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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 26, 1897, Image 9

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WILL SOON
HAVE FREE
CITY WATER
Los Angeles on the Eve of
Assuming Her Former
Rights.
A COUP SCORED BY TIIE CITY.
The Water Company's Thirty
Years' Lease Will Expire
Next July.
SEEKHGJITO DELAY SETTLEMENT.
Municipality to Build Great Head
works and Save Thousands
Annually.
Within a year municipal ownership and
control of water works will be a fact in
Los Angeles. Such is the otiiuion of
Mayor M. P. Snyder, who has been in this
MAYOR M. P. SNYDER, Vhi Asserts That Los Angeles Will
Probably Own and Control Her Water Works Within a Year.
City nearly a week quietly attending to
some business connected with the pros
pective change.
He started from here last night by train
on his way back to Los Angeles, leaving,
as he said, everything moving along
smoothly and indicative cf success to the
all-important project.
The city of Los Angeles actually owns
her water supply now. A little ever
twenty-nine years ago it was leased by tbe
city for thirty years to a private corpora
tion.
The water company's lease expires on
"July 28, 1898.
There is. a difficulty over the terms of
settlement incident to the final transfer
back to the city. The original contract
declares t at at the expiration of the lease
the city shall pay the water company for
tbe pi c lines and all other improvements
made in the thirty years, ltalso provides
that t.iree arbitrators shall determine the
cost or value of these improvements; one
of the arbitrators to be appointed by tiie
water company and one by the city, and
the third chosen by the other two.
The city expected that there wouid be a
difference ol opinion as to values when
the time for the transfer should arrive.
It said nothing, but asked the water com
pany some little tim-^ ago for an itemized j
list of all the added properties and im
provements, and the company furnished ■
it. The City Engineer then went cars
lully and painstakingly to work with this
data. lie ascertained not oniy the cost
ol each piece of property but its va ue
and the cost of each separate piece of work.
With all these details he estimated the
total value of improvements to be
$1,190,640/
The water company was then asked for
its valuations. Its reply was $3,000,000.
To quote Mayor Snyder: "When we
produced our engineer's report it para
lyzed the water company. It is one of the
most complete and . splendid reports of
separate items of water improvements
possessed by any city in this country.
They saw that no arbitrator could get
around the city's valuation, it was so
carefully itemized. Tbe water company
is now delaying the appointment of arbi
trators contrary to the agreement."
Some time ago, says Mayor Snyder, the
city made an effort to buy a tract of '.-.90
acres in a favorable location for a head
works for the water system. The owners [
orleinally offered to sell the land for
$£0,000 A jury afterward placed a value |
of $22,000 on the property during con- i
demnation proceedings. Now the owners ■
refuse to sell at any price. They have ap
pealed to the Snpreme Court and its dcci- j
sion will not be rendered before October.
The city's daily supply of water is 1250
miner's inches, of which the water com- ■
pany owns but six inches, although it pays j
on the basis of ten inches.
By building an extensive head works and
'sinking dams to bedrock Mayor Snyder j
fays the city proposes to demonstrate to j
the wa er company that the company does
not own an inch of water, but that the
little excess they claim to have developed
comes leallv from city sources.
The City Attorney has reported favora
bly upon the proposed head works tract
and bonds are to be issued.' .
Ninety-five per cent of the taxpayers of
Los Angeles would vote to pay the water
company on the basis of the City Engi
neer's report, but the voters wo-id not j
t
permit the payment of a sum much in ex
cess of that. :-tftf %
In the meantime Los Angeles is ex
pectant. T c present officials desire to
have the whole water question finally set
tled before the expiration of their term of
office, a year and a half hence. And the
water company is desirous of a delay.
* Los Angeles will have an abundance of
water taken from the mountains and the
Los Angeles River, and the fall from the
proposed headworks will be great <-nougb
to -jive a powerful head in the city — one
capable of throwing a stream, without the
aid of a lira engine, over the top of the
highest buildiug that may be erected in
Los Angeles.
Municipal lights are a future possibility
from this source of power, but for the
present the city is hoping only for prompt
possession of its property and the annual
savins of many thou-ands of dollars to
the citizens, and the Mayor says that all
is going well.
LEAGUE OP THE CEOSS.
A Successful Kasnv Contest Held by
St. Joseph* Brunch.
Ti:e iunior branch of the League of tbe
Cross Cadets connected with St. Joseph's
parish held a highly successful rally and
essay contest in St. Joseph's Hail Monday
night.
The exercises were opened with the
singing of a hymn, followed by a prayer,
after which a piano solo was rendered by
Harry Hay.
Then came the reading of essays
on "Temperance, the Foundation of
True Manhood." Two were presented,
one by J. Harrington and the
other by Thomas McKeever. Both
were written in a masterful man
ner, which showed the authors not only to
be well iniormed on their subjects but
that the ideas embodied in their essays
had heen wrought into their very lives by
a careful system of training.
The judges — R"v. Brother George, Rev.
J. Dowiing and Miss Josie Mo holy — after
due deliberation, decided th*? essay of Mr.
McKeever to bo the best, and lie wilt c
cording!}' represent the parish in the dis
trict essay contest, which will be held
within a few weeks.
After the reading ol the essays a very
interestin-; and instructive lecture on the
evils of intemperance was riven by the
Rev. Michael Scanlan of St. Teresa's.
This was followed by a solo by Mr.
Donoghue, and the exercises closed with
a prayer by Father Dowling.
The officers of this branch are C. J. Cur
tis, president; John J. Redmond, vice
pipsident; J. Harrington, secretary, and
T. McKeever, treasurer.
ADDING TO THE TAX ROLL
Improvements in the Eichmond
Opens Up 2000 Building
Lots.
A Large Section on the North of
the Park to Be Cffered for
Sale.
The removal of the Bay District race
track from the Richmond district bas been
the means of opening up a large section of
that locality for building purposes. There
are 800 building lots in the old racetrack
proper, with 1200 lying directly west, be
tween Third nnd Tenth avenues. These
avenues have been improved by tbe shift
ing of the sandhill which stood opposite
the racetrack to fill in the deep hollow
that lay in tti'' center of the oval when it
was devoted to racing purposes.
The transformation of this entire section
called for an outlay of $300,000. The con
tract lor filling in, grading and sewering
the streets and avenue* within the race
trade called for $200,000. To obtain the
sand from the adjoining bluff cost $100,
--000. All of this went for labor. The work
is now near completion and when finished
sixty-six building blocks will be opened
for building purposes in .the Richmond
district.
This new addition to the improved out
side property will add thousands of dol
lars to the assessment-roll .of the City in
the course of a lew years. As it is, Rich
mond real estate has improved not only
in demand but also in value. There is
talk, too, of more large tracts being
opened for buyers.
The paving of First avenue from the
Government reservation to Golden Gate
Park will be finished in the course of iwo
months. This will give the long-felt
driveways between those two pleasure
grounds that the, Richmond people and
the Point L'> bos Improvement Club have
been contending f~r for years. *'-iv.v
Severed Hie "Windplp*.
D. Dunker. a mechanic, living at 569 Minna
street, attempted to commit suicide yesterday
morninc by cutting his ihroat with a carving
knife. He succeeded in severing his wind
pipe. He was taken to the Receiving Hos
pital In the ambulance, his aged mother ac
companying htm, and Dr. Thompson stitched
and dressed tbe wound. Dun has been out
of work for some months and took to drink.
He sobered up about a week ago and since
then has been very despondent.
' 'Love, Courtship and Marriage."
;*! Rev. E. R. mile villi lecture on "Love, Court
ship and Marriage" at the Epwortb M. E.
Church, corner of Twenty-sixth and Church
street-, thu eve ling at 8 o'clock. On Friday
evening a novel entertainment, called ''The
District School" will be given in the church.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, THURSDAY, AUGUST 26, 1897.
WILL FIGHT
UNDER WATER
The Result of a Study of
Submarine Navigation
by C. F. Martin.
A San Francisco Man Invents a
Boat That He Thinks Will
Do Wonders.
Plans and Specifications to Be Sub
mitted to the Fulton Iron
Works.
The result of the studies of C. F. Martin
may now be seen in a model of a new tor
pedo-boat at his residence, 115 Fourteenth
street. This model, with the accompany
ing plans and specifications, indicates
that he has not only given his attention
to ships alone the water front of San
Francisco, bill he has studied the various
torpedo-boats designed by -others and cor
rected their mistakes to such an extent
that he is ready to furnish a boat that he
says will de-troy everything in the way of
an offensive flotilla from a monster battle
ship to any other torpe io-boat that floats.
It was the model of the fish torpedo
that was selected by Mr. Martin, and his
Doat will look like an immense fish with
a very sharp-pointed nose. The boat,
when in action, will be S4 feet long, with
a diameter of 12 feet. Mr. Martin feels
sure that it will make '21 knots on the sur
face and 16 under water.
There will be four engines in the boat,
two gasoline and two compressed air. On
the surface one gasoline engine will send
the boat along, while the other will be
used for the purpose of compressing the air
which is to be stored in cyclinders for use
under water. When the boat dips ncr
nose down and starts lar tbe enemy, the
gasoline engine will be shifted aside and
one of the compressed air engines will
take its place, while tbo other will work
the pumps which liiil and empty the
water tanks, by which method the boat
will be raised and lowered in the water.
In the engine-room there will be a plat
form on which two men will stand, one
directing the movements of the vessel
while the other will manipulate the tor
pedo, which is lo do the work of destruc
tion. These two, with the engineer, will
compose the entire crew.
In place of a turret from which the
officers of the vessel may observe the
enemy there will be three deadlights,
which will have something of the appear
ance of the eyes of an alligator when he
lies basking on toD of the water. These
deadlights will have an elevation of bnt
eight inches from the surface of the boat
and will be of such construction that tttey
will offer very little, if any, resistance to
the water as the vessel passes through it.
The boat is to be propelled by a powerful
screw of four blades. Back of the screw
will be the rudder, which will also operate
as a Keel.
The construction of the boat will be of a
nature to mate it combine great strength
with lightness. The four ribs running
from end to end will be steel girders and
these will te sheathed with circular sheets
of steel, while the bow will be covered by
two-inch plates of steel, and will thus en
able the boat to be used as a powerful ram.
The only two openings in the boat, j
aside from this provisional hatchway, are
the entering hatch and the hatch through
which the torpedoes are to be ejec'.ed.
vVhen in action one torpedo will lie in lhe
ejector ready lor firing, while a second will
be held in a compartment in the rear of
the engine room ready to be passed for
ward by the aid of compressed air.
While it is intended that the boat can
remain completely submerged and in
action for six hours, there is no arrange
ment for cooking or sleeping. It is esti
mated that it wi>l co*-t $35,000 to build the
first boat, and iherealter they will cost
about $25,000. The plans and specifica
tions are to be submitted to the Fulton
Iron Works next week, and if the bid on
the first boat does not meet the expecta
tions, then they will be sent to New Jersey.
MONUMENT COMMITTEE.
Preparations for the Great Tournament
at the Presidio Are Now Being
Made.
President W. W. Stone and the mem
bers of the executive committee for the
Lincoln monument are busy making the
final preparations for the great military
tournament field day at the Presidio on
September 9, Admission day.
Arrangements are almost complete for
the erection of the seats. on the grand
stand, a portion of which will be reserved
from $1 to 50 cents, according to location.
Quite a number wi.l, however, be arranged
at 25 cents. Those will afford quite as
good a view of the field as the more choice
ones, with the difference, of course, in the
comfort.
The military authorities, as also the
boys in blue, are taking the greatest possi
ble interest in the event to come off. They
are all on tiptoe with excitement ovsr the
contemplated day's sports.
The various railroad lines running in
the direction of the Presidio have con
sented to advertise the event on their cars
from now until the day UDon which it will
come off, and besides this several quarter
cards will be placed in the show windows
of the principal stores between now and
Admission day.
Contribntions from the school children
are steadily coming, in to swell the $3000
already in the treasurer's hands.
Teachers' " Aid Society.
The Teachers* Mutual Aid Society met on
Monday to elect a new board of directors for the
ensuing year,; with the following. successlul
candidates as the result: Miss Laura" T.
Fowler of tbe Normal School, Miss Alice d'Arcy
of the Der*man, Miss C. B. Earle ot the Paciiic
Heights, Miss Haassler of the Haight, Miss
Addle Grader of tne Everett, r Miss L. Maccord
ot the Whittier, Miss J. L. Sexton of the Dudley
Stone. Mrs. E. _. Hackett of the Websier, Miss
H. E. Whirlow-of tne Peabody, Mis* McNlooll
ol the Horace Mann, Miss E. Donovan of the
Franklin..:
For a Sick Comrade.
The members of Howard M. E. Church have
arranged to give a concert the hall of the
church to-morrow evening. An excellent
programme has been prepared, and as the pro
ceeds are to be devoted to pay me off « debt
incurred by the sickness of a member of Com
pany F, a large attendance is expected. i.-'. t **,',>
The fac-simile yT^- s/&A . sr"* Ni* on every, wrapper
signature of (^^%^ of CASTOKIA.
A HUMAN ARM
FOR A TARGET
Dr. Shiels Tells of His Ex
periments With a
Pistol.
Found That the Hair Was Not
Burned When the Weapon
Was Held Close.
He Agrees With Other Doctors far
the Defense That Suicide
Was Possible.
Tbe cross-examination of Dr. R. E.
Williams was continued yesterday morn
ing in the Figel case. He testified that
the muscles of the body do not relax en
tirely when unconsciousness is produced
by a gunshot wound.
He thought the wound in Hoffman's
cheek would have the effect of producing
unconsciousness, and to inflict the wound
in the temple alter having inflicted the
one in the cheek the party must have
been conscious. In tbe opinion of wit
ness, if Hoffman had inflicted the wound
in the cheek first be must have fired the
shot causing the wound in the temple im
mediately afterward.
Mr. Ach asked the doctor in whose tes
timony as to the wounds be would place
the most reliance— tbat of the autopsy
physician, wbo bad made a careful ex
amination, or that of the physician of the
Receiving Hospital, who bad made an ex
amination lasting only ten minutes. This
was objecied to, and Judge Campbell
ruled that it was the province of the court
to decide as to the credibility of wit
nesses.
On being asked tbe witness said that in
testifying that he thought Hoffman could
have inflicted the wounds on himself he
had not taken into consideration the
amount of blood lost nor the fact that the
deceased was a -handed man. He
thought that after being knocked down
by the shock from the wounds Mr. Hoff
man might have got up and walked from
one room to the o.her.
On redirect examination he stated that
an artery severed by a bullet does not
bleed so freely as when cut with a knife.
Mr. Ach remarked that from the amount
of blood found in the offices where Hoff
man was shot ue thought there must have
been rather profuse bleeding.
General Barnes replied that a very little
blood went a long way, and gave as an ex
ample slight scratches in a prize-tight
causing pro-use bleeding without in any
wav weakening the man losing tbe blood.
Dr. George F. Shiels 'testified" that he
was an associate professor of sureery in
the medical department of the University
of California. He had considerable ex
perience in the use of firearms and had
made experiments to ascertain the effect
of tiring a revolver from different distances
at a human body.
Asked to tell of these experiments be
said:
"I fired nine or ten shots into an
amputed human arm which had consider
able hair on it. When the revolver was
held half an inch from the arm there was
a smudge but no tattoo. At an inch there
was a smudge and sometimes tattoo and a
singeing of the hair. At eight inches there
was a tattoo, but lurther than that there
was no smudge.. There was no tattoo
ing at fourteen inches. The wound be
came less jagged and smaller the farther
tbe pistol was held."
The witness had known of a case where
the sphenoid bone had been fractured, the
roof of the mouth torn away and the
brain injured, yet the patient bad walked
and was conscious. He tnongbt a person
might lose as much as two quarts of blood
without becoming unconscious.
General Barnes askeJ Dr. Shiels the
same questions he has asked all the ex
pert witnesses as to the distance the re
volver was held from Hoffman's head.
Judge Campbell again sustained the ob
jections to the questions. ''" i-' 'v~ C
Dr. Shiels said he thought It possible
that Hoffman's wounds were self-intlicteu.
He also testified that suicides most fre
quently shot themselves in the moutn,
and the wounds of homicides are gener
ally in the body.
In the cross-examination Mr. Ach asked
if the bullet found in Hoffman's stomach
could have fallen there by force of gravity.
Dr. Shiels answered that it could not, but
on being closely questioned stated that
the patient might have involuntarily
swallowed the bullet.
The witness said he knew Figel— bad
met aim on the night of June 1 on the
boat as he wa- going home.
Mr. Ach asked if it wasn't a fact that
paid medical experts were inclined to show
bias for ibe side which employed them.
Dr. Shiels replied tnat it . was unfortu
nately true in . some cases; but tha; if
counsel insinuated that an honorable phy
sician would, do such a thing be would
take it as a gross insult.
Dr. Shiels further testified as to his ex
periments on the arm that the hair had
been curled up a little by the shots at close
range, but was not burned.' The powder
smudges were easily washed off with a
sponge.
. He said there was no flash perceptible
when tne pistol was held close to the arm.
Mr. Ach requested the doctor to try a
further experiment with a pistol held half
an inch distant from an object. The doc
tor will testify to-day as to wnether or not
be found that a flash was perceptible.
PAEEELL WEOTE HIS LOVE.
. --. -
He Annoyed Hie Divorced Wife by For
giving Her for Nothing.
Robert Farrell loved his wife not wisely
bat too well. It is dangerous to volunteer
love where it is not demanded, and it
leads to unpleasant consequences to thrust
it where it encounters a woman wbo has
been scorned or who - scorns. . His wife
Mary is a buxom woman with a sweet
smile, but Robert lost bis grip on his
affinity-compelling by nnotic power, and
the consequence was ,;* that Mary and he
drifted apart and ceased to be friends. A
few months ago He golden chain of mat
rimony was severed by a decree of court,
and Mary faced the cold and heartless
world anew as a grass widow.
■'• Absence, however, made ' the heart of
Hubert crow fonder, and be opened a cor
respondence with bis wife .by means of
postal cards. Vlt is the experience of ; the
postoffice department that- postal cards
are never read tf by - inquisitive postmis
tresses or Carriers unless the postal ; con
tains something abusive or indecent. ",~. '
Mr." - Farrell' postals are of the class
that are read. They are unprintable, be
cause of their libelous character. But
after insinuating that his ex-wife was not
a ht subject for canonization Mr. Farrell
opens his arms and his heart and declares
with emotion that with all her faults he
loves her still, or rather that he loves her
yet.
As Mrs. Farrell is a respectable indus
trious woman the postals sent to her at
her place of employment at Ross Valley,
In Marin County, have annoyed and
humiliated her very much, and sh" com
plained to the Postal Inspectors. Robert
was arrested on Monday by the United
States Marsha], and he will have to ex
plain to a jury how he expected to win
back his wife by abusing her.
Farrell was taken before United States
Commissioner Heacock yesterday and
waived examination. He was admitted
to bail in the sum of $SCO.
Mrs. Farrell turned over to Postal In
spector Erwtn a dispatch received by tier
a day or two ago from Farrell stating that
ii she did not return to him he would con
tinue sending the annoying postals.
Farrell was connected with several
newspapers in Southern California as a
writer for several years. At the last ses
sion of the Legislature he occupied the
position cf watchman in the Senate Cham
ber. Mrs. Farrell is working for the
family of a lawyer near Ross Station.
Marin County, and the postals annoying
tue lawyer's family as well as Mrs. Far
rel], her employer advised her to have
Farrell arrested
Farrell acted yesterday as thoush he
had been drinking heavily, and appeared
to be stupefied from the effects of liquor.
DOG PEDIGREE DISPUTE.
Pacific Advisory Board Invest : gates
Serious Charges Against a
City Dealer,
The Pacific Advisory Board of the
American Kennel Club met at tbe Occi
dental Hotel last nigbt and investigated a
charge of fraudulent pedigree. Tbe charge
had been preferred by George S. Fife
against B. Straus of 411 Kearny street and
Wade Collins, an employe of Straus, for
having sold Fife a St. Bernard dog claimed
to be by Victor Watch out of Lady Mona,
two San Francisco dogs. Straus said after
the sale that he bad found the pedigree to
be fraudulent, and be laid tbe blame on
j his employe. Collins, when summoned
i before the board, testified that he bad
j knowingly given the pedigree.
A decision in the . case will be rendered
on the tirst Tuesday in September, when
the board will hold its next regular meet
ing. If found guilty the penalty is either
suspension or disqualification. Tbe latter
punishment is severe. It means that tne
disqualified man can never again show a
'log m any kennel club in the United
States or in Canada; can never again reg
ister a dog; cannot even lead a dog or act
as an employe at 'a dog show, and the
dogs he may sell cannot be registered.
Five Days to Leave the City.
Nine men suspected of being bunko steerers
! were arrested Monday by. Detective Graham
i and Policeman Sullivan, and appeared before
Judge Joachimsen yesterday. They nil con
-1 sented to leave the City, and the Judge gave
I them five days to curry out their promise. ■- If
found in the City after the expiration of five
! days they will he arrested and will get* six
; months lor vagrancy. Their names are John
i Fitzgerald. J. W. Burk, H. Trnlnor, J. C. Mc-
I Cor-ilck, John . Ling, Peter Hanson, Joseph
, Thomas, George Lewis and Charles Peterson.
HEW TO-DAT.
statemcs
medical institute
Corner Market, Powell and Eddy-
Streets (Entrance No, 3
Eddy Street), S. F.
An Institute Designed to Pill a Long-
Pelt Necessity in This
City.
It is intended as a place where tbe sick
of all classes and conditions, rich and poor
alike, who are suffering from chronic
diseases of whatsoever nature, can receive
medical advice and treatment of the high-
est order at a moderate cost. ""Dr.. W.
Kingston Vance, the physician in charge,
is well qualified to direct the affairs of the
institute and successfully treat all pa-
tients.
Both medical and electrical treatment
are administered. His offices are equipped
with over $6000. worth of electrical bat-
teries, machine* and apparatus of the
latest and most improved type, and their
effects on disease as applied by Dr. Vance
are truly marvelous. Women sufferin*
with disease incident to their sex will find
this treatment a certain balm. In the re-
lief of nervousness, hysteria, loss of ambi-
tion, backache, headache, bearing-down
pains, palp. taiion of the heart, sleepless-
ness, dizziness, gloom, despondency, and
that horrible feeling so often expressed by
the sufferer, "my head feels as though I
was going crazy," this new treatment acts
as if by magic, and permanent cures are
certain and sure. Men and women who
are sick with long-standing complaints
and are tired of doctors and drugs are in-
vited to call and investigate our new
methods of treating disease. •
Our ELECTRO-MEDICAL CURE is es-
pecially effective in catarrh, rheumatism,
kidney disease, disorders of the liv**-r and
bowels, nervous debility and paralysis,
and skin eruptions, Tames are removed
painlessly by means of the galvanic car-
rent.
Advice by mail FREE. Persons living
out of San Francisco write for symptom
blank. Call or address
STATE ELECTRO-MEDICAL INSTITUTE
Cor. Market, Powell and Eddy Sts.,
ENTRANCE 3 EDDY STREET,
San Franclsco. Cal.
DOCTOR SWEANY.
Ten YPARS of Successful' practice
at 737 Market areet, San Francisca Das
. scamped him as the leading specialist *of the
i Pacific Coast In the treatment of • all * Chronic,
.Nervous and bpecial Diseases of . both ; m *n i and
women. Entire or partial loss of manly power
and vigor in young, mid.ile-azed .'or. old I men posi-
tively restored. Weakening drains which sap the
vitality, destroy the health, cans» paralysis. In-;
sanity and premature death, quickly and perma-
nently stopped. Private diseases of every name
and nature cured. - - - -. .-•
Write if you live away from the city. Book,!
*"Gn:de to health," a treatise on alt the organs'
and -.** their - diseases, . free on *• application. * Cori******-
•pondenca strictly confidential. -, Addreis F. l.
I BVVJtA^' V, 737 Market a re*.;, San Frauclaco, Cal i
,3ll§ssp!timijifi
SMTA CATALIM ISLAND i
Greatest Atttracions in the West
"Char-mini climate, wonderful na'ural attri-
tions. FAMOUS FISHING AND WILD ». AT
SHOOTING. The new scenic ride from av.loi.
Splendid coaches, noted Western drivers. De-
lightful coast excursions. Novel ou door sport..
Graud concerts every day by th*- famous MA-
il.N'i* BAND a- 0 OKCHESTRA. Dancing.
Pyrotechnic displays. Water Carnivals, etc.
HOTEL M 11! pPOLK always open, remodeled
and enlarged, nev." addition, elegani rooms with pri-
vate oaths. Grand batiroom. etc.
ISLAND VILLA opens Jn y 1.
lull information, rates and illustrated pamphlet!
Wilmington Transportation Co..
222 S. SPRING ST.. LOS ANGELES. CAL.
THE GEYSERS,
Sonoma Co. , 6 Hour* from San Franclsco.
ONE OF NATURE'S: WONDERS.
Grandest scenery. The hotel an enchanting em-
bowered home. New Bathhouse, Tennis-court, etc.
NATLKAL SIEA3I- A.ND 3IINEKAL
BATHS.
Tepid Swimming Lake. New and Inviting trails to
Interesting points. Table unsurpassed.
J. H. HORTON, Manager.
MADRONE
MINERAL SPRINGS,
OANTA CLARA COUNTY, MOUNT HA.MIL-
•T? ton range, elevation 2200 feet: best mineral
water on this coast for cure of it digestion and
urinary troub es: unexcelled hunting and fishing;
special rates to parties of four or more: Mage con-
nects at Madrone with morning trains Mondays,
Wednesdays and urJays; send for terms and
descriptive pamphlet.
J.DIW CARTER. Mnnacer.
SEIGLER SPRINGS,
LAKE COUNTY. :
THIS DELIGHTFUL \V ATE KING-PLACE 13
located In the mid-t of the toast Rauge.
Abundance of mineral springs, hot and cold
plunge baths, large swimmlug-tank of mineral
water, fine stone dining-room: telephone con
nt-ctions. electric lights, livery accommodation;
good trout-Ashing and hunting. Ronud-trip tick-
ets at aP. offices, $10. ->msmfß*massiiix&*a
JOHN SPAULDING, Proprietor.
HOTEL ROWARDEAIASI,
-TIHE PICTURESQUE SPOT OF BEN LO-
-1 MOND, in the Santa Cruz Mountains. New
hotel and rustic -cottages, containing 60 rooms,
ALL HARD. FINISHED, with large closets.
Two tennis courts and bowling alley. Buildings,
grounds and river lighted by electricity, a BUM
of river for boating. round trip tickets. S3. For
particulars address THOS. L BELL. Proprietor,
Ben Lomond, '.at. <■■*..••■ ■ .
SEW CARLSBAD MINERAL SPRINGS.
LAKE COUNTY. —
I he GREATEST HEALTH-GIVING WATER
A ;n America. Specific for all' stomach, liver,
kldne-* and bladder troub 63. New hovel, new
management. Terms. $S to . $10 ' per week. For
particulirs address W. R. Mc.')VERN, Kelsey-
ViLe Lake to., or DR. McGOVERN, 1577 Fol-
som street, San Francisco.
MAEK WEST SPRINGS,
' Nine Miles from Santa Koia.
THE PIACE WHERE Vol' FEEI, AT HOME.
Table first clajs. Croquet, Billiards Shuffle-
boards, Swings, Swimming Pool, Dancing Pavil-
ion, Fishing, Hunting, New Mineral tinge Bath:
$10 and $12 p-r week; children under 10. tf a
Special rates for clubs and large families. Batm
tree, hound trip, $3.73.
FREESE <fe JUERGENSEN.
iNERALMODBATHS
FOR GOUT, RHEUMATISM, SCIATICA,
Nervous Prostration, Obesity (special attention
paid to reducing stout people) at the
MILL VALLEY SANITAKIU3I,
E. STEELE, Manager. Marin County. Cal.
LAUREL DELL.
PLEASANTLY LOCATED ON LAUREL DELL
Lake; new dining-room, new livery stable. It
is now one of the most attractive online places In
Lake Connty. Rates $8 to $12 per weet Boating
and bathing free. Bt log your bathing suits. Ad-
dress H. WAMBOLD, uertha -P. o„ Lake Co., Cai.
QLENBROOK,
ONE OF THE MOST CHARMING RESORTS
in the State. Fine scenery, homing and fish-
ing. Excellent table. For circulars and further
Information address O. W. R. TREDWAY, Ulan-
brook. Lake County, Cai.
KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS,
BESWICK, SISKIYOU COUNTY, UAL, A
noted fishing and health resor:. Hot mud and
sulphur baths.
KDSON BROS., Proprietors.
"I think Ripans Tabules about the best thing
there is," said the Colonel ;;:" I guess they are THE
best ! I was sitting the other evening smoking and drink-
ing a little whisky and water ; there were four of us there
and one complained of being very uncomfortable. When
he had told us about it I said to him, ' all that ails you is
indigestion,' and I gave him a Ripans Tabule from a little
■- * ' ' ' ' '■" ' ' ■ ' '--•■'■■ '"■. * ■ - - . * *
vial I had in my pocket. We each of us took one, and
since then I have learned that every one of the three has
bought the TABULES and thinks them the greatest;.
things there are a goin^."
PACIFIC
CONGRESS SPRINGS
SANTA CLARA COUNTY.
SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS.
Only 2' hours from San Francisco.
Remodeled and under new management
For rates and printed matter address
JOHN S. MATHESON, Manager.
rt 1/ A Anfl 1 ! HOT SPRINGS, Sonoma
V H li fl I V to, only 41/ 3 nours ,rom
■M 1% Mil 31 a « ! ~ arl l rancisco, and but 9
ViinU*wV miles' staging. Water]
noted for their medicinal virtues and generally
conceded to be the finest natural bath water in -.ii****
State. Excellent climate and grand mountain
Cenery. Long distance telephone: dally mall and
express; well-stocked trout streams. Round trio
from San Francisco only $5 stt Take Tiburon
ferry at 7 :30 a it. or 3:30 p. m. Terms, 4'J. a day
or $12 a week.
J. F. MULGREW. Proprietor.
HOWARD LAKE COUNTY,
T-NDER THE ARLE SUPERVISION OF MRS.
Li 1- E. H. BEEB >'. Acci>miuor!a-.io-.is strict
first-class. Rates $10 and $12; special terms to
families. P. O. and telephone. Hound trip $10. S.
V. Ollice, 613 Market st. Address
J. WALLACE .PAULDING. Mgr.
OLIVE HILL FARM
Four Miles from Napa, Foot of Mt. George.
FINE FRUIT. CREAM, BERRIES, CHlCK-
ens, etc. Plenty of shade, hammocks and
games. Hunting and tisbin*.-. Pleas int place to
spend vacation. Will meet guerts a*, station. Write
for particulars. C. X LOOK, Napa, Cal.
TAHALPAIS VILLA.
pOSS VALLEY, NEAR SAN RAFAEL: COT-
-Ti tages and iis, with or without - board; danc-
ing pavilion; salt water bathing,
MRS. PETER SMITH, Manager.
AGUA QUEUE SPRINGS,
SONOMA VALLEY. OPEN ALL THE YEAR.
2 hours from San Francisco. Elegant Modern
HoteL Warm Mineral swimming and Tub
Bnths. fen d for Circulars- Address AQUA CALI-
ENTE SPRINGS HOTEL, Aqua Caliente, CaL .
REDWOOD FARM.
AN IDEAL LARGE COUNTRY RESORT IN
A. Sonoma County: Ant-class accmnmodatlons;
ho*, and cold mineral baths; circulars. W. A.
THOMPSON. , __^_^
- U m 31 E i: HOME FA BM,
Santa Cruz Mountains
FIRST-CLASS FAMILY SUMMER AND WlN-
ter resorL Cottages, tents, hunting and fisho
lug. Campers' return tickets. $2 50. Board, $8 to
$10 per week. Send for circulars to J. H. HA ES-
TER , Glenwood, Cat. Long-distance telephone.
"MONTK VISTA." "'
THE PICTURESQUE GEM OF '• HE SIERRAS
(elevation 3500 ieet). This mos, popular ra-
sort under new ownership is now open; delightful
climate, lawn tennis, photo dark-room, boating,
fishing, hunting; four trains daily*; Vs-mile from
station; free carriage. For circular aduress THUS.
E. MORGAN, Monte Vista, Dutch Flat, Cal.
OTEL REDONDO.— THIS MAGNIi'iCEN V
structure, 4 stories high, with every modern
convenience, is the crowning effort of all hotels on
the Pacific Coast: completely surrounded by beau-
tiful lawns, flower beds. etc. Boating, fishing aod
surf bathing are the chief amnsement. Write for
rates and one of our beautiful souvenirs. E. DUN-
HAM, proprietor.
— , *
AT BELMONT, SAN MATEO COUNTY,
board for summer months; private fam lv; cro-
quet ground; large snnny rooms, biiliara-room and
salt baths: convenient for busiuess men and fami-
lies. MP.S. M. HANSEN.
WALL'S SPRING-, NEAR RUSSIAN RIVER,
■IT oo»n for season: write for circular. Addre
R. ARMSTRONG, Manager, Hilton P. 0., Sonoma
County, CaL .
,
SUMMER BOARD ON FRUIT FARM NEAR
Los Gatos: hunting and fishing. Address A.
C. W., I c Franc station, Frohn's P. 0., Santa
Clara County.
' TDEAL FRUIT RANCH. THEN TON, SO-
JL noma ro. ; furnished cottaxes with free fruit,
ye****-., horse, $12 to $22; lovely healthful locality.
.
.-CHEAPEST AND BEST IN AMERICA—
V- 1 WEEKLY CALL, sent to any address in tha
United States or Canada one year for $1 60, post*
age free.
rV*RJ|^tefe(s««W Rift -Si is a non-polsonon«
«. < jfiSS***^^^Sfc_fil r '* »"J- v for Onorrbo-a,
J^^l'CKEti^l Gleet, Spermatorrhoea,
£jßr in l to 5 days. W Whites, unnatural die-
BfBM Quartan*!*- ■ charges, or any infiamma-
fftbff not to itrieture. tion, irritation or ulcera-
g— jPrereaw contagion. tion of mucous mem-
Ba*alTHEEvAt|3CHEM!runo. br; -*n*-'s. Non-astringent.
I-^Asincinnxti.o EBB Sold by ■ "«nru«_,
vl^^. C. 3. a .^^■^ or c( tf ,lt in plain wrapper,
<*^9SR-k^ ' " J^^^m by express, prepaid, for
'"^Q Mf^°l J. 1 - 00 ' or 3 bottles, 12-75.
* '^tH^v ■ Circular *•• ut on request.
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