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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 29, 1899, Image 5

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VISITING BAPTISTS OCCUPIED THE
PULPITS OF MANY DENOMINATIONS
THRILLED HIS
AUDITORS WITH
HIS ELOQUENCE
Dr. Lorimer a Brilliant
Orator.
ANNUAL SERMON A SUCCESS
MISSIONARY SECRETARIES DE
LIVER ADDRESSES.
Able Sermons Delivered by the Dis
tinguished Visitors to Congrega
tions of This City— Their
Thoughts in Brief.
THERE are scores of orators in this
city. The pulpit has furnished an
array of Christian pleaders who
have uplifted the members of their
congregation to higher ideals; the
law has its qu.«ta of spellbinders who
have snatched victories from certain de
feat by Imbuing juries with the justice
of tln-ir course in their clever speeches.
ami the lay profession has any number '>f
champions whose voices and logic have
charmed audiences and raised them to a
high pitch of enthusiasm. But there are
thousands in this city who are of the
opinion that none of our local speakers
■ ompares with the Rev. George C. Lor
the distinguished divine who
preached at the services <>f the First Bap
tist Church yesterday morning at the
Alhambra Theater.
Seldom has an audience listened to such
a brilliant discourse as was delivered by
the Boston preacher. Nearly 2000 people
were seated in the Moorish play house
which for the occasion was turned into
a place of worship to accommodate the
crowds desirous of hearing the em
inent pulpit orator. Nor were they
disappointed. For about an hour and
a half he thrilled them with his
tence, and when they departed their
minds were filled with the views he ex
pressed on many themes.
The services were opened by the Rev.
A. J. Rowlands, secretary of the Baptist
Publication Society, who announced the
singing of an anthem by the choir, com
poaed of Mis:; Fanny L. Denny soprano,
Miss Florence Nagel alto. Herbert Wil
liams first tenor, Arthur A. Macurda sec
ond tenor, I). B. Crane first bass and
Matbew McCunie second bass, and H. K.
Mitchell accompanist. At the conclusion
of the singing Rev. D. B. Cheney of Wis
consin, whose father was formerly pas
tor of tho First Baptist Church and who
Is himself a native son. Invoked the di
ng. This was followed by Rev.
li. L. Mirehouse of New York reading
Psalm 7-: "Give the King thy judg
ments. O <iod. and thy righteousness unto
the King's son." Dr. E. B. Hulbert,
i the Chicago Theological Semin
ary, and former pastor of the First Bap
hur^h of this city, led in prayer.
Dr. Rowlands Introduced Dr. Lorimer to
his audience in a short speech in which
he said that the Eastern clergyman had
given up his life to the great studies of
. ly. As the pale-faced but intellec
tual little giant stepped forward a hush
fell on the congregation. "You will lind
the words of my text," he coldly said, "in
the second chapter of Daniel, the forty
d verse."
And In the day? nf those kins? shall the
God at heaven set up a kingdom, which
Fhall never be dentroyed. nor shall the sov
pr^'pnty thereof be lfft to another people;
but it shall break in pieces and consume all
the?e kingdoms, and it shall stand forever.
Closing his eyes and folding his arms on
his breast the doctor opened his sermon
on "Christianity as a World-Power." "A
dream, only a dream," he said, "is likely
to be the mocking language of the so-called
practical men of the world, who regard it
as an evidence of superior sanity to trust
or.ly facts and figures when this im
mortal declaration is read in their hear
ing."
Bis glowing periods made his listeners
forget that they were attending church
services and irresistibly they broke Into
applause and as it sv,is not relinked con
tinued to punctuate ,iis address with signs
Of their appreciation. He created a bit
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Mrs. Bradish, of Detroit, Wrote
Mrs. Pinkham and Tells the Result.
, [LETTER TO MRS. . PINKIIAM NO. 82,310]
"About two years ago I began to run
down and soon became almost a wreck.
I lost my appetite and began . to lose
flesh ; my blood was impoverished and
I had to leave our store.
" The doctors gave me a little tonic,
but I steadily grew worse and consulted
another doctor. He helped me in some
ways, but my headaches continued, and
I began to have night sweats and my
rest was so disturbed that I would have
hysteria and would cry and worry over
business matters and my poor health.
" Finally, husband took me South, but
with no benefit. This was a year ago
no one can ever know what a winter of
misery I spent. Would bloat after
eating and was troubled with palpita-
tion of heart and whites. Having read
by happy chance of your medicine, I
bought it and wrote for your advice, •
and before having finished the first
bottle of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound, the hysterics nearly stopped
and I slept soundly.
"I used seven or eight bottles with
such benefit that I am as health}' as I
can ever remember of being. I shall
never cease to sound your praises."—
Mb* E. M. Bradi6h, 179 Dix Aye.,
Detroit, Mich.
Mrs. Pinkham's advice is at the free
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wishes help. Her address is Lynn, Mass.
Every case is sacredly confidential.
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of mr rrlment at the outset by telling the
congregation that an old lady asked him
us he was leaving his room whether he
was going to church, and when he an
swered in the affirmative Bhe fervently
answered: "Well, God be wid yer." Again
in the middle of his address when
he said "The man who wants to
celebrate the Battle of Boyne has
no more business in America than
the Czar of Russia has to hencme
the President of the T'nited States." the
audience expressed its approval with pro
longed applause: A train, when he dis
cussed the grasping tendencies of Euro
pean nations he Impassionately exclaimed:
"The Gospel that takes the sword or that
ciaims to trample on the sword shall be
slain by the .-word if the Master's word
is true."
During his sermon he alluded to
France's treatment of Dreyfus, whom he
believed to bo innocent. He described the
persecuted Jewish officer seated in his
prison cell on Devil's Island listening to
the mutterings in Paris. "I warn you,
France, ' he exclaimed; "keep your hands
off the Jew, and I w.u n you as well that
God Almighty has revealed himself to the
Jew. Yes. there is something grander in
the universe than the Grand Army of
Fiance, and that is Goa Almighty." From
all sides of the hall were heard fervent
arr.ens.
Throughout his long address Dr. Lori
r.ier rose to lofty flights, stamping him-
Belf as a great orator. After the services
the members of the church crowded
around him and offered thanks and con
gratulations to him for his able sermon.
Owing to its length it will be Impossible
to publish it in full, but in part he said:
"A dream, only a dream." is likely to be
the mocking language of the so-called
practical m«n .if t !i»- world, who regard it
as an evidence of superior sanity to trust
only facts and figures, when this Immortal
declaration is read in their hearing. True,
in tho visions of eight r->y.-,i Nebuchadnez
zar bad Been a gleaming colossus of dif
ferent metals, not unlike (lie huge colossi
guarding his own palace gates, which had
REV. GEORGE C. LORIMER, D.D., DELIVERINfi THE ANNUAL BAPTIST MISSIONARY SERMON.
been smitten by the mysterious fragment
'if rock cut from a mountain without hands,
and which Daniel had interpreted in the
passage before us. A.nd what then? Are
all such disclosures necessarily unworthy
of credence? "Was not Abimelech divinely
guided throueh a dream? Was not the
immediate future of Egypt accurately fore
shown to Pharoah through the Fame
means? Assyrian cuneiform ■ inscriptions
relate the accomplishment of various events
that were anticipated in sleep.
Thus Qyges, Kins of Lydia, had been ad
monished to enter on an alliance with
AsHUrbanipal, and by this method Egypt
had been encouraged to unite against the
Assyrians. Likewise in Persian history
rulers, such as Afrasiab and Xerxes, were
warned and directed when their senses were
wrapped in slumber, and the scenes uncur
tained were faithful counterparts of ap
proaching realities. And what are all the
successes or our modern era, all the con
quests over nature, all the triumphs over
tyranny, all the vindications of human
rights, but th- fulfillment of dreams
dreamed by saints and sages, noets and
philosophers, for the announcement of which
they were derided and cursed, were shut
up in prison and thrust out of life? As
these visions have not failed, so neither
have we reason to reject as inherently in
credible those which agitated the mind of
Nebuchadnezzar, and which | for centuries
have filled the world with hope.
It is very generally assumed by com
mentators that we have in the King's
huge, composite image a prophecy of suc
cessive empires. There is, first of all.
Babylon, the head of gold; then the Medes
and Persians, the breast and arms of sil
ver; followed by the Macedonian, the belly
and thighs of brass, and terminating with
the Roman, the legs of iron, whose feet are
partly iron and partly clay. Frequently has
It been brought to the attention of students
that the description of Rome is very fine
and very pertinent. As a world power the
trampled down all opposers and was ut
terly ruthless and merciless;, while ulti
mately she . undermined her own stability
by dividing Into east and west, and by
mingling in her poulation aliens and free
men, and by blending with her customs
and manners tin' practices and vices of the
nations she bad conquered. In the words
of an old write.r, "The Kyrinn Orontes pol
luted the waters of the Tiber."
Christianity as n World-Power: This
then Is my them<\ appropriate, I trust, to
this first assembling of our national societies
on the shores of the Pacific, from which
notable event should date a new era in the
history of cur denomination. In Its discus
sion I shall not follow the order of its de
velopment eLe we have it in Daniel's inter
pretations! for by a slightly different
method it can be rendered clearer and
more practical.
The originality of Christianity as a
world-power in worthy of serious thought.
If anything Is plain it U the difference
that exists between the metallic and the
stone empires. The latter Is cut out of the
mountain without hands; that is, has a
providential beginning, and only of It is
the record Riven "that the God of heaven
shall set up a kingdom.' Those that are
of the earth are born of mixed human mo
tives and ambitions, and have bei n the re
sult of various political or warlike move
ments None of them is warranted In claim
ing for Itself the origin which distinguishes
religion..
Hut in addition to this peculiarity it is to
be observed that Christianity is to fill the
whole earth. In every sphere and terri
tory occupied by the linage, and even be
yond it is to penetrate. Perhaps we shall
be told that Jopus said, "My kingdom la
not of this world": and that therefore we
are not warranted In speaking of if at all
as a world-power. Hut why not? Are we
sure that our Lord's words are understood?
What he meant was not that his empire
was excluded from relationship with human
affairs, but that It was never designed to
copy other world-powers and strive to be
like them. It is one of the grave mistakes
committed by some pious people that they
regard organized religion as merely a means
to itself, whose sole function Is the salvation
of individuals from the peril of perdition.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, MAY 29, 1899.
whereas It constantly proclaims that it has
come to inaugurate a "renewed earth where
in dwelleth rifchtousness."
All prophetic visions which relate to this
subject represent the mountain of the Lord
as exalted above the hills, and in other
glowing figures reveal it as blessing in tem
poral as .well as in spiritual things. Jesus
himself confirms this view in some of his
parables, and there is hardly room lelt for
serious controversy.
That Christianity is fitted for domestica
tion in all the earth is evidence of the gulf
that separates it from other powers. Pro
fessor Seeley is filled with wonder at the
many-sidedness of Great Britain, ruling
■despotically in Asia and democratically in
Canada, and adapting herself to Moslem ex
clusiveness in the East and to free thought
and spirituality in the West. Perhaps the
secret is not difficult to solve. Hut there
is a more startling phenomenon; it is that
of a religion assuming to be capable of
satisfying the cravings of mankind, and to
rule for the common good European and
Asiatic, Saxon and Slav, civilized and sav
age.
Two tendencies are observable to-day. The
one is toward secular imperialism. It is
the dream of nationalities in the old world,
and" is not without charm for ourselves in
the new. Success along this line apart from
religion is freighted with ultimate mischief
and peril. Hut the other trend Is more en
couraging and more ennobling; it is toward
the triumphant imperialism of Christianity.
For which shall we labor? I am not Baying
that they are necessarily inconsistent with
each other; but so far as grandeur and
sublimity are concerned. T would rathbr de
vote myself to the second than to the tlrst.
Would not you? 'As for me, I would rather
stain! with Livingston, Carey. Marshman,
Judson. than I would with Cllve. Hastings
and Lawrence; and I would rather in the
»nd be associated with Christ and tils
apostles than 1 would with Caesar anil the
legions thundering at his heels. Would not
you? Between them we must make our
choice. And I appeal to this great assembly
nl Christians and citizens, by the glorious
imagery we have studied, which holds form
the precious hope of a spiritually trans
formed and morally regenerated social State,
to array themselves beneath the banners
of Christ, and here pledge life, fortune and
pacred honor, that he may "see of the tra
vail of his soul and be satisfied."
YOUNG BAPTISTS WERE
GIVEN GOOD ADVICE
At 3 o'clock in the afternoon the mem
bers of the Baptist. Young People's. Union
came together in the auditorium of the
church and for two and* a half hours lis
tened to some rousing speeches on practi
cal Christianity and the true spirit of the
simon-pure Baptist. Eloquence from the
four quarters of the country poured
out without stint and that the meeting
was intensely interesting to ; those who
participated was demonstrated by the
fact that there were no less than one
thousand persons, young and old. present
to listen.
• The meeting was opened with prayer
and song and then Rev. C. M. Carter of
Muncie. Ind., was introduced to his audi
ence. He had for his subject "The Baptist
Young People's Union and Its Relations."
It was a talk of instruction to
the younger Baptists of the church,
but it was ; listened t. to. with • ; wrapt
attention by the ' elders' as well as
the younger people present. Dr. Carter
decried narrow ■ sectarianism • that ac
knowledged the good in no other creeds
than its own but at the same time pointed
out that every true Baptist should know
and have faith in his ownchurbh and its
tenets.
He was followed by Rev. W. G. Par
tridge, D.D., of Cincinnati, Ohio, who
spoke at considerable length on "Training
for Service.". He held up the fact to the
younger members that there is always
room in the field for earnest workers, and
dwelt earnestly upon the necessity for
beginning preparation during the earlier
years and outlined the plan' of training
that the older heads had found of great
est efficacy. • '",-..■
Rev. E. E. Chiyers, general secretary of
the Union, delivered a sermon that in
eloquence has not been excelled < during
the present convention; Ho dealt with the
spirit that should dominate every true
Baptist, the relations of the Baptist
church with the churches of other sects,
and- he outlined clearly the broad: princi
ple upon' which members of the < church
might live in relation with members of
others without in the remotest jeopardiz
ing their creed and privileges. „• •
At 5:30 o'clock "America" was sung by
the congregation and the 'services for the
evening were announced. .•,';■
.1 . ;~ : - -, ■ . ♦ , - ■ . »' ':■"' -•'
SECRETARIES DISCUSSED
INTERESTING SUBJECTS
In the evening a missionary mass meet
ing was held In the First Baptist Church.
The sacred edifice was crowded to the
doors with interested worshipers, who
listened Intently to the addresses deliv
ered by R. Q. Seymour. D.D., H. C. Ma
bie, D.D., and T. J. Morgan, D.D. Rev.
H. L. Morehouse acted as chairman of the
meeting.
The first speaker was Dr. Seymour, mis
sionary secretary of the Educational So
ci<t\. His subject was on "Personality
in Missions." In part he said:
The word mission Is a very wonderful word.
There are some who shrink from It, because
it implies a propagation ot the great facts of
thi-lr religion. It is a broad word, for it belts
the Klobe. It Is an extra scriptural word: It
is not found within the lids of the Bible, and
yet the whole spirit of the Bible Is In It. It
Is part and parcel of our religious nomencla
ture. We have tried and tried in vain to find
a substitute for it. It has now a place for
•itself. It does not belong to any distinctive
field but to every field. It belongs to every
Christian life. No man can get a single step
outside of his own life's path without becom
ing a missionary. "As thou hast sent me into
the world even so have 1 also sent them into
the world." So in this priestly prayer of
Jesus we have conjoined his commission and
ours as missionaries — sent ones. The extent
and range of faith depends upon the breadth
of our visitant. That is, however widely the
Lord has opened our eyes it may be only to
see our white brother who lives in India,
Africa or the Philippines. We believe in our
great missionary organizations which are here
at the Golden Gate celebrating their anniver
saries-, one its eighty-fifth, one its seventy-fifth,
one its sixty-seventh. We can measure the
work which has been accomplished by these
societies. They are in the heart 6of the peo
ple. They are mighty engines for the dis
semination of the gospel and the establishment
of Christ's kingdom; the great machinery by
which Baptist churches have sent the electrical
power of the Individual life throbbing with
force and licht to the ends of the earth. I
have wondered whether faith in these organiza
tions has not allowed many to excuse them
selves from a personal participation in the
work of saving lost men. And this Is the
reason I emphasize now "Personality In Mis
sion?." • . . ..
After the singing of a hymn. Rev. Hen
ry D. Mabie, secretary of the American
Baptist Mission Union, was introduced
and spoke on "The Resurrection— Errand
of the Church."
The address of Dr. Mabie was an endeavor
to show the intimate connection between the
doctrine of Christ's resurrection. Its spiritual
apprehension by the church, with its illustra
tion in the life of the Church and the preva
lence or non-preva'"?nee of missionary convic
tion. He began his address, by calling atten
tion to the fact that the promulgation of tha
Great Commission, as it is recorded at the
end of the Gospels, was reserved until after
Christ's resurrection from the dead. It was
the supreme event connected with the forty
days of post-resurrection of earthly life. Other
injunctions of every sort, he said. Including
the sermon on the mount, the law of prayer,
the principle of forgiveness of injuries, mercy
to the needy, etc., "were plainly and emphatical
ly taught previous to Chrlsfa crucifiction and
resurrection. Hut the Great Commission itself
was reserved to a unique occasion. ' '
SOUNDING BRASS AND
TINKLING CYMBAL
Rev. Kerr Boyce Tupper, a distinguish
ed Baptist minister nf Philadelphia, occu
pied the pulpit of the First. Presbyterian
Church last evening and preached an able
sermon. His text was, "Jesus of Nazareth
went about doing good— Acts x:3B. In
part he said:
"This la the most attractive picture giv
en by Inspiration of the Son of God. More
than that, it is the only of the divine pho
tographs lust suited to our age. We live
,in an age of practical benevolence, of util
itarian tendencies. The Romans em
phasized power, the Greeks learning, the
Hebrews religion, the Americans deeds
as proving creeds. The Christ that the
world needs to-day is the one which
matches sermons with services, doctrines
with doings, creeds with characters.
"It is a remarkable fact that Christ
wrote nothing. His impress upon the
world comes through acts rather than
through writings. Plato and Homer wrote
and lived; Christ wrote not, yet lives .is
no Greek author ever lived. The secret
of his influence over men is found in the
fact that he illustrated in his life th<*
doctrines of his mjnd. blending theory
and practice with perfect purity of pri
vate life and public action. The tributes
of the great men of the world to him. as
from Carlyle and Leckey, are based
chiefly upon his tender philanthropy and
noble living.
"And Christ buttressed his deed with
his creed. Three majestic and supreme
doctrines characterize his teaching, and
these doctrines the world needs to-day:
First, the Fatherhood of God. Once God
was more to man a judge; now he is a
Father. Second, the brotherhood of the
race. The ancient Hebrew was bigoted
and narrow. No man to-day can be a
true follower of Christ who does not be
lieve in the brother man as the one to be
loved and helped. There was no poor la
bor that Christ would not touch, no home
of Squalor that he would not enter, no
humble class he would not help. An un
gem rous soul can never be the soul of
a Christian. Third, the improbability of
a soul. Once it was a wish, now it is a
conviction; once it was a probability,
now it is a certainty. By the grave Christ
stood where philosophers had thrown un
answered their questions Into the dark
ness, and he said, 'I am the resurrection
and the life.' All the darkness of his day
he would illumine by revelation from the
other world, where once he dwelt in an
ineffable way with the Father.
"The great lesson from all this is that
no life can be true that is not benevolent.
Christianity without these elements 'is
'sounding brass and tinkling cymbal.'
Better have little light and much love
than to have a full revelation and a nar
row soul."
CHARMED HIS HEARERS
WITH WORD PICTURES
Rev. William Rader of the Third Con
gregational Church shared his pulpit last
evening with Rev. Dr. Poteat, one of the
most prominent divines of Philadelphia,
Pa., who Is just now touring the West.
Both by his eloquence and breadth of
thought Dr. Poteat has bullded a reputa
tion throughout the Eastern States and
the magnificent sermon he preached la-st
evening will certainly leave him as firm
ly fixed in the minds of San Francisco's
church goers.
Dr. Poteat took for his theme "The
Light of the World." He spoke eloquent
ly and at length of the revelational as
pect of Christianity, presenting his
thought in the following points: First,
the statement made by Jesus, "1 am the
Light"; second, the self-consciousness
Jesus evinced in the statement; and third,
the pure question of fact.
Said he: "Our Lord conceived all the
institutions of religion to be for the time
being summed up in his person and that
all the -generations of men must look to
Him for light. In such self-conscio.usness
he was either a stark lunatic, a blatant
fool, or he knew himself and his relation
to the world and spoke the utter truth."
"As a matter of fact, attested in mul
titudinous experiences, he la the light of
the world," continued Dr. Poteat. "The
world without him is a world of dark
ness, of weariness and suicide; the world
of'Zeno, of Hume, of Yon Hartman, of
Byron. The world with Christ in it is the
world of John and Paul and Bunyan, and
ail our social and personal and world
problems can be read aright and solved
only in his light, for he is the light of the
world."
This in brief was Dr. Poteat's remark
able sermon. The word pictures he paint
ed in Its elaboration could be presented
only in his own fashion. In most vivid
English he drew the antithesis between
the waste world of Byron and Hume and
the lightened paths traced by Paul and
John. He cast aside the facts, and th»
ories made common by daily use and
dipped deeper into the Bible for fact and
lope to prove the things he had to say.
His sermon was such a one as is not too
often heard in this city and, his hearers
express the hope that he may be heard
again before he returns to the East.'
DR. LORIMER WAS
A REAL SURPRISE
OAKLAND, May S2.— Rev. George C.
Lorimer, D.D., L.L.D.. of Tremont Tem
ple; Boston, who has been attending the
Baptist anniversaries, created a sensation
at the Memorial services held in the Ex
position building to-night by the Baptist
churches on this side of the bay.
During .the course of his eloquent dis
course on "Old Glory" Dr. Lorimer al
luded to politics several times. He said
first that he did not care from what
source an army was drawn so long as it
be American "and have an able Secretary
of , War .at .its head and no embalmed beef,
success' and victory will attend it wher
ever it went."
■Referring -to the act of Congress forbid
ding the sale of liquor in the canteens,
whk-h act. on .the advice of the Attorney
General, was declared inoperative, the
sneaker said it was about time to get a
I new legal adviser to the President when
! si:i-h advice as this can be expected.
! Trusts and monopolies the speaker
branded as menacing the liberties of the
; people and he said that if they, were fos
t< red much longer the boasted liberty of
; freedom would yet turn out to be the llb*
j erty of the people to go out upon -~e
' highway and starve to death.
REV. P. S. HENSON'S ADDRESS.
Speaks Before the Young Men's Chris-
tian Association.
Rev. P. S. Henson of Chicago, one of
the most prominent of the visiting Bap
tist divines, delivered a very eloquent lec
ture in the auditorium of the Young
Men's Chritlan Association building yes
terday afternoon. A large audience gath
ered to hear the eminent preacher.
The text was the one hundred and third
Psalm, an exhortation to bless God, and
was taken up seriatim. The twenty-two
exhortations received a full and beauti
ful interpretation by Rev. Mr. Henson,
whose simplicity of style and natural wit
won him the most absorbed attention.
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THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS COMPANY,
' 34 2 to 350 Geary "Street. Above Powell,
' .*■ Periodicals. Books end Stationery.
COAL. COKE AND PIG IRON. •
J. C. WILSON & CO..
bOO BATTERY STREET.
\ Telephone Main 1564. ■ ' " ' \
! , COPPERSMITH. . .
JOSEPH FOX. Supt. H. BLTTH. Mgr. :
C. W.- Smith, Ship ' Plumbing,' Steamboat
and Ship Work a Specialty, 16 and 18
Washington St. Telephone. Main .s64l.
; DRUGGISTS (WHOLESALE.
REDIN6TON & CO.^^^K^
. FRESH AND SALT MEATS. * ;
lAS : RfkYr^X ''it C Ii "■ Shipping Butchers. ':iM
J A 3-. DU I (X Ml,, ■ Clay. Tel. Main 1294.
■' v ; HARDWARE :, ;> v-
PALACE Hardware Co.. Importers and Deal-
ers in hardware. 603 Market; . tel. Main 732.
GOLDEN SARD
BROUGHT DOWN
FROM ALASKA
Cargo Arrives on the
National City.
WILL BE TREATED AT SELBY'S
CAME FROM THE APOLLO MINE
ON UNGA ISLAND.
The "Sand" Is Valued at Over $100
a Ton, So the Steamer's Cargo
Is Worth Considerable.
Money.
The steamer National City attracted a
great deal of attention at Main-street
wharf yesterday morning. She was all
the way from Unga Islund with a cargo
of "sand," and the crowd could not un
derstand how such an article came to be
shipped so great a distance when enough
of the same kind of stuff to load every
vessel afloat could be procured at the
ocean beach.
Then the National City was very deep
ly laden and such great care had been
taken that not an ounce of the deck load
should be lost. The forward part of the
main deck had been into a large
box with an arched roof. This was made
throughout of inch planking and was fas
tened together as securely as nails and
the joiners' art could make it. Tons of
water wash over the structure but never
move it the fraction of an inch.
Just forward of the pilot house a well
was left in order to catch the water that
might get into the house and percolate
through the cargo, and in this way any
chance of loss was reduced to a mini
mum. The crew of the vessel said the
cargo consisted of 450 tons of sand, and
at lirst blush it seemed incredible that
such care should be taken of the cargo.
But when it is known that this particular
sand contains $100 per ton gold dust
and that it is on its way to Selby's Smelt
ing Works, the care taken to save every
ounce of it is explained.
The National City left here for Unga
Island about a month ago. She carried
a very large cargo and twenty miners for
the Apollo mine. The passage north was
a very unpleasant one and everybody
aboard was glad when it was over. It
took some time to discharge and load the
vessel and it was not until the 18th inst.
that Captain Dettmers was ready to start
back again. Two miners from the Apollo
mine— 'W. Cushin"- and A. Wilde— took
passage on the National City. They have
spent a year on Unga Island and have
come home for a rest. It blew very hard
the tirst few days out and Captain Dett
mers had to run his vessel into Sand
Point for shelter.
The barkentine Fremont and schooner
Winchester of the codfishing fleet had
been at Sand Point, but had cone back to
the banks before the National City got in.
The mail steamer Newport reached Unga
on the 17th inst. and th<- staling schooner
Olga put in there for water a few days
before that, but went on her cruise again
as soon as her water tanks were filled.
The last few days of the passage Captain
Dettmers had to economize his coal sup
ply. It began to run short, and in order
to reach port the National City had to
come along at half speed. Tt was origi
nallv the intention tn have taken her to
Selby's direct, but instead of that she had
to go to Main-street wharf and coal up.
As soon as that was done she went up the
river and her cargo of gold-bearing sand
will be carefully discharged to-day.
SIXTEENTH INFANTRY HERE.
Will Leave for Manila To-Day on the
United' States rransport Grant.
The Sixtprnth Infantry arrived from
Fort Crook, Nebraska, Jefferson barracks,
Missouri, and Fort Leavenworth, Kans.,
yesterday en route for Manila.
Company B and the band was the first
detachment to come over the bay and
they were followed at regular Intervals
b\ the other companies during the day.
Before dark all the men had arrived and
were safely housed aboard the transport
Grant at Folsom-street wharf. They are
a splendid body of men and made a fine
appearance, as they marched along p:ast
street. The majority of them are very
young and there is not an old man in the
ranks.
Colonel Hood is the commander of the
regiment, but he is not going to Manila
at this time, so Lieutenant Colonel Spur-
Kin is in command. The other officers
are: Majors — Kirkman and Ward; cap
tains— Wcodbury, Allen, Thursten, Buck.
Dunning and George; lieutenants—Pres
tcn. Woodward, Sorley, Carey. Simmons,
Miller, Mulliken. Ridenour, Gowen, Mc-
Grew, Toffey, Comer. Ford, Riffenberrick,
Hayes, Stone and McCain; surgeons-
Harris. Lloyd. Richmond *nd Dade.
All the supplies and the mail will be
aboard the Grant by this afternoon and
during the evening- the vessel will sail
for Manila via Honolulu.
Jf(a/i^^^^^
puts heart and ability into one— helps one over
the hard places In life. Its merit is asslired by
the fact that it is made by the Anheuser-Busch
Brewing Ass'n.
:■■ ♦ ■
Now Sorry He Did It.
Marcus Hansen, a laborer, living at IS2
Hickory avenue, saw a bottle on the bu
reau in his bedroom yesterday afternoon
and decided to investigate. He pulled out
IRON FOUNDERS.
Western Foundry. Morton & Hedley. Proo*.
234 Fremont St. Castings of Every Da.
scrlption Made to Order. Tel. Black 1503.
• LIQUORS.
OCDOLD WHISKEY, gallon.. $1.50 ; ease, $6.03
0. P. B. PONY, da. .......$2.53; case $10.03
L. CAHKN ii, SON, 418 Sacramento St.. 8. F.
NO BETTER CN EARTH gSSSL^iI?-
Comanche Ochre Co.. 203 Front; tel. Jessie 1996.
.PAPER DEALERS. *
Wll 1 AMFTTF PULP AND PAPER CO..
If ILLMITILI I L 722 Montgomery Street.
PRINTING.,
EC HUGH E S, 611 PRINTER,
• V- llvmiLO.6ii Sansome strot.
THF Hlf S IPnn fft Printers, Book-
IDC UIVAJ-JUVU UJ-. binders. 23 First st.
STATIONER AND PRINTER.
Telegraphicr> \ DTDIHrF 306 Call-
Codes. rV\IV'l IVILUjC fornla st.
WAREHOUSEMEN.
THE HASLETT WAREHOUSE CO.,
Forwarding Agents and public Weighers.; Gen-
eral Storage. Free .and. Grain Warehouses.' Gen-
eral office, 210 California st. Tel. Main 1914.
• •' ■' '■■■[ WATCHES, ETC.
T I IIVnV Headquarters for fine Jewelry and
•;Llinill< 18-lc. Wedding Rings. 4 3d St.
WrilTii ASH STEAM COAL,
Mined by the ' •.■' "'■
BLACK DIAMOND (UAL, MINING CO. at Its
GREEN RIVER COLLIERIES,
V '■'".} - is -■ the ' Beet Coal In the Market.
' Office and Yards— Main Street.
the cork and smelled :t, but not being sat
isfied he swallowed a dose of the con
tent?, which tasted so queer that he
locked at the label on the bottle and dis
covered that it read 'aconite." He imme
diately hurried to the Receiving Hospital
and the usual remedies for aconite poi
son were applied. He was able to leava
the hospital several hours later.
Ocean Water Tub Batha.
101 Seventh street, corner Mission. Salt
water direct from ocean.
i
AMUSEMENTS.
COLUMBIA^™
last WEEK.
! MATINEES TUESDAY (Memorial Day)
AND SATURDAY.
HERBERT EFFIE
KELCEY -SHANNON
j In the Great American Play.
™M©TH^ FLAME
next MONDAY. First Production Upon
Any Stage of a NEW PLAY,
CALIFORNIA THEATER.
BEGINNING MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 5.
LAMBARDI GRAND
ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY
FROM MILAN.
REPERTOIRE FOR THE FIRST WEEK:
, Monday ........"CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA"
...;. And -I'PAGLIACCI"
Tuesday "LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR'*
1 Wednesday "ERNANI"
Thursday :."MAJ»ON LESCAULT"
Friday "RIGOLETTO"
, Saturday Matinee
"LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR"
Saturday "IL TROVATORE"
Popular Prices! All Seats Reserved!
Entire ground floor $1 00
Balcony 50c, 75c and $100
1 ' Gallery r----; 25c
! Box and Low Seats $1 aO
The Sale of Seats Will Begin THURSDAY
', MORNING. June 1. at 9 o'clock. _
; GRAND OPERA HOUSE
'. Telephone Green 861.
THIS EVENING.
[ First production in San Francisco of the New
York Casino Furor.
'■ . THE
; PRINCESS NICOTINE!
The Entire
: SOUTHWELL OPERA COMPANY
In the cast.
• : Reserved seats, 25 and 50 cents; gallery IB
1 cents.
Branch box office just inside main entrance
of Emporium building.
■ HOLIDAY MATINEE TOMORROW,
I DECORATION DAY. _
■ | ;
i ■ ' .' '
CLIFFORD and HUTH,
Stars "A High Born Lady."
HENRI FRENCH,
' The New Sensation, Juggler and Bicyclist.
MOUNG TOON and MOUNG CHET
; The Burmese Wonders.
i ! BILLY VAN. MONTGOMERY AND STONE
AND TEN BIG VAUDEVILLE STARS.
1 , Reserved seats 25c. balcony 10c. . Opera
' ' chairs and box seats ">oc.
' SPECIAL MATINEE TUESDAY, MAY 30.
' Regular Matinees Wed., Sat. and Sunday.
'| TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE.
ONE WEEK ONLY
I Of Edmond Audran's Greatest Comic Opera,
THE
MASCOT.
Great Cast! Correct Costumes! Appropriate
Accessories!
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2 O'CLOCK.
SPECIAL— MONDAY EVENING, June 5,
Reappearance of the San Francisco Favorite,
GRACIE PLAISTED,
In Strauss' Masterpiece,
"THE " MERRY \A//\R»»
j PRICES ! 25c and 500
Telephone Bush 9. " ; -'.- i
ALCAZAR™
THIS (MONDAY) NIGHT AT 8.
MEMORIAL DAY MATINEE TO-MORROW.
Engagement of the Celebrated American
Actor,
yvvre. lewis MORRISON,
Supported : by the Talented Actress,
FLORENCE ROBERTS,
Magnificent production of
HAMLET.
P81CE5..... Isc, 25c, 35c. 50e.
CHUTES JND ZOO!
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
GREAT BILL IN THE FREE THEATER.
BILLIE DODSON. Male Soorano^ WALDO
and ELLIOTT, Aerial Contortionists : .LWTLE
MAUDIE. the Phenomenal Child; QUERITA
VINCENT, the New York Sensation: ANTONIO
VINCENT, the Eminent Barytone; WESTON
and HERBERT. Musical Comedians, and NEW
MOVING PICTURES. ,
RIDE ON THE GALLOPING HORSES.
VISIT LUNETTE AND THE MAZE.
Balloon Ascension TO MORROW,
Decoration Day. :^:| :;
GLEN PARK.
TO-MORROW, TUESDAY. .
FIRST AMATEUR DAY !
Darin? Ballots Ascension by
AMATEUR AERONAUT
I! AMATEUR CAKE WALKERS.
DRAMATIC READERS. GYM-
NASTS. OPERATIC SINGERS.
I FANCY DANCERS, etc.
Horse . racing, . pie eating, pole climbing and
ladder scaling CONTESTS FOR CASH
PRIZES. Open to. all children.
i Admission to Park 10c; no extra charge for
| "theater. .
CONCERTS AND HESOBTS.
DalllW GREAT realistic
. _ WAR PANORAMA!
OT Prof. W. a ROLLINS,
rz: — the eminent orator,
mm • . lectures half hourly.
IVI Si Fl 1 1 <B Market St.. nr. Eighth.
■ ■ ; -,vr Admission 60c.
Bay! Cl "*' r ""*-
SUTRO BATHS.
OPEN NIGHTS.
OPEN DAILY FROM 7 A.M. to 11. P. M.
BATHING FROM 7 A. M. to 10:36 P. M.
ADML-'oION, 10c. CHILDREN, sc.
Bathing, Including admission, 25c; children, 20c.
5

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