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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 30, 1898, Image 5

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MERRITT TAKES CHARGE TO-DAY
MAJOR GENERAL, WESLEY MER
HITT, commander of the Ma
nila expeditionary force and Gov
• ernor General of the Philippines,
will move his headquarters from
• Palace Hotel to the Phelan building
i >-day.
lie and his staff will occupy the rooms
aye been the headquarters of Briga
dier General Elwell S. Otis, who will, this
morning, move with his staff to Camp
iond, where tented headquarters
been prepared for him.
Genera! Merritt will Issue an order to
day formally announcing that he has
taken command of tho Philippine forces
and expeditions.
GET WARM FOOD.
A Red Cross Meal Causes Vet-
erans From New Orleans
to Give Cheers.
Two regiments of United States infan
try, the Eighteenth and Twenty-third, ar
rived from New Orleans yesterday and
went into quarters close to General Otis'
h. -idQuartera at Camp Richmond.
i umpany A of the Battalion of Engi
numbering sixty men, in charge of
First Lieutenant C. P. Echols and Second
Lieutenant W. P. Connor, also arrived,
coming direct from Willits Point, New
York.
With the arrival of these troops all the
available space in the old Bay District
track, with the exception of two squares
immediately east and south of General
Otis' headquarters, are occupied by
troops. Tho • reservation of these two
blocks, while the First Montana has been
cTned to a. location north of Point Lo-
UU-. avenue, three blocks distant from the
main camp, and the two regiments from
the Dakotas will also go there, indicate
that more regulars are expected here in
the near future, though, so far as known,
none have been ordered to this point,
with the exception of the headquarters
and four troops of the Fourth Cavalry.
As these will in all probability be quar
tered at the Presidio, the chances are
that at least two more regiments of in
fantrj will be ordered here in the imme
diate future.
The Twenty-third Infantry, eight com
panies was the first to arrive, landing at
the Market street ferry at 11 "a. m. It
would not be just to compare them with
volunteers, but somehow even the women,
when they saw the men marching off the
boat, exclaimed:' "Those must be regu
lars!"•
Pt-rhaps the completeness of their out-
Jits aided somewhat in their recognition,
but that soldierly bearing that can only
bo acquired by long experience, was their
most distinctive feature. Even • the re
cruits—and there were many of them —
bore themselves differently from their
volunteer comrades who a month ago
v ere occupied on the farm, at the bench.
or in the office.
Bronzed by the Southern sun, under
■tthieh the regiment has been stationed for
eoine years, the men are a fine looking
k>t. Quickly they stacked their arms on
the dock and then marched into the head
quarters of the Red Cross Society with
tne determination to not leave anything
In the way of edibles for those who were
to follow. The ladies had been given am
ple notice of their coming, however, and
were fully prepared. Hot meat stew, cof
fee, sandwiches, bread and butter, fruits
and pastries of all kinds were heaped be
fore them, and officers and men were not
slow In getting down to work.
'•Have we done it?" asked a young lieu
tenant of a surpassingly pretty girl who
had kept his plate filled for half an -hour
spite his best efforts. As he spoke he
glanced around the big room and saw
the others fairly gasping from their ex
ertions, and all had called a halt.
"Done what?" asked tho pretty girl,
with a puzzled air.
• Eaten up everything from the Eight
eenth," replied the officer. "You see, re
ports of the work of you ladies reached
us on the road, and as we have a good
healthy lot of feeders in our regiment
and were ahead of the Eighteenth we i
thought we'd play a joke on the others |
by causing a famine in the Red Cross
Society betore they got here."
"Oh. is that it? Well, we're willing,
but you'll have to start in again, for you
* haven't began to reach the limit, of our
supplies yet. Have some more of tht
Btew, won't you?"
"No, 1 can't; really, I'm disappointed,
but I'll have to call it off. and 1 guess
the others will, too, judging by their ap
pearance."
The members of the Twenty-third were
disappointed at the failure of their joke,
but they were profoundly grateful to
their entertainers, who had supplied
th'«n w.th the first warm meal they had
eaten since they left New Orleans. After
the regimental band had played several
selections U.e entire command joined in
three enters -for the Red Cross Society,
: which -were repeated again and again.
Then they marched out to where their
arms and accoutrements had been stack
ed and were Boon on their way up Mar
ket F'ireet to camp, cheered by thousands
of people along the- route. *
The orncers on duty with the regiment
are as follows: Colonel, Samuel Over-
lieutenant-colonel, J. W. French;
assistant surgeon. Captain J. B. Clayton;
adjutant. First Lieutenant C. B. Haga
dorn; quartermaster. First Lieutenant
W. EL Sage; commissary, First Lieuten
ant T. F. Schley. Lieutenant Schley Is a
: on of the commodore in command of the
rlying squadron and was promoted from
second lieutenant last Saturday. :
Company Captain. G. A. Goodale;
second lieutenant. G. A. Goodale Jr.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
TELEPHONE GRANT 33 and 38.
222-224 SUTTER STREET.
SPECIAL
Monday— Tuesday —Wednesday
Seasonable goods for the
picnic and outing time.
BUTTER, choicest creamery, reg-
ularly 45c square 35c
PUREE DE FOIE GRAS, fine for
sandwiches, regularly 25c tin.. tin 2Oc
BOUILLON CAPSULES, Anker's.
A capsule dissolved in boiling
water makes a cupful of deli-
cious beef tea instantly; regu-
larly 30c— box of ten box 25c
MUSHROOMS, regularly, F. Le-
court brand, 25c tin; La Bor-
dier, 20c tin— now 1 r>c and 2Oc
HICKORY NUTS, regularly 15c
pound— now . ..3 It>s 25c
MAPLE SUGAR, new crop, very
fine, regularly 15c Ito ft>l2 1-2 c
SARDINES, Imported French, in
fine Olive oil, % tins, regular-
ly 12 V>c tin 3 for 25c
O. K. BOURBON WHISKY, the
old reliable, regularly $1 and $4..
3 botsB2
Gallon $3
10c STRAIGHT SIZE.
CALLE DE ORO, CLEAR HAVANA,
Better value than most 12% cigars.
Send for catalogue.
Goods packed and shipped free 100
miles.
;■*££& piii^i
way's Ready Relief for Spalnn, BruUw,
Bor* MubCle*. Cramp», Hums, Sunburn., Back-
ache, Hfadacho, Toothßchn. Rheumatism. Neu-
ulif'u. 1-umba*©. Internally for - all Bowel
Pains, Colio, Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Cholera
Mui-Jjuu and Biekne>E», Naus«i»- etc. All dru»-
■MM.
Company B— First Lieutenant R. R.
Stevens.
Company Captain, W. A. Nlcholls;
lirst lieutenant, E. P. Pendleton; second
lieutenant, F. W. Kobbe.
Company Captain. Lea Feblger; first
•lieutenant, ts. E. Morse; second lieuten
ant, C. E. Hampton.
Company E— Captain, E. B. Pratt; sec
ond lieutenants, Thomas Franklin and J.
M. Wheeler.
Company F— Captain, J. R. Clagett; first
lieutenant, J. R. M. Taylor; second lieu
tenant, — Kerth.
Company G— Captain, E. B. Bolton; sec
ond lieutenant, F. G. Stritzinger.
Company H— Captain, Stephen O'Con
nor; second lieutenant, H. G. Cole.
While the Twenty-third Infantry was at
breakfast, the company of engi
neers arrived and waited for a chance at
the tables. Their turn soon came, and
they made glad the hearts of the ladies
by their enthusiastic onslaught on the
commissariat. This company will proceed
to Manila with the second expedition for
the purpose of rebuilding the fortifica
tions at Cavite and Corrigidor and min
ing the entrance to the harbor as a safe
guard against an attack by Spanish war
ships.
The Eighteenth Infantry cam© In shortly
after noon and were bountifully provided
for as their predecessors had been, and
again the huge ferry building rang with
cheers for the Red Cross Society. The
ladies seemed to take particular pleasure
in showering attentions upon the regu
lars, and their favors were as keenly ap
preciated as they have been by any of the
volunteers.
Like the Twenty-third, the Eighteenth
Infantry is composed of eight companies,
averaging seventy men each, Several
hundred recruits will arrive from the
East in a few days when the two skeleton
companies in each regiment will be filled,
and two new companies organized, mak
ing them twelve company regiments. The
officers of the Eighteenth are as follows:
Colonel, D. D. Van Valzah; lieutenant
colonel, C. M. Bailey; major, Charles Kel
lar; assistant surgeon, ■ Captain Crosby;
adjutant. First Lieutenant F. D. Evans;
quartermaster. First Lieutenant T. W.
Griffith.
Company A— Captain, R. F. Bates; first
lieutenant, H. J. Hirsch; second lieuten
ant, W. F. Grote.
Company — Captain, C. R. Paul; first
lieutenant, G. W. Martin; second lieuten
ant, J. H. Lazelle.
Company C— Captain, O. B. Warwick;
second lieutenant, P. Whitworth.
Company D— Captain. C. B. Hinton; first
lieutenant, E. A. Lewis.
Company — Captain, W. B. Wheeler;
first lieutenant, E. E. Hatch; second lieu
tenant, A. S. Brookes.
Company F— Captain, C. H. Potter; sec
ond lieutenants, F. C. Bowles and M.
Baldwin.
Company G — Captain. W. T. Wood; sec
ond lieutenants, \V. S. Mcßroom and H.
B. Flak.
Company H— Captain, C. L, Steele.
The regiment started for the camp at
2 p. m., escorting the engineers, and In
a surprisingly short time after their bag
gage arrived all the regulars were snugly
under canvas.
SOLDIERS WILL PAY FARE.
Why Men at the Presidio De
cline the Union Street
Road's Offer.
There Is not a man In San Francisco
so thoroughly enthused over the good
work of the Red Cross Society as J. B.
Stetson, the millionaire merchant and
street railway magnate. Day after day
he spends many hours at the headquarters
at the ferry depot, cheering the ladies, the
arriving troops, the bands, and in fact
everybody and everything. Every time a
shout goes up Mr. Stetson's voice is
pitched above all the others; whenever
there is a waving of hats the shining
silk tile that adorns the merchant's head
swings higher and more frantically than
the rest.
And the California street cable road
waxes fatter each day on the scanty
nickels of the boys in blue.
Perhaps it is not Mr. Stetson's fault
that this condition still exists, but it does
exist, and the men at the Presidio, as I
shown by the following statement, are
loth to accept the generous offer of the
Union street line, while its ally reaps all
the profit.
The Union street road and the Hyde
street branch of the California street line
exchange transfers, and the only way by
which the men at the Presidio can reach
the center of the city is to transfer at
Union and Hyde to the California street
line.
The Union street road has issued an or
der that all soldiers in uniform shall rive
free, but of course it does not issue |
transfers to its connections. When the j
men board the Hyde street car they must
pay full fare and as they object to that
road receiving all the money at the ex
pense of the Union street line, they will
insist upon paying fare upon that road
until the other gives them permission to
ride free. When fare is paid and a trans
fer given, each road receives. 2% cents.
The communication- calling attention to
this condition is as follows:
Presidio, San Francisco, Hay 29.
To the Editor of The Call-Sir: On behalf
of the enlisted men stationed at this post,
regulars and volunteers. I wish to state that
while we are profoundly grateful to the Pre
sidio and Ferries Cable Company for having
extended to us the privilege of riding free on
Us cars, we feel that under the present condi
tions we would be doing it a great injustice to
accept its offer. Our only means of reaching
Market street is by that line to Hyde street
and transferring to the California street
tern, which lands us at O'Farrell and Mar-
Ret
At present we are charged full fare on the
latter road, after riding free on the Union
street line, and as the boys do not care to
have one company take it all, we shall Insist
upon paying our fare on the Union street cars
The men in the regular service do not mind
this but it is hard on the volunteers, who
have received no pay yet and in consequence
most of them are "broke." Those men have
never seen the objects of interest in San Fran
cisco and they could spend their leisure hours
in sight-seeing were they enabled to get down
town but as it is they must either walk or
remain close within their quarters.
Trusting that upon having its attention call
ed to this matter the California street company
will follow the example of the Union street
line at least =o far as the volunteers are con
corned, I am. respectfully. & MQRRKLI ,
Private, Battery I. Third U. S. Artillery.
SERVICES IN CAMP.
It Was Chaplain's Day Among
the Encamped Soldiers.
San Francisco went out to Camp Rich
mond yesterday. The thousands of vis
itors battled with great disadvantage
against the. wind and du.st. Despite this,
however, numberless curious and eager
people passed continuously through the
various camps.
The Sabbath was observed in nearly
all of the different regimental camps, and
in those in which no services were held
the soldiers were permitted to go to
church or to attend the service In some
neighboring camp. In the Seventh the
chaplain, Captain Clark, held service at
10 a. m. The companies were marched
into the regimental street, "where a short
service was read to them. The band
played "My Country. "Tis of Thee," and
the men sanj.. Chaplain Clark preached
from Proverbs, lv:2S, "Keep thy heart
with all diligence, for out of it are the
issues of life." He referred to the death
of Private Pruett, who died last week of
pneumonia, and alluded to Memorial day
and the heroic patriotism that its exer
cises commemorate. .__-_:.
Father Yorke, assisted by Father Mac-
Donald, held s< rvict-s in a tent erected at
the southeast corner of the Kansas camp
by the Sisters of the Holy Fair. The
League of the Cross Cadet Band ren
dered the music. Services were held in
the camp of the First Colorado by
Chaplain Fleming, and also in the First
Nebraska by Chaplain Moilly. The men
of the latter regiment were excused from
noon until retreat by Colonel Bratt, and
the boys all took advantage of the op
portunity to visit the various points of
interest about the camp.
The Kansas Regiment yesterday re
ceived a large amount of supplies from
the quartermaster's department, includ
ing shoes, shirts, socks and underwear.
The rustruments for the band have also
been purchased with the donations by
generous Kansas citizens and yesterday
the band played for the first time. Only
two cases of measles were reported yes
terday in the regiment, and these were
nuickiy quarantined.
Tnero art some cases of. measles in tn«
THE SAX FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, MAY 30, 1898.
fHE BRIGADE HOSPITAL AT CAMP RICHMOND.
Idaho x Attallon, but none of the men are
seriously sick.
Colonel Hawkins of the Tenth Penn
sylvania was notified yesterday of the
death of Private Collins of D Company.
Collins died at Mount Gretna, in Penn
sylvania. He contracted pneumonia when
th< regiment was encamped at Lebanon.
Private Mush, X Company, of the same
regiment, was taken to the French Hos
pital yesterday. He is ill with typhoid
fever.
The Thirteenth Minnesota received
some ordnance and other supplies yes
terday. There were reported two cbhwm
of measles In the regiment.
The Seventh Regiment also received its
ordnance and ammunition yesterday. The
regiment is now~completely equipped and
Colonel Berry is rr pared for Held ser
vice at a moments notice.
The Union League Club has extended
to all the commissioned officers of Camp
Richmond the courtesy of the club.
The concert by the band of the First
Colorado yesterday afternoon drew a
large crowd. National and sacred airs
were beautifully rendered.
MORAL FORCES ALERT.
The Christian Endeavor Union
Begins Good Work in
Camp.
The Christian Endeavorers have found
large numbers of their members among
the various Eastern regiments of volun
teers now at Camp Richmond. In one
of the Kansas companies forty out of the
eighty-three men belong to the organiza
tion and have formed a Christian En
deavor Society of their own. One of the
Minneapolis companies has thirteen young
men from one small Baptist church of
that city, headed by Sidney Pratt, sou
of Mayor Pratt of that city.
The California State Union has seized
the opportunity to institute a system of
reading and writing rooms in the camp,
where the men, regardless of religion,
(•reed or color, may gather to read or
write letters home. These tents are fur
nished with pen, ink, pencils, paper and
envelopes to be used free of charge, and
keep a supply of stamps and postal cards
on hand for sale.
General Merritt and General Otis have
sanctioned the plan and allowed space
in each regiment for the erection of tents.
The work is In direct charge of Misn Min
dora L. Berry. State superintendent of
missions, and she is ably assisted by a
large corps of workers from Golden Gate
Christian Endeavor Union. During the
day ladies will be in charge of the tents.
The tents may aIBO be used at certain
times for praise services if a desire is
expressed by the men for such at any
time.
The general headquarters have been es
tablished in the tt-nt of the Kanßas Regi
ment, but Monday will be transferred to
Scott & McCloud's warehouse, where the
citizens of San Francisco may send all
the reading matter they have at hand,
and it will be distributed from time to
time in the various regiments as needed.
There is a large demand for reading mat
ter by the ,90«W men now in camp, and it
will take large quantities to rill the de
mand.
The expense of this work will be con
siderable, but the State Union feels that
the demand is one not to be overlooked,
and the officers have no doubt but that
the local members and societies will give
freely to the work. A call will be issued
next week for contributions to be sent
to Miss Berry at 7«uA Harrison street.
Mrs. C. S. Wright has issued a call for
a mass meeting of Christian mothers, to
be held in the Endeavor headquarters
Tuesday at 2 p. m., to assist the young
people in their good work. The older
members of all the city churches are in
vited to attend and see the need and ap
preciation of the soldier boys for all of
the efforts being put forth in their behalf
by the citizens of California.
One of the surprising features of the
big army camp being established in the
city is the inability of book concerns to
supply the demands for cheap editions of
the New Testament. The demand has
been simply enormous. Not only in the
city, but from all over the State orders
are pouring in from dealers who have
numerous calls which they cannot supply.
At present it is said there are none to be
had in San Francisco.
The greater demand for these Testa
ments comes from the makers of the com
fort bags, as each of these has a Testa
ment along with the other useful articles,
and the cheap edition is desired, as they
take up less room and can be carried in
any pocket without the least inconveni
ence.
THE FIELD HOSPITAL.
Every Comfort and Attention
Provided for the Sick.
To-day will see the completion of the
big field hospital of Camp Richmond, and
it is about as nearly complete as any
field hospital can possibly be. The loca
tion is somewhat removed from the camp
proper, but there will be every facility
for attenumg to the sick. The hospital
is located just west of the Montana Regi
ment and is bounded by Point Loboa,
Jordan, Michigan and California avenues.
The hospital covers an entire square and
for the present it will be under the
charge of Captain Owen and Lieutenant
Page. U. S. A.
It has three large double hospital tents,
facing on Point Lobos avenue, that are
capable of accommodating forty men. To
the west of these is the chief steward's
tent, while to the east on Point Lobos
avenue is erected the medical officers'
headquarters. In the middle of the field
are the large conical tents that will hold
twenty men. There are fifteen of these
and they will be used for the lees serious
CASTORIA
For Infants and Children,
Thefio- sf __^ ,
elalla /y //*j, _ ■"* tow
Blgaatura A/^ jJ>(/ f &-?-#- ?■ eTn^
cases. On Jordan avenue Is the Isolation
tent for contagious cases, while two tents
have also been erected near this one to
be used for the measle cases, of which
there are now quite a number In the
camp.
The field hospital is well drained and
has an abundant supply of fresh water.
It Is well located with a view of drain
age and protection from tl» afternoon
wlndp, being protected largely by the
Geary-street cable shops. There will be
a detail of stewards from each regiment
to assist the Burgeons and no visitors will
be allowed access to the field.
SOLDIERS TO PARADE.
Seventh California and First
Colorado in Line To-day.
The Seventh California and First Col
orado Regiments will to-day participate
in tho Memorial day exercises. Colonels
Berry and Hale yesterday received the
following order:
Pursuant to the request of the Memorial
Day committee of the Grand Army of the
Republic, the First Colorado and Seventh Cali
fornia Regiments of the United States Volun
teers are directed to participate in the con
templated Memorial Day parade in this city
on Monday next, the 30th instant. The First
Colorado, Colonel Irving Hale commanding,
will report with his regiment at the Palace
Hotel on Market street at 9:30 a. m. of that
'.ay, when the necessary Instructions as to
place In line and route of march will be given.
The Seventh California, Colonel John R. Ber
ry commanding, , will form on Central avenue
and escort the members of General George H.
Thomas Post to the cemetery grounds. Time
of formation and line of march wni»ei.-nJonn
to requests already made by that post and
which have been duly communicated to him.
In accordance with the further request of
the same committee. Captain Richard W.
Young, commanding. the Utah regiment of light
artillery will fire a salute of twenty-one min
ute guns from or near the grounds where his
command Is encamped, between the hours of
11 a. m. and 1" o'clock p. m. On Monday next—
the definite time for firing the first gun will
be communicated to him by an officer con
nected ■ with the parade formation. By com
mand (ft Major General Otis.
'> . ■■ - THOMAS H. BARRY.
• -„-< , Assistant Adjutant General.
She other commands will not turn out
unless ordered to do so, although all of
them are willing to do honor to the na
tion's dead. The parade will form at the
Presidio gate on Central avenue and the
Seventh Regiment will leave camp at 9
o'clock.
CANNOT TELL. THE TRUTH.
The Examiner Taken to Task
by Utah Artillerists for Pub-
lishing a Yellow Fake.
The yellow Journal is at it again. After
publishing a blood-curdling fake on Sat
urday morning regarding the poisoning
of men in the First Nebraska Regiment,
yesterday it published an article regard
ing the distribution of a company fund
in the Light Utah Battalion in which the
facts were so distorted that the officers
and men of the battery are placed in the
position of being at loggerhends over th<>
division of the company fund, the men
mutinous, ill treated and half starved,
and the officers painted as unsympa
thetic and merciless autocrats.
The facts in the case are as follows:
The battalion left Salt Lake City with
a purse of $SOO raised by a committee for
the benefit of the men enlisted from that
city and county. Captains Young- and
Grant were empowered by the committee
to distribute the money equally among
ADVERTISEMENTS. '
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the two batteries for such men as it was
Intended. Saturday, at the suggestion of
Captain Young, the men held a meeting.
The captain submitted the proposition
that the money should be used as a com
pany fund and kept for cases of emer
gency, and that such men as were not
beneficiaries of the purse under the reso
lution of the committee should at the
next two pay days put in their pro rata
amount and all have an equal share in
the purse. The men. after considering
Captain Young's proposal, stated that
they would like to borrow the entire
purso and pay it back out of their money
at tho next two pay days. This Captain
Young refused to consider, as he was
empowered to disburse the purse as he
thought best, and he thought the men
would spend it for articles they really did
not need, and that the batteries would
be without funds when they left here.
However, he gave each man in his
company $3, and Captain Grant distrib
uted $2 among his men. There is no dis
satisfaction among the men and they are
well ted and have plenty of fresh meat.
This statement is made by The Call at
the request of Captains Young and Grant,
who desire that the truth may be known.
CALIFORNIA RANGERS.
The First Battalion Drilled and
Inspected on Van Ness
Avenue.
The Firßt Battalion of the California
Rangers was put through a number of
evolutions on Van Ness avenue yesterday
afternoon, and considering the fact that
they have Just been organized, they made
a most creditable showing. They are a
fine body of men and have been selected
for their horsemanship and marksman
ship. The four companies are In com
mand respectively of Captains Waller,
Lewis, Lockhart and Ross. After being
put through their evolutions they were in
spected by General Hart and Colonel
George W. Fox.
The "Second Battalion has Its headquar
ters at Healdsburg and the Third Bat
talion at San Luis Obispo. The regiment
could be mustered In for service in five
days, and as it has been recommended by
the California delegation General Hart
expects to receive orders from Washing
ton this week to have the regiment in
readiness for active service.
The Rangers will be really mounted
riflemen, and an effort will bo made to
haye them armed with the Lee rifle. They
will be serviceable as cavalry, artillery or
Infantry. Each company will consist of
1W men. Colonel Fox and most of the
officers of. the regiment have seen service
In the civil war.
A COLORADO KICK.
Yellow Journalism Gets That
. Regiment Mixed Up With
the Minnesotans.
The Editor of The Call: The Examiner
of Saturday morning stated that the Min
nesota Regiment would give a dress pa
rade that evening, the first ceremony of
the kind to be held In camp. This morn
ing it said "the dress parade of the Min
nesota Regiment was the feature of the
day," and highly praised the appearance
of the troops and execution of the move
ments and manual. The above state
ments are correct and very satisfactory
except that the word "Colorado* should
be substituted for "Minnesota, and it
should be explained that Instead of be
ing the first parade in camp It was merely
the regular parade given daily by the
Colorado Regiment since its arrival.
We are here for work, and not especi
ally seeking newspaper notoriety, but as
the Examiner saw fit to speak in such
complimentary terms of our parade, we
would like to have the above correction
made as a matter of justice and lnfor
.nation to the P^ bKAJ3Q pRIVATB .
War Incidents.
Major Choate. surgeon of the Seventh
California Regiment, was besieged by a
f callers yesterday, whom he enter
tained most delightfully in his quarters.
Among them was Mrs. Joseph Wolf skill
and her daughter, accompanied by the
Iflsaefl Talbott, Uutte Mont. Mrs. Wolfs
kin Ys from Los Angeles, where she holds
full sway in the social circles of that city,
and where her daughter is recognized as
one of the reigning belles.
With their usual patriotism and gener
osity, the ladies of the Hebrew Sewing
Society have espoused the cause of the
"boys in blue." and will meet on Tues
day and Wednesday, at Saratoga Hall,
and devote those entire days to the mak
ing of caps and bandages. The ladies
have unlimited material on hand and ex
pect to turn out many dozens of the need-
Axapanoe Tribe of the Improved Order
of Red Men has decided to pay the tribal
dues and assessments in the endowment
fund of any of its members who have
K one to the war or who may enlist. The
Improved Order of Red Men in this city
will establish a free reading room at
< '; inn Richmond for the benefit of the
volunteers, and the members of Arapa
hoe Tribe are taking an active part in
Union Council of the National Union,
at its meeting last Friday night, donated
$lv to the Red Cross Society, and the
membership was informed that any one
of the council going to the front will be
maintained in good standing while in the
service of the United States.
Excelsior Circle of the Companions of
the Forest of America on last Saturday
visited Camp Richmond and distributed
a large amount of food to the soldiers.
Mrs Julia Wishman. the chief compan
ion of the circle, distributed about fifty
pouches of tobacco, which the majority
of recipients appreciated much more than
pies and cakes.
Several of the fraternal societies who
are anxious to do something for the sol
diers who are going to the front have
asked "What is best to give?" The an
swer has been "<3lve the boys suspen
ders, plain, strong, serviceable ones, shoe
laces and patent snap buttons for trou
sers that are put on without sewing.
These are needful articles and will always
be handy."
Professor Charles F. Graeber and his
mandolin, guitar and banjo club of sixty
or more will volunteer their services in
aid of the Red Cross Society at any time
such may be needed.
In Memory of the Dead.
Last Thursday night the members of
Lincoln Relief Corps, auxiliary to the
Grand Army of the Republic, held memo
rial services In memory of their deceased
fellow-members— Mrs. Carrie L. Arm
strong and Mrs. Annie Luther, who
passed away during the year preceding.
There was a short Impressive service,
which included music by Dot S. Martin
and an address by Alice L. Staples, the
secretary.
Mrs. Armstrong, one of the membf«
who died, left two sons, one of whom ha^
since her death Joined the navy and is
now at the front.
The members of this corps will to-day
assist the Grand Army in arranging the
flowers for the decoration of the soldiers'
graves.
STREAM BROUGHT BACK.
Th© Thieving Watchmaker Safely
Landed in the City Prison.
Fred Stream, who a short time ago
stole a number of watches valued at sev
eral thousand dollars from Hammer
smith & Field, Jewelers, by whom he waa
employed, and who waa arrested in Ta
coma by a brother of Mr. Hammersmith,
arrived here last night on the steamer
Topeka and was turned over to Detec
tives Dillon and Crockett. He was taken
to the City Prison and booked on a
charge of grand larceny.
Stream was employed by the Jewelry
firm in the capacity of watch repairer.
During an evil moment he appropriated
the most costly watches which were in
his care and pawned them, realizing only
a small amount. With the proceeds of
his crime he went to Seattle, where- he
was traced by Charles Hammersmith.
Before the latter reached the Queen City
Stream, evidently knowing that he waa
being followed, took the steamer for Ta
coma. Hammersmith pursued him, final
ly overtaking him as he was about to dis
embark from the steamer. Stream offer
ed no objection when told that he would
ADVERTISEMENTS.
+■+«+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+■+»
CITY OF ijj| PARIS
DRY GOODS CO.
CURTAIN
DEPARTMENT, •
SECOND FLOOR.
Will offer TUESDAY, May 81st. a new lot of NOTTINGHAM CUR-
TAINS in fancy real lace effects, «.„-.«.
at.fel.so, JJt2.RO and #3.50 per pair.
Handsome line of CLUNY LACE CURTAINS, with laca Insertion and
edge, for $3.50 and upward per pair.
IRISH POINT CURTAINS In endless variety at ?5.00, 96.00, f 7.50
and upwards per pair.
Rich effects In REPP PORTIERES, in all the new colorings, at $3.50
per pair.
Special line of REPP PORTIERES, good valua for $7.60, on Bale at
$5.75 per pair.
Artistic drapery work of all kinds done at short notice and at reason-
able prices.
DRESSMAKING AND TAILOR-MADE SUTTS A SPECIALTY.
Don't fail to visit our ELEGANT MILLINERY DEPARTMENT.
CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS COMPANY,
S.E. Cor. Geary and Stockton Sts., S. F.,
UNION, SQUARE.
AMUSEMENTS.
COLUMBIA THEATER.
BEGINNING TO-NIGHT.
MATINEE SATURDAY. .
/ John H. Martin Presents MR. CLAY
CLEMENT
IN THE
NEW
DOMINION!
The exquisite charm of the play together with
Mr. Clement's unique characterization as well :
as THE EXCELLENCE OF THE COMPANY
serves to make this engagement memorable
as thedrama^^^^ SEASON,
June 13— THE FRAWLEY CO.
CALIFORNIA THEATER.
SPECIAL HOLIDAY. MATINEE TO-DAY .
The Grandest Vaudeville Organization Extant.
HOPKINS TRANS-OCEANIC STAR
SPECIALTY CO.,
Headed by Frank Gardner and his riding ba-
boon Jessie. Little Lulu, the great trapeze ar-
tist 10-OTHER BIG ACTS— IO.
Popular prices 15c. 25c and 50c. Matinee,
Wednesday. Saturday and Sunday.
SPECIAL " MATINEE TO-DAY (MONDAY). j
Parquet, Any Seat, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Children, !
»'.-.:■ 10c, Any Part. :
LEONID AS. ■ Dog and Cat Circus.
EZRA KENDALL. Humorist.
THE JOHNSONS. Xylophone Wonders.
LA -MONT 1 FAMILY, r Europe's -"Acrobats.
AL LEACH AND THE THREE ROSEBUDS.
CARROLL JOHNSON, Black-Face Comedian.
MANHATTAN COMEDY FOUR.
.X COLBY & WAY AND HARRY ALLISTER.
TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE.
Mrs. Ernestine Krellng. Proprietor and Manager
THIS EVENING.
■ The Brilliant Success,
The Musical Travesty.
"THE POSTER"
"IT ' MOVES— BREATHES."
VCU/ SCENERY,/ COSTUMES.
11 1- TV BALLETS. EFFECTS.
'"■-■- •'.! Lookout ' for : • '■•'■ '■■•■:■■ '■■•'•■■
"AN AMERICAN HERO," .
:!- . . * A New Comlo Opera, •
Popular * Pri0e5. .,.,".';, . . . ;v. ,J....;.,"..80, J . . ..;.,". .Bo and Wo
. No Telephone .:-;' •"v;^
have to accompany Hammersmith to this
city.
. They took passage on the steamer To
peka, arriving here last night.
Shortly after Stream disappeared from
this city the detectives recovered several
of the watches where they had been
pawned by the thieving watchmaker.
To-day they expect to get the others, as
they know where they were sold.
Stream readily admitted his guilt, and
attributed his downfall to his penchant
! for horse racing and liquor. He told tn«
detectives that he had pawned the most
valuable watch in Seattle, receiving a
small amount for it. The tickets for the
other watches which he pawned were
found in his possession.
BORNE TO THE CEMETERY.
Last Rites Over the Body of the Late
Mrs. F. M. Pixley.
All that is mortal of the late Mrs. Frank
M. Pixley was borne from her late resi
dence, at Fillmore and Union streets, yes
terday afternoon to the Odd Fellows'
Cemetery, where the body will be inciner
ated to-day. ■■ .. .
Notwithstanding the announcement that
the funeral was to be conducted privately
the quaint old residence was packed by
the many friends of the deceased.
Among those who were present to pay
their last respects to her memory were
Mrs. Leland Stanford. Mrs. John F. Swift,
Theodore Hittell. Judge F. W. Van Reyne
gom Police Commissioner Alvord and
Mrs. Alvord, Dr. Powers, Detective Har
per Dr. S. S. Kahn. Mrs. F. W. Van
Reynegom and the Misses Van Reyne
gom and H. G. M. Curtis.
The front parlor where the body lay
was filled by a collection of the choicest
flowers. The short and simple service of
the High Episcopal Church was performed
by Rev. Mr. Parrish of the Church
of the Virgin. At the conclusion of the
service the body was borne to the hearse
by J. W. Allyne, C. V. Meyerstein, E P.
Staton, Robert Harrison, Kenneth Mel
rose and Joseph Clark, who acted as pall
bearers. ..
Out of respect to the memory or the
late Frank M. Prxley a delegation of
Chinese merchants attended the funeral
and followed the remains to the cemetery-
Cruelty to a Cat.
Walter Flanders, & painter, was ar
rested on Taylor street yesterday by
Policeman W. Coleman on a charge of
cruelty to animals. It la alleged that
Flanders dashed a cat on the Bldewalk,
killing it.
AMUSEMENTS.
MOROSCO'S GRAND OPERA-HOUSE
Walter Morosco, Sole Lessee and Manager.
Evening Prices— loc, 25c and 50c. *
Regular Matinee* Saturday . and Sunday. •
GRAND HOLIDAY MATINEE TO-
DAY AT 2 P. M.
First Appearanc* of the Well Known Eastern
ACt °GEORGE P. WEBSTER,
In a magnificent spectacular production of
the Great Scenic Marine Melodrama. . • :
THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA!
Powerful Plot, Gorgeous Effects, Strong Cast. '
CPP Exciting Fight With a Devil Fish
— ' *— '*—* at the Bottom of the Ocean.
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
ALCAZAR SEATS BY
A I CvAX/AhC PHONE,
r\i^\^r\i^r%r\, main 254.
MATINEE TO-DAY AT 2. •
TO-NIGHT AND ENTIRE WEEK. *
First Time in This City,
THE MASTER OF CEREMONIES I •
LEWIS MORRISON
' In His Original Creation.
Prices....'. ........ ... ..loc, 25c, 35c, Wo
Next Week— "A CELEBRATED CASE."
MOTHERS, SISTERS, " SWEET-
HEARTS AND WIVES, •
• See Your Gallant Heroes
DEPARTING ON THE PEKING
AS ' SHOWN BY THE ANIMATOSCOPE
EVERY AFTERNOON. AND EVENING
AT THE CHUTES.
SOLDIERS IN UNIFORM ALWAYS ; FREE ! '{;
10c to All, Including Zo . etc.; Children, Sun-
\ days and Holidays. 10c.
' fif VMDIA I Corner of.Mison and
ULllUr-lH 1 . Edd/ StrMU _
More soul-inspiring war scenes, new life pic-
tures •by the Biograph, ■ Captain Sigsbee and
Staff, United States and Spanish troops. -. bat-
tleships, torpedo , boats and thrilling Havana
scenes, and a strong olio of ten Great Special-
ties. . Admission free. „. ' ..: *.-.: : ■
SUTRO BATHS.
OPEN NIGHTS.
Open Dally from 7 a. m. until , 11 p. m.
ADMISSION lOc - - - CHILDREN So
Bathing, with admission." 23c; children, 20c,
BASEBALL— feE CREATION PARK,
Eighth and Harrison Streets. •
I PACIFIC COAST ;^BASEBALL \ LEAGUE ;
l"'. ■-.■.-,-■ TO-DAY AT 2:15 P. M. ; .
-;- $300 Crt- SIDE.
—ATHLETICS VS. SAN FRANCIBCO— .
1 > : ; Admission 25c; ■ Children. 10?; Ladies - iro*.
5

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