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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 27, 1899, Image 9

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GEN. JAMES F. SMITH
WRITES TO THE MAYOR
Review of Past and Present Con
ditions in the Islands.
Philippines a Land Rich in Natural Wealth
and Resources Natives Not to
Be Depended On.
MAYOR PHELAX is in receipt of
an interesting letter from Gen
oral James P. Smith, who is at
present in command of the
United States forces in the
Island of Xegros, P. L The letter deals
■with the conditions now existing in the
newly acquired territory and besides
being instructive is particularly inter
esting to Californlans when considered
in the light of the future intimate re
lation?, business and social, that will
prevsiil between this State and the
Phili£9ises. Following is the letter in
full: '
Headquarters, Sub-military District of
the Isle of Negros, Bacolod, P. L, April
11, 1579.
Hon. James D. Phelan, San Francisco —
Dear Friend: I must apologize to you
sincerely for failure to suitably acknowl
edge up to this time the many courtesies
and kindnesses which you have unremit
tingly extended to this regiment md to
myself. My only plea in mitigation is
that the excitement of campaigning,
changes from one station to another and
routine, and detail work involved my pri
vale correspondence in such confusion
that up to this time 1 have failed to meet
the obligation due both to friendship and
to courtesy.
I have received many letters from
friends and relatives of some of the boys
< f the regiment, asking me to secure
their discharge from the service. To
many 1 have explained that the power
to discharge those unlisted in the service
does DOC reside with me save upon ex
piration of term of enlistment. Many of
those who have commimic-aied with me
on the- subject, however, have not been
answered, as owing to my departure to
the island of Xegros 1 was compelled to
leave much of my correspondence in Mi
nila. Will you be kind enough to have it
announced that such applications must
be : .it- by the enlisted men to the Secre
tary of Wax. through military channels,
a.nd thai until a suitable force of regulars
is on the. ground ready to lake the place
of volunteers it is not likely that such
applications will receive favorable con
sideration unless the enlisted man be so
disabled as to be Unable to perform mill
tary duly.
1 have noticed that some of the papers
have expr«%sed dissatisfaction that 1 have
not ta.kt_n some steps to have the regiment
sent home. That course was not open to
me. inasmuch as every man in the regi
ment pledged his service to the Govern
ment lor two years. Of course there was
a mo: obligatiun on the Government to
dispense with the volunteers as soon as
the necessities of the case would permit,
but for my part 1 felt that the conclusion
of peace with Spain would not be an end
cf the trouble. 1 have always believed
from the very first that the conflict with
Aguinaldo and his ambitious leaders must
comt, and thai neither diplomacy, kind
treatment nor guarantees of any kind
could avert it. From 1 ■'■• time of our
arrival in Luzon on the 30th day of June
to the present hour not one act of kind
ness on the part of AguinaJdo to the army
can be shown as an earnest of his good
will toward the United States. On the
contrary, everything that could bo done
to annoy, harass and embarrass the op
era lions of the. American land forces was
done. With this state, of the case con
sULnllv before my eyes and knowing that
two independent armies could not long
claim jurisdiction over th( same territory
without a collision, I could not well put
the regiment in a. discreditable position
by asking thai it be sent home- when al
most iU. any moment active service might
begin. In that opinion 1 have always felt
1 have had the support of an overwhelm
ing majority in the regiment. I am cer
tain that when the Government has no
further use for their services they will
f>f nd the volunteers to the homes and oc
cupations to which they have been ac
customed, and no one prays more devout
ly for the speedy arrival of that hour
than l do, but the country is the best
judge of the time when our service - can
be dispensed with, and to that judgment
we must obediently submit.
Rumors have come to me from the
United States by private correspondence
and otherwise that I am being out in j
training for some political office. This, in
justice to myself. i cannot permit. I vol
unteered, as did all the others of the
regiment, from no selfish motive, and I
cannot by my conduct give justification
fur the statement, that my service has
been actuated or induced by any other
motive. At present 1 feel that I enjoy the
good will of all the citizens of my State;
not for what I have done, but by reason
of what the regiment has accomplished.
and 1 do not propose to create any other
feeling through the medium of a politi
cad campaign or to take advantage of a
sentiment which belongs to the regiment,
a_n4 not to me.
My out; ambition In life to see active
service has b*-en gratified, and 1 .shall be,
perfectly content to return when the war
[a over to the peaceful pursuits of civil
life, where I may without dispute retain
the friendship and reaped of all my fel
low citize.ns regardless of party or politi
cal affiliations.
Of the Philippine Islands much has been
said in the columns of the papers and
much In the magazine articles concern-
Ing tb«tr beauty and resources, but
they mast be seen to be ap
preciated- The soil is inexhaustibly fer
tile and produces sugar cane, coffee, to
bacco hemp, rice, the ' cacao bean from
which chocolate is made and the fiber of
the ptna and jusi cloth. In th- interior
of ail the islands is to be found great
forests of valuable woods untouched by
the hand of man. Of it 3 mines but little
Is known, save thai coal beds are a cer
tainty and of a great extent. Many ex
perts assert, however, that the coal is
what might more properly be called lig
nite-. Some gold has been found in the
beds of the rivers, and it is said that
there are rich stores of th« valuable metal
in Luzon and Mindanao. .
These tale* of rich gold deposits lack
confirmation, save in the particular that
gold is to be found, but where and in
what quantities has not been definitely
determined. With all its agricultural re
fconrces, wealth of valnable woods, stores
of ecu) and probably gold. 300 years of
Spanish rule has brought about but little
of devclopmtTU and nothing of the nat
ural progress which such resources would
seem to jusiifj-. Spain, as far as her civil
and military administration was con
cerned, appears to have confined her ef
forts to the territory in the vicinity of
the. coast line. Vast •-. •- of territory
in the interior were ]»-ft practically un
der the independent control of the' na
tive tribes and rupees who. with the ex
ception of the missionaries; seldom saw
a Spaniard, and so the development of
the interior has riot been .in proportion
to the resourres, and little development
made can be attributed wholly to the mis
sionaries.
Rice and cane fields are cultivated with
a wooden plow. Cr<-a»s axe out with a
wishbone, ha vice a. rude knifu lixed in
one of the arms. The rice is separated
from the husk by striking it in a wooden
bowl with a long stick and is winnowed
by the slight breezes that sometimes blow
in the Philippines. The sugar cane is J
crashed beneath rude rollers, trodden out !
•with the feet, boiled In funny vats and :
finally resolved Into crude brown sugar,
fine la , lily, but nnlmiUngr in appear-
There arc no eairialllji In th«» woods.
no pLanlng-xmlls to smooth xtu-. surface or
the lumber, and smooth floors and pol
fahed surfaces -'?"■ produced through the
medium of the hatchet and the exercise
of muscle. The Jukl and pina cloth are
woven with hand loom* and the produc
tion of a single drees tn«-an3 a world of
labor and an eternity of patience, Th»
hemp. or. rather, abaca, is broken out
by hand, bat the factories which make
the rope into which it develops are at
JJongkong. not In the PhlUnpfnes. The
coffee tree* are shaken and those beans
which drop are gathered; those which re
main upon lbe trees are not and are al- i
lowed to spoJL The tobacco industry is I
the most adVatnoed of all those In the |
Island* and is probably the only one In ,
which methods have reached a high slate; J
of perfection. Outside of Manila there
are no electric lights, gas lights,
or lights at all except those fur
nished by candles and coal oil.
Luzon has one steam railroad, 160
miles long. There are no other railroads.
Electricity as a motive power is unknown
and streetcars have no existence outside
, of Manila.
It seems to me, inexperienced as I am,
that the Philippines ought to be a para
dise for the capitalists who wish to in
troduce electricity, put up sugar refin
eries, build sawmills and planlng-mills,
Intro modern agricultural implements
and all kinds of machinery. The Island of
i Negro.-, on which I am at present locat
ed, is rich to a degree, and the sugar
planters live like princes of olden times,
it has progressed more than any of the
other islands in agriculture, yet there is
much to be done to bring it to even a
moderate state of progress. It has 217
rivers and streams emptying into the
ocean, few roads and no kind of transpor
tation save th.-» carabao, whose trotting
record Is about a mile a month.
The people of the Islands are not capa
ble of self-government considered as an
entirety. There are certain classes, how
ever, whom 1 think might be safely en
trusted with the reins of local self-gov
ernment. The educated class, the prop
erty-holding class and the householders
who have the responsibilities of families
and property, might, i think, be allowed
the privilege of the ballot, and under
proper protection, encouragement and ad
vice would in all probability in a very
short time establish a stable form of local
government Underlying these three
classes of inhabitants in the Islands are
the irresponsible^, who live from hand
tc mouth and who only work when com
pelled by dire necessity idlers who will
not work at all and prey on their fellows
ana the savages, who, of course, have no
responsibilities and have no desire to as
sume any. In my opinion the idlers and
Lrresponaibles ought to have no voice in
: the government at all, but they form an
i element dangerous to the peace and wel
fare of the community, being read) at all
times to fall in line with the discontented
or ambitious because they are "agin" and
ever prepared to overturn existing condi
tions. I think, however, if the Irresponsi
bles and idlers were utilized for military
purposes and to form a local can:
iary that under the. Influence oi~ discipline
and education they might in time become
i useful citizens.
The present trouble In the islands arose
through no fault of the military power
ati Manila. Everything was one to con
vince the leaders of the insurgents and
the people thai the United States intended
' nothing but what was for ih± welfare of
| those who had been oppressed so long.
i Amicable relations were encouraged in
! every way by General Otis. The insur
i gent soldiery and officers were permitted
j tree entrance into Manila at all times
I and at ail hours and were allowed to come
, and go a.s they pleased; bu: the mortal
offense has been given on the 13th of
August when the insurgent soldiery were
not permitted to enter the city and loot
it to their hearts' content. For that in
jury. th~re was no forgiveness and ex
pressions of open disapproval of the
Americana began and the Government of
the United States which had lifted the
yoke from their necks was openly claimed
to be an enemy to the people greater than
Spain. The American troops were not
j permitted to go into the country with
' out being constantly interfered with, fre
j fluently annoyed uiiJ sometimes arrested.
j Manila was virtually beleaguered by bos
tiles who only waited the word to begin
operations against the forces whose kind
ness, forbearance and leniency the un
grateful Tagalos had mistaken for cow
ardice.
L»ai]y for a month their soldiery stood
: upon the trenches, defied our sentries to
combat, calk-d them women, spat upon
; them and invited them to come over and
have their throats cut. Conferences were
held with the leaders and representatives
of the insurgents, but their demand for
absolute independence, their insistence
th*t our navy should not be further
strengthened, and that the regular troops
should not be permitted to land, coupled
I with the threat that unless these things
were promised the people could not be re
strained, and that trouble would begin,
I rendered futile all efforts to bring about
a more satisfactory condition of affairs.
I The insurgent paper, the Lndependencia,
! took the stand that the attack should be
gin at once on the Americans; that the
regulars were not coming for the pur
pose of relieving the volunteers; that the
conferences- were being had for the pur
pose of accomplishing delay, and that the
Yankees wanted to gain time for rein
forcements to arrive and so be enabled
to cope with the force about Manila.
Insurgent colonels and captains began
to warn their friends in Manila to leave
the town — that it would be certainly de
stroyed.
Arms were secretly smuggled into the
city and secret societies' for the purpose
of murdering American officers and burn
ing the town were formed in every dis
trict. The insurgent lines were advanced
until their sentries brushed elbows with
ours. Enlisted men were- seized within
our own lines and carried to Malolos.
Products were not allowed to be sent Into
the city, and about everything that could
be done was done to cause the American
forces to take the initiative and lire the
first shot. This plan which was probably
the result of deeper counsels than their
own, did not succeeed— the shot was not
fired.
Then they began to send armed men
across our lines in broad daylight, but
after threats, protests, menaces and nego
tiations would withdraw them. Finally,
on February 4, the Filipinos determined
• to force the first shot, and at night they
sent an armed party across the line of
one of the American sentries located at
Santa Mesa. The sentry called "Halt,"
the armed party halted, consulted and
then retired. In a few minutes it re
l turned. The sentry again called "Halt"
and persisted in calling "Halt" until they
had crossed his lines. They would not
I halt, and then he fired his piece. That
; was the signal the Filipinos were waiting
for. The immense string of insurgent fire
crackers, having its large end at Calocan,
| from which it stretched to Santa Mesa,
, had been ignited at the smallest diameter
: in Santa Mesa and the insurgent fire, at
j will, in a short time spread from one end
: of the insurgent line to the other. They
; rang out the volleys at Santa Mesa. The
Nebraskana had tumbled out of bed and
got to work. Next came the volley firing
at Sanpaloc and vicinity— the Colorados,
I Montana* and Dakotaa bad rushed to the
support of their threatened outposts and
pickets. Last of all the steady tire of the
i Pennsylvanians, Third Artillery, and
Kansans showed that they had buckled
1 down ■to meet .the heavy attack on the
| Calocan front. Now and then a heavy
i gun would "boom," showing by the sound
from the water or from the land whether
the execution was being done by the navy
or the Utah Battery.
• Bo was the second battle of Manila
brought about by the very people on
whom kind treatment was worse than
wasted and by whom courtesy and con
sideration were taken for timidity and
fear. The fight waged ail night on the
north side of the river, and with the break
Of day the conflict spread to Santa Ana,
Singallon and Malate. These are the
facts as 1 understand them concerning
! the commencement of the struggle be
tween the Americans and Filipinos. God
knows an American was compelled to en
dure almost everything rather than do
anything which might bo ground for com
plaint or bring about a rupture of peace
ful relations, yet I am sorry to say emi
nent and able men of my own nation have
seen fit in the halls of Congress and from
the rostrum and pulpit, to denounce the
action of the American soldiery at Ma
nila and to assert that the conflict was
, initiated to force the treaty in the inter
est of annexation and imperialism. The
truth is the insurgents had determined to
crush us before the regular regiments ar
rived and the Americans had the choice
of being crushed or fighting. They were
i not crushed.'
Truly this letter is already too long, so
: I will bring it to a close by renewing: my
' thanks to you for all you have done for
the California- boys, and remaining, as
I ever, yours sincerely, .
JAMES F. SMITH.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SATURDAY, MAY 27, 1899.
REPRESENTS DEWEY'S
FLEET AT ANNAPOLIS
AHX SOLDJVULN, ihe Ycung .Native Son
wfyo H as Received an Appointment
to t^e 13 S. .Naval Jlcademy.
MAX GOLDMAN, an apprentice on the Concord, and a native of this city,
has been appointed to a cadet ship at Annapolis and is ordered to re
port at the academy on September 1 for examination. The fortunate
young Californian has been detached from the Asiatic squadron and
is expected home on the transport Solace.
His appointment is due to the efforts of Congressman Julius Kahn, who
was anxious that a representative from Dewey's victorious fleet be given
an opportunity to rise above the ranks. The choice fell on Max Goldman, and
througH the intervention of Secretary of the Navy Long the native son was
th€ appointment. Goldman and Osborn W. Dignan, the boatswain who
steered the Merrimac \inder the direction of lieutenant Hobson, will enter
the Naval Academy at the same time, the former representing Admiral
Dewey's fleet and tho latter Admiral Sampson's.
Goldman was born at the Potrero and received his education in the Irv
ing M. Scott School. Ho always had a longing for tho sea. and when but
16 years of age he enlisted as an apprentice on the receiving ship Indepen
dence. He was shortly afterward transferred to the Concord, which was
ordered to the Asiatic station. Young Goldman served on the deck of the
Concord with distinction during the battle of Manila Bay, and for his gal
lantry and bravery he was mentioned in general orders and promoted to the
position "f a gunner's male's apprentice.
Having always had an ambition t« go to Annapolis, young Goldman has
pursued his studies aboard ship with unerasing vigor. He has had kind tutors
to direct his studies, and as a result he [g even now ready to undergo the cru
cial test Immediately on his arrival in this city he will be discharged and
will go directly to Annapolis and enter Professor Wilmer's preparatory
school for further instruction.
The friends and neighbors of the Ooldmans, who reside at 1200 Kentucky
street, are greatly interested in the welfare of the young mariner and are do
intr everything in their power to advance his interests. Though but 18 years <>f
age, Goldman is six foot in height and is a splendid specimen of California
manhood. The officers and men on the Concord, and, in fact, in the whole
proud "f him and are. watching his future with deep concern.
WITNESSES SAY
THE CREMATORY
IS NO NUISANCE
More Testimony in the
Garbage Case.
Further testimony was taken by Judg;e
Heacock yesterday in the case of the San
itary Reduction Works of Ban Francisco
vs. the California Reduction Works for an
injunction to restrain the respondents
from collecting sarbajje In the county of
Sun Francisco and removing the same.
,ii;dt;<» Hoacock has been engaged for sev
eral weeks in inkinK testimony of wit
nesses as to the Potrero crematory being
a nuisance anil as to tho validity of its
contract with tho city, and several wit
nessea have testified to sickness and death
iii their families caused by the odors and
gases escaping from the chimney of the
crematory whenever lhe wind blew their
way.
Yesterday several witnesses worp ex
amlned to "show that the chimney did not
emit riny unhealthful gases. John Center,
capitalist, swore that he had not been
fible to detect any odor in his neighbor
hood. Thomas Price, chemist, said that
lie had made an examination of thi cre
matory and that hf had found* the com
bustion complete and no bad gases escap
ing. On cross-examination he admitted
that wh*n thf fire was not v. ry hot and
the garbage was smoldering gasos mipht
escape from the chimney, and while they
mi^ht be offensive they would not be poi
sonous.
Dr. Williamson gave hi? opinion that
the crematory was not a menace to pub
lic health.
Is. R. Ellert, president of the company,
swore that he had not beon able to find
a smoke consumer that would consume
"that kind of smokp."
Th<- examination will be resumed at 10
o'clock this morning.
After the taking of testimony shall have
I ALFRED DEAN'S WOUNDS !
I PROVED TO BE FATAL }
• •
# Result of a Bicycling j^^j^^i •
o Accident in the M^ •
T * LFRED DEAN, the young bl- w|j ?^M
T cyclist who injured in Gold- ■£> i J^|[l^l O
cyclist who was injured in Gold- ike f^
I Al en Gate Park last Thursday l-i'^** fi&SiM'lW '
Q asm evening by colliding with the ill^V gS^Hlf 1 •
I bicycle of A. L. Rlley of 1120 wffi*'* 7 ' X|^2BBl
0' Fell street, died of his wounds yester- Afiwrl/iiL*f^ Mllllrn*
I day morning. Dean was descending JbWTSb*^ Ma fIJ)
9 the hill west of the speed track when JBm' r '^^ri\^mm^ 111 ' I 111 ' O
i he .■•:).:. -1 with Riley. who was l iJJW/ /
© ascending the slope. Both men wero id£sBnWt&? 'Jtimw'j/.' 'I '■'' *
I thrown from their wheels, and Dean ViK«Svit^K '■'} I / * '• 'I' m
• was rendered unconscious by reason ;VwJtuM^ / fWiiulfltti
| of a fractured skull. Riley was not "^Sk« v\ ///m/flf/{//T^. '
9 much Injured. ''"^SfSs^h i '''/',/ ®
I Coroner Hill will hold an inquest- ;^M(W' ' i ■& ) |,
a thin afternoon at 1 o'clock at the resi- V^ 1 1/ \ r. . ' 0
y dence of the deceased, 2008 .Larkin |
0 street. '-. ..:;^:^ - t ' '._... &
•-•-•-•-•-#-• -•-<>-•-•-•-•-•-•-•-•-♦-•-•-•
boor, completed tho transcript will be '
. In tne hands of United States Cir- j
cull Judge Morrow for the purposes of i
the trial, which has been set for next t
\\ • ■!• ■• sday.
Yesterday Judge Morrow required the'
Sanitary Reduction Works to give a bond
ir the sum 0rn.7,500 ti> cover all damages i
which may have oeen heretofore suf
fered by the respondents, the California
Reduction Works, "or which may during '
the continuance of this provisional in
-1 unction be Buffered by said respondents
In case the said complainant should be ad- ;
judged to be not entitled to said injunc- >
tion.''
A LUCKY MAN!!!
C. O. dohanson. an Emp'oye on Board the
SP. Co. 's Freight Boat **Transit,"
Drew $400 on a Ten-Cent Ticket.
Ran Francisco, May 19, 1599— 1 hereby certify
that 1 was the holder of ticket No. 32.452 in
Henry B. Cahn & Co.'s Little Honduras Lot
tery, for which I paid ten cents, and that on
the drawing of May 13, 18«t. my ticket drew
$400. This amount was promptly paid tv me
in full on presentation of the winning ticket to
Henry S. Calm & Co. C. O. JOHANSON,
Freight Boat Transit. •
Jury Could Not Agree.
The jury in the case of Anders vs. the
California Powder Works, which has been
on trial before Judge Daingerfleld, was
dismissed at 9 o'clock last night. After
being out from 10 o'clock In the morning
the jury reported that it could not agree.
Original Little Bencficcncia Publica Co*
of San Francisco, Cal. Drawing
May 25, 1899.
No. 44525 wins $.1750 00, sold In San Francisco
Gal.; No. 51830 wins $12."-0 00. sold In Virginia
City, Nev. ; No. 47SK8 wins $625 00. Void in San
Francisco, Calif. ; No*. 27432, 51154, 63022, 84670
and 79823 each wins $62 50, boM in San Fran
cisco, Calif., and Hpnicia, Calif.
Fell Down the Elevator.
Henry Fixspn. aped 40 years, fell down
the grain elevator in the Jackson brewery
yesterday, a distance of about X feet, and
sustained a compound fracture of the left
thiph. The injured member was dressed
at the Receiving Hospital.
Ocean Water Tub Baths.
101 Seventh street, corner Mission. Salt
water direct from nn-an.
Labor Council's Affairs.
At a meeting of the San Francisco La
bor Council held last evening tho boycott
on Siebe & Green, bill posters, was offi
cially declared off. The Sailors' Union re
ported that seamen's matters were about
the same as at the last meeting. They
also called attention to the fact that sail
ors from a British ship had deserted in
the harbor last week and requested that
they be treated as. immigrants in accord
ance with a recent decision of the Immi
gration Commissioner. _
A joint committee of the Labor Coun
cil and Brewery Men's Union reported
that matters were in a fair way toward
unionizing all brewery employes of the
city. It was also stated that the San
Francisco Bridge Company of Alameda
was employing non-union men and re
quiring them to work a time exceeding
eight hours.
CHILDREN ON THE STAGE.
Warrants Out for the Arrest of the
Managers of Three Different
Places of Amusement.
The California Society for the Preven
tion of Cruelty to Children has again
started a crusade against children being
permitted to perform on a stage.
Yesterday warrants were obtained in
Judge Mogan's court for the arrest of Dr.
Fred A. Grazer and Mrs. Ernestine Krel
ing of the Tivoli for permitting the boy,
Arnold Grazer, and the little girl, Hazel
Callahan, to perform on the stage. In
Judge Graham's court a warrant was ob
tained for the arrest of Walter Morosco
in regard to little Mattie Southwell and
against Edward P. Levy of the Chutes and
Mrs. Afldie Sorenson in regard to little
Maud Sorenson. Acting Police Judge
Groezinger issued warrants for the arrest
of John Morrissey of the Orpheum and
Mrs. Lund for permitting little Pearl
Lund to perform.
Kennedy Was Romancing.
Detectives Byan and ODea, who were
detailed en the case of an alleged rob
bery committed in a saloon on the south
east corner of Howard and Fremont
streets, reported yesterday that no such
crime had been committed in the place
named.
The charge was made by Michael Ken
nedy, a machinist, residing at 426 Sixth
street, who stated that he had been held
up in the presence of the bartender in the
place about 11 o'clock Wednesday even
ing and relieved of coin and valuables.
The officers found that Kennedy had been
romancing, as the saloon in question
closes its doors at 8 o'clock. The machin
ist was undoubtedly robbed, but not in
this particular saloon.
The Power of Storm.
The Cayman Islands In the West Indies were
nearly overwhelmed by the recent storm. Even
apparently secure things are not safe. Even
If you have health be on your guard. Dis
ease works stealthily — it undermines and trou
ble occurs where it Is least expected. An oc
casional dose of Hostetter's Stomach Bitters
will keep the bowels regular, the stomach sweet
and disease at bay. If you have indigestion
and constipation try it. It cures.
XjBEECHAM'SI
J 1 * PILLS !
+ Have for many years been the popular fam- +
+ ily medicine wherever the English language +
+ is spoken, and they now stand without a +
+ rival for Bilious and Nervous Disorders, 4
+ Wind, Pain in the Stomach, Sick Headache, +
+ Fulness after meals, Dizziness, Drowsiness, 4"
+ Costiveness and Sallow Complexion. These +
+ afflictions all arise from a disordered or 4
+ abused condition of the stomach and liver. +
41 Becoham'B Pills, taken as directed, will +•
4> quickly restore Females to complete health. +
+ They promptly remove any obstruction or +
: •>> irregularity of" the system. +
* 10 cents and 23 cents, at alt drug stores. *
000000000000000000
t*!" 1 PALACE '■"■!' l
°GRANDmiMiM°
j? SAN FRANCISCO. Q
" Connected by a covered passageway. **
O 1400 Boom— w: h Bath Attached. O
O All Under One Management. O
0 NOTE TEC PRICES: O
0 European Plan. sl.oo per d«y and upward O
f^ American P'.an.fS.OO per dayjand upward A
v Correspondence Solicited. , ..'.■.•/•.**■
O : JOHN 0. KIRKPATRIOK, Kutgif. O
000000000000000 00 0
1 visit DR. JORDAN'S great
{MUSEUM OF ANATOMY^
A Cp 1051MA2BTST.let.6±ft7Ui,S.r.fcl. i
1 T Tf The Largest Anatomical Museum in the \
t ' «««S"""»^ World. We»ltnesses or any contracted A
™ &C £v 9 '■ rl r po"tHi»cly cured :iy th- oldest T
0 lE* 53 1 Specialist on the CoJit. libt. 36 ye:.r-- O
SQ%OI DR. JORDAN-PRIVATE DISEASES 4
. lljml Consultation frre and <tn tly private. \
I JLiifi£ If Tieiiment personally or by letter. A A
fl H' 'Si H fosittve Cure In every case undertaken. T
AW I lA Write for Boole. PniLO»UI-BYaC A
II 1^ HAltlllAGi:, MAILED free, [a*
A t» ll' valuable book for mm) . \
f I>U. JORDAN ACO.IOoI Market St.. S. F. ¥
/^%l. J^r. Gibbon's Dispensary,
Jlh&&9M. KEAR.W NT- Kstabllshed
a Dr. Gibbon's Dispensary,
625 HEABNY NT. Established
In 1H54 for the treatment of Private
HI pffciWff I Mseuaes, Lost Manhood. Debility or
JMKjJwtfKtabrilspaso wearing on bodyandnilndamj
■4SB TftStSWa Skin Diseases, rhedociorcureswhon
JB gUWSiBi others fall. Try him. Charges low
i^92S3s3£iSl fare* sunrnnt <■•■<]. Callorwrlto.
3>r. J. JP. •.IflltON, Box 1907. Francisco
OCEAN TBA\EL.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co,
Steamers leave Broadway
wharf. San Francisco:
IC&JPfcfc. For Alaskan ports, 10 a. m. ,
; HPrSSsfci Ma > 21. 26, 31: June 5: cnani ?
BSs>siiffifl Sal F or Victoria. Vancouver CB.
■HCs^S&i C •>• Port TtiTn?i>nd, Seattle.
r^"^^BE«\ Tacoma. Everett, Anaonrtesi
and New Whatcom (Wash.).
10 a. m.. May 21. 26. SI: June
S. and every fifth day thereafter: change at
Seattle to this company's steamers for Alaska
and O. N. Ry. ; at Tacoma to N. P. Ry. ; at
Vancouver to C. P. Ry. ••'■•
For Eureka (Humboldt Bay). 2 p. m.. May
19, 24, 29; June 3. and every fifth day there-
after.
For Santa Cruz. M-onterey. San Simeon.
Cayucos. Port Harford (San Luis Oblspo),
Oavlota. Santa Barbara, Ventura. Hueneme,
San Pedro. East San Pedro 'Los Angles) and
Newport. 9 a. m.. May 20. 24, 28: June 1, and
every fourth day thereafter.
For San Diego, stopping : only at Port Har-
ford (San Luis Oblspo). Santa Barbara. Port
Los Anseles and Redondo (Los Angeles), 11 a.
m..' May IS. 2*. 26. 30: June S. and every fourth
day thereafter. . . .5 ,
For Knaenada. MR<rc:alpr>R Ray. San Jose del
Cabo, Mazatlan. Altata, La Pas.. Fsinta Rosalia
and GuaymaS (Mex.), 10 a. m.. 7th of each
month. ' . .-
For further Information obtain folder.
The company reserves the rleht to change
without previous notice steamers, sailing- dates
and hour* of Falling. -
TICKET OFTIOa —4 New Montgomery
street (Palace Hotel). -.: :t. • V
GOODALL. PFRTCINS * CO.. Gen. AKts..
10 Market st.. San Francisco.
THE 0. R. &N. CO,
DISPATCH FAST STEAMERS TO
PORTLAND
From Spear street Wharf at 10 a. m.
PARE * 12 llrst Class including Berths
milL $8 Second Clns* . and Meals.
Columbia Fails May 23.
State of California sails May 18. 28.
Short line to Walla Walla, Spokane. Butte,
Helena and all points In the Northwest.
Through tickets to all points East.
E. C. WARD, General Agent,
6SO Market street.
GOODALL. PERKINS & CO..
•' . Superintendent.
The S- S. Australia
sails for Honolulu
W jkl"*i''E a * ill *' Wednesday, May 31.
Ifl»!a at 2 r m.
fMMfl|mn«a The - a S. Australia
TSiIBMaC sails for Honolulu
r^™ I"*'1 "*' Wednesday. May 31.
(& I S^ L'^\ "■ Alameda sails
iSIP/lUKninc.* vla Honolulu and
JK53»Q;IUllllJ!ll[/ Auckland for Sydney
XsS^^ /ofnC\pjnJU. Wednesday. June 14,
VyilipUKcp at 10 p. m.
Favorite Line Round the World, via Hawaii,
Samoa. New Zealand. Australia, India. Sue*.
England, etc. ; $610 first class.
I. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., Agts.. 114 Montgomery
Pier 7, Foot Pacific St Freight Office, 327 Market St
COMPAONIE GENERALS TRANSATLANTIQCE.
DIRECT LINE to HAVRE-PARIS, _y2(t
Sailing every Saturday at 10 a. m. frt~f>
■from Pier 42, North River, foot of ™* " '*""•
Morton st. LA GASCOGNE, June 3; LA CHAM-
PAGNE, June 10: LA BRETAGNE. June 17;
LA TOURAINE, June 24; LA GASCOGNE, July
1. First-class to Havre. $65 and upward, 6 per
cent -reduction on round trip. Second-class to
Havre, $45. 10 per cent reduction on round trip.
GENERAL AGENCY FOR UNITED STATES
AND CANADA, 3 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUGAZI & CO., Pacific Coast Agents, 5
Montgomery aye., San Francisco. -..-. . : .
ADVERTISEMENTS. .
"absoi^
Genuine CARTER'S LITTLE LIVER PILLS must
bear signature of . /^Lw^^
Very small and as easy
to take as sugar.
SEE lrADTrtfcl FOR HEADACHE. SEE
3EC CARTERS FOR DIZZINESS. LC
rcuiTTNC UITTLE FOR BILIOUSNESS. r ™ ITIV r C
GENUINE UivER for -torpid liver. GENUINE
H PILLS FOR CONSTIPATION.
WRAPPFR _H__Ji "" FOR SALLOW SKIM. WRIPPFR
WKAITtK )gjmm_j FOR THE COMPLEXION >VKA^ LK
25 Cents Paroly VegetaWe./^a^^^S
"FR,I3STTE3D O3ST RED PAPER."
OCEAN TBAVEL.
AMERICAN LINE.
NEW YORK, SOUTHAMPTON. LONDON. PARIV
Stopping at Cherbourg, westbound. .
From New York Every Wednesday. 10 a. m.
New York May 31 New York June 21
St. Paul June 7 St. Paul June 28
St. Louis June 14 St. Louis July 5
RED (STAR LINE.
V(W YoH< n'l ■Sntvrertv
From New York Every .Wednesday. 12 noon.
Kensington .....May 31 1 South June 21
Noordland June 7 I Westernland ...June 28
Frlesland .-.June 14 1 Kensington July 5
EMPIRe LINE.
Seattle. St. Michael. Dawson Citr.
For full information regarding freight and pas-
sage apply to
INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION COMPANY,
30 Montgomery Bt., or any of Its agencies.
TOYO KISEN KAISHA.
STEAMERS WILli LEAVE WHARF, COR-
ner First and Brannan streets, 1 p. m., for
YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, calling at
Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and
connecting at Hongkong with steamers for
India, etc. . No cargo received on board on day
of sailing.
NIPPON MARU ....Tuesday, June 27
AMERICA MARU Saturday, July 22
HONGKONG MARU Thursday. August 17
Round-trip tickets at reduced rates. For
freight and passage apply at company's office,
421 Market *t., corner First.
W. B. CURTIS, General Agent.
HAMBURG-AMERICAN
TWIN-SCREW EXPRESS LINE.
NEW PARIS— HAMBURG.
TWIN-SCREW PASSENGER SERVICE.
NEW YORK— LONDON— PARIS— HAMBURG.
Also NEW YORK-HAMBURG Direct.
For sailings, etc. apply to HAMBURG-
AMERICAN LINE, 37 Broadway. New York.
HERZOG * CO., Gen. Agents Pacific Coast.
401 CALIFORNIA ST., cor. Sansome, and
118 Montgomery st.. San Francisco.
BAY AND RIVER STEAMERS.
STOCKTON EXCURSIONS.
THE STEAMER H. .T. CORCORAN
Will leave Washington-street wharf at 8 a. m.
daily, returning from Stockton at 6 ; p. m.
dally (Saturday excepted). Regular steamers
leave Washington-street wharf at C p. m.
daily (excepting Sunday).
CALIFORNIA NAY. AND. IMP. CO.
Telephone Main SO5.
FOR 0. S. NAVY-YARD AND YALLEJO.
Steamer "Montlcello."
MON., Tues:, Wed, Thurs. and Sat. at 9:45
a. m., 3:15. S:3O p. m. (ex. Thurs. night); Fri-
days, 1 p. m. and 8:30; Sundays, 10:30 a. m., 8
p. m. Landing and office. Mission-street Dock,
Pier No. 2. Telephone Main 1508.
FARE 50c
RAILROAD TRAVEL.
CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RY. CO.
' : I_iEiSSHiEj-. -
SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC
RAILWAY COMPANY.
Tlburon Ferry, Foot of Market St.
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL.
WEEK DAYS— 7:3O, 9:00. 11:00 a. m. 12:35,
8:30, 6:10, 6:30 p. m. Thursdays— Extra trip
at 11:30 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:30
and 11:30 p. m. ■ . . : : :'
SUNDAYS— B:OO, 9:30, 11:00 a. m.; 1:30, 3:30.
6:00, 6:20 p. m.
B AN RAFAEL TO SA_N FRANCISCO. •
WEEK DAYS— 6:IO, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 a. m. ; 12:45,
3:40, 5:15 p. id. Saturdays— trips at
1:55 and 0:35 p. m.
SUNDAYS— B:IO, 9:40, 11:10 a. m. 1:40, 8:40. 6:05,
6:25 p. m.
! Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park
came schedule as above.
Leave Arrive
San Francisco. In Effect San Francisco.
. April IS, . —
Week Sun- 1&99. Sun- Week
Days. days. Destination. days. Days.
7:30 am 6:00 am Novato, 10:40 am 8:40 am
1.30 pm 9:30 am Fetaluma, 6:05 pm 10: am
6:10 pm 5:00 pm Santa Rosa. 7:35 pm 6:20 pm
Fulton,
T:SO am ' Windsor, ' 10:25 am
Healdt-burg,
Lytton,
Geyserville,
8:30 pm 8:00 am Gloverdale, 7:35 pm 6:20 pm
7:30 am Hopland and j 10:25 am
8:80 pin 8:00 am Ukiah. I 7:35 pm 6:20 pm
7:30 am 10:25 am
8:00 am Guerneville. 7:35 pm
8:30 pm 6:20 pm
7:30 am 8:00 am Sonoma 10:40 am 8:40 am
and
6:10 pm 5:00 pm Glen Ellen. 6:05 pm 6:20 pm
7:30 am 8:00 am Sebastopol. 10:40 am 10:25 am
1:30 pm 5:00 pm[ I 7:35 pm 6:20 pra
Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West
Springs and White Sulphur Springs; at Lyttoa
for Lytton Springs; at Geyservllle for Skagga
Springs; at.Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hop- '
land for Duncan Bprings, Highland Springs,
Kelseyville. Carlsbad Springs. Soda Bay, Lake-
port and Bartlett Springs; at Ukiah for Vichy
Springs. Saratoga Springs,- Blue Lakes, Laurel
Dell Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno,
Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierley's. |
Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville,
Booneville, Philo. Christine. Soda Springs,
Navarro. Whitesboro. Albion, Little River,
Orr"s Hot Springs, Mendocino City. Fort Bragg.
Westport. Usal. Willitts. . Laytonvllle. Cum-
mlng's. Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsen's, Dyer,
Bcotia and Eureka.
Saturday to Monday round trip tickets at
reduced rates. "
On Sundays round trip tickets to all point!
beyond San Rafael at half rates.
Ticket Offices, 650 Market St., Chronicle bid*.
H C. WHITING. . . R. X. RYAN,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. Agent.
NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD.
Via SsoMllte Parry.
Commencing April 23, 1899. ' ; • :
FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO MILL VALLEY
AND SAN RAFAEL.
WEEK DAYS— •8:00, 9:30. 11:00 a. m.
•1:45. 3:20, 4:00, 5:15, •6:00, 6:30 p. m.
EXTRA TRIPS— For Mill Valley and San
Rafael, on Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays
and Sundays, at 9:00 and 11:30 p. m.
SUNDAYS— 'B:OO, '9:00. *10:00. 11:00, 11:30
a. m. ; 1:00. »1:45, •2:30, '4:00, 5:30, 6:45 p. m.
11:00 a. m. does not run to San Raf'l Sundays.
6:30 p. m. does not run to Mill Vai'y Sundays.
I Trains marked (•) run to San Quentln.
FROM SAN RAFAEL TO SAN ' FRANCISCO.
WEEK DAYS— S:2S. »6:40, 7:55. 8:40, '10:20
a. m.; 12.30, 2:13. »3:40, 4:35, 5:15 p. m.
EXTRA TRIPS on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Saturdays, at 6:40 and 10:15 p. m.
SUNDAYS— *8:00, »9:45. 'lO^o, »11:45
a. m.. 1:00, 2:20. *3:30. •5:15, »6:00, 7:00, 10:15
p. m.
Trains marked (•) run to San Quentln. ■
FROM MILL VALLEY TO SAN FRANCISCO.
WEEK DAYS— S:4S. 6:50. 7:55. 8:55. 10:35
a. m.; 12:35, 2:45, 4:55, 5:20 p. 'm.
EXTRA TRIPS on Mondays, Wednesdays i
and Saturdays, at 7:00. 10:20 p. m. •
SUNDAYS— B:OO, 10:00, 11:10 a. m. : 12:05,
1:20. 2:40. 3:55, 5:30, 6:30. 10:20 p. m. "
THROUGH TRAINS. - .
7:00 a. m. week days— Cazadero and way sta'ns. ,
3:20 p. m. Saturdays — Cazaderd and way sta'ns. '
5:15 p. m. week days (Saturdays excepted)— j
Point Reyes and way stations.
8:00 a. m. Sunday?— Cazadero and way sta'ns. I
1:45 p. m. Sundays— Reyes and way sta'ns. i
. . |
MOUNT TAMALPAIS SCENIC RAILWAY j
Leave San Francisco, via Sausallto Ferry
Commencing SUNDAY, April 23. 1899.
WEEK DAYS, 9:30 a. m. and 1:45 p. m.
Extra trip on Monday, Wednesday and Satur-
day at 5:15 p. m.. Returning Same Even-
ings, Arriving in S. F. at 11:20 p. m.
SUNDAYS, 8, 9, 10 and 11 a. m. and 1:45, 2:30
■ and 4 p. m.
On May 30 Trains Run on Sunday Time. ) '...
' Fare. 6. F. to Summit and Return. $1 40.
' TIIOS. COOK & SON. Agts.. .621 Market st.
; , IUTT.TIOAP TRAVEL,
WCTHCBI PACIFIC CVIirAITT.
. (PACIFIC SYSTEM.)
CTrMlna Mare nntl are tine to nrrlva a*
SAN FJtASiI'IKCW. -■_,:
(Main Line. Foot of Market Street.
leave — . From May 7, 1899. — arriv*
7:OOa. Benida. Suisun and Sacramento. . . . 5:45
TiOOa Marysville, Ororiiloand IteddiugYik
Woodland 5:45p
7:OOa Elmira, Vacaville and Rumsoy 8:43*
7:30 a Martinez, Han Uamou, Vallejo, N»pa,
Calistoga and Santa Ko.« Oil
SiOOa A tlautic Uxprt'Bs, OgiUii and l':«at.. 8:1-1 p
HiIIOa S»n .(('mo, Livermoru, Stockton, •"'.
lone, .Saerainento, Flacerrille,
MnrysTillo, Chico, BeiUllnlT 4:1.-»p
8: BO a "Milton, Oakdaloand Monora 4:15p
9:00 a Hayvrards. Niles and W.iy Stations. 11i43a
9:0Oa Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton,
Merced anil Fresno 12:13*
mkioa Fresno, liakerslield, Santa lUii-irn.
Los Arjgeloß, Demiup, El Paso,
New Orleans and Bast O:4."Vr
I O:OO\ VftUejo, Martinez and Way Stations 7: l."5»
11:OOa Haywards, Kilcs and Way Stations. 2<43r
I2:OO» Niles, Livermore, .Stockton, Wacra-
. •■- . mento. Mendota, llauford, Viaaiii. ".v-
-, Pcrterville 4:I5»
•ls<M»p Sacramento HiTerSteiimerß »8:« Op
8:OOp Haywardii, Niles anil Way Stations. 3:43p
*:O«i> Martinez, Han Bamoii, Vallejo,
Napa, iatoga, Santa 1:obh » : 1 3 »
4:OOi- Bcnicla, Vaoaville, .Sacramento,
Woodland, Knights Lauding, .
Marysville, Oroville 10:43*
4i3OpNlies, San Josoaud Stockton 7:15r
«:30p Yosemito Sleeping Car for Raymond J2:lsi>
O:OOp Stockton, Merced, Fresno 12:15?
B:OOp Martinez, Tracy, Mendota, Fresno,
Mojave i id .01 Angeles 8:43 a
AiOOp Sautn Fi) Itonte. A Hunt la Kxpress
1 for MojuTo ami Itafc O:43»
C:OOp The Owl. Fresno, Bakerstield. San-
ta Barbara, Los Angeles 8:43 a.
6:00r European Mail. Ogilun aud Kast 9:154
8:00p Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7: 13a
•6:00 - Vallejo 1 2t 1 3V
THMrOrecou Kx|>ress,Baer*meuto, Marys-
ville, lli-Miiiif, I'orMand, l'nget
•Sound him! liast 7:43*
i*:OOp Vallejo, Port Costa and Way Bta-
tiona \%OiHOr
COAST DIVISION (NnrroiT «unge).
(Foot of Market Street.) • J _
{7:43 a Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa
Cruz and Principal Way Stations JBt©B»
8:1 Neivark.Centerville, San .lose, Felton,
BonlderCreek.SantaOruzandWay ■ ' • ■
Stations Bi3C»
*2il3p Newark. Centerrille, San Jose, Now V) • ••
Almaden, Felton, lioulder Creek,
Santa Cruz and Principal Way
Stations " 10:304
4:13p Sun Jose, Glonwood and Way Sta-
tions 0:20 a
M:lsp Felton, Santa Cruz and Way Sta-
tious /»:2OA
CREEK ROUTE FERRY.
rromSAli FRANCISCO— foot or Market Sirett (Slip 8)—
•7:15 f.-OO H:OOa.M. 11:00 *2:00 S3:00
M:00 . 18:00 •6:00 p.m. • -
rrtmOilUND— "6:oo 8:00 10:00 a.m.
t!2:00 '1:00 12:00 «3:00 I<:C3 "5:03 P.M.
COAST DIVISION (Rroad Gauge).
(Third and Townaend St 9.)
•6: 1 Oa Ocean View, South San Francisco.. ' *6:30»
•7:«Oa San Jose nnd Way Stations (New
Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :»•»
, J7:3Oa Sunday Excursion for San Jose.
SanU Cruz, Puclna GroT9 and
■■ Principal Way Stations J9:33j
• iOOa Han Jono, Trcs Phios, Hunta Cruz,
Padlio Orore, Paso Itciblea, San _ . r
. . Luis ( >liiH|Mi. Guadalupe, Surf aud
Principul Way Stations 4:10?
1O:4Oa San .lusu nnd Way Stations «B:<>Oa
I 1:3Oa Sou Joso aud Way Stations 5:II0»
*il:4sr Sail Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park.
Palo Alto. .Santa Clara, «-ii .lose,
Gilroy, Hollister, Santa ('ruz, . .
Salinas, Monterey aud Paciflo
Grove *!O:3(lA
•SiSOp San Jose and Way Stations *9:OOa
*4:13p San Jose ami Principal Way Stations 9: 15*
•3:00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 6:33 a
3:3Oi> Sau.Toao and Principal Way Statlous *8:3.1 a
6:30 - San Jose ami WayHkations 7:30p
j ♦ 11:45p San Jobs and Way Stations " 7:! top
A for Morning V for Afternoon.
i • Sunday excepted. t Sunday only. ♦ Saturday only.
{(Saturday and Sunday /Sunday and Monday.
California
Limited
Santa Fe Route
Connecting Train Leaves San
Francisco via Los Angeles at 5
P. M. every SUNDAY. TUES-
DAY, FRIDAY.
Arrives In Chicago at 9:52 A. M. tha
following Thursday, Saturday
and Tuesday— Arriving in New
York at 1 :3O P. M. Friday. Sunday
and Wednesday.
DINING CARS, "BUFFET CAR, Ob-
servation Car and Electric
Lighted Sleeping Car.
This Train Is In Addition to the Daily
Overland Express.
SAN FRANCISCO TICKETIFfiCE— 528 MARKET ST.
TELEPHONE MAIN 153 L
Oakland Office— lllB Broadway. .'..
Sacramento Office— 2ol J Street.
San Jose Office— West Santa Clara St.
A Superb Train
4#Tfffk EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR
wP-Unioii Pacific.
SAN FRANCISCO TO CHICAGO
WITHOUT CHANGE.
BUFFET SMOKING. AND. LIBRARY CARS
WITH BARBER SHOP. v-'.h'V:
DOUBLE DRAWING ROOM SLEEPERS. '
FREE RECLINING CHAIR CARS.
PULLMAN TOURIST SLEEPERS. '
DINING CARS (A LA CARTE).
ONLY 3% DAYS TO CHICAGO.
Leaves San Francisco daily at 6 p. m.
: D. W. HITCHCOCK. General Agent. ~
Ho. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. ' ;
THE SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN JQAQUIH
- VALLEY RAILWAY COMPANY.
From Jan. 2s, 1599. trains will run as follows:
South-bound. -■ North-bound.
Pas Be- Mixed. Mixed. Passes-
ger. Sunday Stations. Sunday ger.
Dally. Exc'ptd -' • Exo'ptd Dally..
7:20 am 10:30 am Stockton- 3:45 pm 6:00 pm
1:10 am 2:05 pm ; Merced 12:40 pm 4:13 pm '■
10:40 am 5:35 pm, Fresno 9:30 an 2:42 pm
11:3$ am 7:45 pm Hanford. 7:45 am 1:43 pra •
t:25 pm 12:30 am Bakersfleld 2:00 am 11:00 am
11:69 am 6:25 pm Visalla 6:40 am 1:22 pm*
12:15 pm 6:63 pm Tulare 5:50 am 1:05 prn
Stopping at Intermediate points as required.
For particulars of stage and other connection*
Inquire at Traffic Manager's Office. 3SI Mark*!
street. Ban Francisco.
& | Co.^ggV '
% f|
V2SS/33U MARKET ST.S.F.^§bS*
9

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