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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, July 06, 1898, Image 1

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VOLUME LXXXIV.-NO. 36.
LINARES MAY APPLY THE
TORCH TO THE DOOMED CITY
THREATENS
TO DESTROY
SANTIAGO
Says He Prefers to Burn
the City Rather Than
Surrender.
Refugees Declare the Span
ish Soldiers Are Dis
heartened and Ready
to Give Up.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 5.
General Linares, in command of
the Spanish forces in Santiago.
will not surrender to General
Sliafter, according to statements
made by refugees who arrived
here from Santiago to-day.
"] shall burn the city to the
ground first," they quote General
Linares as having declared.
Since the effects of the fierce Ameri
can attack bec;.me known in the city
the residents and nearly all the soldiers
have lieon strongly in favor of surren
dering before the Americans can be
gin a bombardment.
Blxty-three refugees were brought
from Santiago on the British men-of
war Alert and Pallas, and seventy
Others on the Austrian warship Maria
Teresa. The » • :if> fat the wharf vhen
the refugees wcro landing was graphic,
many persons having gathered to learn
trK' latost news from the beleaguered
city.
When the refugees left Santiago the
American troops were within 300 yards
of the barbed wire fences, just outside
of the city lines, and the Archbishop of
Santiago had appealed to the comman
rii-r to surrender rather than be sub
jected to bombardment. General Li
nares, although In great pain. from the
injury to his arm, and compelled to
depend for support upon General Taral,
absolutely refused, to comply with the
Archbishop's request. He emphasized
his refusal, I am told by several of
to-day's arrivals from Santiago, by de
claring that he would burn the city be
fore he would permit.it to fall into the
hands of Americans. The Spanish
troops had been greatly reduced in
numbers just prior to the arrival of
General Pando's reinforcements.
The refugees declare that Linares
had only 4000 regulars and 200 volun
teers left with which to defend the
city. Several thousand of his men had
been killed or wounded, and Admiral
Orvera was no longer aiding with his
fleet. The enemy's troops were much
depressed over these conditions, and
their spirits were further lowered by
the wounding of General Linares, and
the death of General Vara del Rey,
Who succeeded General Linares in com
mand of the troops at the front.
If the Spanish troops could have their
•way, I am told, they would surrender
to General Shafter forthwith. The ref
ugees generally agreed that the city
would be surrendered, but the Spanish
leaders showed' no. lnclination to adopt
that course. General Pando's arrival
with 7000 additional troops, by the lat
est information here, places the total
strength of the Spanish In Santiago at
only a little more than 11,000.
Only two houses in the city of San
tiago had been destroyed by the Ameri
can fire up to the time the refugees left
for Kingston, but .the Spanish ship
Trafalgar, Which was lying in the har
bor, had been sunk by a shell. Two
men were killed and five wounded. One
woman was kilfed. by the firing on the
city. The refugees, left Santiago in
l>'>ats, being allowed to take no bag
gage. CrAwds surrounded the con
sulates *n the beleaguered city, praying
for permits to leave.
Flour is ri.ot obtainable in Santiago,
beef costs $1 40 a pound, rice 50 cents
a pound and lard $1 a bottle. Refugees
pay they paw many persons lying on
tlif plaza of Santiago dying of starva
tion. ■' •
It was announced officially in Santi
ago during the American attack on
Saturday that Admiral Camara's fleet
had bombarded Key. West.
SAMPSON PLANNED
CERVERA'S CAPTURE
Expecting a Dash to Escape, He Had
Given Orders to Cover Every
Contingency.
NEW YORK, July s.— The Washing
ton correspondent of the Herald tele
graphs: I learn to-night that Rear
Admiral Sampson had not only so dis
posed of bis fleet in front of Santiago
de Cuba bb to best meet any attempt
of the enemy to get out and given or
ders which resulted in every ship be
ing constantly ready for battle, but In
anticipation of Juat ouch a dash out of
The San Francisco Call
CEUTA, WHICH MOY BE COMMODORE WATSON'S BASE OF OPERATIONS WHEN HE MfJKES HIS RAID ON THE COAST OF SPfllN. CEUTO IS ON
A PENINSULA ON THE AFRICAN COAST AND OPPOSITE GIBRALTAR, WHICH IS DISTANT SEVENTEEN MILES.
CREDIT IS DUE
TO BOTH SCHLEY
AND SAMPSON
How It Should Be Divided Between
Them Official Reports Will
Determine.
NEW YORK, July 5. — A Washington special to the Herald says:
Until Rear Admiral Sampson's official report of the batiLg of Santiago
has been received if will be in.j" rmine In .v the credit for
the admirable work done by the American fleet in destroying Admiral
('ervera's ships should be divided between the admiral and the second
in command. Commodore Sehley.
Unfortunately for ,Admiral Sampson he happened to be absent from
the fleet to attend a conference with Major General Shafter at the
time when the Spanish ships left Santiago harbor, and he did not get
back in time to take charge of the first part of the fight, which was, con
sequently, conducted under ordors of Commodore Schley.
This being the case, some persons who have been impatient with
Rear Admiral Sampson for some time because he did not run his fleet
into Santiago harbor in the face of the land batteries and Cervera's
fleet and through the mined channel have hastened to give Commodore
Schley all the credit for the victory.
The Secretary and officials of the Navy Department are confident
that when Admiral Sampson submits his official report he will give
Commodore Schley full credit for his prompt work in getting the ships
of the fleet into action against the Spaniards. He will also give due
credit to all the officers and men who especiallydistinguished themselves
in the fight. Incidentally this report will indicate the part Admiral
Sampson personally took In the fight.
Upon one point all are agreed. That is that Commodore Schley and
the commanding officers of the several ships handled the fleet and its
individual fighting units in a manner that could not have been im
proved upon, and that they are entitled to all the praise that Admiral
Sampson will doubtless give them in his report and to such recognition
as Congress may see fit to bestow upon them.
the harbor as actually was made he
had, soon after his arrival, mapped out
a careful plan to meet it. In this plan
the part that was to be played by each
ship In every contingency that could
be foreseen was laid down and each
commanding officer was given instruc
tions as to what he was expected to do.
When the contingency which Admiral
Sampson had foreseen arrived there
was little time for Commodore Schley
to give orders, but he and the captains
of the ships promptly realized the sit
uation and carried out the plans of the
admiral with such changes as the ac
tions of the Spanish ships made neces
sary.
COMBINED ATTACK
ON MORRO CASTLE
Forces of Shafter and Sampson Will
. Make a Joint Assault
To-Day.
tion It Is confidently expected by the
administration that a combined attack
on Morro Castle will be made to-mor
row by the .forces under command of
Major General Rhafter and Rear Admi
ral Sampson.
CERVERA'S OFFICERS
WERE NOT UNANIMOUS
Minority of Them Sightly Thought
the Destruction of the Spanish
Fleet Certain.
Copyrighted. 1898. by the Associated Press.
OFF SANTIAGO DE CUBA, July 4
(via Port Antonio. Jamaica, July 5, per
the Associated Press dispatch boat
Cynthia 11, via Kingston, Jamaica,
July s).— Admiral Cervera held a con
sultation with his officers before sailing
out of the harbor of Santiago de Cuba,
and by a small majority the move was
agreed upon. The minority said that
destruction was sure, as many of the
firemen had mutinied and the best men
in the fleet werft worn out hy serving
the guns in the shore batteries. Early
on the morning of the sortie careful
observations were taken of the sea
east and west. Admiral Cervera de
cided upon taking the westward course,
with Manzanillo, Olenfuegos, or, if pos
sibel, Havana the port to be reached.
He would have gone east but for the
SAN FKANCISCO, M r EDNESDAY, JULY 6, 1898.
sighting of a large transport fleet off
Siboney and the assurance that a con
voy of war vessels was still with the
transports.
As a matter of fact, there is no war
vessel largr-r than a converted yacht,
except the New York, that could have
obstructed Admiral Cervera's escape
eastward. Naval men here are sure
that the Spanish vessels could have
disabled or sunk the New York and
escaped had the eastward course been
chosen.
It Is claimed that one shell killed 100
men on the Vizc-aya, raking the vessel
fore and aft.
RENEWED EFFORTS
TO EXCHANGE HOBSON
Navy Department Willing to Surren
der an Officer of Higher Grado
to Secure His Release.
NEW YORK, July s.— The Washlng
HOSPITAL AT SANTIAGO IN WHICH HOBSON IS CONFINED.
ton correspondent of the Herald tele
graphs: There is a possibility that be
fore the Spanish sailors are sent north
something will be done looking to the
exchange of Hobson and the men un
der his command for some of the ' Off
icers who were on board the Spanish
warships. Assistant Naval Construc
tor Hobson has the rank of lieutenant
of the junior grade, and under the rules
of civilized warfare he should be ex
changed for an officer of equal rank.
The department, however, is willing to
waive the 'question of rank, and will
give an officer of . the grade of com
mander, or of captain, if necessary, to
obtain an exchange of the American
heroes.
It is not believed the Spanish will
surrender Hobson and. the., men with
him at this time on account of the
knowledge they have of Santiago's de
fenses. This was the plea made by
the Spanish Government, several week*
ago when ii. announced that It must
decline to exchange the Americans.
The authorities, have not V forgotten
Hbbson and the others of the Merrimac,
and propose to do everything possible
to effect their release 1 as speedily as
possible. ■ ■' '■'■-'■'.'_ '-'•■ ; ■ :
CONSULS DEMAND THAT
THE CITY SURRENDER
Spfftal cable to The Call and the New York
Herald, <v>pyrighted, IS9B, by James Gor
don TJennett.
KINGSTON, Jamaica. July s.— News
has reached here that after General
Taral, the Spanish commander at San
tiago, had refused to comply with Gen
eral Shafter's second demand for the
surrender of the city the foreign con
suls in Santiago united in a demand
that there be a cessation of hostilities
until the 30,000 foreigners in the city
could be removed from danger. It was
their intention to take these people out
p.nd put them under tlie protection of
the United States. The American com
mander declined to comply with this
demand, and told the consuls that they
should insist on the surrender of the
city. The consuls had another confer
ence and decided to act on this advice.
A formal demand has now been served
by the consuls and they are waiting
the reply of the Spaniards.
CAPTAIN OF OQUENDO
COMMITTED SUICIDE
Special onhlo to The Call and the New
York Herald. ('■■pyrlKhted, 1898, by
James Gordon Bennett.
ON BOARD THE CALL
HERALD DISPATCH BOAT
SOMMERS N. SMITH, July
4- (via Kingston, Jamaica,
July s.)— The captain of the
Almirante Oquendo commit
ted suicide after the loss of
his vessel. This gave rise to
the report that Admiral Cer
vera had killed himself.
CERVERA TALKS
FOR THE CALL
AND HERALD
Defeated Admiral Says {-^Orders
to Leave Santiago l-jarbor
Came prom Madrid.
Special Cable to The Cull nnd tbe BTevr York Herald. Copyrighted, 1898,
by «l!».i>i"« Gordon l!cnn< ?t.
ON BOARD THE CAIL-HERALD DISPATCH-BOAT SOMMERS
N. SMITH, WITH THE FLEET, July 4, via Kingston, Jamaica, July
5. — I have just had an interview with Admiral Cervera, who received
me very courteously. He said:
"I wish to present my compliments to The Call and Herald. I do
not wish to- make a statement at present, although I am deeply sen
sible of the generous treatment accorded to myself and to my men by
the American sailors, from the rear admiral down to the officers of his
fleet.
"I received orders twice from Madrid to leave Santiago harbor and
go to Havana, and fully realized the difficulties that beset my path,
but the honor of the Spanish navy demanded of me that the move
ment be made and I gave the order for my fleet to dash forth to al
most certain destruction."
Lieutenant Juan Aruar, third officer of the cruiser Infanta Maria
Teresa, dictated the following statement:
"We staked all on the chance of catching the American fleet nap
ping and we have lost. Our fleet has been wiped out and Spain's naval
power is suddenly shattered. That is the situation which Spain must
face. The war eanoot be continued with any hope of success. We
have done our best, but we have been overcome by a superior force.
"Admiral Cervera decided last Wednesday to ieave Santiago in
obedience to instructions received from Madrid, which ordered him to
proceed to Havana in order to assist in the defense of that city. The
fleet accordingly coaled and provisioned and the men ashore were re
called."
CUBANS CAPTURED
AND BURNED CABANAS
But They l_ade a Bad Mistake in
Firing on the Body of a Dead
Spanish Officer.
Special cable to The fall and the New York
HothM. Copyrighted, IS9S, by James Gor
don Bennett.
ON BOARD THE CALL-HERALD
DISPATCH BOAT SOMMERS N.
SMITH, OFF SANTIAGO, July 4 (via
Kingston, Jamaica, July 5). — The Cu
bans who have been acting under Ma
jor-General Shafter's orders since his
arrival burned Cabanas to-day, defeat
ing the Spanish garrison. They are
marching now toward Santiago along
the western coast of the bay.
After Admiral Cervera's fleet had
been destroyed the body of a handsome
Spanish officer drifted between the aux
iliary gunboat Gloucester and the
shore. It was lashed to a spar and the
face was upturned. The Cubans on
shore fired at it, whereupon Lieutenant
Commander Richard Wainwright of
the Gloucester, who had so gallantly
fought the whole of Cervera's fleet the
day before, fired blank shots in their
direction. Then he shouted through
the megaphone '"I will use six pounders
on you if you do not stop firing on that
body." The Cubans fled through the
bushes.
When I asked Captain Robley D.
Evans of the lowa what he thought of
Sunday's battle, he said: "God and
gunners were on our side."
GRACEFUL COURTESY
EXTENDED. CERVERA
In Fact, All the Captured Naval Offi-
cers May Send Messages to
Spain.
WASHINGTON, July 5.— A graceful
courtesy was to-day extended to the
captured Spanish admiral, Cervera, by
the President. Through General Gree
ley, chief signal officer, permission was
sent to Cervera to communicate with
his family in Spain by cable. Permis
sion was also granted to other cap
tured Spanish officers to use the cable
to transmit personal messages to
friends in Spain. The messages will be,
of course< carefully censored and noth
ing will be allowed to pass that would
be of assistance in any manner to the
enemy.
GENERAL MILES WILL
STAY IN WASHINGTON
Remains at the Capital in Order to
Organize the Porto Rico
Expedition.
NEW YORK, July 5.— A Washington
special to the Herald says: General
Miles, it is now positively said at the
War Department, will not go to Santi
ago. Again the authorities have gone
back to the plan for the general com
manding the United States army to re
main here in order to organize the
Porto Rico p^nedition. The time for the
sailing of this. however, is not stated
for the Santiago expedition will be
given the right of way.
HOW CERVERA'S MEN
FARED ON THE LAND
MADRID, July s.— An official dis
patch from Havana says that in the
fight of July 2, three men were killed
and seven wounded on board the Reina
Mercedes. Of the troops disembarked
by Admiral Cervera, seventy-one were
rendered hora de combat.
PEICE FIVE CENTS.
OUR SHIPS
WILL ENTER
THE HARBOR
Sampson and Shatter to'
Join in Bombarding
Santiago.
Plans of tile Attack Left
Entirely to the Decision
of the Two Com- ;^
manders.
WASHINGTON, July s.— As a result (
of the Cabinet meeting: to-day instruc
tions-were sent by the President tn Ad
miral Sampson and General Shaffer to
confer together concerning: a,.- joint plan
of attack upon the city. Upon the out
come of this conference depends the
line of action for the immediate future. v
For the present the land bombardment
by General Shafter's forces has been
deferred, as the situation is so com
pletely changed by the annihilation of
the Spanish fleet that is is manifestly
the part of -wisdom for this land bom
bardment to await the co-operation
and support of a bombardment from
Admiral Sampson's fleet.
General Shafter's demand for ihe sur
render of Santiago, on pain of bom
bardment, was made at 8:30 Sunday .
morning. An hour later Admiral (er
vera made his suicidal dash from the
harbor, resulting in a complet? trans
formation o f the naval anl military
conditions. Instead of a menacing ..
Spanish fleet within the harbor, * In
way has been cleared, save for the
fhrre batteries, for the entrance of the
Americas fleet up to the very wharves
of the city With this matenal ch£<ng,e
wrought it was obvious to the autr.o; i
ties bore that the blow first intend*'! to
be delivered by General Shaftor aJcne
woulu be duubly effective and decisive •■
If the two iorces could be brought tr.
gether and strike simultaneously from .
land and sea.
■ It is for this reason that the confer- .
ence between the American general and
the admiral was called. Up to the close
of office hours to-day no word had come
either to the War or Navy Department;
so far as was disclosed, as to what de
termination had been reached at the
conference. At the same time it Is the
expectation of the authorities that the
conference will result in' a determina
tion by the admiral to take his fleet
through the narrow neck of the harbor, .
making his way past the shore bat
teries and fortifications, and take posi
tion before the city for bombardment.
There is reason to believe that the in
structions sent to Admiral Sampson at
least conveyed the desire, if not the
order, that he enter the harbor. But
it is said that the admiral and the gen r
eral continue to be the supreme officials
in authority, and that, being on the : .
scene, fully alive to all the conditions,
their judgment will be taken as filial in
the course to be adopted.
There is said to be no obstacle, so far
as navigation is concerned, to the. en- .
trance of the harbor by the American
fleet. The Cristobal Colon, which
cleared the Merrimae and got out of. .
the harbor on Sunday, drew 23 feet 3
inches, which is within seven inches of
the draft of the battle-ships lowa, In
diana, Massachusetts and Oregon, and
is greater than the draft of the battle
ship Texas. Moreover, the Navy De
partment has known for the last ten
days that the neck of the channel was"
open, despite the sinking of the Merri- ;
mac, and that there was a clear seaway
of seven fathoms, through which any'
ship in our navy could sail. This re
moves all difficulty, except from sub-'.
marine mines, or from the shore bat
teries.
As to the mines, little account Is
taken of them, since the Spanish fleet
passed over them. The Spaniards are
in the habit of using contact mines, so
that there is little likelihood of there
being mines operated by electric con
nection with the shore. .
The forts and batteries have been
badly weakened by the constant fire
of the fleet for many weeks past, an*
while still a factor, they are greatlj>
disabled.
Once up to the city the fleet :.nd army
could combine in a terrific double fire.
No less than 292 heavy Runs would be
trained from the American warships on
the city and at the same time the big
siege guns, which, it is expected, have
been brought to the front of Shatter's
line, would rain down a torrent of steel
from that quarter. The siege guns
throw shells of 135 pounds. Aside from
them there are four modern howitzers,
with guns of a smaller caliber. These
are in the heavy artillery, while the
light artillery embraces a great number
of guns of .2 caliber. Combined this
fire from land and sea would be "terrific
in its effect.
The action of the foreign represents- .
tives at Santiago has been an additional
reason for deferring the bombardment.
It was made known late to-day that
one of General^ Shafter's dispatches
stated that these represeatatives ha.4

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