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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 05, 1897, Image 16

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-12-05/ed-1/seq-16/

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16
LIGHT UPON
A SKULKING
SCOUNDREL
Truth About a Lying Cir
cular Being Mailed to
Merchants.
INTENDED TO DECEIVE THE PUBLIC
Based on Untruth and Issued
by an "Organization" Never
in Existence.
COWARDICE PART OF THE CRIME.
Reputable Business Men at Once De
tect the Fraud and Suspicions as
to Its Perpetrator Arise.
To look with respect upon an enemy is
possible. But for the enemy who skulks
in the shadow, stabbing furtively at the
back of one he dare not face, there is
nothing but detestation. The author of a j
malign lie, afraid to reveal his evil
personality, impelled not by shame but
by cowardice to conceal his name and
purpose, is an enemy of this sort.
It befell not long ago, as the public
knows, that The Call had opportunity
to aid an expedition to the Arctic for the
jescue of scores of whalers Imprisoned in
the ice threatened with death from fam
ine or from cold. It did its part gladly,
and is able to believe did it well. After
Bailors had been supplied bountifully ne
cessity arose for buying outfits for the offi
cers of the Bear. The vessel was at Se
attle scheduled to sail on the 25th of
November. On the 23d the commander
made known to The Call that certain
raiment and equipment were needed by
the officers of the vessel.
To have obtained these things In San
Francisco and get them to the ship in
time would have been impossible. There
fore they were purchased in Seattle. That
was all; surely nothing in the nature of a
crime. Life was at stake. Had the ship
been in China the articles would have
been bought in Hongkong as quickly. It
wis no moment for weighing detail.
None but a creature combining the
traits of the lowest ord*r of man with
those of the coyote and the rattler would
have found in the circumstance a chance
for a howl and a hiss. Yet somebody has
found it. Somebody more base than
brave, more cunning than wise, has
through the medium of a circular, floated
anonymously, attacked The Call, using
this transaction as a pretext. There will
be developments. One of these will he a
vigorous * prosecution of the criminal
offender for misuse of the mail! . And as
an outcome, it would not be surprising if
the journalist now secreted in New York
might have a friend from the West to
bear nim company.
Th« person responsible for this circular
is more than a mere liar. Not content to
have - falsehood on his own lips, or to
write v<snomou3 untruths, or to dictate it,
and thus attempt to deceive the public, he
must needs begin his nefarious work by
making _ boy lie for him, play the sneak-
thief for him. To give the circular an ap
pearance of good faith the schemer ha
to have a statement clipped from The
Call.
A ooy was sent to newsdealers to secure
all the copies of the paper he could, pre
tending that he had been dent frcm The
Call office. This incident was the first
inkling that a new piece of villainy was
afoot, and wonder arose as to the form it
would assume. Soon the circulars began
to appear, and the motive for tho subter
fuge was plain.
The matter is of far more importance to
the public than to The Call- It shows
that there are scoundrels blacker than the
footpad who menaces the wayfarer, more
cowardly than the wielder of the sandbag
and yet without police interference able
to attack citizens and institutions. To be
sure the attack ia stealthy, and made from
a point of supposed security —the assail
ant veiled, but thinly, very thinly. Hap
pily th re are few people so debased that
this peculiar mode of indecency would b 1
suggested to their unclean minds, a fact
rendering exposure comrmrat'vly easy.
In the "mental "rogues' gallery" wuich
every student of local events natural. ac
quires, the picture or the criminal in this
instance has a prominent place. Every
cartoonist in town is particularly familiar
with it, doubtless.
.If, when matters of life and death are
at issue there are rascals vile enough to
perpetrate so cowardly an act, is it any
wonder that sailors bound for a winter's
cruise go clad in shoddy garb?
And can there be marvel, if such rascals
escape unwhippe I, that reputable people
feel ill at ease, deeming property insecure,
fair fame in danger of tarnish, and even
1 i ie itself not properly safeguarded? The
man responsible tor the circular is unfit
to associate with aught but jail-birds, on
whose moral plane he would find congen
ial environment.
The circular was issued apparently by a
business organization. This organization
does not exist, never did. and nobody can
be fouud willing to be responsible for its
standing. A lac-simile of the circular
is shown herewith.
In order to ascertain the source from
which the contemptible circular emanated
porter of The Call went to the chef
of the Letter-carriers' Division of the post
office and asked if there were such an or
ganization as the "San Francisco Mer
ciiants' Committee on K.ondike Outfit
ting." Mr. Inibrie of the postal service
called several carriers and all of them said
that there was no committee known by
that name.
The reporter then asked where a letter
addressed to sucu a committee would be
delivered. The carriers replied, "We would
deliver the letter to the Alaskan Trade
Committee, as it is composed of merchants
of San Francisco who are interested in the
Klondike trade."
D. M. Carman, secretary of the Alaska
Trade Committee, was seen at his office
near the ferry. When a copy of the cir
cular was placed before him be remarked
that two hours earlier he had received
from George Liebes a copy of the identi
cal circular. It was sent to tne firm of
Kelly & Liebes and by Mr. Liebis for
warded to the committee for investiga
tion.
Secretary Carman, speaking of the mat
ter, said: "The circular was not author
ized by the committee. We had no
knowledge of its existence until this
copy was received. It is not
indorsed by this committee or any
member of our organization. It
is so adroitly prepared, however, that the
inference might be readily formed that
our commitite was responsible) for it. I
shall make it my business to investigate
fully and ascertain if possible the source
from which the circular came. We re
gard the whole thing as a contemptible
trick, in which me good name of our
committee is sought to be used to perpe
trate a fraud."
H. H. Sherwood, chairman of the Alas
kan trade committee, was seen at his
residence last evening. When a copy of
the circular was placed before him he read
it carefully and without hesitation
asserted that the committee of merchants
of which he was chairman had
nothing whatever to do with the docu
ment. He said: "I see that it is cun
ningly designed to deceive people and
lead merchants of the city to believe that
it emanated from our organization. We
shall endeavor to find out where the cir
cular originated, and the names of the
persons concerned in its circulation."
The inclosed slip referred to in the cir
cular is a clipping from The Call of No -
vember 27, which mentions mat some
of the supple* for the Bear's outfit had
been purcnased in Seattle. As a matter
of fact the articles bought in Seattle were
purchased to fib a requisition made by
Captain Tuttleof the Bear the day before
the date set for the sailing of tha vessel.
There was no time to forward from this
city the supplies embraced in the last
requisition.
Johm D. Spreckels directed that the
supplies for the .bear should be procured
in San Francisco, and all the goods ex
cepting the articles called for by Captain
Tuttle on the eve of the ship's departure
were purchased here.
LEE CHAU SAN ARRIVES.
The New President of the Ouong Wo
Company Was a Passenger on
the City of Peking.
Lee Chau San, the new president of the
Quong Wo Company, one of the most
powerful of the Chinese Six Companies,
arrived here yesterday afternoon on the
Cityjof Peking from China, and was imme-
diately landed, pursuant to instructions
received from the Department of State at
Washington.
Lee Chau San will be the guest of the
firm of Sang Wo San & Co. at 1006 Dupont
street pending the adjustment of the
books and affairs of the retiring adminis
tration, to which he succeeds. He is
highly educated and comes from the
province of Hong San. He reports a great
shortage in crop?, especially that of rice
caused by hot winds, insects and lack of
rain, and that prices in China are higher
tnan for over twenty years. He is the
youngest Chinaman ever sent to this
country by his Government to preside
ovr the Six Companies, being 40 years of
age. ■■• ■_
A .Sovereign Remedy.
Dr. Parker's Cough Cure— one dose will stop
a.cough.never falls. Price 25 eta. All druggists*
THIS SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1897.
DREADED A
SUICIDE'S
GRAVE
Vincent Wallace Takes His
Life at the French
Hospital.
ARRANGED HIS OWN FUNERAL.
Carefully Planned to Blame
His Physicians for His
Death,
A FAMOUS OPERA COMPOSER'S SOL
He Was Once a Banker at Guthrie
and at Seattle, but His Money
Disappeared.
The body of Vincent Wallace, son of !
the composer of the English opera
"Maritana," is lying on a slab in the i
Morgue — a suicide.
VINCENT WALLACE, WHO DIED BY HIS OWN HAND.
He came to an untimely end yesterday
morning at 2 o'clock at the French Hos
pital from morphine administered by
himself.
The story of his death is a strange one.
The "pain in the heart," of which he
spoke in the last message which he wrote
two days before his death, was not a phy
sical pain. Perhaps the cause which
wearied him of life may never be known,
for he was not used to speak much of his
private personal affairs.
It has been discovered by reason of the
plan conceived of by him at first having
failed, because of lack of the favorable
opportunity, that he had a horror of the
Morgue and of the disgrace that attends
the name of a suici to, and he deliberately
took steps to compass his death in such a
manner as to lead to the belief that it was
caused by an operation for the purpose of
which he went to the hospital.
To bis friend, Owen Burns, General
Manager of the Commercial Fire Dis
patch Company, in the Crocker building,
be confided his intention of making away
with himself. He charged Mr. Burn
with the sad duty of arranging for the
cremation of his body. All that hi- friend
could say to dissuade him from bis pur
pose was in vain.
The last entries in his diary, made after
he went to the hospital, speak of the
"pain in the heart" and of pinks and
violets brought by friends to cheer him.
Monday, Nov. 29, 1807.
Two letters from C. Answered. Went to
hospital early in afternoon, Registered <fee.
Then walk In G. G. Park. Very beautiful,
peaceful and quiet Road over C.'s loners.
Poor old C. Tore the letters up. What's tin
use of anything. "Nawthin." Donald called
in th evening.
Nov. 30. Operation for this morning. Have
eaten hardly anything since Sat night
Lizzie came with her mother. Pinks and
more Violet*. Also letter irom Lizzie this
A. M. E O. and Ownie called up just at dark.
More violets. Am very weak and have bad
pain over or in(?) the heart
The pinks and violets will keep me com
pany to-night
It had been his intention to take a fatal
quantity of morphine just before the
operation so that it might be thought tbat
bis death had resulted from shock conse
quent upon the use of the surgeon's knife.
but the opportunity did not come, and he
swallowed the poison some time during
the night of December 1. The operation,
while painiul, was not at all dangerous,
and when it was discovered about mid
night that he wan sleeping with all the
symptoms of narcotic poisoning, the alarm
was given and the doctors immediately
set about to brim: him out of danger.
They pursued the usual course in such
contingencies, whipping his body for the
purpose of counteracting the deadly
drowsiness and endeavoring to induce na
tural respiration by artiric al methods.
After working upon him for eighteen
hours they restored him io consciousness
and he told how he had attempted to
commit suicide by taking the poison,
which he had concealed about his person.
The ordeal of the operation and the
ravages of the drug were too great a strain
upon his vitality and the death tbat he
planned came in spite of the efforts of the
physicians. . : t ..
♦ The officers of the hospital had been
! warned by Wallace's friends that he con
templated suicide and a strict watch was
kept on him. The physicians and nurses ,
removed as much or "the man's clothing !
from the ward as they could without ex- j
citing the suspicion of the patient that !
his purpose was known and what clothing |
was left in bis room was searched care
fully, but it seems the poison was over
looked and it is thoueht Wallace had con
cealed it in the nightshirt he brought
with him y hen -preparing for the opera
tion. A search of the garment after he
was found suffering from the narcotic dis
closed a small pocket in it where the
drug might have been hid.
Wallace left a letter in the office of the
Commerc Fire Dispatch Company, ad
dressed to Owen Burns, when he went to
the hospital, with directions that it should
not be opened until the following Wednes
day. It contained instructions as to the
disposition of his body, and gave informa
tion that all the preparations ior its cre
mation had been made.
About ten days a o Wallace went to the
undertaking parlors of Suhr & Co., on
Mission street, and notified them that he
was to undergo an operation at the French
Hospital, and that it was not possible lor
him to recover. He was a little nervous,
and wanted to make all arrangements for
the funeral, so tbat his friends would be
relieved of that trouble. He wanted the
undertakers to take charge of his funeral
ai>«l to have It as simple as possible.
He told the undertakers that he bad
been to see Mr. Gibson, the manager of
Oid Fellows' Cemetery, and had arranged
with him for the cremation of his body,
and tbat Gibson had sent him to them to
take charge of the remains and prepare
the body for cremation. He asked what
the charges would be for the undertakers'
services, and a pr cc was set at $75. He
said the money would be deposited with a
friend, a Mr. Burns, who had an office in
the Crocker buildim-.
The deceased had lived in San Francisco
for several years, and he was more or less
interested in mining. He went to Cripple
Creek during the fir>t outbreak of the ex
citement there, and became interested in
several mines, but they did not prove
very profitable.
He was well supplied with money, and
while in the city embarked in numerous
business enterprises with poor success.
Recently he has been doing nothing, and
his friends looked upon him as a man of I
leisure with sufficient funds to keep him
in moderate circumstances. His diary,
however, discloses the fact that all he had
left of his money was about $300, and it is
now believed that the loss of his income
was the cause of his act.
Wallace held for a time a position in a
Seattle bank as cashier, and previous to
that time he managed a bank in Guthrie,
O. T., and at another lime one in Albu
querque. It is said it was his money on
which the last two banks conducted their
business.
The dead man's diary shows that he
regularly for some months attended the
meetings of the Theosophical Society, and
tbat he was k-ei>in«» company with a
young woman whom he called Lizzie.
The funeral will take place on Monday
from Suhr's undertaking parlors, accord
ing to the plans the deceased arranged for.
NEW TO-SAT.
mm GATE CLOAK m mmm
.SILVERMAN BROS.
1230-1232 _^ ______ __:___? t_\TJ_____W_y.
HOI iriAV fllFT^ USEFUL — BEAUTIFUL.
lIWLIUrtI VJICI^ POPULAR PRICES.
EUR COLLARS and COLLARETTES in endless variety, the latest styles, prices $1 to $50.
C-Jf J__-th_
J__Wslfa*% KK^fe
%\m wm '
05.50 __-___-*_- _=_.___ SPECIAL &5.50.
100 FITCH COLLARETTES 95.50 SILK WAISTS, SILK UNDERSKIRTS, at
Good value at $10.00. lowest price-.
CHILDREN'S FUR SETS. .SOc, 91. 91.50, 93 ALL-WOOL MORREEN SKIRTS, extra wide.
M, " FKS 25c - 50 " *•"» 81 DRMSn^to-tfii^-s^VW^S,-,^
FEATHER BOAS, the genuine 93 to 930 popular puces.
Golden Gate Cloak and Suit w_m_-,_\JS __lSLL_i_--^
TURNER TO
FIGHT HIS
ENEMIES
The Real-Estate A^ent Sues
J. P. Frenna and Charges 2
Many Wrongs.
A GRAVE CONSPIRACY ALLEGED.
Weary of Prosecutions, He
Will Make Serious Counter
Allegations.
A HOT TIME PROMISED II COURT.
A Long Array of Witnesses Will
Testify Kegarding Land
Swindles.
A suit that promises to develop some of
the most sensational imaginable features
was filed in the Superior Court yesterday
afternoon. It i* the complaint of J. P.
Turner, the well-known real estate agent,
against Joseph P. Frenna. On its face it
is a simple claim for about $30,000, alleged
to be due on a note of hand, which is
secured by divers mortgages. In reality
it is supplemental to the suit of the same
plaintiff against Jacob Bertz for the sum
of $124,000. There is nothing on the face
of either complaint to show the fires that
promise to belch forth before the litiga
tion is ever.
According to the plaintiff, these suits
are the beginning of what promises to
make a long, bitter and interesting fight
for his own vindication against the grave
charges that have from time to time been
made against him in the criminal courts
of the State. He has already been cleared
of the charge of forgery, winning his case
in the Supreme Court. In a grand larceny
charge, based on the same facts the jury
disagreed in Judge Cook's court, and the
defendant is demanding that he be tried
again as soon as possible. He says he is
eager for the fray. On a perjury case,
growing out of the same facts, the case is
now on appeal to the Supreme Court. The
jury found the defendant guilty, but he
says he feels confident he will win.
Turner protests that he is innocent of
every chtrge made against him. He says
he is ready to show in the most positive
manner that he is .the victim of a con
spiracy by L. S. Magginson, Joseph P.
Frenna and Jacob Bertz, who are charged
with laying plans by which to place him
in the penitentiary and get from him
property of the value of more than half a
million dollars. Bertz is a money-lender
and restauiateur, while Frenna is a well
known barber at Sutter and Polk streets.
Magginson is a speculator and real estate
man.
Speaking of the matter last night Tur
ner said : "I have submitted the record of
my life to a syndicate of millionaires and
business men who have some business
with me. I have offered to show Chief
Lees a complete record of all my acts
from the day I first began business. lam
going into tnis fight to win. 1 have kept
away from the newspapers, lawyers, Chief
of Police and District Attorney and have
fought this conspiracy against odds since
181*4. Now 1 propose to show whether I
can fight. Someboily else may land in
the penitentiary before the whole thing is
over."
The suit filed yesterday alleges that
Frenna took a note and mortgage from
plaintiff for the sum of $24 000. collecting
the money and making no account there
for. He alleges that all the property thus
disposed of was deeded by him to defend
ant in trust.
KEW TO-DAT— DRY GOOD*.
' HANDKERCHIEFS!
An Elegant Stock.
LADIES' HEMSTITCHED AND INITIALED
HANDKERCHIEFS (pure linen)—
$1.00, $1.50, $2.25 and $3.00 per box.
Half dozen in box.
GENTS' HEMSTITCHED AND INITIALED HAND-
KERCHIEFS (pure linen)—
$1.50, $2.40 and $3.00 per box.
Half dozen in box.
LADIES' HAND-EMBROIDERED HANDKER-
CHIEFS, hemstitched and scalloped (sheer linen)
$1.50, $2.25 and $3.00 per box.
Half dozen in box.
GENTS' PURE LINEN HEMSTITCHED HAND-
KERCHIEFS—
$1.75, $2.25, .$3. $4, $0, $7 and $9 per dozen.
LADIES' PURE LINEN HEMSTITCHED HAND-
KERCHIEFS—
$1.20, $1.50, $2.25, $3.00 up .o $9.00 per dozen.
.LADIES' HAND-EMBROIDERED AND HEM-
STITCHED HANDKERCHIEFS (all pure linen),
in an immense variety of patterns, from —
Isc to $4.50 each.
We have also opened an elegant variety
of Ladies' Duchesse Lace Handkerchiefs,
Ladies' Novelty Neckwear, Gents' Silk
Mufflers, Gents' Silk Neckwear, and Gents'
Hemstitched and Initialed Silk Handker-
chiefs. '
SEE DISPLAY OF AEOVE GOODS IN OUR SHOW
WINDOWS.
XmS MAT A*
111. 113, 115,117, 119, 121 POST SThfici.
WE
CARRY
FURNITURE,
STOVES,
CARPETS, BEDDING, ETC.,
AT LOWEST FIGURES, LATEST STYLES.
CASH OK EASY PAYMENTS.
All honest people can have liberal
credit.
We have two acres of floor space
parked.
We carry everything needed in a home.
J. NOONAN
1017-1019-1021-1023 Mission St.
516-518-530-533 Minna, St.
Above Sixth.
Telephone, South 14. Open Evenings.
I DISSOLUTION
1 — of —
CO-PARTNERSHIP
FINE AND RARE
TURKISH RUGS
CARPETS, PORTIERES, ETC. I
AUCTION!
TO-MORROW
Monday, - - - Dec 6
At the Old Y.Tc? A. Building,
230 to 234 Sutter St.
The famous Slllc Rugs of the Turkish Rug Co.
will also be offered in thissale.
KASTON. ELDRIDjE _ CO., Auctioneers.
■f r _fm^ k "jar^^
IF YOU WEAR GLASSES
ArxAWisKp^fApt.rfficiv^StrVir.t by _b\i-
_l\_ v>-rV_9\J!> OPTICIANS t&ll <?r\ Vj>:.
642 Market ST.
' JIHDER CHRONICLE BUILDIN&.
REAL ESTATE
I AT AUCTION I
§ THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, |
W At 12 m., at Salesroom of ®
I A. £ SPECK & CO.. 602 Market St. 1
i Jo. I— Foreclosure Sale. i
S No. 1828 Flfteentn st: a 2-story house of _
>< 8 rooms and stable and tot 30 oy irregular ><
X depth of 100 leet; mortgage of $1200? ®
I Jo. Investment at 531 Dolores. §
® A cottage of 4 rooms and lot 26:6x110 <•)
(J) feet at 531 Dolores st., near High School. (§
IU 3— Probate Sale. §
McAUister-st. building lot: lot 27-6 by ®
ir egular depth of 100 fee:, on N. line of ®
McAllisiersu, 358 6- ._ feet _. of Willard. ®
® Jo. 4— Foreclosure Sale. ' i
@ Six elegant FLATS. 606 SHOT WELL $
S ST.; lot, 32x122 6-12 feet, with 6 elegant, X
9) weii-constracted flats. 4, 5 and 6 rooms X
Jy and bath each, renting for about *75- ®
Q? mortgage fSOuy. ' X
w Jo. Business Corner |
S At 219 Eleventh St.. bet. Howard and Foi- ?&_
W som; lot 23 4-12x92 6-12 feet, with im- _V)
9> provements of s-tora with 4 living rear 2 1
9> rooms and 7 rooms and bath flat; al-o §*'
9} nearly new house at 2 Bowie place; rents $
9> Jrs6. Qx)
| Jo. 6— Referee Sale |
S. On Ritch at. near Fourth and Bryant: S<
W. 'nd income property ; lot 50x75 feet, and ><
X improvements of store, 6 flats and 9 rear 2?
9J bouses; Income when all rented, JJ94. No >«
'*) reserve. >-ale subject to confirmation of ®
9) Probate Court. ®
| Jo. 7— Hayes Valley Investment. I
S 406 and 406 Vis Grove st.; lot 30x68 IV] 2 >
X feet, with improvements of 2 houses of 9 X
>< rooms and baih each, renting for $75- 55
« mortgage 55600, Uibernia Bank. ®
St Terms of Sale will be announced at anc- S
S • tion by - ■ «
® FRANK W. BUTTERFIELD, ®
® Auctioneer for A. JL SPECK & CO.. $
® 602 Market st. ®
|®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®® @®®®®®®®®
EASTERN PRICES
WILL HEREAFTER APPLY TO
CHAMPAGNE _
PALACE HOTEL
Pints, $2. Quarts, $3.90
k^H These tiny Capsules are superlcrt/
f\ 1 to Balsam of Copaiba, S^\f
' \l CubebsorlnjectionsandiMlLWi
Jtfj CUR£IN4BHOURSV_>^
i^ J the same diseases without!
>^ inconvenience.
7^ Sold by all druggist-.
NEW WESTERN HOTEL
KEARNY AND WASHINGTON STS* n».
JV modeled and renovated. KINO WAKn^m
European plan. Rooms 500 to *l 50 ocr d« Sx
to $6 per week. $8 to *30 per ___._,*_______•
hot and cold water every room- _J^ r ___.t_
•nty room elevator runi aUaa^it lumim **

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