortune."
When Margaret Mather goes to Wallack's
Theater Fhe promises a production of '•Cym
beline" which, she declares, will compare with
Henry Irving's in Londan.
Tho Chicago press is very enthusiastic con
cerning "The Prodigal Father." which is now
on its way to the coast and will be seen at the
Co.umbia Theater in January.
Mrs. Langtry has a rival in the way of a rac
ing actress. Mile. Marsy of the Comedie Fran
chise, whose name figured so prominently in
me Max Lebaudy cast-, was one of the chief
NEW TO-DAY— AMUSEMENTS.
.- ■ . ■ . ■ ■ ■ •
SOMEIIII\G 3 W ODER THE SHUT
. <11JEO OF DAACE
I. A 1.01 1-:
DEC. 31. "3fEW Oj%:\CTES'»
OIVIiY FOUR NIGHTS. "UiEW DANCES"
V L.OIE. •*I¥EW'l>AiyCES»f
a TSWLW ke:*satio:y V
••THE CHINESE LADY." "NEW DANCES" A
LALOIE I> A SEW ROLE
♦* A PARIS TRAGEDY"
(Pantomime from the .French)
LA LOIE'S POSITIVE GOOD.BY
Management William A. Bradv
Direction George M. Welty and Alt. EUinghouse
CALIFORNIA THEATER, TIIURS. EVG., DEC.3I
MATINEE NEW YEAR'S DAY
ATI NEE SATURDAY, JANUARY 9
Popular Prices— Entire Dress Circle. 81 ; Entire Balcony. 50c and 75c.
Seats Ready Tuesday Morning at the Itox-Oflice.
BflLffilftlfegT^ I LAST PERFORM ISCES!
wNrrnStn&k ' I LAST PERFORM IMES !
THIS (SUNDAY) NIGHT AND EVERY NIGHT NEXT WEEK.
Farewell Performance Sunday Night, January 3.
Matinees Wednesday, New Year's and Sa urday.
O. B. JEFFERSON, KLjA.-W AND ANQBR'S
THE GREAT BIG SUCCESS,
p ct?r BROWNIES!
THE FLYING BALLET !
This Much Discussed Feature Positively Presented in Every Performance.
TELE rPTTPO"!*""*" GrJEt^USOiA,!* I3^.lXrX>
THB OKIKNT.M. DANCING GIKI.B ! WANDERING MINSTKELS !
DISAPPEARING DEMONS AND OTHER GREAT NOVELTIES ! .
/~1 XT' DTI"!? r* \DI TCT li 1 SAN FRANCISCO'S FAVORITE, IN HER WOSDEB-
(jrHirvl liii \j AilJjlo-LJcj, plx rendition of --ben bolt r
Secure Seats ' Now.
Mnnd«V,J".4, D"rilT>a ' T^'-m-*- •*» F""^" p " "ThcQ'ri M^mr.c^ooH"
COLUMBIA THEATER.
FKiEDLANDhIt. GOTTLOB & C 0....... ..:.... .....Lessees and Managers. '
-- LAST PERFORMANCE OF— —
Jkw*. "THE RAILROAD OP LOVE!"
UQK >^ THEN COMTiS THE FAREWk.LL, WKKKI - ,'
immt \ TUKN COM>:S THE FAREWr I.i. \V i- XX'
GOOD-BY CXTIL NEXT SUMMER! fj
JBSgK As COMMENCINQ MOND <±^r. DEO. as. j
mtm/Bem \ ') \1 AT T N TTTh 1^ Friilay (Sew Year's) January 1.
MTxBBBw V -' MAlliMl<riO. Siturd.»y January S.
T>M THE FRAWLEY COMPANY
jf|B^Q A Great Triple Bill By Unanimous Request.
A^SH Monday Nitht I TT» W7"»f > T~» ,1
JHHHB - . ju sfi.iy M S iH His Wile S J H 3.tn2f
AH Wednesday Night I ■*■•«& W lie O X U.IIICI .
Tll^^fflß Wn Thur.-dar Night I «-r-rf /"» .TT f
mm Am Inday N a h? c . c ::::::.::::::::! Ihe Great Unknown.
mm bB Saturday Matinee If n « XVT
■A JHBI Satuiday Night lVl^n and Wompn
i»L #Hfl Sunday (Farewell) Night.... IVICII ctllU W UlllCli.
•*— ■■■mbJ^b. Jmmm January 4 >' i: JOSEPH am up nx.
nnr^r% noAAJ O THIS afternoon AND TO-NIGHT.
MOROSGO S ** P^onnance^ ...
GRAND OPERA-HOUSE SHE I"
WALTER MOROSCO...SoIe Lessee and Manager. WITH lIS SPLENDID SCENERY.
Commonoin6 M0nday . . . . . . .... • Seoomiaer 28th
A Revival of the Stlrrinar Drama of the Lat Rebellion,
ACROSS THE POTOMAC !
Acknowledged the B«st Wsr Pay Ever Written.
MAONIFICENT SCENERY A STRENGTHENED CAST I INTRICATE MECHANISM!
go— PEOPLE ON THE STAGE 100
SPECIAL NEW YEAR'S DAY MATINEE ON FRIDAY
Evening Prices-lOc. 85c and 50c. .—M VTIXEES S TIKD AM) SUNDAY
rik n TiVOLI OPERA-HOUSa
/ *■ m/ . - lliuEßXisiiXE Krkt.iv). Proprietor Jt^laa*i*e
11 (•jl M I^l l\ . THE HOME TRIUMPH!
V*\AA^VA/ U\AJ \J \ OUR HOLIDAY SPECTACLE !
THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING J CC~ _ .
LAST PERFORMANCES :OF ik T A f* |< "
"TDEIRICRErOJ THE HEARTH rt J /\ V f\.
AND THK
MONDAY EVG, DECEMBER 38, w-^ »— . m. »*-».•"■-• m. » w m •■■
AND SPECIAL MATINEE NEW YEAR'S DAY, RFANSTAI IV I
• The Paulton Bro.hirs' Kulously Funny ' .I™? V.'». 1 ™?V.'» i\ 1— « I X. ■
( 'lhree-Act Comedy, • 3 GRAND BALLETS 1-3
TVT TT : "'TF? ITS * SUPERB TRANSFORMATIONS'-*
-.=- •*-^ 1 -■■ .V-r ...JBi *— " •;■-■ SPLENDID CA-«T!
WITH GEORGE OSBOURNE, HUGO TOLAND, ENTRANCING srECIALTIKS J /
Ana Our Great Company in the Cast.", A Treat for Young and Old— AVWell-
ONii BIG LAUGH FROM BEGINNING billed Clirist must i<le Pudding of .
'I A TO END. SONG, DANCE AND HUMOR.
;■ Order seats b>- telephone. Black 991. . . ':_;../..• -.-. _
Wight— 15c. 25c. 35c. 50c :. Matinee— lsc, 25c, 35& PODUIa- Prices..:....-.:. 25c ?n1 503.
Mg!\ Y^l TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE.
v (By kind permission of MRS. ERNESTINE
W^S»^sWli^X^| KRELING.)
O'Farrell Street. ] e : wwi Stockton anj Po^alL THIS AFTERNOON, AT 3 O'CLOCK,
lKS^^???c;'^ d n7 JSJSS, ?J: ; FIFTH ANKUAL BENEFIT OF THE >
.; Children. 10c, any. part. _„ x • , m 1 •«■ • >• .
An Unrivaled Christmas Vaudeville Feast I IlGSirifi&l niMifST AX^ftPlfUlAll "
The Original ad Hie only. Ml,*s KURO- * u vOI)I1VO1 iUlv.lia.lll> iidSUliailUll •
• PEAN .A ■ RIAL BALLET an 1 KIRALFY'S ■ ; V .?..—-—
X, KKSiPLKNDI NT BALLKT PAGEANT. -.„-, miici.-i cn-/<t it ticci
The Grandest -pecttt' 1p ! v^r Pro I uccdlnthU City. ' AKCt I ; MUSIC I SPeCIALTIES I
OALLE^^^^'c^Dl^Sf WTheaterinthe CUy WiM * represented,
■ ■--..;, And CUSHMAN and HOLCOMB.
~ T ~~ ■•■ •■ ■•■•- - -■..-.,■- .■ ;..... " ......-■ The Biggest Bill Ever Given I
THE CHUTES. —
':•-- v. . . ". .-■.•■■ ADMISSION (tncliKlins Reserved Seat) 50
THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING. CfcNTS.
SFESOIALiI '. .;• : ; v- . - ■.' '' "'' ' : .'". '": ' ' '"/ " " ,' ' ■
fit. M. BROWN, OIITnA nATT TO
The One-Legged Cyclist! will Coast the O U I K\J DA 1 Mb.
Chutes and land in the lake on his wheel v^ * ** >/ 1— »X~». A * * v^*
" . Afternoon- Balloon Ascension by a« mm m ■■■ "'w\w%rmmm** ■
EMEL MAKKEBEKG. ; $] 00 0 JN PRIZES!
walking down^h^e. on. Glob* Grand In terna tional : Tug-of-Wap!
- ..-.: ; and Potato Race.^":; > "m KaV^ CMMHAV
EvenlQ - Anima oscope, Korto an d TO-DAY, ; SUNDAY. '
v " '■•■'■.■. Bicycle Khcos. ', - ; ' ;'" ' "-' December' a 7,' 1896.* r ' -
ADMisßioNvio ct-'. i ; children, 5 era See Programme. ' . '
~ ~- •• • - „. . „ -.: ~T~ --:-.- - '■ — :: — ~ — . . .". -'■"'. America vs. lr«lan.l.
' riDPIIC davai — .' "Canada vs. Denmark.
_ "'. . K ~'"^ U& « O V A Li. , Sweden v*. Aor w;i y.
People's Palace Bui ding, v Eddy and Mason sta. Germany vs. Portugal.
'•'■ : " ■ TO-NIGHT"^— -*blxionx.'- ;^ ■-■■ : "" :-~: -~ ;4"v- i: ****>¥**> Mavonia. : ■
BIG SUCC^S^B?C?^JCCESS Gm * r " X Ml "' a 5 Cent " .
*" ? RLFA^fIN' TUE CENTRAL PARK.
GREAT ULC HOUR . GREAT nn . v -I— n „
King of Hone- tamers. ): ;..---. ■■• TO-DAY A' . V'».'--..?.'UM. . ■ '
POPULAR f PRICES. POPULAR PRICES. BASBBALiIj:
lOc, «oc, 30c, sOc. 8. r. ATHLETICS VS. SANTA CLARA ,
bidders at the sale of Camille Bianc's stud the
other day.
There is already being manifested a decided
interest in the series oi Lillian Xordica's ope
ratic concerts to be rieUl pa the Baldwin Thea
ter during tne week of January 18.
The scenes in Otis f-'kinner's new romantic
play, "A Soldier 61 Fortune." ore laid in Italy
nt the beginning oi the sixteenth century, the
time being the secon<l invasion oi that coun
try by the armies of France.
H. Beerbohm Tree's fcvenKall is strikingly
original and forcible. He looks more like Dv
Maurler's hypnotist musician .han any of the
portraitures of tiie iuuaoua character yet seen
in New York.
A lady Has come forward to say that % work
written by her suggested to Wilson Karrett the
idea of !iis •'^isn of the Cross." Barrett dis
misses the charge of plagiarism in a lofty,
Marcus Superbus vein. Tne dramatist-novelise
says he doesn't owe anything io anybody, he
got his story entirely out of his own h.-a<l, ana
then he goes on to s«y he aetnowledgei no
indebtedness toanybodv except to Suetonius,
Seneca, Tacitus and other classical authori.
ties, "which are, of course, open to anybody.' 1
What a wonderful thing this letirn::i'-r i-!

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