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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 28, 1899, Image 5

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-^-,^_, ADVERTISEMENTS.
IT PAYS TO TRADE IN THE MISSION.
PATTOSIEN'S
BARGAINS 4^ LADIES'
BARGAINS - LADIES'
ON SALE Sk Mm DRESSERS
The Most AttractWe Store In the City. I I 'nas French
The Most Attractive Store In the City. 1 i. |-j Has French
The Furnished Cottage First floor a ftgfe II mirror, etc.
The Picture Display Second floor 1 I */■** THIB BARGAIN
The Drapery Display Second floor •-*** _%__%. FLOOR.
Carpets, rugs and mattings.
Carpets, rugs and mattings.
Most liberal price reductions ln new fresh goods to tempt you out to
the Mission this week— a mammoth de-
■rtTT^ tfr-^iSSV. partment — overflowing with economy —
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value $1.40 yard «4>1..£3
CHINA MATTINGS, plain and fancy , SCOTCH LINOLEUMS— Best quality,
weaves, large assortment of patterns, '- handsome new effects, in tile and
regular 30c and 40c qualities; -IC,, floral patterns; regular price Hflr
sale price ■4J*«' 65c per square yard JUL
Only a few items here to give you an idea what you can expect from
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pare favorably with others' so-called sale prices.
ELEGANT COMBINATION COTTON MAT- C/f Hfl : •
TRESSES, with flne quality ticking 35T-.3U : :
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ALL ROADSTEAD TO PATTOSIEN %
MISSION AND SIXTEENTH STS. THEATER BUILDING, SAN JOSE.
MISSION AND SIXTEENTH STS. THEATER BUILDING, SAN JOSE.
CORNERSTONE
IS LAID WITH
MANY PRAYERS

New Richmond Con-
*
gregational Church.
NOTED DIVINES PRESENT
>
CEREMONIES ARE IMPRESSIVE
AND BEAUTIFUL.

Dr. Bevan and Dr. Hailey, of Mcl-
bourne, and Rev. Mr. Desha and
Rev. Mr. Emerson, of Hon
olulu, Make Addresses.
-—
With fervent prayers and beautiful sa- I
cred music the cornerstone of Richmond j
Congregational Church, at Seventh avenue j
end Clement street, was laid yesterday |
afternoon at 3 o'clock. Rev. Dr. Bevan, j
L.L. D., who has been for many years :
the pastor of the First Congregational i
Church of .Melbourne, Australia, placed
th© symbolic mass of granite in its pre
pared niche with the solemn words, "I '
declare that this stone has been well and
duly laid In the name of the Father, the
Bon and the Holy Ghost."
The services in the half-finished struct
ure were begun with the singing of St. ]
Martin's hymn. The invocation, by Rev.
F. I. Wheat, followed, and Professor R.
R. Lloyd then read selected passages from
the scriptures.
Rev. F. B. Cherington of Plymouth Con
gregational Church made a few remarks.
He said In conclusion:
"We are assembled to-day for no other
purpose than to lay the cornerstone of a
building that shall help souls as they
reach up for God. God grant it that this
building shall be a meeting place of those
■who worship in spirit and in truth."
Rev. J. H. Warren, D. D., made a brief
but eloquent address.
"If I didn't believe in the future," he
eaid, "I wouldn't be here, and if you didn't
believe in the future you wouldn't be here,
in such a place as this, on such a day as
this. But because I believe in a golden
age a golden age better than any one has
ever hoped for, that will make the world
what it ought to be, I am here, and glad
to be here."
Rev. William C. Pond, Rev. William
Rev. William C. Pond, Rev. William
Rader and Rev. G. C. Adams followed
with five-minute addresses of congratula
tions and earnest prayers for the future.
Rev. Mr. Frary of Pomona also made a few
remarks in response to the Invitation of
the pastor. Rev. Philip Coombe, to whose
earnest efforts much of the present pros
perity of the church is due.
Rev. Dr. Hailey of Melbourne, the sec
retary of the Congregational Union of
Australia; Rev. J. Kanhane, Rev. S. L.
Desha and Rev. O. P. Emerson, all of
Hawaii, were present at the services and
made a few remarks, Rev. S. L. Desha
speaking in Hawaiian. These divines are
on their wav to the International Congre
gational Council, to be held in Boston in
the near future.
After the laying of the cornerstone Rev.
S. H. Willey offered a prayer, the bene
diction was then pronounced and the ser
vices were over. The choir, which con
sisted of Mrs. J. L. Reeve, Mrs. McCloud,
Miss Maguire, Mr. Taylor. Mr. Lowe and
Mr. Pinkerton, rendered several beautiful ,
selections during the afternoon.
RICHMOND METHODIST
CHURCH DEDICATED
The dedication services of Richmond
Methodist Church were held yesterday
tfternoon at half-past 2 o'clock. The
»retty little structure on Fourth avenue,
tear ClenK.it street, was crowded with
Jie zealous workers, whose efforts to se
ture a permanent home for their church
tad been finally crowned with success. .*•
The servies, which were conducted wjr.
Rev •U.W. Case. D.D., begun with the
singing of several hymns by the congre
gation, led by J. A McGaw. A fervent
prayer for the succes- of the church was
then offered by Rev. W. M. Woodward.
The present financial condition of the or
ganization and the contributions which
had aided in the erection of the building
were set forth by H. H. rhnen, the treas
urer, and E. 11. Wilcox, the financial sec
retary.
Rev. George Baugh, the pastor, followed
with a brief address, giving a sketch of
the origin and growth of the organization.
At the conclusion of the pastor's ad
dress the lessons from the Scripture were
read by Rev. F. C. Lee and Rev. T. ii
Woodward. Dr. W. W. Case, Dr. C. E
Locke, Dr. J. N. Beard, Rev. W. M
Woodward, I. J. Truman and C. B. Per
kins made short addresses of congratula
tion and guidance.
The formal presentation of th* church
by the trustees, led by William Abbott,
concluded the beautiful and Impressive
service, by which the new structure was
set apart to the work of God.
SOUTHERN LYNCHINGS.
Rev. T. Brown Discusses the Negro
Outrages and Their Solution at
A. M. E. Zion Church.
Rev. T. Brown delivered a strong ser
mon on the recent outrages in the South
and the solution of the race question at
A. M. E. Zion Church last night. He said
in brief:
"Since there is no law by which the
lynchers of the land can be punished,
and since public sentiment has become
30 biased on the question of justice to all
American citizens, the question of the
law of necessity can legally be raised.
There is not a nationality on the face of
the civilized globe which does not In
some way indicate to the negro that they
are his superiors. Such is the outgrowth
of the greatest age in the world's his
tory-
"Lynching has become a mania with
the American people. Guilty or not guilty,
lynching must be done. My heart goes
out to all who suffer the fate of lynching
or other injustice. But another day will
come. Let us wait on the Lord and on
him alone."

AN INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE.
Dr. Gilbert Reid's Striking Sermon at
Calvary Presbyterian Church.
Calvary Presbyterian Church.
Dr. Gilbert Reid delivered a striking ser
mon at Calvary Presbyterian Church yes
terday morning on the "Relations of
Christian Nations to China."
Dr. Reid ls the head of a proposed in- j
ternational institute to be established in
Peking through the support of different I
nationalities, and is now in his way back
to China to organize the work of the in
stitute. He said in the conclusion of his
address:
"There Is now an unusual opportunity
to show China the worth of Chris
tianity by showing in these internatonal
relatons justice, fair play and gener
osity."
"CATHOLIC FAITH."
Rev. Father Sasia of St. Joseph's
Church, San Jose, Preaches at
St. Ignatius.
The Rev. Father Sasla, now attached
to the Church of St. Joseph at San Jose,
preached an abie discourse at St. Ignatius
yesterday morning. He said in part:
"Whoever understands well the para
mount importance of religious truth and
comprehends, accordingly, its Immenese
superority over all other knowledge, can
not help admitting that among the many
gifts lavished by God's infinite goodness
on His Intelligent creatures here below
there is none more precious in its char
acter, more substantial in its nature and
more beneficial in its results than the gift
of supernatural divine Catholic faith. In
fact, even in this nineteenth century of
ours, with all its progress of modern civ
ilization in every sphere of secular learn
ing, in every field of scentific research,
what, I ask, should we know, for In
stance, of this single truth, the purpose
or object of our brief existence ln this
lower world, without the touch of heav
enly faith, .without the light from above,
which, like the beacon set on the moun
tain, top, guides the tempest tossed mari
ner into the harbor of safety?"
"CONSECRATION TO GOD."
Rev. T. Caraher Preaches to a Large
Audience at St. Francis Church.
At 11 o'clock mass yesterday Rev.
Father Caraher preached to a large con
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, AUGUST 28, 1899.
OUR GALLANT FIRST
EXTROLLED BY A
PATRIOTIC PULPIT
THE home-coming of the First Cali
fornia Regiment was the theme of
many eloquent discourses ln the
churches of San Francisco yesterday.
Pulpits resounded with tributes to the
valor of the volunteers and lessons were
. drawn from their eagerness to defend
I Old Glory. The magnificent spectacle
witnessed during the past week was
dwelt on at length, as was also the senti
ments which actuated the citizens of this
State to enter into such an elaborate re
; ception to the returning heroes. In many
i of the churches patriotic music waa ren
; dered in honor of the occasion.
WJiJIT SEJ_TI.ME.NT JiJIS
DONE FOR, OUR BOYS
DO.NE FOR OUR BOYS
"The Home Coming of the Boys" was
' the subject of an able sermon yesterday
; morning by the Rev. Herbert N. Bevier.
\ In part he said:
California In general and the city ln parti
j cular has been mightily swayed by sentiment
during the past week. Sentiment has opened
hearts and purse strings. Sentiment has Illu
• minated our Etreets -with bright lighting ; given
[ us an evening in Venice, and in so doing pro
duced some of the moat noble night pictures
j the land has ever seen. Sentiment has woven
garlands of holly and olive; turned thorough
fares into boulevards by borrowing of the firs
and the palms; made suppers and twined flow
ers and given the boys who went to war a
homecoming worthy of the uame. California
resolved that no State should outdo her in the
magnificence and splendor of her welcome and
has magnificently kept her resolve.
Sentiment has kept the whole State on the
tiptoe of expectancy for the arrival of a cer
tain ship. San Francisco has ships come and
go every hour of the day, yet this ship has
been so eagerly watched for that news of her
arrival by ordinary process could not answer
for our eagerness. No, we must send an elec
tric impulse from the heart of the ocean across
seven miles of boiling sea to tell our people
that the ship had been sighted, and. when
sighted, half the city most go to boats and the
other half to the hilltops to express their Joy.
Love of home and the homeland, gratitude and
gregation at St. Francis Church. The
pastor spoke on the "Consecration of
Christendom to the Sacred Heart." He
said:
To consecrate an object is to set lt apart and
devote it to some sacred purpose. When you
consecrate yourselves to the sacred heart of
our Lord you set apart, as lt were, and devote
yourself to Its love, homage and adoration.
Excellent music was rendered by the
choir, which consists of the following
members: Mrs. B. F. Sides, Miss Vlautln,
A. F. Woodbridge and T. G. Walsh.
In the evening Father McDonnell
preached to a crowded congregation on
"Devotion to the Sacred Heart."
AT THE PARK AND CLIFF.
Contrary to Expectations Soldiers
Were Not Much in Evidence.
Although the people were tired and full
of sightseeing after viewing the splendid
pageant in honor of California's boys
home from the Philippines, they gathered
again at the park and other recreation
places yesterday. Doubtless many of the
many crowds anticipated an opportunity
of seeing the boys out of parade and pos
sible opportunities of conversing with
them regarding their experiences on the
firing line, but they were disappointed.
The boys perhaps preferred to rest yes
terday. In any event they were not
much in evidence.
During the past week there were re
ceived at the Park Museum two splendid
models inVstucco of the giant octopus or
cuttlefish, made and presented by Pro
fessor Ward of Rochester, N. Y. These
models are life-size and caused consider
able interest and comment. Thomas
Hevdenfeldt of 1040 Post street has do
nated a collection of ethnological speci
mens made and used by the natives of
the Philippines. There are twenty-eight
pieces in the collection, and, owing to the
present war, the specimens attracted
considerable attention.
The usual interested crowd assembled
at the Chutes yesterday. The new illu
sion and the ever-entertaining Zoo,
coupled with the many other attractions,
served their purpose and the crowd en
joyed the day. Adgie and her lions are
on the bill for next week.
Many people watched the sport at
Sutro Baths. Following are the results
of the aquatic contests: 50-yard dash
(novice), F. Neal, Al Cook: 100-yard dash
(juvenile). H. Seebach, A. Smith; 100-yard ,
dash (amateur), open to all, R. Dahl, E.
Smith; tub race, 100-yard dash, C.
Augustus, B. Wells, H. Olsen; trick and
fancy springboard diving, J. O'Brien, A.
Peters; high diving. C. Donovan, J. Cook.
■ ■ — ■
FUNERAL OF MRS. DUNN.
Victim of Ptomaine Poisoning In-
terred in Masonic Cemetery. .
The Interment of the remains of Mrs.
Jane L. Dunn, whose sudden death last
i Wednesday shocked a large circle of
i friends and prostrated the members of
[ her family, took place yesterday in Ma
sonic Cemetery. Mrs. Dunn's death was
caused by eating overripe muskmelon. in
which deadly ptomaines were found when
an examination was made after her de
mise, j . _ .
As president and one of the most popu
lar members of the Forum Society, Mrs.
Dunn wielded a wide influence. She was
a deep student in social affairs and a
i woman of many charities and numbered
! warm friends by, the score. These at
i tended the funeral services- yeserday,
I which were held at the family residence,
! 1218 Hyde street. The services were of
the simplest character. At the request of
the family there were no flowers, save
those which her fellow club members in-
sisted upon bringing.
The members of the Forum Club attend
ed in a body and accompanied the funeral
, cortege to the grave. Mr«. Dunn left a
| husband and two sons and one daughter
* to mourn her loss.
A. Chinawoman Commits Suicide.
Chew Deck, a Cninawoman residing at
1 Waverly place, hanged herself yester
day forenoon with a piece of cloth, which
she made fast to a board, tying the
other end about her neck. It was stated
to the Coroner's deputies that the woman
had for some time been sligthly dement
ed. Otherwise no cause appeared why
she should seek her own life. Her body
was removed to the Morgue.
He Did Not See the Procession.
August Shoenfeld, a grocer, residing at
18 Clara street, while making prepara
tions to take his family to see Saturday
night's procession, fell in a faint at his
store. He lingered until yesterday fore
noon, when he died. His death was re
ported to the Coroner's offlce and his
body removed to the Morgue. Deceased
was a native of Germany and leu. a
widow and several children.
■ ■ ** * -.
Keith's leading millinery house for tho
new walkers. 808 Market street. :•>
Joy all have Joined to produce one of the
noblest outbursts of sentiment the land has
ever known. All hearts are better for it. The
boys will know their heroism, sufferings and
sacrifices are appreciated and the heart of the
State will beat true to the nation's heart on
account of this genuine spontaneity.
SOLDIER'S PROMI.NE.NT
. PLJICE m .HISTORY
Rev. William Rader. pastor of the Third
Congregational Church, delivered an able
sermon last night on "The Soldier." His
text was Second Timothy iv:7— "I have
fought a good fight. I have finished my
course. I have kept the faith." He said:
The soldier occupies a prominent place ln
The soldier occupies a prominent place ln
history. In Rome Caesar is as great as Cicero:
in England Cromwell is as great as Beacons
field and In our own country no name in let
ters outshines the names of Grant and Dewey.
The Bible Is full of great soldiers. During the
past week our city has been profoundly stirred
by the return of the California Volunteers. The
greeting given this regiment equals that given
Napoleon on his return to Parts, the German
army in Berlin and the grand review In Wash
ington after the war. San Francisco made
history last week.
The speaker then developed the quali
| ties of the soldier as they apply to life.
• and spoke upon sacrifice, obedience and
I courage, saying that the price of all vic
| tory, whether in the life of the nation or
! the individual, was battle.
SY.MPJn\HY FOR
WEEPIES MOTHERS
Rev. J. George Gibson of the Emmanuel
Baptist Church yesterday morning deliv
ered a sermon on "The Weeping Moth
ers," parts of which brought tears to the
eyes of his congregation. He chose his
text from Judges v:23— mother
looked out at a window and cried, "Why-
Is his chariot so long in coming?' " In
part he said:
A mother's love is the greatest thing In the
world. She loves her boy when he ls fighting
on the right side, and she still loves him when
in the estimation of others he fights on the
wrong side. Love is superior to political con
siderations. To-day while thousands are re
joicing It seems right that we should bow our
heads and whisper words of sympathy into the
ears of those fond mothers whose sons will
never return.
War is a terrible thing. Every victory brings
sorrow to some hearts. In San Francisco to
day and in Spain there are white faces watch
ing the Joyous procession and weary lips ask
ing, "Why does my boy not come back?" War
is a rough, rough way of putting things right,
a way of sorrow. The. mother love reminds us
that In human nature there is still much of
the divine. The mothers of our land and the
mothers of the other land bend over their dead
and love them because they were brave.
It ls woman's work to wait and be disap
pointed more than man's. It is easier to go
and fight than stay at home and watt. It re
quires less courage to go Into the busy world
and work than it does to step aside and wait.
Men work, women wait. I would rather work.
They are waiting for us ln the day time when
we return heme, and at night they wait on us
when we are sick. What wonder if the anx
ious look gets Into their faces.
And these waiting mothers amid all the Joys
SURPRISE AT
FIRST CHURCH
An Interesting Wedding to
Be Followed by a Ter
n Parting.
At the First Congregational Church last
evening Miss Lulu Snider, daughter of
Mrs. Andrew Snider and sister of Miss
Charlotte Beckwith, who is so delight-
fully associated with the Tivol Opera
Company in the minds of local theater
goers, became the bride of Spencer J.
Johnson Jr. The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. George C. Adams, ln the
presence of the entire congregation.
The announcement made by Mr. Adams
at the colse of the services last night that
he had been commissioned to invite the
congregation to remain and witness a
wedding was the first Intimation that
many of Miss Snider's friends had that
she had selected that as her wedding
day. The date was originally fixed for.
the 17th of September, but Air. Johnson,
l who Is inspector for the Continental In
surance Company, and who is prominent
in business circles in Chicago, received an
unexpected telegram last Friday sum-
moning him to that city. It was on. that
account that the wedding was hastened.
Miss Snider, who for the past few
months has occupied the position of lead-
ing soprano in the First Congregational
Church, was in her usual place In the or
gan loft last evening.
i After Mr. Adams' announcement she
I descended to the chancel rail, accom
panied by her bridesmaid, Miss Laura
Meigs. Here she was met by the groom,
attended by Dr. W. S. Porter, who acted
as best man. The bride was attired in a
gray "going away' gown, with velvet
toque to match.
Immediately after the service supper
was served at the home of the bride's
mother, 1317 Leavenworth street. The
house was tastefully decorated with red
roses, waving ferns and huckleberry
branches. In the dining room the na
! tional colors were prominent, two im
mense American flags forming a canopy
in the large bay window. The table was
trimmed with red carnations, placed there
by Miss Beckwh.i's loving hands, and at
each plate was a dainty favor of red,
white and blue.
Mr. Johnson will leave for the East to
night, where he will be Joined a month
later by his bride. Chicago will be their
future home. -.
Rush of Blood to the Head.
George Burke of Company I, First Cali
fornia Regiment, was picked up at the
corner of Stockton and Market streets
BEST IN
THE WORLD.
Dp. McLaughlin's
Dp. McLaughlin's
Electric Belt.
The ELECTRIC BODY BELT, by which I
apply my new method of treatment, is the
best in the world: strongest, most durable,
most expensively made, most convenient to
use, most effective in curing. Upon these
points I will guarantee it upon a bond of 15000.
With all this, an electric belt can do no
good without knowledge of how to apply it.
This ls my method, learned In the past twenty
years, in which I have cured 50,000 oases. I
give every patient the benefit of my experience,
hence the many cures after everything else
has failed. * -'X-
You feel the current at once. No burning.
but a gentle, soothing warmth. Warranted
one year, without any . expense for renewals.
Call and see it, or write for book, free.
dr. m. a. Mclaughlin,
702 Market St.. cor. Kearny, S. F.; Burdick
702 Market St.. cor. Kearny, S. F.j Burdick
Block, cor. Spring and Second Sts., Los An-
geles.
Office Hour*-- a. ra. to 8:30 p. m.: Sundays,
10 to L NEVER SOLD IN DRUG STORES.
are sad to-day. Their sons are not with the
returning heroes. The Golden Gate for them
was far away beyond the confines of earth.
They do not have the poor privilege of looking
on the upturned face and the folded hands.
And still they wait, unable to convince them
selves that their boys will never return.
"GOD BLESS YOU,
BRAVE SOLDIERS"
In closing his sermon on "The Enemies
of the Home," last evening Rev. Charles
Edward Locke of the Central Methodist
Episcopal Church said:
I cannot close this discussion on the home
j circle without assuring the noble boys of the
i California Regiment of our sincere delight in
j receiving them home, safe anil well. We have
been Justly proud of your patriotism, self-sacri
fice and valor and during these long months
you have been continually in our love and
prayers. As you have been welcomed into the
I State and city, so we welcome you into our
: temple and homes. May God bless you and
; make you brave citizens because of your ex-
I perience in real war. There are great battles
to be fought in these days at home and we
I ask you to help us in the conflicts of peace.
PATRIOTISM IS JI
CIVIC VIRTUE
Rev. E. Nelander of the First English
Lutheran Church preached on a patriotic
theme yesterday morning. His subject
was, "The Pnilippine Earthquake." In
part he said:
During the past year we have all been pro
foundly moved by national and international
Issues. No one that loved his country could
be disinterested. A sorry citizen is he whose
soul has not been stirred during the past week.
Patriotism is not only a civic virtue, it is
Christian duty. But is there, after all, any
current event to be compared with the tragedy
on Gol^atha? or any happening that can so
profoundly concern us as the revelation of
I God's mercy to our souls?
about 1 o'clock yesterday morning suffer
ing from what was feared to be a con
cussion of the brain. He became con
scious a few hours later and was sent to
the Presidio. Dr. Stephen, who attended
him, diagnosed his case as a temporary
rush of blood to the head.
AMUSEMENTS.
Sick Women a. Advised to Seek
Advice of Mrs. Pinkham.
[LETTER TO MR3. PINKHAM NO. 94,863]
"I had inflammation and falling
I of the womb, and inflammation of
i ovaries, and was in great pain. I took
' medicine prescribed by a physician,
! but it did me no good. At last I heard
of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com-
! pound, and after using it faithfully I
am thankful to say I am a well women.
I I would advise all suffering women to
seek advice of Mrs. Pinkham." — Mrs.
G. H. Chappell, Grant Park, 111.
.
" For several years my health was
V For several years my health was
miserable.' I suffered the most dread-
ful pains, and was almost on the verge
of insanity. I consulted one of the
best physicians in New York, and he
i pronounced my disease a fibroid tumor,
advising an operation without delay,
saying that it was my only chance for
life. Other doctors prescribed strong
and violent medicine, and one said I
was incurable, another told me my
only salvation was galvanic batteries,
which I tried, but nothing relieved me.
One day a friend called and begged me
to try Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound. I began its use and took
I several bottles. From the very first
i bottle there was a wonderful change
I for the better. The tumor has disap-
peared entirely and my old spirits have
returned. I heartily recommend your
i medicine to all suffering women." —
I Mrs. Van Cleft, 416 Saunders Aye.,
j Jersey City Heights, N. J.
v 5
Choicest fRUiTs.WiNES.VEGE- .
Choicest Fruits.Wines.Vege-
-tables. Grains & Grasses
fc^^QP fALIFORNIA<- -g^
A GTOAT &10C& SWWJ.
A GTCKt;StOC& SYNW.
fl§Q\cjfs Dltertair\meT\t.
EXHIBITs'TRANSPORTED fm
Excursion Rates To Visitors.
Write for Particulars
Vorite FOR I>arTICULARs.
HITCHCOCK SCHOOL
IiTCHGOCK SCHOOL
(LATE SELBORNE),
S.A.2ST IIJi.JFJLEIIL,. v
This school will reopen on August 29, with
This school will reopen on August 29. with
handsome new buildings, heated by steam and
lighted by electricity. Every pupil has aepa-
rate room, chcice of bedrooms on flrst and sec-
ond floors. Steam from outside, no furnace, no
stoves no flues In boys' quarters. . The nearest
approach to a fireproof school. Arrangements
have been made for. boarding pupils and carry-
ing on the school in the Hotel Rafael until tha
buildings are completed. For catalogues, testi-
monials and reference* apply to the principal,
REV. CHARLES HITCHCOCK, Sao Rafael.
ADVEBTISEMENTS.
•1-* ■!■» ■!■ >•].»■;.» -H -|.» ■!■> 4.^4.^-4. ».fre.i.« -I1 • .fr «■!■>■>> ■;■»■!■• ■!■♦ •l-*-l** fr**-;
•!■♦ ■!■>■ i- >.fre.t.».].«. ;. » .^ » 4.^-4.^-^. ♦ .j. » ■!.♦ .i» ♦.;.<■ \ »■>♦•}■♦ 'I-e-I-e ■:•»■!■♦ •!■♦•;
ESTABLISHED ISS©
ESTABLISHED 1869
Visitors to the City
Visitors to the City

Are respectfully invited to examine our -
large and varied stock of seasonable
large and varied stock of seasonable
goods, including everything desirable
goods, including everything desirable
and in demand in the line of Staple and
and in demand in the line of Staple and
Fancy Dry Goods and Boys' and Chil-
Fancy Dry Goods and Boys' and Chil-
i dren's Clothing. i
dren's Clothing. \
To our regular patrons as well as
To our regular patrons as well as
visitors we specially recommend the
visitors we specially recommend the
following:
following:
BLACK DRESS GOODS.
BLACK DRESS GOODS.
Black English Cheviot, all wool, 58 Inches wide, at 91 25 per yard.
GOLOr*.*_D DRESS GOODS.
COLOHhD DRESS GOODS.
For one week commencing on Monday, 28th Inst. — Crepaa and Novelty
For one week commencing on Monday, 28th Inst.— Crepaa and * Sfoveltjr.**
effects in mixed suitings, 10c per yard.
Navy Blue Serge, 52 inches wide, 29c per yard. ci
LADIES* JACKETS.
LADIES* JACKETS.
Ladles' Kersey Cloth Jackets, ln black, nary and tan. fly er double-
breasted fronts, faced with silk, tallor-flnlshed seams; extra rains at
97 50 each.
COMFORTERS.
COMFORTERS. \
Five cases Bed Comforters, fnll size for donble beds, fine white eottoa
filling and covered with pretty sllkollne, tufted, the soft, fluffy kind; ex-
cellent value for 91 IS each. _
LADIES NECKWEAR.
LADIES' NECKWEAR.
Stocks. Collarettes and Jabots ln new styles and complete ■■■i.v tmiwiW
at prices from 91 OO to 93 50 each. <*
HOSIERY.
HOSIERY.
Ladles' Fast Black Cotton Hose, full finished with donble heels and
soles; excellent value at 10c, 15c. 25c, 35c, 50c and 75c per pair. -
REAL OSTRICH EEATHER BOAS.
REAL OSTRICH FEATHER BOAS.
An entirely new stock, which, owing to our having placed orders prey-
ious to the advance in Ostrich Feathers, we will continue to sell at the
old prices, Including our line of elegant Collarettes and 88, 46 and M
Inch Boas In black, French gray and white colors. i
(Miw Murphy Building:, /
IFIw Murphy Building:, /
Cor. Market, Jones and McAllister Sts.
Cor. Market, Jones and McAllister Sts.
WOMAN'S BREAST AND MAN'S LIP
tseen in my of-
fjl? I flees. Lady at-
|^^g^hWoman'3 Breast
Woman' 3 Breast
And if allowed to get large always poisons the
And if allowed to get large always poisons the
glands ln the armpit. When cancer in the
armpit gets large cure ls almost impossible.
BOOK. SENT F=*REE
I With addressee and testimonials of thousands
I I have cured ln California.
S. R. CHAMLEY, M.D., 25 Third St., S-F.
S.R. CHAMLEY, M.0., 25 Third St., S-F.
LITTLE PALACE SANITARIUM.
E7Send this to some one. with cancer.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
MECHANICS' PAVILION
MECHANICS' PAVILION
DON'T FORGET
DON'T FORGET
THE DATE.
THE DATE.
MECHANICS' FAIR
MECHANICS' FAIR
Philippine" exhibit
Philippine" exhibit
OPENS SATURDAY NIGHT, SEPT. 2
OPENS SATURDAY NIGHT, SEPT. 2
REMEMBER
REMEMBER
THE NICHT.
THE NICHT.
Double S»ason Tickets tJo.OO
Double Season Tickets $5.00
Single Admission 25c
Children lOc
CHUTES AND ZOO
CHUTES AND ZOO
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
BIG VAUDEVILLE SHOW
BIG VAUDEVILLE SHOW
BEGINNING TO-DAY
BEGINNING TO-DAY
ADGIE AND HER LIONS.
ADGIE AND HER LIONS.
And MOVING PICTURES Showing the AR-
And MOVING PICTURES Showing the AR-
RIVAL OF THE SHERMAN
And
MARCH of the FIRST UP VAN NESS AYE.
100 FEET OF LIVE PYTHONS IN THE ZOO!
Visit "Dawn," the Parisian Illusion.
Visit "Dawn," the Parisian Illusion.
Phone for Seats— Steiner ISSL
CAN ENJOY HOURS AT THE
CAN ENJOY HOURS AT THE
| I BATTLE I
I BATTLE I
OP
MANILA
MANILA
Market Street, near Eighth.
Market Street, near Eighth.
CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEERS.
GALIFORNIAJOLUNTEERS.
MONSTER BENEFIT TO
MONSTER BENEFIT TO
JOHN W. SLADE,
JOHN W. SLADE,
THE HERO OF SAN PEDRO MACATI.
THE HERO OF SAN PEDRO MACATI.
ALHAMBRA THEATER.
ALHAMBRA THEATER.
SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 2, 1899.
SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 2. 1899.
A SPECIAL SALE OF RESERVED SEATS
A SPECIAL SALE OF RESERVED SEATS
AND BOXES will be held ■at SHERMAN &
CLAY'S on MONDAY AND TUESDAY.'
AUGUST 28 and 29, between the hours of 10
a. m. and 4 p. m. Address all communications
to E. R. MOSS, room 209, Emma Spreckels
building.
MU. T. HBSS,
MU. T. HBSS.
HOTABY POdLIO AKD ATTORNBY-AT-LAW.
Tenth Floor, Room 1014, Claus Spreckele Bid*.
„ Telephone Brown 93:.
Residence, B*l Cailfornla st., below Powell.
Franciaco. —.-;*. * ,
■*="^=^^^^^*^^^^=""""^^Z=Zl^=^Z=^Z=ZZZ====*.
AMUSEMENTS.
FELIX MORRIS AND COMPANY
FELIX MORRIS~AND COMPANY
IN REPERTOIRE.
IN REPERTOIRE.
MOULIERE SISTERS.
MOULIERE SISTERS.
ARNOLD GRAZER and
LA PETITE HAZEL.
APOLLO.
CARON and HERBERT.
HALL and STALEY.
FREEZE BROTHERS.
McMAHON and KING.
BIOGRAPH.
Reserved Seats , 25c: Balcony, 10c; Opera
Chairs and Box Seats, 60c.
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday.
COLUMBIA v^
COLUMBIA^
Beginning To-Night!
Beginning To-Night!
MR. CLAY
MR. CLAY
CLEMENT i3p<
CLEMENT™
IN THE IDYLLIC COMEDY
IN THE IDYLLIC COMEDY
THE NEW DOMINION.
THE NEW DOMINION.
MR. CLEMENT as
MR. CLEMENT as '**.-
BARON YON HOHENSTAUFFEN-
A Complete Production.
NEXT— "THE BELLS."
TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE.
TIVOLI OPERA-HOUSE-
GRAND OPERA SEASON.
SUPERB PRODUCTIONS OF
SUPERB PRODUCTIONS OF
LA GIACONDA
LA GIACONDA
Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
Monday, "Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
Evenings.
Sumptuous Rendition vt——
—Sumptuous Rendition vt—
RIGOLETTO
Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday Nl«hts aat
Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday Nights and
Saturday Matinee.
Famous Artists in Each Opera!!
Famous Artists in Each Opera!!
Every One Anxious to Hear Them!!
Secure Seats Early. The Demand Is Blg!t
POPULAR PRICES 26c and 600
Telephone for Seats— Bush 9.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
TELEPHONE MAIN 6&.
THIS EVENING!
THIS EVENING!
SUPERB PRODUCTION OF FLANQTTETTETS
SUPERB PRODUCTION OF PLANQUETTETS
PATRIOTIC COMIC OPERA,
PAIL JONES.
PAUL JONES.
Usual Popular Pricee— lOo, 180, tto. tte, 60c
Usual Popular Prices— lOo, IBs, Be, 15c, SOe.
SATURDAY MATTNEE:
SATURDAY MATTNEE:
Beat Reserved Seat ln the Theater, Co.
Best Reserved Seat ln the Theater. Ca
ALCAZAR Wm
ALCAZAR SHS
TO-NIGHT BEGINS THE FINAL WEEK OF
TO-NIGHT BEGINS THE FINAL WEEK OF
MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS
MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS
AND WHITE WHITTLESEY,
AND WHITE WHITTLESEY,
When Will Be Presented a Gorsreous Coetume
When *Wlll Be Presented a Gorgeous Costume
and Scenic Production of
INGOMAR!
INGOMAR !
15c 25c, "?gS?D 35c 50c.
15c, 25c, REsiEA^ED 35c, 50c
MATINEE SATURDAY ONLY.
NEXT WEEK— "CHRISTOPHER JR."
NEXT WEEK— "CHRISTOPHER JR."
— *
CONCEBI'S AND BESO.4TS.
CONCEBI'S AND KESO.4TS.
~ :-JJ *
GOLDEN GATE AGRICULTURAL
GOLDEN GATE AGRICULTURAL
DISTRICT NO. I.
DISTRICT NO. -I.
Races J^ Races
Races J^g Races
"*1 EMERYVILLE.
CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB'S TRACK.
Aug. 26. 28. 29. 30. 31, Sept. 1. 2.
TWO HARNESS AND THREE RUNNING
RACES EACH DAY.
' Racing Begins at 2 o'clock.
ADMISSION U. ',':'*•?-.
W. fl. KENT, Pres. ■ JOS. I. DIMOND. Sec. .
bUTRO t-AiriS.
bUTRO BATtiSV
OPEN NIGHTS!
OPEN DAILY FROM 7 A. M. TO 11 P. M.
BATHING FROM 7 A. M. TO 10:50 P. M.
ADMISSIN. 10c. CHILDREN, Be
Bathing, Including admission, 25; Children, Wo.
5

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