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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 25, 1897, Image 32

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-04-25/ed-1/seq-32/

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32
CORRIGAN IN A
TIGHT CORNER
Confessed Under Oath That
He Had Seriously
Blundered.
A Great lojustice Was Done
Messrs. spreckels and
Leake.
It Was All About an Obligation for
$2500, Which the Turfman
Seeks to Ignore.
Had Edward Corrigan, turfman and
sport, been possessed of the true instincts
of a gentleman who is not loth to acknowl
edge when he ha* committed an error, he
would have stood up yesterday morning
and proffered an abject apology to Adolph
B. Spreckels and W. S. Leake, the late
president and secretary, respectively, of
the Pacific Coast Jockey Club.
The opportunity for this was presented
to him, and it would undoubtedly have
been received with good grace, but Corri
gan either did not appreciate the situ
ation, or, what was more apparent, did
not want to.
Nevertheless, while under oath, and
while under the presence of a series of di
rect and unavoidable questions hurled at
him by Attorney Garret McEnerney, this
Mr. Corrigan was compelled to confess,
-.-radically, that he had been articulating
through his chapeau when he made a
statement recently to the effect that
Messrs. Spreckels and Leake had con
spired to rob him of $2500.
Corrigan has had a great many business
transactions with Mr. Spreckels during
the past two years, chief among which
was the borrowing of money from the
young millionaire. But all this ended
recently, wh en Messrs. Spreckels and
Leake withdrew from the Jockey Club in
order to let the Chicago horseman run
things in his own peculiar way, and since
then Corrigan has not had many kind
things to say about his former associates.
At all events, during the settlin_-up
process Mr. Spreckels found that Corrigan
still owed him $2500 on a promis3 ory note
executed on the 3d of February, ISU6, and
be formally apprised the man who in the
East is known as "the master of Haw
thorne" of the fact.
•^Corrigan refused to redeem the obliga
tion and in consequence a suit was begun
to recover ttie amount.
This proceeding had the effect of caus
ing Corrigan to lose his temper and to
forget as well his pretensions toward up
rightness and integrity. In his angry
moments he proclaimed that be had
thought all along that he had been deal
ing with gentlemen, but found himself
mistaken. More than this he made re
marks which were printed in a morning
paper, from which the inference could be
drawn that Mr. Leake, with the knowl
edge and consent of Mr. Spreckels, bad
juggled three promissory notes and a like
number of cbecks in such a manner as to
deprive him of $2500 due him.
But these gentlemen were given a speedy
and positive vindication yesterday morn
ing, when, by mutual consent and on an
order of court, they met with Corrigan at
the office of Attorneys Rothchild & Ach
for the purpose of giving depositions.
Mr. Spreckels was first sworn, and in re
sponse to Mr. Ach's questions said that on
February 3. 1896. he loaned Corrigan $2500
and received his note therefor. He paid
the money over in the form of a check on
the Nevada Bank. On the 10th of March
of the same year Corrigan wanted some
more money and Mr. Spreckels loaned
him $10,000, again civing a check on the
Nevada Bank and attain receiving a prom
issory note, and once more, on May 21,
1896. Corrigan borrowed $5000 more.
This time the check was drawn on the
California Safe Deposit and Trust Com
pany, in favor of a Mr. Summerfield, but
was indorsed "nayable to bearer.'' All
three of these checks were produced by
Mr. Spreckels before the notary who took
the deposition, and the cancellations
showed that they had been paid over to
Corrigan. They all bore the latter's sic- |
nature, too. The promissory notes for
$10,000 and $5000, respectively, Mr. Spreck
els did not possess, as he had turned them
over to the horsemen when they were re
deemed, but he did have the unpaid note
for $2500 and promptly exhibited it. This
amount be said was still due.
Then Corrican was sworn. He was in
clined at first to dodge a direct admission
that the signature-* on the checks were
his, but Attorney McEnerney's persistent
demands for a positive answer finally
brought out the desired acknowledg
ment.
"Now, Mr. Corrigan, you received all
of that money — those three separate
*NEW TO-DAT.'
*-» irkirtrk ifc »*■(»»»•»»•»••»•••»»
* ' *
I AWriting Desk I
I I
* You should see J
* fA^s^^M oven «f you *
* ss~E__(lJ need none. *
fc <S^*_-ar*^-_*'* i * l The price is so *
fc fl^^^SH low !t wi " pay *
* J» ic ~~~---»Jl you t0 get one 5
* &^ "S^i just to ornament J
* /^fesß^/y your room. *
£ •Jk-*'^^"jW Solid oak, well *
% a. J* made, with drop- J
fc *£; lid pigeon-holes *
* and lower shelf. *
I $3.50. I
* *
I CHOICE RIGS I
I % PRICE. I
fc • *" ; t ' *
fc Ngt the common, ordinary kinds, *
* but rich, luxurious ones. To ad- *
J vertise' our Carpet Department, a J
fc limited quantity, as follows. (They'll *
fc be gone quickly at these prices, so *
*, call early:) J
* 100 Smyrna Rugs, 26x54 $1.25 J
fc 175 Smyrna Rugs, 30x60 : 1.50 *
fc 50 Smyrna Rugs, 36x72......... 2.25 *
.* . — AlifO— *
fc 250 Wilton Rugs, beautiful de- . *
£ signs, 26x54 1.40 J
{ M. FRIEDMAN & CO. I
C (7 Immense floors). ;'-'•' J'-; J
fc 233235-237 POST street *
J * (Near Stockton). J
* 130-132134 MITH STREEL *
* OPEN EVENINGS. fc
fc X
*¥¥¥¥¥ ¥ ¥-»»»^¥¥*»^MMM^»AMM^»»»
amount? didn't you?" asked Mr. Mc-
Enerney. * Zy.' J
"I presume I did," replied the Cbi
cagoan, h-suatinglv.
"Well, now, didn't you?" *_'/*«■
"I suppose — well, I must have received
it. The checks show for themselves."
The attorney then handed Corrigan the
unpaid promissory note, and asked him if
he nad executed it. Corriean first "sup
posed" he did, and then acknowledged it
flat-footedlv.
"Mow, Mr. Corrigan, what we want to
know is whether or not you are willing to
swear that you paid that amount?"
Here was the nut of the whole affair.
Corrigan was palpably worried, and iiazel
uneasily at that canceled $5000 check.
Then he procee*iel to lain, rather dis
join tedly, that he had been under the im
pression for some lime that, while he had
given a note for $5000 on the last borrow,
still he had received a checK for but $2500,
t'*e idea being to take up the first note for
$2500. He remembered that he had made
a dicker of some sort with Mr. Leake, who
was acting for Mr, Spreckels.
He acknowledged, however, that there
was a mistake somewhere, as the last
check plainly indicated that he had re
ceived the full $5000.
This would snow that the $2500 debt
was still delinquent.
"You thought you received but $2500
when you gave that last note for $500*0
there, and thought that in that manner
you had disposed of the first $2500 note,
and yet the check here shows that you re
ceived the full amount— isn't that about
the situation?" asked Mr. McEnerney in
conciu-ion.
Corrigan nodded affirmatively and Mr.
McEnernev said he guessed they had
heard all that was necessary in the case.
Corrigan had blundered, but would not
come out and say so.
He said he might have paid the money
over in some other manner, but could not
say how. He would like to have time to
look over his books, he said, and in this
manner was granted a week's respite.
"I will say this for Mr. Corrigan," said
Attorney Ach, rather apologetically,
"this $5000 check is a surprise to him. He
had forgotten it. It is in reference to that
matter that he asks for time to consult
his accounts. He is nofquite sure as to
how he stands."
Messrs. Spreckels and Leake and their
friends departed in triumph, while Cor
rigan remained behind to tell his troubles
to Mr. Ach. It is extremely doubtful
now if the case will ever come up in court.
PICNIC AT EL CAMPO.
St. Peter's Parish Preparing
for a May Day
Outing.
Energetic Committees Working to
Insure the Happiness of All
Who Would B- Merry.
St Peter's parish is to have a picnic at
El Campo next Saturday, Mayday, -which
those interested declare is to be an occa
sion of unusual enjoyment. Boats leave
Tiburon ferry, foot of Clay street, at 9:30
and 11:30 a. m. The returning boat will
leave El Campo at 5:30 p. m.
El Campo is one of the most delightful spots j
on the bay for an outing, beautifully sheltered '
and always warm and pleasant. Fogs are un- !
known there, so it is said. The committee of
arrangements announce that there will be no '
liquors sold or permitted, either on the boat
or on the grounds.
The committee on games has arranged a •
schedule of twenty races, giving every one an I
opportunity for lou of fun aud of securing a !
valuable prize. Valuable gate prizes will also
be given.
The object of these annual excursions is to '
get all the members of the parish ip touch i
with one another and also to perform little
works of charity. The following are the com
mittees;
Committee of arrangements —James B. i
Hughes, chairman; J. C. O'Donnell, secretary; *
Anthony Quill, treasurer; Captain C. D. Doug
lass, P. J. Curtis, D. J. Drew, P. J Tor me v.
Committee on music — John Kenny (chair
man;, Thomas P. Curtis, P. J. Sullivan ; com
mittee on prizes— L. C. Cull (chairman), John
O'Brien. S. Brinchat, Martin Connelly, P. Big
gens, M. McCann. M. Lar'.in, Thomas Ken
drick, P. Dugcn. E. Fen::e.<y. Dr. H. Lagan. EL
F. Wynne, J. C. Flood, A. McKeany, P. Cassidy,
XV. XV. GuDpen, P. J. Whalen, C. D. Douglsss,
T. Wadsworth, John Kenny, P. J. Tormey, T.
G. Maguire, James P. Slaven, Senator L.J.
Dwyer, Phil Sheridan Council, Y. M. I.
Committee on games— Captain C. D. Doug
lass (clian man i, Morris Barrett, James Burke,
James B. Hughes, H. Pinkham. Patrick Big
gens, D. J. Drew, John O'Brien, E. D. Sullivan,
Frank McAleer, John Cummin*;, J. C. O'Don
nell, P. J. Tormey, Andrew McKeanv, Edward
Finney, P. J. Doyle, Joseph 1. Twohig, P. J.
Curtis.
Floor committee — Thomas Wadsworth,
chairman; P. J. Whelan, floor manager, H.
Pinkham and James Bailey, assistants; E. P.
Barry, Frank Mitchell, John Cosgrove, Peter
J. Hagcerty, John Welch, E. D. B*.illlvan, Ed
ward Brown, James Sullivan, James Grace,
Daniel Wren.
Committee on order— John Kenny, chair
man; T. L. Healy, M. Larkin, A. Quill, James
Burke, M. McCann, Richard Curtis.
Schedule oi games— Altar boys' rsce of St.
Peter's Church ; race for boys under 10 years;
race for girls under 10 years; race for boys
under 15 years; race for girls under 15 years;
race for single men, open to all except profes
sionals; race for single ladies, open to all ; race
for married men, open to all except profes
sion-. s: race for married ladies, open toall;
cadet race; egg race for ladles; race for fat
men; race for fat women; three-legged race;
caudle race for young ladies; potato race for
gentlemen, open to a.l; pack race for gentle
men. Hop, skip and jump, running jump,
putting the shot, open to all except profes
sionals. Best lady jig and reel dancer, best
gentleman jig and reel dancer.
FUBNISHINGS DAMAGED.
Suit of Webster Jones Against Rudolph
Spreckeltt on Trial Yesterday.
The suit of Webster Jones against Ru
dolph Spreckels was on trial before Jus
tice Groezinger yesterday, the plaintiff
giving bis testimony.
.He stated that he bad rented bis ele
gant home to tbe defendant because he in- !
tended to remove to Ross Valley. He had
asked $200 per montli, but had taken $110
per month, with a year's rent paid in ad
vance in consideration of Mr. Spreckels
residing in the house and taking cood care
of it. He testified that the latter bad
agreed to turn over the property at the
end of eighteen months in as good condi
tion as he had received it.
Mr. Jones further stated that when the
lease was up he found that during the
last four months 01 its duration Spreckels
bad not lived in the house, and had not
even Kept a caretaker there, and the range
was broken, the curtains and carpets torn
and soiled, and the place in a generally
bad condition. The water had been al
lowed to run until it had ruined plants
and sidewalk. He had sent the bills for
repairs, amounting to several hundred
dollars, to Mr. Spreckels, but no attention
was paid to them, and he sued for $250
damages. - >*'
The case was continued until the de
fendant's attorney could have a chance to
produce testimony.
Fell Thirty Feet.
Charles Meyers, a painter, living on Jessie
street, met with a serious accident yesterday
morning. He was painting a house at Fill
more street ana Golden Gate avenue and fell
from a scafl'old, a distance of about thirty feet.
He was picked up In an unconscious condition
and taken to the Receiving Hospital. There
was a lacerated wound on his forehead and it
was thought thai his skull was fractured.
Uow In a saloon.
James Cooney, a cook, went Into a Third
street saloon yesterday morning and raised a
disturbance. He threw a beer glass at the win
dow smashing it, and when the bartender at
tempted to eject him he showed tight. When
hostilities had ceased Cooney had a wound on
his forehead mid his left wrist and right hand
were cut He was taken to the Receiving
Hospital, wht-re his wounds were dressed, aud
a charge of malicious mischief was entered
againt him at the City Prison. '
ADViNcra made on 'furniture and pianos with
or without removal. Moouan, 1017-1073 Mission.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1897.
HALE BROS. >„
v:v:-:v>>v*y^:^v>>:v>A
Dress Goods
For Economy Seekers.
FRENCH FOULARD >ILKS— AII _>CC
pore Silk, 22 inches wide. Spe- ♦;-'
cial all week Yard
CHANGEABLE TAFFETA
SILKS— I 9 inches, 10c a yard (*Z.C
less than the regular price. ripe- lit)
cial Yard
SEVENTY. FIVE CENT FANCY
SlijKS— 19 inches wide, very ftG-
heavy, all the newest colors. Ww
Special Yard
OUR 9 1 25 Fancy raye
SILKS— A three-toned novelty "J.**- 1 j
for waists and fancy linings, <J>l
very swell. 20 inch. Speclid... Yard
EXTRA HEAVY IWI LL
sEltii ES — Navy or back, . 9CC
strictly all wool, 37 iuch, a bar- OO
gain Yard
HEAVY TWILL CHEVIOT
SERGE— Navy blue onir, 45
inch, a touch fabric, fine for ?\(\ C
outing costumes and skirts. At •''"
Hate's Yard
FANCY WORSTED CHECKS—
A 40-inch cloth In all the new P-,n c
colors, popular, durable, reason- — '" '
able Atilale's Yard
FANCY BRi'CHK SUITING
Figures formed by tancy colored t^fl^
curled varus 00 black warps, a •-*"'
swell cot 38 Inch At Hales Yard
F A N C V Ml X E D ZEPHYR
CHEVIOTS -All the newes- 'J CO
lings, a spring novelty, 50 I «'
Inches wide. Atilale's Yard
ENGLISH aIOHAIKCCRL SUIT-
ING— A novelty in the latest 1 .OO
colorings, 40 Inch, stylish, ex- itjp I
elusive. At Hale's Yard
ART DEPARTMENT.
(RE AH OF STOKE).
NEW TAPESTRIES— A big as- ,**• I .r.o
sornient in new patterns, 50 "tjp 1
inches wide, 40c to Yard
DENIM TABLE COVERS— QQO
Inches, tinted and embroidered, t/O
linen filnge, 60c to Each
DENIM TABLE COVERS— I inttd 9QC
Each OV
DENIM TABLE COVER Delft one
designs Each OV
DENIM TABLE COVERS— O'C
Stamped Each —• — '
CUSHION COVERS— Tinted den- ICC
Im Each AO
CUSHION COVERS-Tlnted and OCC
nnpllqued E..ch — O
CUSHION COVERS — Stamped |*>JIC
deuim Each i- _-2
(See Window Display).
NOTION DEPARTMENT.
LADIES' SAI IN BAND AND 101°
BUTTON CLASP HOSE SUP- 1--3
PORTERS— five colors Pair
M. K. Stockinet Dress shields, No. 2, 6c pr.
25 > Pius on a paper for lc paoer
MUSLIN ROSE — in a bunch, -)lr\C
rubb-r stem, pink and cense. -**-••'
I'er Bunch
VELVET AND MUSLIN VIO- «>rC
LETS— 3 dozen In a bunch .. OO
Per Bunch
CLOVER— II large b ossoms and r\(Y-
-4 buds, white or heliotrope OKJ
Per Bunch
SWEET PEAS— 3 sprays to a (RAO
bunch, Jac, pink and a combl- UU
nation of he i., trope and Jac Bunch
BUDS— Pluk, cer.se, Jac, tea 7 CC
Dozen tO
EMBROIDERY DEPT.
FINE CAMBRIC GUIPURE EDGE:
lii Inches wide 5c yard
•_V» inches wide 7-V_c yard
6 to 8 Inches l'-i^ic yard
SWISS FLOUNCE -45 Inches ore
wide, deep embroidery.... Yard _•_»
MUSLIN ALLOVEit —30 Inches U-V-*
wide Per ya.d -•_»
WASH GOODS DEPT.
The Wash Goods Department probably re-
ceives more new goods every day than any
other one department. We must apologise
for the crowds you always meet, but good
goods, nove ty patterns and small prices
createatrade and iieces-ar.lv crowded count-
ers. The arrivals yesterday were:
A NEW LAPPET MULL, iv 6 colors, to be
sold at 15r the yard.
A NEW JaCQUARD SWISS, in 5 tinted
colors, to be sold at 1 '.:1,3c the yard
ANEW DOT! El> SWISS uUGANDIE. In
15 colorings, to be sold at lOc the yard.
•I*T''l*T***T*_'*'»*L'oi C*l*~*'r , -O , C'*C-C*l'
NO HOPE FOR THE
SHIP SAMARIA
The Wreckage From Her
Washed Ashore Along
the Coast.
Fishermen Looking for Bodies,
but None Have Come
Ashore.
The Schooner Albion Had to Put Back
in Distress— Lest Her
Mainsail*
All doubt as to the fate of the overdue
collier Samaria seems to have been set at
rest. In a private letter received by E. L.
Woods from Astoria yesterday, it is
learned that a life-preserver, part of a
boat and a section of a deckhouse, all
marked "Samaria," had all drifted ashore
off Cape Disappointment during tbe night.
The wreckage was hauled up on the beach
by some fishermen and a search made for
bodies, but none were recovered. '■".' ...
Fire broke out on the collier Washtenaw
now being repaired at the Fulton Iron
Works yesterday, but was put out with
out much damage being done. The fire
started in the galley and made a gr?at
smoke, bui a "bucket brigade" soon bad
it under con trol.
The schooner Albion, which lett her* a
week ago for Alaska, ran into a heavy
norther on tbe 25 1 inst., and was so dam
aged that she had to put back here for re
pairs. The mainsail was carried away
and took with it all -the blocks and the
standing rigging from both sides of the
masts. She will have to go on the dry
dock for repairs.
i The ship Occidental also put in. At
first it was thought she was in distress as
tbe Guide showed her as bound from De
parture Bay lor Acapulco. It was learned
on her arrival, however, that there was no
demand for coal in Central America, so
the vessel's destination was changed for
San Francisco. •-;--.!
There was a shakeup among the carpen
ters, sweepers and dredger bands on the
water front yesterday. All Commis
sioner Cole's appointments went out and
Commissioner Harney's men will till their
places to-morrow.
Since the arrival of the United States
sbip Cam-inch-.*, in the harbor for the
use of the Naval Battalion, that organiza
tion bas greatly felt the need of an engi
neer corps to bave charge of and handle
the machinery on the vessel. During the
last Legislature tbe matter was actively
pushed before the Committee on Military
Affairs, with the result that a bill was
passed providing for an engineer division,
to be composed of fifty or more men.
A list has been ODened at '2:1% East
street for applicants who may wisti to en
list: as machinists, water tenders, boiler
makers, oilers, first, second and third fire
men. Tne opportunities for promotion in
an organize tion of this kind just forming
are very bright, and the officers having
the matter in charge ex- eet to soon have
a division of first-class men- on. their
hands, especially as the men when called
upon by the 4 Government for their ser
vices will receive the same pay as those in
tbe corresponding ratings of the United
I HALE BROS. "j'j^* i;l
*>>*>>i--c*cc-^^-oo:-c-q*:-»^ :♦•::->:•»>> >»:<>>x
£§5-^ >, ' I [INCORPORATED) ' ,*^R*_»Pb
f%4J / V 937-945 Market Street, Jw^^k^b^
Jf/\lc 8 IMPICIh^ i^A^w'/Jl vk
TO EVERY SERIOUS-MINDED WOMAN OF SAN FRANCISCO
LET THIS ADVERTISEMENT APPEAL
The items quoted are on dependable merchandise— Garments of superior
material, finish and workmanship— Made to fit, wear and satisfy— Worthy
of the customers we cater to No inferior stuff at any price.
"IF YOU GET IT AT HALES IT'S RIGHT."
HERE ARE THE PRICELETS FROM MUSLIN UNDERWEAR.
NIGHTGOWNS.
LADIES' HEAVY MUsLIN GOWNS,
3 clusters of 4 flne tucks on yoke,
cambric ruffle on neck, front and /IXC
cuffs, as clean as a whistle. sale _:0 |
price Each j
LADIES' FINE MUSLIN GOWNS, V-
shaped or hUh neck, tuckel and em-
broidery trimmed. iar<e mill- of f^fi o
cambric on neck, front and cuffs. OU
Sale price Each
LADIES' SOFT- FINISH MUSLIN
GOWNS, large turn-down collar, em- XQC
broidery trimmed, iancy stitched OtJ
pleated front, t ale price Each
LADIES' CAMBRIC EMPIRE GOWNS,
embroidery trimmed iront. ruffled 7QC
embroidered collar and cuffs, sale I•>
price Each
LADIES' MUSLIN KMPIRE GOWNS,
very heavy soft-tiuished muslin,
deep lawn ruffle, embrollery trimmed CXC
front, fancy sdk-stltcned, a dream in CO
itself. saleprice Each
LADIES' SOFT-FINISHED MUSLIN
i-.MI'IRE GOWNS, all over em-
broidery trimmed yoke, deep em- QQC
broidery ruffled collar and cuffs. OO
tale price Kach
muslinHdrawers.
GENUINE LONSDALK MUSLIN, *1 re
deep ruffled bottoms, open or closed, J.O
worth 25c, liberal width. Sale price.. Fair
ONE-INCH EMBROIDKRY RUFFLED OQC
BOTTOM, tucked, worth 35c. f-a.e _-0
price Pair
TWO-INCH EMBROIDKRY RUFFLED QQC
BOTTOM, lucked, worth 45c. Sale OO
price Pair
SOFT-FIN MUSLIN, embroidery AOC
Insertion am two-inch embroidery _rO
ruffle on botiom. Say i r :> - Pair
EXTRA.
PURE SILK GLOVES— I2OO 1 air, pearl and
medium gray: 8\' 2 7, TV; and 8'8...15c pair
•"»^;»^-'*^i'"i^—^♦^•'^•^•^•^•^*^.^—^*»^*^»~**.»^'*»^^^-i2»^:-*»^*»^'
States navy. Any information relating to i
the details of the organization may be ob
tained by addressing J. R. Christy, chief
engineer N. 8., N. S. G., 22^ East street. *■
The bark Mermaid will come out of her
retirement in Oakland Creek next weeic
and will dock for an overhauling. She
will take away with her 100 men bound
for -a new Eden in tbe Solomon group.
Nearly 150 applications have been re
ceived, but at least half of tbese have not
tbe necessary $100. As the vessel will not
sail until May 15, Captains Quinton and
Alexander McLean think they will have
no difficulty in securing the required
number.
The Pacific Mail Company's steamer
Acapulco cot in yesterday from Panama.
She was expected to get here last Thurs
day, but was delayed by a heavy north
west gale. She brought very few. passen
gers and a light cargo.
I The side-whe-1 tug Tiger, formerly
owned by the North Pacific Coast Rail
road, has been sold to K. C. Eldridge,
and be will bring her to San Francisco
and put her to work in tbe bay.
The British schooner Fortuna arrived
here in ballast yesterday and will be put
under the Mexican flag. In future she
will trade between here and Mexican
ports.
The German bark C. H. Watjen has
been hauled out of Oakland Creek and
will load wheat for Europe. She is the
first vessel to get a charter in six weeks.
It was inadvertently stated in yester
day's Cam. that Morton's special delivery
had gone out of business on tbe water
front. This is not so, as their solicitors
are there as usual and can always be
found at their post. The only change
made by Mr. Morion was the removal of
his office and receiving-room at the
ferries. His delivery system on Taylor,
Market and Battery streets is still in full
force, however. Morton Brothers assert
that they are still in the ring, and that it
will take a dozen transfer companies to
kill their opposition.; JJJ, J.
EXPENSIVE ECONOMY.
Big- Damage Suit Growing Out of Mar
ket-Street Railway Parsimony.
Henry Johnson, by bis attorney, Martin
Stevens, bas instituted an action at law
against the Market-street Railway Com
pany lor $10,000 damages for personal
injuries.
The plaintiff avers that on the 18th of
the present month he was riding on one
of the electric cars of the defendant cor
poration, which was operated by a motor
man without the assistance of a conductor;
that tie tola the motorman to stop at the
corner of Frederick and Stanyan street;
that when nearing that point the car was
slackened in speed and the plaintiff was
about, to alight, when the person acting in
the dual capacity of motorman and con
ductor carelessly and without warning so
operated the motive power that the speed
of the car was suddenly increased, wheres
by the plaintiff was forcibly thrown to
the ground, breaking his right arm in two
places and painfully bruising his head
and body. *
Mr. Johnson complains of the conduct
on the part of the company for employ
ing one man to do the work of operating
this car when two were needed, and holds
the company responsible for tbis culpa
ble negligence, as the accident would not
have happened if there had been a regular
conductor on the car. This is another
instance where an effort at economy may
piove a source of expense. * ;**_'-*i
OHAFPELLE ATTACHED.
The Private Detective and Turfman
Sued by a Collector.
A collector of bad debts took out an at
tachment yesterday against the racehorses
of E. 8. Cbappelle, thhe private detective
and turfman, ana a deputy Sheriff served
it at the lngleside track. « The attach
ment is based on assigned claims for
$49 92. . ... . .
••Curiey*' Shields, the well-known horse
man, was also attached in a suit brought
by N. S. Hall to recover ' $299. claimed to
ibe due for money loaned the defendant. ■
JJ. BALE BROS.
INFANTS' DRESSES.
INFANTS' SHORT CAMBRIC
DRESSES, tucked yoke, embroidery OXC
trimmed neck and cuffs, a neat little —•'
gurment. Salepr.ce. Each
INFANTS' SHORT CAMBRIC
DRESSES— Fine Nainsook, embroid-
ery trimmed yoke, pleated back, em- QQC
broidery trimmed neck and cuffs. OO
Sale price. ;. Kach
INFANTS' FINE LAWN SHORT
DRESSES— All over embroidery. AQ C
trimmed yoke, neck and cuffs, em- * _tO
broidery ruffle. Sale prlie Each
INFANTS' NAINSOOK AND FINE
LAWN SHORT DRESSES— --.m-
broldery tucked, Imitation hem-
stitched yoke und bottom, em broid- CiOC
cry ruffle on neck and cuffs, sale OO
price Kach
Good Clean Merchandise— Every Item
a High-grade Garment.
INFANTS' LONG SLIPS— Fine Cam- OXC
brlc, embroidery trimmed yoke, neck _J_»
and cuff. Saleprice Each
INFANTS' FiNE CAMBRIC LONG
SLlPS— Pleated and all over em-
broidery trimmed yoke, ruffled neck AA^
and cuffs: tuere is style even in _l _:
baby dresses. Sale price Each
INFANTS' FINE CAMBRIC LONG
SLIPS — All over embroi
trimmed yoke, embroidery ruffle on <oC
neck and cuffs; a dainty littie gar- *iO
ment. Sale price Each
HALES MAILORDER STORE.
A store within a sore. Our great mailing de-
partment busy with orders from our hundreds of
country friends. New Zealand, Alaska, Hono-
lulu, .-outh America, ail contribute their or ers.
Sena for our 120-pa***e Fash on Book and Cata-
logue, ISO » illustrations: free to tne coun. Let
us be your agents here. Write us for miormition.
Call and see us when visiting here. Order by mail
anything we advertise.
*IvOl*^T*_*L"*C*lv_*l*_*l , l*_'Ol*^
TEN THOUSAND
STILL NEEDED
Balboa Boulevard Macad
amized One Hundred
Feet Wide.
United States Commissioner on
Roads Interested in the
Project
He Will Prcb-bly Introduce Boule
vard Building in the East on
tbe Same Plan.
Ten thousand dollars more will com
plete the Balboa boulevard, which is at
tracting attention all over the country.
Roy Stone, United States Commissioner
on Roads, is taking much interest in tho
work on the Balboa boulevard. William
M. Bunker of the boulevard committee
received a letter from him yesterday in
quiring for full particulars concerning the
manner in which the boulevard is being
NEW TO-DAT.
CROWDED E DOORS
THE PHEXOMEML SUCCESS OF THE RETIRING SALE OF THE
Paragon Cloak House,
1230 MARKET STREET,
SHOWS THAT OUR PRICES ARE DOING THE BUSINESS. EVERYTHING MUST GO!
-NTO RESERVE !
At 10 o'Ciock Monday Morning, April 26, we will offer:
100 Fly-Front Latest Style and Fabric Suits at $3:7s worth $7.50.
50 Genuine English Serge Suits, latest styles, silk lined, at $7.so— worth $15.
5O Novelty Suits (checks), Eton style, at $s.oo— worth $13.50.
50 Black Figured Silk Skirts at $7.00— worth $12.
25 Black Figured Silk Skirts at $9.00— worth $18.
25 Tan Kersey Jackets, lined throughout with silk, at $3.7s— worth $7.00.
250 New Style Percale Wrappers at 45c— worth $1.00.
Come and take advantage of our prices and satisfy yourself that we really
mean ALL we advertise.
I 1230MARKBT STREET.
I HALE BROS , " '
WHITE SKIRTS.
LADIES' WHITE SKIRTS— Fine mus- XQC
lin. tucked, deep cambric ruffle on Om
bottom, liberal width, sale once Each
LADIES' WHITE UMBRELLA
SKIRTS— The best of he_vy muslin, XQC
deep flounce, tucked and ruffled bot- OtJ
torn, extra wide, sule pr.ce Each
LADIES' FINE WHITE CAMBRIC
sKlßTa— Liberal ruffle on bottom, TXC
prettily tucked, as neat as wax. Sale i O
price Each
LADIES' FINE WHITE CAMBRIC
UMBRELLA SKIRT Deep
flounce, deep cambric ruffle, trimme i "I .OO
with embroidery, one of Hale's K$)X-
specialties. Saleprice Each
LADIES' FINE WHITE MUSLIN
UMBRELLA SKIRTS. 2 deep lawn
flounces, trimmed with ruffle em- *"""*■ "I .00
broidery, an elegint skirt. Hale's <£)
price Kach
LADIES' FINE WHITE CAMBRIC
FLOUNCE UMBRELLA SKIRTS—
Embroidery Insertion trimmed, very ff*A ,45
deep ruffled embroidery bottom. «JpJ
Sale pr.ce Each
LADIES* FINE WHITE MUSLIN
UMBRELLA SKIRTS— An 8-lnch
cambric flounce, all over embroidery, 1. 75
ruffled bottom, a very wide skirt. 36.1
Sale price Kach
CORSET COVERS.
All or the lies: of -cambric— Well Made,
a Fresh t'loau stock.
2- INCH EMBROIDERY TRIMMED, "I QC
V-shaped neck. Saleprice Each Xo
HIGH NKC a, tucked joke, fancy silk tire
stitched. Saleprice Each _10
LACE OR EMBROIDERY TRIMMED, QrC
V-shaped neck, sale price Each OO
BOUND OR V SHAPED NECK, very X-ftC
elaborately trimmed with embroid- OU
cry. saleprice. Each
-E3__i_^3S_A..
TAFFETA AND CaSHMERE GAUNTLET
GLOVES— For a thousand uses — Tan.
browns. 8c pa i
>>>>>>>>>>>:.:.>>>>>>>>>>:«*>>:o
constructed. The writer explained that
he required the information for the benefit
of Eastern communities'which might de
sire to follow the example of San Fran
cisco.
Heretofore the unemployed in other
States have been set to work at repairing
roads, but the experiment of making per
manent roads has never been tried.
Three hundred and fifty men were en- ;
gaged yesterday on the boulevard. The
work of macadamizing the roadway to the
full width was begun yesterday and if the
good people who have not yet subscribed !
will now step to the front and assist in the j
undertaking the beautiful driveway will
be completed to the lngleside.
Mr. Bunker, speaking of the 250 un
employed men under Letlingwell, who
made a raid upon the town of Lodi
last Friday, said:
"This committee has never recognized
those people in any way. They organized
simply for the purpose of bulldozing the
community. We organized this boulevard
committee to furnish relief to the genuine
unemployed, who are willing to work on
the bouievard. Thos*) Leffingwell people
came to us at the outset and said, 'We de
mand recognition as a body,' aud they I
were told that they were recognized, and
for that reason we didn't want them.
They refused to leave the City in detach
ments or to accept positions offered to
squads of three and four, but insisted that
the whole gang should he employed as a
body. Their leader, Leffingwell, said
that if they were to accept employment
as individuals, the organization would j
fall to pieces, and that they proposed to j
hold together."
Supervisors Devaney and Delaney pro
pose to introduce a resolution at next
Monday's meeting of the Board of Super
visors to turn over to the boulevard lund
the $3000 usually appropriated for Fourth
of July fireworks.
1 It is estimated that $10,090 more will be ,
HALE BROS.
•*>so-*^^2_____-_---^-_- '-*-*-*-*-*•*-*
Towel Talk
For Economy Seekers.
DAMASK TOWELS, pure linen,
18x39 inches, Kno.ted fringe, *I ,-C
colored border, a towel thai Is JO
good. At Hale's Each
DAMASK TOWELS, pure linen,
24x5U Inches, knotted fringe,
colored .orders, a hi- towel, a "I QC
pood towel, a cbeup towel, were _- v
25c Special Each
Damask TOWELS pure flax,
22x44 leches. 2 rows of open-
work, co ored borders, knotted i )^.C
tring***, asabsoroenta3asponge. m-O
-.1 Hale's ■ Luch
BLEACHED COTTON KITCH- aC
EN 'lOWELS, 15x28 inches, a "x
bargain. All week Each
IH'l'K TOWELS, hemstitched. **| CC
18x36 inches, a cose woven J O
20 1* towel, to te on sale all week Each
HEMMED HUCK TOWELS, no".
so very- fancy, but made to "I CL"
wear. 21x42 " Inches, colored _-«-•'
borders. Special a.l week at Each
UNBLEACHED TURKISH TOWELS— A
thick and heavy towel, a blood-warmer.
"special all weeK —
24x50 inches 15c each
23*54 inches 19c each
BLEACHED TURKISH TOW-
ELS, the baths delight, extra *| OIC
fine Tery cloth, 19x46 inches. J-_-a
Special at lines tach
We've hundreds of other Towels. Some
better, some cheaper— all good.
FROM DOMESTICS,
BLEACHED HEMSTITCHED SHEETS—
Good, heavy, closely woven muslin,
2 yards Wide 45c each
21/ i yards wide 50c each
2y2 yards wide 53« each
HEMMED PILLOWCASES— 4Sx
36 incbes, made of remnants of "1 AC
h-avy sheeting, therefore the KM
qua iiy|i'or the price, special.. Each
CRIB COMFORTEBS— Hgu'ed CAC
Sl.kollne covered, milled edge; OM
for baby Each
CURTAIN SCRIM— stripe, *| -AC
42 inches wl.e: 4 pretty col- X U
ors: Special all week Yard
(12>/ac grade.)
CLOAK DEPARTMENT.
LADIES' BLACK FIGURED AL-
PACA SKIRTS— fitted to you (*""**o.7s
free, thoroughly well made. At «Jp_-
Hale's Each
(All Skirts thoroughly lined with perca-
line and bound w.tu velvet).
LADIE--*' SERGE SKIRTS - A •
heavy serge skirt in black or Q. 50
navy, for outing, work or street, <Jp
very serviceable. At Halt's... Each
COLLEGE CHECK SKIRTS — A
made-io-order air about them, ©Q. 25
altered and fitted free. At <p«J
Hale's Each
large patterned figured <***-. .oo
MOHAIR SKIR IS — Hangs *upt)
beautifully. At Hale's Each
TAN JACKETS— Fancy silk linea, ff* '.OO
4 large pearl buttons, a swell k&O
littieaffair. At Hale Each
TAN SUMMER CAPES — High
slashed co. lar, double pleated Cg^.OO
back, handsomely braided. At *©*)
Hale's Each
LADIES' CASHMERE SERGE
SUlTS— Boiero Jacket effect,
black braided, Dan-sn collar,
silk lined; high band on skirl;
fitted to perfection, as good as ,*""*• 1 Q.OO
made to order; black, blue or -upl-.
green. At Bale's Each
OUR BUSY~BAZAAR.
WHITE BRISTLE TOOTH BRUSHES-
wereanlckel; Special 3 C tacn
RULED PENCIL TABLETS-200 pages;
note paper size; Special 4c each
MONARCH TOILET PAPER— SiIk tissue;
In Hale's Bazaar 5 C package
•»»»!!♦>:♦:♦»>:*•»»:♦:♦"•'♦'♦
necessary to complete the work. Yesterday
afternoon the fund stood as follows:
Previously acknowledged, $26,913 41; In
dianapolis Furniture Company. $25; Improved
Order Red Men, $95 95; cash, "Alviirado "
through The Call, $2; grand total. $27,036 16.
CLEANER CORRIDORS.
Head Janitor -'Neil of the City Hall
Much Pleased.
The corridors of the new City Hall al
ready bear witness to the good effect of
the anti-expectoration ordinance. Head
Janitor T. J. O'Neil reports that the work
of keeping the main corridors clean has
been minimized, thus permitting the em
ployment of the men in other parts of the
building.
Another advantage is sanitary in its
character. Hitherto vast quantities of
soap and water were required to scrub out
the stains of tobacco juice that befouled
the stone floors of the passage ways, and
the atmosphere was Kept damp by the
evaporation that followed those diurnal
floods. That evil has been obviated in
great part by the fact that not so much
water is needed.
An odd phase of the expectoration
nuisance, which leads to spitting on the
various stairways, has grown up. how
ever, by reason of an effort on the part of
some graceless wretches to show their de
fiance for the spirit of the law without, as
they think, violating the letter, and thus
laying themselves liable for prosecution.
Inasmuch as the ordinance forbids the be
foulment of the corridors, but says noth
ing of the stairways, some evilly disposed
clowns consider it a mark of wit to use
the stairways as cuspidors. Chief of Po
lice Lees has instructed the policemen on
duty in the municipal buildings to arrest
the first person caught offending in this
regard, and a test case is to be made in the
Police Court. '••';-..';

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