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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 26, 1899, Image 8

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CITY OF ROSES JOINS
IN TRIBUTE TO DEWEY
JAMES S. SWEET, flayor of Santa Rosa.
Mayor Sweet of Panta Rosa is in hearty accord with the movement to
i statue to Admiral Dewey. He says:
SANTA ROSA. June 25.
To the Editor of The Call: I am heartily in favor of erecting a suit
able monument to Admiral Dewey and in doing something to commem
orate his wonderful achievements in the harbor of Manila, California
contains a large number of wealthy and influential citizens who should
and doubtless will esteem it both a pleasure and an honor to contribute
to such a cause. Such monuments should ba encouraged. They lead to-^he
advancement and beautifying of the Stnte, while back of it all is the
idea that has been popular ever since the world began — that of suitably
honoring the public servant who has added to the honor and dignity of
his native land. I shall de=m it an honor to assist the project in every
way, and now have Mayor Phelan's communication under consideration.
JAMES S. SWEET, Mayor.
"THE CHIMES
OF NORMANDY "
AT THE GRAND
i The stage manager at the Grand Opera
..oi)«>> possesses in perfection the
rhythmic sense and spares no pains to
: w:ork his Ideal Into his reputation. Did
'.ihf-v managers accept him as a mentor
they might earn the right to live In our
. st.eem, and in the words of Plato
"niipht die with the faier hope." Plan
quette's merry opera, "The Chimes of
Normandy," is full of old friends
grappled to the soul of the comic opera
composer this many a day and thrice dear
to us for their very familiarity. The vil
lage maiden of obscure parentage in
search of a family and always found in
flimsy ambush in the nick of time to over
hearrwhat villains and heroes would fain
conceal and to that end talk in the open
at the top of their voices. Or if not In
fl'iihsy ambush perfectly disguised from
her oldest friends behind the meshe3 or a
thin tulle veil. „ _„
"Consistency, thou art a jewel. inc.
robust and florid Baelll, a ci-devant nt
only for sour celibacy, yet madly in lov-i
with Mademoiselle, a blushing bud of
seventeen summers, he linds his ralson
d'etre as a mouthpiece for the topical
'pong, and with his horse play keeps the
unlettered in a roar. They think he is
funny, and we are under no obligations to
convince them of the contrary. Besides,
perhaps he Is. "We have only as much
of" the world as we can appreciate. The
cruel guardian who would marry beaut}
to' a money chest and break the heart of
a-.tlshermanlover. who sings his tenor
soi-rows in every disengaged ear-ami
dots nothing else. The village Popula
tion that makes a profession of attending
fairs by day and balls by night and has
no explained means of support beyond
the faiOi that God will provide.
They all ring musically in the
"Chime*." bo ably sung by the Southwell
company, with its clever principals and
wcS drilled choruses. The stage pictured
are beautiful, the figures except a few,
moving in perfect time and grace. Those
™w must inevitably find places In the
back row. for lack of time argues a men
tal infirmity. You can trace it from the
tols tip Thomas H. Persse sings the role
of Henri to well merited applause, . but
with a method calculated to break early
1 , rood voice. He carries his middle reg
kter too high and holds his best notes
not at the option of good taste but to the
limit of breath and sometimes beyond It.
The audience approves, but no singer
owes the public bo much effort. If it were
\Vil liam Wolff who did this we should
say "Go on and lose your voice as fast
as possible, for we need you to play the
-Old Musicians" and .."Dunston Kirks'
and "Colonel Prestons" of the future.
His Jaspard was a cameo Edith Mason,
hough lacking in magnetism, makes S*r
polette a most ingenuous hoyden. Miss
Hattio Belie Ladd is a charming Ger
mane and in a Jessie Bartlett Davis qual
tvof! voice sings herself quite Into our
affections! I wonder what subtle poison
lurks for her In the folds of a white gown?
Her charm perceptibly lessens as soon
as she dons one. Even her voice seems
*The enoruses and sextets In the second
art are the gems of the opera, and abovo
the beautiful harmonies the strong, sjm
pfHhftio tenor notes of Mlro Delamotta
rose and foil with infinite sweetness. H ■»
voice will last, for it is well posed and hl3
method good. The shivering trio was
more than well don* 1 , despite the fact that
the Illusion was destroyed by a stage
much too light for groping purposes. llw
enterprise of the Grand Opera-house man
agement deserves recognition and ap
plause. They promise on Monday a splen
did production of the "Lily of Klllarney."
CHARLOTTE . THOMPSON.
SOLDIER, LAID TO BEST
Interment of Captain Cressey's Re-
mnifrs in the National Cemetery.
Kdwnrd Potter Cressey, late brevet lieu
tenant colonel and '-aptaln of the Third
United States Cavalry, was buried yes
terday In the National Cemetery with full
Mnnnnl^ rltos. Service? were held at the
Masonic Temple at 1 o'rlork. a large num
ber of friends, military- and civil, being
present.
Captain Cressey was a graduate of West
Point, rlnss r,f j<v',R. He «erved with dis
tinction and honor throughout the war of
the Rebellion and latterly held posts on
the frontier. For many years he has been
an Important personage In the Masonic
order. Captain Cressey was born in
Delhi Delaware County, New York and
was 63 years old.
Sons of Benjamin.
The grand annual pl<-nir' of the Califor
nia .Lodge No. 113, Independent Order
Sons of Benjamin, was held yesterday In
the Germpnia Gardens at Harbor View.
There was a large crowd In attendance
and President Emll Cohn expressed him
self r»s greatly pleased with the turnout.
The list of gate prizes was large and a
number of useful and beautiful pr
■ v. The occasion was en
i by m;i=ic and dancing. Every one
had a royal good time.
MISS EATON MARRIED
TO BERT DRUMMOND
A Quiet Sunday Wedding
at San Rafael.
A quiet wedding took x>'ace yesterday
at San Rafael, when Hattie M. Eaton,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Eaton of
this city and granddaughter of Mrs. Mary-
Eaton of Burlington, Vt., was united in
marriage to Bert E. Drummond, son of R.
E. Drummond. Horticultural Commis
sioner of T.os Angeles County. The Rev.
William Marshall, pastor of the M. E.
church, officiated.
A reception will be held this evening at
the home of the bride's parents, 8,13
Shrader street in this city, after which
the happy couple will make an extended
trip to Seattle and the leading towns of
the Northwest, returning in the early
part of Septfmber.
Mr. Drummond is connected with one of
the largest navigation companies on this
coast.
RAILWAY EMPLOYES
ENJOY AN OUTING
Three trainloads, containing about 2000
pleasure-seekers, spent yesterday at Sun
set Park in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Tt
' was the occasion of the first anniversary
: of the organization of the Railway Em
ployes' Association, and it was Improved
by all as an opportunity to have a good
time. Dancing and music were the chief
features of the day's pleasure, the floor
being as smooth and che music as good as
could be wished for. F. S. Grummon
made a decided hit as floor manager and
everything passed off serenely under his
supervision.
D. L. Fitzgerald, president of the club,
acted as chairman of the committee of ar
rangements. In his efforts to make the
outing a notable success he was ably sec
onded by P. J. Kelly, the chairman of the
executive committee. A special event of
i the day was a cake walk, in which Louis
s and Miss (Jertie Moore came out
victors. The second prize was awarded to
Jesse Bilvey and Mi<=s Brooks, George
Hubert and Miss Nettie McElroy being a
, good third.
J. J. Donegan Laid to Rest.
The funeral of J. J. Donegan, who died
at his home last Friday, took place from
St. Dominic's Church yesterday. In the
morning a requiem high mass was said
over the remains, which were afterward
intem<! in Holy Cross Cemetery. The
funeral was largely attended by "various
orders to which the deceased belonged
among them being the Ancient Order or
Hibernians, Knights of St. Patrick, St.
Patrick's Alliance. Youne Men's Catholic
Tnion and the Cork Rebels' Benevolent
Association. The ueceased was a well
known merchant and very nopular among
his many acquaintances. He left a widow
and six children. His death occurred at
his home, 610 Larkin street.
Threw Eggs at a Socialist.
John Speak, a socialistic orator who
gathers a large crowd every night at the
corner of Grant avenue and Market
streets, was treated to a fusillade of rot
ten eggs Saturday, and for a time it
looked as if a general riot was imminent.
The eggs were thrown by unknown per-
Bone from the roof of the clothing store
at the southeast corner of Grant avenue
and Market streets. Policemen Murphy
and Marshall, who were in the neighbor
hood, quelled the disturbance, much to
the Fatisfaction of Speak, who contlnin-.i
his address after quiet was restored and
the supply of eggs gave out.
L. Dinkelspiel Dead.
Lazarus Dlnkelsplel, the woll-known
capitalist and founder of the firm of L.
Dlnkelsplel & Sons, died at his residence
1292 O'Farrell street, yesterday. Deceased
was 76 years of age and a native of
I Baden, Germany. He came to Ban Fran
' cisco many years ago and entered Into
! the business of Importing dry goods,
which business grew to large proportions
ias the years passed. Successful In busi
ness, h* accumulated a large fortune. He
Is survived by his widow and seven chil
; dren.
Swallowed Bat Poison.
John Lyons had designs on his life yes
terday evening, and consumed half a box
of rat poison with suicidal intent. The
prompt use of a stomach pump at the
Harbor Receiving Hospital stayed John's
flight up the golden stairs, and he is now
on the road to recovery. The terror of
the rodents was taken at Lyons' home.
Pacific and Powell streets.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, JUNE 26, 1899.
DEFENDS THE
PRINCIPLE OF
UNION LABOR
Rev. J. N. Beard's
Able Address.
STRIKES ARE JUSTIFIABLE
— * _
A LARGE AUDIENCE AT GRACii
M. E. CHURCH.
He Declares That if Low Wages and
Long Hours Mean Civilization
Then China Is in the
Vanguard.
The Rev. J. N. Board of Grace Metho
dist Episcopal Church held the close at
tention of a large audience last night. His
subject was "The Church and the Labor
Unions."
The pastor dealt thoroughly with the
topic of organized labor. While admit
ting the Inadvisability and evil results of
many strikes, he thoroughly Indorsed the
principles involved in the boycott and the
strike, even the sympathetic strike, as
being legitimate means of waging the In
dustrial war between labor -and capital.
In part he said:
"The interests of labor and capital are
not identical, but they are reciprocal.
! Neither can succeed at the expense of
! the other. Labor seeks equality of bar
■ gaining power, and this it can best effect
| through organization. The organization
j of labor tends to prevent the monopoly of
i wealth, because only the strongest bust-
I ness concerns can stand against the ex
| actions of the unions. On the same prin
ciple combinations of capital necessitate
the union of laborers in self defense. Be
cause we cannot differentiate labor from
man it has a humanitarian aspect. Men,
! even considered as laborers, are not like
, so many hales of hay or bags of potatoes,
to be bought and sold without reference
ito their humanity. Laborers demand a
' living wage, but this does not mean a
1 simple subsistence. We are all interested
• In a high standard of living for laborers
! as well as others, because this is a eon
; dltion of a high civilization. If low wages
and long hours mean civilization then
China is in the vanguard. I cannot be
lieve that any man who must give all his
, waking hours to the struggle for bread is
I a free man.
"All unions are Interested In attaining
i their legitimate objects by conciliation,
■ when possible, but they are all ready to
I report to war. in the shape of strikes and
boycotts, when necessary. Between labor
! and capital, as between nations, arbitra
tion and peace are most probable when
I each is able to care for Itself; in other
: words, to prepare for a strike, by thor
ough organization, is frequently to avert
one. The feeling which prompts the harsh
treatment of non-unionists at the time of
a strike is natural and founded on Justice,
, though not justifiable If It proceeds to
lawlessness.
"While there Is no defense for many
things done under the name of hoycott,
the principle cannot be successfully at
tacked. This congregation Is constantly
recommended to boycott saloons and such
institutions. Concerning sympathetic
strikes, where men with no grievance of
their own strike to assist their fellows. I
can only say that my earliest recollec
tions are connected with the great war
of the rebellion, which was nothing more,
in one aspect, than a great sympathetic
strike. And the same remark applies to
our recent war with Spain. In another
aspect trades unionism is also an active
check on the importation into this coun
try of undesirable, cheap foreign labor."
AUTOMOBILE CRAZE
REACHES THE CITY
Tn the line of accidents It was extreme
ly quiet at the park yesterday, but the
police and hospital physicians are antici
pating a brisk time in the near future.
The automobile, or horseless carriage,
craze has assumed such proportions In
the East that many of the wealthy of
this city have determined to get in line.
In fact, there are a few of these four
wheeled machines in the city at the pres
ent time, but owing to their horse-fright
ening propensities they have up to date
been excluded from the park. San Fran-
Cisco must be up to date, however, the
wealthy say, and the eoulne animals of
this commonwealth might as well prepare
for the worst.
In consequence It is said that in a short
time the Park Commissioners will be
called upon to revoke their order exclud
ing machines from the park calculated to
stampede horses, and allow the automo
biles free access. It is during tr| process
of initiating the horses and consoling
them upon their ultimate consignment to
the canning factory that the police and
surgeons anticipate a busy time, but they
are ready for all emergencies.
M-rrilf Owens, an insurance clerk, who
resides at IS3O O'Farrell street, was ar
rested by the bicycle path policeman for
fast cycling. When taken he was going
at a great speed and submitted to arrest
with apparent indifference. On the way
to the station, however, he met a crowd
of his friends, and the policeman says
that all hands jumped him and endeav
ored to release the young man. When
Captain Thompson heard this he ordered
the prisoner locked up for the offense, in-
Ftead of warning and then releasing him,
as in done when people violate the cycling
law for the first time.
The usual crowd assembled at the
Chutes yesterday and enjoyed the various
features, as did the guests at Sutro
Baths. The results of the aquatic con
tests at the baths are as follows: Fifty
yard dash, novice— H. Seehach first. J.
Laird second. 100-yard dash for juveniles—
M. Gardner first. F. Faker second. 100
--yard amateur race— T. Cook first, C. Royal
second. 100-yard tub race— W. Dunford
first. A. Bandain second, C. Augustus
third. High diving for boys— Won by R.
Cooke, C. Augustus second. Trick and
fancy springboard diving— Won by C.
Royal, C. Augustus second.
THREE PARLORS GOING TO
NAPA FOR THE FOURTH
Fourth of July -will be celebrated jointly
by Mission and Precita Parlors, N. S. G.
W., and Yosemlte Parlor, N. D. G. W.,
and the celebration will take the form of
a grand river excursion to Napa.
The steamer Zinfandel has been char
tered for the occasion and will leave San
Francisco at 5:45 p. m. on July 3, arriving
at Napa at 10 o'clock of the same evening.
The visiting parlors will be the guests of
Napa Parlor, N. S. G. W., at a grand ball
Immediately on the arrival of the steamer.
On the morning of the Fourth there will
be a parade with several novel features,
and In the afternoon a picnic, basaball
game and bicycle races. In the evening
another ball will be given in the new pa
vilion, which will be opened for the first
time. The baseball game will be between
nines from Preclta and Napa parlors.
The steamer will leave Napa on the re
turn trip at 12 o'clock, midnight, and ar
rive in the city at 4 o'clock on the morn
ing of the sth.
An enjoyable time is promised all those
who attend. A fine band of twenty-four
pieces will accompany the excursionists
and there will be dancing and concerts
both going and coming.
The committee of arrangements, which
is working indefatigably to insure the
success of the affair, consists of H. L.
Hartman, chairman; L. G. Shade, A.
Tiedemann, Fred C. Gerdes and Frank H.
Mills.
Theosophical Society Meets.
The Universal Brotherhood of the The
osophlcal Society held a meeting last
night in the Academy of Sciences Hall.
H. B. Monges delivered a speech on the
real and Ideal, after which the meeting
was thrown open for a general expres
sion of views on various theosophlcal sub
jects, and some very Interesting and In
structive discussions ensued.
CAMP MEETING OF THE
HOLINESS ASSOCIATION
OAKLAND. June 25.— The Paci
fic Coast Holiness Association
will hold a camp meeting at
Keulah Park. East Oakland,
beginning June 29 and contin
uing over two Sundays. The associa
tion was organized in ISSO by a few
earnest Christians, who felt the neces
sity of more aggressiveness in certain
lines of religious activity. Represent
ative^ were sent out all over the
coast, and many of th<# various forms
of mission activity now manifest had
their origin in the work established by
the society.
The first refuge home in San Fran
cisco that became a permanency was
founded by the society and is now one
of the most successful of the Florence
Crittenton homes. George Newton, the
president, was the first presiding offi
cer. He was formerly a Methodist
minister, beginning his labors on this
coast thirty years ago, and has been
identified with the holiness movement
for twenty years. He will superintend
the present camp meeting. Mr, New
ton has recently opened a benevolence
in Oakland called the Christian Home
for Unemployed Girls, and contem
plates the establishment of a home
for wornout aged people.
HELPED US TO EMPIRE
IN THE PHILIPPINES
When the Pacific Mail steamship City of
Rio de Janerlo docked last evening she
: landed three distinguished passengers
; who have had considerable to do with the
making of history since last their feet
i touched the soil of California.
They are Captain N. M. Dyer, who com
; manded the Baltimore at that famous bat
.' tie of Manila Bay; Captain M. A. Waiker,
I who commanded the Concord, and J. C.
] Wise, medical director of Admiral
Dewey's fleet. The three officers are on
their way home after having completed
: their terms of service on the Asiatic sta
, tion. They will remain in the city but
a few days, when they will proceed to
their several homes, whence they will
report to the Navy Department for duty.
It is not likely, however, that they will be
detailed for active service for some
. months to come, as the department will,
j no doubt, give them a chance In which
! to recuperate and see something of tneir
j families before again calling upon them
! for their services.
When seen last evening at the Occi
-1 dental they were disinclined to taJk. Too
modest to speak of their own exploits and
i —with the example of the jovial Coughlin
still fresh In their minds— too politic to
■ criticize affairs in the Philippines, they
! confined themselves to expressions of
satisfaction at once more getting home
' and inquiries after news of the world
they have been so long shut off from.
When questioned concerning the cap
; ture of Hollo and the protest of Captain
i Wilde of the cruiser Boston against Gen
• eral Miller receiving his promotion as a
reward for taking the place, they had lit
tle to say beyond a statement indorsing
: Wilde's action and claiming for the navy
the credit of the capture and occupation
of the city.
Captain Walker left Manila and went as
far as Hongkong with Dewey on the
; Olympi.i. He reports the admiral in good
th, though considerably run down and.
exhausted from his long strain of anxiety
j and responsibility.
Captain James M. Forsyth relieved
Captain Dyer in command of the Balti
more and Captain Walker was relieved of
1 his command of the Concord by Com
mander Seth M. Ackerley.
WANT THE BERLIN RAIL.
Teamsters and Improvement Clubs
Making a Fight for Bet
ter Streets.
A general movement is on foot in the
city to compel street railway companies
to adopt the Berlin grooved rail, in pref
erence to the T rail now in use. It is
claimed that this rail presents a smooth
Burface and not only adds to the appear
ance of the street, but is a great con
venience to teamsters and drivers gener
ally.
At the meeting of the Draymen and
Teamsters' T'nion held Saturday reso- j
lutlons requesting the Board of Super
visors to compel railway companies to
use this rail were adopted, and similar
action was taken by the executive com
mittee of the Richmond Improvement
Association at the instigation of E. P. E.
Troy. >
Rio Janeiro in Port.
The Rio Janeiro arrived from the Orient !
yesterday afternoon and docked at the
i Pacific Mail Steamship Company's dock.
1 She brought the fumigated mail of the i
Nippon Maru and about forty cabin pas
i sengcrs. among whom were Captain N.
M. Dyer and Captain Asa Walker of the
; navy. No Incidents worthy of mention
occurred during the voyage, and agree
able weather caused the trip to be a very
pleasant one. Mrs. Anna Cummlngs, sec
retary of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. R. R.
Mutual Benefit Association, was also on
the passenger list.
Accidentally Shot.
Michael Monahan was shot while in the
saloon of A. Schwedt at the corner of
Florida and Twenty-third streets last
night by the accidental discharge of a
Winchester rifle. The rifle was upon the
draining board in the rear of the bar, and
in some way while drawing the beer
Schwedt struck it and discharged it. Ine
bullet passed through the counter, also
through Monahan's leg and into the body
of a dog. Captain Gillln had the wounded
man removed to the City and County Hos
pital, where Dr. J. A. Lane dressed the
wound, which Is not serious.
Fractured His Ankle.
W. McMillan of the Journal of Com
merce while jumping from a car at Larkin
and Eddy streets yesterday morning frac
tured his right ankle. He was taken to
the Receiving Hospital and later to the
City and County Hospital.
DIRECTORY
Of RESPONSIBLE MANUFACTURERS, MERCHANTS
AND JOBBERS.
CATALOGUES AND PRICE LISTS MAILED ON APPLICATION
PLEASE MENTION "THE CALL."
BELTINO.
Ln IIFfiFN Manufacturer of Beitlfiw and
I. l/LUCt^, Lnco Leather. 105-107 Mis-
sion St., cor. Spear. Telephone Main 563.
BOXER MAKERS.
EUREKA BOILER WORKS,
W. J. BRADY. Proprietor.
Special Attention Paid to Repairs and Ship
Work.
Office and Works— ll3-115 MISSION ST.
' Telephone Main 5045.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS COMPANY,
342 to 350 Oeary Street. Above Powell,
Periodicals. Books and Stationery.
COAL. COKE AND PIQ IRON.
J. C. WILSON & CO.,
WOO BATTERY STREET.
Telephone Main ISM.
COPPERSMITH.
JOSEPH FOX. Bupt H. BLTTH. M«t.
C. W. Smith, Ship Plumbing, Steamboat
and Ship Work a Specialty, 16 and 18
Washington St. Telephone. Main 5641.
DRUGGISTS (WHOLESALE).
REDINGTON & CO. SecondandSteren.
nuUINUIUH 06 UUi son Sts. TeL Main 4
FRESH AND SALT MEATS.
I AC' RAYF? £m Shipping Butchers. 1M
4AJ. DUIIO tt Wt f Clay. Tel . Mala 1294.
GEORGE NEWTON.
COL. C. R. GREENLEAF
TALKS OF THE WAR
A good-sized audience filled the First
Presbyterian Church last night to hear
Colonel Charles R. Greenleaf, medical In
spector of the United States army, speak
of his experiences In Cuba and Porto
Rico. Colonel Greenleaf, who is here to
take charge of the sanitary affairs of the
troops returning- from Manila, was the
medical inspector of the Eastern camps,
where the soldiers were quartered after
having served in the tropics. He had
under his direct supervision at Savannah
13.000 and at Harrisburg 6000 returned
soldiers.
The colonel said that during the war
one thought had often occurred to him,
and that was that the people at home had
little conception of the suffering and
misery that was incident to war. He con
tinued: "The first six months or year of
a wnr are very productive of sickness. It
takes about that time to teach a soldier
how to keep his person and surroundings
clean. The prime duty of the medical
staff is to gauge the percentage of sick
ness among the soldiers for the first half
year. We count on about 15 per cent of
sick men to S per cent of those Injured in
battle. The Red Cross societies of Europe
an' organized under more favorable con
ditions than ours. They have the advan
tages of centralization and systematic
distribution. The necessity of these two
things in this work is one of the lessons of
the war."
The speaker described the condition of
the troops when he reached Siboney in a
very graphic manner. He said: "it was
impossible to keep the men from exposing
themselves. They seemed entirely de
void of caution and could not be kept
from the infected houses. One incident
touched me deeply," eald he. "The hos
pital at Siboney was crowded. Every
nurse and attendant had come clown with
the contagion. At my request a captain
of the Twenty-fourth (colored) called for
volunteers from his company to act as
nurses. The company stepped forward as
one man."
After describing some interesting inci
dents of the Porto Hican campaign, the
colonel told of the scenes and conditions
in Cuba. He said that Senator Proctor's
letter before the war does not begin to
express the suffering. He saw more suf
fering, more dreadful misery in tftat
island than in all the rest of his lifetime
put together.
Officers Elected.
Following are the. officers chosen by
Cathedral Council, Y. M. 1., for the en
suing term: Very Rev. J. J. Prendergast
V. G., chaplain; John D. Mahoney, past
president; Edward J. Dollard. president;
W. Chester Keogh and Walter E. Dorn
vice presidents; John J. Clifford record
ing secretary; John M. Hyland, financial
secretary; T. J. Farrell, corresponding
secretary; P. p. McCarthy, marshal: Dr!
\\ . C. Hopper, medical examiner; Will
iam Rattlgan. inside sentinel; James
Reardon. outside sentinel; Daniel C
Deasy, W. F. Humphrey and Rev E p"
Dempsey, executive committee. Edward
J. Dollard and Rev. E. P. Dempsey were
chosen as delegates to the Grand Council.
Liberty Lodge, Knights of Honor will
on the 3d of July install the following
named, chosen as officers for the ensuing
term: Thomas Billingslea. past dictator-
James A. Johnston, dictator; A E. Cohn
vice dictator; John Furness. assistant dic
tator: Ben I. Salomon, reporter; W. J.
Langstaff, financial reporter; R. A A
Summers, treasurer; Augustus Johnson'
chaplain; Arthur E. Rowe, guide- L, Mr-
Mahon. guardian: George Fox. sentinel-
William Cellarrus, organist; William J
Thomas, Frank Laurence and B. E
George, trustees.
New Charter Democratic Club.
At a meeting held Saturday evening at
Washington Square Hall the New Charter
Democratic Club of the Forty-fourth As
sembly District effected a permanent or
ganization and elected the following offi
cers: President, Dr. L. D. Bacigalupl:
vice presidents, IT. Gutstadt. Dr. Harold
yon der Lelth, John B. Campodonieo
Philip P. McMahon and Charles Gay
secretary, E. J. Sullivan. Two hundred
and fifty-four members have signed the
roll. Meetings will be held every Wed
nesday evening.
Demand Merriam's Recall.
NEW YORK, June 25.— District Assem
bly No. 4, Knights of Labor, at a meet
ing to-day unanimously adopted resolu
tions demanding General Merriam's recall
and court-martial on account of his action,
in the Coeur d'Alene labor troubles.
Big Offer for David Garrick.
NEW YORK, June 25.— The owner of
David Garrick was offered $20,000 for the
horse, which offer he refused.
The deer really weeps, its eyes beine
provided with lachrymal glands.'
HARDWARE.
DA LACE Hardware Co.. Importer! and Deal-
r >m In hardware. 603 Market: tel. Matn7sl
IRON FOUNDERS.
Wentem Foundry Morton & Hedley. Proo^
234 Fremont St. Castings of Erery D».
scrlptlon Made to Order. TeL Black 1503.
PAPER DEALERS.
WILLAMFTTF P LP AND paper co.,
lI ILLMITIL 111. 722 Montgomery Street.
PRINTINO.
EC HUGHES, 5 u
THE HICKS- CO, tSaSJn'&S^
STATIONPR ANO PRINTER. !
™SS2? 'PARTRIDGE S»J?S:
WAREHOUSEMEN.
THE HASLETT WAREHOUSE CO.,
Forwarding Arentfl and public Weigher*. Gen-
eral Storage, pre, and Grain Warehouses. Gen-
era! office. 210 California at. Tel. Main I*l4.
WATCHES, ETC*
Tf lINHY Headquarters for fine Jewelry and
• LtnUl. is-k. Wedding Rings. 4 M «t.
WHITE ASH STEAM COAL.
, Mined by th«
BLACK DIAMOND COAL MINING CO. at Its
! GREEN RIVER COLLIERIES,
Js the Beet Coal In the Market.
Office and Yarda— lfiO Mala BtmC»
WEATHER REPORT.
(120 th Meridian— Time.)
SAN FRANCISCO, June 25. 5 p. m.
The following maximum temperatures are re
ported from stations In California to-day:
Eureka 60 1 San Diego 66
Fresno 80 Sacramento 70
I<os Angeles 74 ' Independence 80
Red Bluff 721 Yuma 100
San Luis Oblspo ... 68!
San Francisco data: Maximum temperature,
58; minimum, 50; mean, 54.
WEATHER CONDITIONS AND GENERAL
FORECAST.
The weather is generally cloudy and threat
ening ever the northern portion of the' Pacific
Slope and in Utah and In Arizona. Light
showers and thunder storms have occurred
generally throughout the country west of the
Rocky Mountains except In California.
The pressure has risen except along the coast
of Oregon and Washington where there has
been a slight fall.
The temperature has risen over California
and Southwestern Oregon and fallen decidedly
over the remaining portions of the Pacific
Slope.
From San Francisco northward In California,
In Northern Nevada and in Utah and Arizona
the weather Is threatening and light showers :
with thunder storms in the mountains are
probable to-night and Monday.
Forecast made at San Francisco for thirty
hours, ending midnight June 26:
Northern California— Cloudy and probably
scattered showers to-night and Monday in the
north portion; fair in south portion; warmer In
the interior; fresh variable winds.
Southern California— Monday: fresh wes
terly winds.
Nevada— Cloudy with showers in the north
portion Monday; fair In the south portion.
Utah — Showers Monday.
Arizona— Partly cloudy Monday with show- J
ers in the east portion.
San Francisco and vicinity— and some
what threatening Monday: fresh west winds.
G. H. WILLSON, Local Forecast Official.
SUN, MOON AND TIDE.
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey—
Times and Heights of High and Low
Waters at Fort Point, entrance to San
Francisco Bay. Published by official au
thortly of the Superintendent.
NOTE— The hlph and low waters occur at
the city front (Mission-street wharf) about
twenty-five minutes later than at Fort Point;
the height of tide is the same at both places.
MONDAY, JUNE 26.
NOTE — In the above exposition of the tides
the early morning tides are given In the left
hand column nnd the successive tides of the
day In the order of occurrence as to time. The
pecond time column gives the second tide of
the day, the third time column the third tide
and the last or right hand column gives the
last tide of the day, except when Ihere are but
three tides, as sometimes occurs. The heights
given are additions to the soundlnps on the
United States Coast Survey charts, except
when a minus sign (— ) precedes the height,
and then the number given Is subtracted from
the depth given by the charts. The plane of
reference la the mean of the lower low waters.
STEAMERS TO ARRIVE.
STEAMERS TO SAIL.
SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
ARRIVED.
Sunday, June 25.
Stmr City of Rio de Janeiro, Ward, 29 days
from Hongkong-.
Aup Ftmr Slam, Ralclch, 86 hours from
Nanalmo.
Stmr Corona, Debney. 61 hours from San
Diego.
Stmr Whltesboro, Johnson, 16 hours from
Whltesboro.
Stmr Gipsy, Iceland, SO hours from Moss
Landing;.
Bk Rufus E. Wood, McLeod, 100 days from
Sydney.
Bk Carondelet, Stetson, 9 days from Port
Ludlow.
' SAILED.
Sunday, June 25.
Stmr Walla Walla, Gage, Victoria and Port
Townsend.
Stmr Laguna, Ericsson, .
Stmr George Loomls, Brldgett. Ventura,
Rtmr Coos Bay. Hall, San Pedro.
Stmr Rival, Johnson, .
Stmr St. Paul. Hays, St. Michael.
Stmr Weeott. Burtls, Eureka.
Schr Allen A., Schage. Kahulul.
Schr J. B. Leeds, NeUsen, Tacoma.
TELEGRAPHIC.
POINT LOBOS, June 25. 10 p. m.— Weather
hazy; wind SW; velocity 14 miles.
MEMORANDUM.
Jap stmr Nippon Maru, from Hongkong, etc.,
for San Francisco, has been ordered Into quar
antine off the port of Honolulu for seven days.
Per Btmr City of Rio de Janeiro— Left Hong
kong May 27, 4:45 a. m., for Yokohama, via
Inland Sea: arrived at Yokohama June 5.
Left Yokohama June 7 at 10:53 a. m. Experi
enced fair weather and light winds to Hono
lulu. Left Honolulu June 18 at 4 p. m. To
San Francisco had fine weather and light NE
winds. Arrived at 3:36 p. m. June 25.
DOMESTIC PORTS.
PORT GAMBLE— Arrived June 25— Schr Roy
Somers, hence June 6.
SAN PEDRO— Arrived June 24— Bktn Tain
O'Shanter, from Ludlow.
Sailed June 25— Schr William Hentoh, for
Tacoma.
TACOMA— Arrived June 24— Stmr City of
Puebla, from Townsend. Stmr Washtenaw,
hence June 20.
Sailed June 20— Stmr City of Tooeka, for
Dyea.
NEAH— Passed June 24— Schr Q. W. Watson,
from Tacoma. for Tahiti.
PORT ANGELES— Arrived June 25— Schr
Kin* Cyrus, from Chemalnus, for China.
NESAH BAY— Passed June 25— Stmr Queen,
from Tacoma, for Dyea. •
GRAYS HARBOR— Arrived June 25— Schr
Twilight, hence June 18.
FORT BRAGG— Arrived June 25— Btmr Noyo,
hence June 24.
FORT Arrived June 25— Schr Mary C,
hence June 24.
TACOMA— Arrived June 25— Schr Metha Nel
■on. hence June 7.
NEWPORT— Arrived June 25— Schr Esther
Buhne. from Eureka.
PORT BLAKELEY— Arrived June 25— Schr
Defender, hence June 11.
FOREIGN PORTS.
KAHULUI— SaiIed June 14— Schr Muriel, for
Honolpu. June I.l— Bg Lurllne, for San Fran
cisco. To sail June 17— Schr William Bowden.
tor San Francisco.
HONOLULU— Arrived June 13— Haw bk R. P.
Rithet, hence May 28. June 15— 8tmr China,
hence June 9. June 16— Br schr Retriever,
from Hongkong. Sehr LUlebonne, from Grays
Harbor. Haw by Diamond Head, hence May
28. June 17— Jap stmr Nippon Maru, from Yok
ohama. Bktn 8. N. Castle, hence June 4. Bk
S. C. Allen, hence June 4. Stmr Rio de Jane
iro, from Yokohama-
Sailed June Schr H. D. Bendlxon. for San
Francisco. June Ship Standard, for San
Francisco. June Stmr China, for San
Francisco. June 17— Bktn Irmgard. for San
Francisco. Ship Aryan, for San Francisco.
TRANSATLANTIC STEAMERS.
NEW YORK— Arrived June 26— Stmr La Ga»
cogne, from Havre. Stmr Maasdam, from Rot
terdam.
SOUTHAMPTON— Arrived June 25— Stmr
Prince Resent LuttDOld. from New York, for
Bremen.
Sailed June 25— Stmr Bremen, from Bremen,
for New York.
QTTEENSTOWN— Arrived June 25— Stmr
Italia, from Philadelphia, for Liverpool.
Sailed June 25— Stmr Etrurla, from Liver
pool, for New York.
MO VILLE— SaiIed June 24— Stmr Anchorla,
from Glasgow, for New York.
HAVRE— Arrived June 25— Stmr La Touralne.
from New York.
AUCTION SALES.
AUCTION SALE!
fe fc* fe
THIS DAY .
MONDAY. June 26. at 11 o'clock, at 11«
GOLDF.N* GATE AYE.. I will sell 40 head of
work and driving horses to highest bidder. In-
cluded In this lot is one handsome bay pacing
mare, very fast, 16 hands high, perfectly gen-
tle for lady to drive; stands without hitching;
also 2 well broken saddle horses. No reserve
or limit.
S. WATKINS & CO., Auctioneers.
AUCTION SALE
OF
<afffejb c^iSfcv /^£b&
w^a^; tHs?"gfe»«
CARRIAGES, ROBES AND HARNESS. 85
NEW SURREYS, BUGGIES, PHAE-
TONS, WAGONS AND TRAPS.
E. E. AMES VEHICLE CO.,
20 McAllister st.. near hibernia
BANK.
Dealers' opportunity. Closing-out sale. No
reserve. Retiring from business.
TUESDAY, June 27, 1899, at 11 A. M.
CHASE & MENDENHALL. Auctioneers.
. Successors to Kllllp & Co.
[ DR PIERCES ?
GOLDEN
MEDICAL
DISCOVERY
FOR THE
I BLOQP.LIVER. LUNGS.
/^\. Dr. Gibbon's Dispensary.
Am&M 025 KEABNY .ST. Established
a Dr. Gibbon's Dispensary,
025 UEABNY ST EstabHehea
In 1M54 for the treatment of Private
Wl Ajbk-^Sli Diseases. Lost Manhood. Debility or
{gftSQggjgjih disease wearing on body and mind and
«3Hwfi%jS|s|§ Sklu Diseases. The doctor cures when
■*J&3SK&£Ha others fall. Try him. Charges low
£*>. »»35SPg£SI <urf»!riiarinitfpd. Callorwrltew
j If r. J. if. •tiBISO.V Box 2937. 5 ac Francisco
OCEAN TEAVEL
Pacific Coast Steamship Co
Ihfe^ Steamers leave Broadway
' f^TVmi wharf. San Francisco:
tSE&Sfi^. For Alaskan ports. 10 a. m.,
■BR^H^ June 15, 20, 25. »0; July i.
EKfiJMVIKa change at Seattle.
H Isls&Eß J&l For Victoria. Vancouver (B.
\St ICi&SI C). Port Townsend. Seattle.
r^^SHgafiMJ Tacoma, Everett. Anacortes
and New Whatcom (Wash.),
T 10 a. m., June 16, 20. 28, 30;
July 6. and every fifth day thereafter; change
at Seattle to this company's steamer* for
Alaska and O. N. Ry. ; at Tacoma to N. P.
Ry. ; at Vancouver to C. P. Ry.
For Eureka (Humboldt Bay). 2 p. m., Jnn*
18, 28, 28; July 8, and every fifth day there-
after.
For Santa Cruz. Monterey, San Simeon.
Cayucos, Port Harford (Pan Luis Oblspo),
| Gaviota, Santa Barbara. Ventura, Hueneme.
I San Pedro. East San Pedro (Lob Angeles) and
j Newport. 9 a. m.. June 17. 21. 25, 29: July *.
and every fourth day thereafter.
For San Diego, stopping only at Port Har-
ford (San Luis Obispo), Santa Barbara, Port
Los Angeles and Redondo (LoB Angeles), 11 a.
m.. June 16. 19. 23, 27; July 1, and every fourth
day thereafter.
For Eneenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose del
Cabo. Mazatlan. Altata, La. Pax. Santa Rosalia,
and Quaymas (Mm.), 10 a. m.. 7th of each
nth.
For further Information obtain folder.
The company reserves the right to change
without previous notice steamers, sailing date*
and h"iir« of pulling.
TICKET .OFFICE — 4 New Montgomery
street (Palace Hotel).
GOODALL, PERKINS *: CO.. Gen. Agta.,
10 Market Ft., San Francisco.
THE 0. R. & N. CO,
DISPATCH FAST STEAMERS TO
PORTLAND
From Spear-street Wharf at 10 a. m.
CADE *1 " 2 First Class Including Berth*
IAiIC $8 Second Clas* and Meals.
Columbia sails June 22; July 2, 12, 22.
State of California sails June 17, 27; July T.
17. 27.
Short line to Walla Walla, Spokane, Butts,
Helena and all points In the Northwest.
Through tickets to all points East.
. B. C. WARD, General Agent.
430 Market street.
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO..
Superintendent.
AMERICAN LINE.
rTW TORK. Southampton, loitooh. pa»i\ .
Stopping at Cherbourg, westbound.
From New York Ever*- Wednesday. 10 a. m.
St. Louis Juiy ?fVew York August 3
New York July 12 Ht. Louis August 9
St. Paul July 19lst. Paul August 18
RED 6TA<? LINE.
Kensington July rl-Vdria July M
Noordland July 12 South wark ..August I
Friesland July 19 1 Westernland ...Aug. S
New York and Antwero.
From New York Every Wednesday, 12 noon.
EMPIRE LINE.
«e*»t*'«. 6t. Mlshasf. Daw*r»-« O»t,
For full information regarding freight and pas-
sage apply to
INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION COMPANY.
30 Montgomery St., or any of its agencies.
TOYO KEEN KAISHA.
STEAMERS WILL LEAVE WHARF. COR-
ner First and Brannan streets, 1 p. m.. for
YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, calling at
Kobe (Hiogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and
connecting at Hongkong with •steamers for
India, etc. No cargo received on board on day
of Railing.
NIPPON MARU Tuesday. June 27
AMERICA MARU Saturday. July 2t
HONGKONG MARU Thursday. August 17
Round-trip tickets at reduced rates. For
freight and passage apply at company's office.
421 Market Ft., corner First.
W. B. CURTIS. General Agent.
ANCHOR LINE
United States Mail Steamshios
Sail from New York Every Saturday fo.*
Glasgow, via Londonderry.
€aloon PassnO.r . $50 and upward.
Second Cabin
City of Rome. $35. Other Steamers, $30.
Steerage Passage
Rome, $25.60. ' Furnessia. $24.50. Other
Strs., $23.50.
For Book of Tours and information apply to
HENDERSON BROTHERS.
General Agents, 7 Bowline Green. New York.
Or J. P. FUGA7.I. 6 Montgomery st.,
Or L. F. COCKROFT. 114 Montgomery St..
Or R. R. RITCHIE. 2 New Montgomery St..
SAN FRANCISCO.
flfmniUMl The S. S. Australia
IEDHIr sails for Honolulu
• Monday, July 3, at I
I p. m.
t*^S^l S. S. Marlposa sails
i^pamcnint) via Honolulu and
Q)lCdllljlllU t/ Auckland for Sydney
fSIIIR(WM~ Wednesday. July 12,
VyilipUlwT at 10 p. m.
Favorite Line Round the World, via Hawaii.
Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, India, Sues.
England, etc.; $610 first class.
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO.. Acts., 114 Montgomery
Pier 7, Foot Pacific St. Freight Office. 327 Market St
COXPAOIfIS GENERALS TRANSATI.ANTIQ.tnL
DIRECT LINE to HAVRE-PARIS.
Sailing every Saturday at 10 a. m. <2SJX|i£i
from Pier 42. • North River, foot of * J " um "f*
Morton st LA GASCOGNE. July 1; LA
CHAMPAGNE. July 8; LA NORMANDIE. July
15? LA BRETAGNE. July 22; LA GASCOGNE.
July 29 First-class to Havre. $65 and upward.
6 per cent reduction on round trip. Second-class
to Havre $45: 10 per cent reduction on round
trip GENERAL AGENCY FOR UNITED
STATES AND CANADA, 32 Broadway (Hud-
son building). New York. J. J. FUGAZI *
CO., Pacific Coast Agents. 5 Montgomery aye.»
j San Franclsco^^^^_^^^^___^__^^^^__^ -
BAT AND BIVEB STEAMEBa *
STOCKTON EXCURSIONS.
THE STEAMER H. J. CORCORAN . .
Will leave Washington-street wharf at 8 a. m.
dally returning from Stockton at 6 p. m.
dally (Saturday excepted). Regular steamers
leave Washington-street wharf at C p. -m.
dally (excepting Sunday). AND IMP. 'CO.
CALIFORNIA NAY. AND IMP. CO.
Telephone Main 806.
FOB U. S. NAVY-YARD AHD VALLEJO.
Steamer "Monticello."
MON.. Tues., Wed.. Thurs. and Sat. at 9:45
a. m.. 3:15. 8:30 p. m. (ex. Thurs. night); Fri-
days. 1 p. m. and 8:30: Sundays. 10:30 a. m., g
p m. Landing and office. Mission street Dock, -
Pier No. 2. Telephone Main 1508.
FAKE , M*r^-
7

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