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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 02, 1900, Image 7

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DR. CROSSMAN'S
SPECIFIC MIXTURE,
FOR THE CURE OF GONORRHOEA;
Gleets; ' Strictures . . and analogous * com-
plaints of the Organs of Generation.- .
Price |li bottle. . Fcr sale by druggists.
Writ's Mai VletaUe Piils
ARE ACKNOWLEDGED BY THOUSANDS
of persons who have used them for forty
years to cure SICK HEADACHE, GIDDINESS,
CONSTIPATION. Torpid TU»er» Weak Stomach.
Pimples and purify the blood.
Still in Their Happy Home.
Mrs. Annie Schereck and Miss Catharine
Conley. charged with disturbing the neaco
of the other roomers at 93S Howard 3trect
by playing an organ and singing **I*4
Leave My Happy Home for You." will ap
pear before Judge Cabaniss this momin?.
and If they have left their ''happy home*
for another the case will be dismissed.
Mrs. Schereck is indiamant at the «tate
ment that she Is llvinjr apart from her
husband and says it is not true.
I>-»ry Night aacludinj Sunday>.r ¦ i:- .-.
T-AST 3 NIGHTS and Matinee Saturday. : ---
LOViS iwATlittiS CUAKUiS 0.
JAMES KIDDER lIANFORD
TO-MGHT-"TH E Ri V^LS.V U
Eaturilar Night ar.3 A!* 6 Scnda.y.i;.Vi...-...1;. > ..
• .........."THE WINTER'S TALE
Eat. Mat... "THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL"
UrglnmnK NEXT MONDAY. .: .
Er^-aeement Llnittej to Eltht«-.en >"i*rhts and
Thfee Matinees, THE FAMOUS
BOSTONIANS
Preser.tsn« :• ." -.'. '¦-'¦; ¦'- . ¦ ¦'.
"THE SMVCCLEHS OF BAD A YEZ."
Scats f^ow selli %c.
s COLUMBIA THEATER--EXTRA!
SUNDAY , A FTERNOON,
¦¦• .V - FEBRUARY 4.- -• ; '
EIGHTH ANNUAL BENEFIT
:;..:.-.¦:.¦.;¦. vf/. in: AiD-6r.,THT3 v - ' .¦-....".¦;
CHARITY
San Francisco ledge No. 21,
THEATRICAL MECHANICS'
ASSOCIATION.^;- ;
B->T IT.OGHAMME EVER OFFERED IN
...- - .. THE CITY. •¦¦.-.. :- ¦ •¦.-. ¦
T1CKET5. . ..... . 50c and Sl.OO
THREE! THHEEi THREJEII
¦":-.'•••.¦ v:-^—IJttST:TmEB-'OFW" •¦ •¦•.' ':¦:'
LAST iIATINEE TO-MOliRpW AFTERNOON i
TH £ FK A\V L tV COMPAN Y.^
¦¦; —— seats \-yoy>'-: on sale TOß-r— "\ :•'
; '¦'¦¦¦ ' " Tt-t G^CZlJi^K.<dtc>." / '-) "•¦¦"¦"¦.
KVITNV FX^NN'IER-THAN - : ' : IN 'PARAPISJC;''
V.J'irft; Perferciancp.- St'XpA.r : ;N^HT..; " :
ASHOWWITOTIFLA^
BEST THIS POPULAR HOUSE HAS
EVER OFFERED. . v; ,\
THE HOIXOWATS: BRUET and RIVIERE:
PAHTIE TRIO: SOHLKE'S ARCHiriiLA-
GOAKS; IRENE FRANKLIN; FAPrNTA:
J O. BARROWS, .JOHN A. LANCASTER
AND COMPANY; EDNA BASSETT MAII-
fcHALL AND COV'J ANY: J. NEWMAN: , : \
Rp*«>n.-eiS rear*. 25c: ". liaJeiny, 19c: :¦• opera'
cha!n> end box wats. ,50c. "'.•.. vr V '•'•;• ¦
Matinees: Wednesday.' Saturday and Sunday.;
TIVOLI OP|RASHOUS^
-HOOT MON, fTerj One Is rLau*hing:"
THIRD WEEK
Of the Enormous Comic Opera. Triumph,"
THE IDOL'S EYE;
Every Ev*-n!n« st S. S4atlne« Batnrday at J.
THK BEST I'ERFORMANCE EVER 6EEN
IN FRISCO!
This Is What Press and Public Say..
POPULAR PRICES tic AND 50c
Telephone Cash t.
P PEOPLE'S POIULAR I'LAY HOUEE.)
PHOAE SOUTH 770.
EVEHY EVENING THIS WEEK.
MATINEE SATURDAY.
HIS BETTER HALF.
POPULAR PItICES.
Evenin*.....: 15c.: 2?*, lie. We *nd TSo
liaticee lie. 25c, 2ic and JOe
Next Eurdsy Afternoon. "LONDON LIFE."
Extra Comlnir— Th^ Rea! JEFFRIES-PHAR- I
KET CONTEST PK^TUIiES. A Card— Mana- j
Ctrf EHlcchuune and M^tt r'^Se their worJ !
thst the»e arc tne ONLY GENUINE PIC- i
TfltES OF THE JEFFRIES-SHAHKEY CON-
TKh"T.
' These Picture* will l>e r>r»*ent."i at the Ex-
jv+itlon building. Oakland, February 4. -5 and «.
SHERMAN, CLAY & GO. HALL,
S3.EUTTER STREET.
THE ILLUSTRIOUS SOFRANO.
MLLE. ANTOINETTE
TREBELLIj
WILL GIVE •
AN EXTRA SONG RECITAL
TO-MORROW AFTERNOON,
ENTIRELY NEW PROGRAMME.
Reserved Seats. $1 and Sl£o.
At Ebenuaa.'day & Co.'s Music Stor*.
MANSLAUGHTER CHARGED.
Verdict V of ihe-<^rqner's Jury^iiijtne
Inquest bh the' Body: of Nar
jot's' Victim. -
v. The ¦Corbnej'.s- jury ; lri;:the::inquest:bri ; ihe
bpdyVof/ Jos^phXO'NeiVGleOs^n' -yesterday;
¦.returned '.-'a.':' yerctict^^^cha^ng. Ernest 'Narjot.
Mlth manslaughter. ;
•i';NarjOt^was-{nr^sgntjaV ; ;th|e -ihqUest.'.tiut;
decllnedxtp >makfe;; a/sta^mentk:: :MJnnie;
Hamnton;- ; ;who^ls- v the; cau^e-';bf : 'ihe-kill-;
irig.told thejury : how.;she:hid rpicked^up
a .strange" man: ori Vthe. street- arid 'accpmv
pariled hjni : to, the Stafiley ; Tamate Grottb
<3ft' ; Tur k>s t ree t f on : the• nl gh it 6f -the shoot -
ilrigi. : -- ; TheyyW'ent ; into, avprivate^ box.; ahd :
had ' some,;Vd .rinks.:; '^A fiuarrel^arose: : :b.e-
tween- her -and' the .Stranger,':' who. ; wanted
her to ridrlrik i- whisky cc>ckfaii;;WhHe shey
being 'hungry,' preferred He Are-:
;fuped:;t6; treat hori to jthe tamale and^she
arose.tb leave the. box and discoveifed that
a"s5 r piece Vthat ; she said :she;lhadin^her.
pockeC was: misplng. She.: raised.an out-
Ci^%. "accusing the stranger ;^ of -. haying 1
picked her pocket , and . she/j ran put; : fol
lQwed: by . tho man; who was ; calling, her
vile-, rianies; . Narjot tried i to ... stopr :. :the
stranger .and r the deceased • and. 'another
man attacked Karjot." The latter ttiirned
to ¦g6t'-aw.ay: i arid drj- being pursued turned
and shot iGleespn. ¦¦'•.' She '-. had , bsen • living
r with..'Karj6t for. twd:years.;.::^;:»;vr: ; ::/;v:
•rOther .witnesses .testltled. that Gleeson,
the, .(stranger, and Narjot were, the only
men '.-.engaged ¦ in: "the.' quarrel -and that
Gleesoii - was -acting .merely as ;a, peace?
makerv/'i. ¦"¦¦^¦ i '-. J'^:- v -^-'-''' }^ Vi v '-' : ."^.-- ; :.^: .-'.'. •;¦:.•<
from ;^ffi|-|-;>
We close our
clothings
department Satur-1
day night, Februr^ o
ary £ 1900.
Brown Bros.
121-123 Sansome St.
THE CALL'S
HOME STUDY CIRCLE
GREAT ANTI-SLAVERY CRUSADER.
Copyright; 1800? by Seymotir Eaton.
GREAT AMERICAN STATESMEN.
: :¦ Contributors to this course: Professor Albert Bushnell Hart, Professor John Bach Me-
Master, Professor Charles H. Smith. Dr. Frederic. W. Speirs, Professor Andrew C Mc-
Laughlin and others. - ; ; \ V-: :S ¦¦¦:¦'¦¦'..",¦ ¦'¦'¦ : : -'C ¦;.j':^'.<:-i .":: ¦;¦:• ::' ; :.;. : -.-- V ':•••" •"-••'.•; ' "' - "¦•• '•'¦'¦' ¦
XVI.--CHABLES SUMNER.
¦: : There are those who believe that a ; na
tion's hlstdry Is involved in -the lives of
its great men. ""; The life of Charles Sum
ner certainly very -largely embodies the
history : of : the., anti-slavery conflict , In
America. t;To: study that: life is to study
the causesV : the Issues and the results of
thb great struggle for emancipation and
union, arid t<>; know the merits of that
struggle; one must needs know something
of the life. 'arid "'••service'". and character of
;Charles:Suniner.. : ."". 'r:y .;¦;=:. :>-.,¦¦ ¦. ::.''::,.].\
Sumner the Scholar and Jurist.
¦ Little -need be said of: Sumner*B early
llfe> rßorn, In Boston. January he
became a j graduate" of- Harvard '.. In IS$).
Like : Motley, he ; enjoyed early "affluence
and , advantages/ and- succeeded in spite
of -thenii In 1^31; he entered" the Harvard
law school;: where he studied, under the
renowned Judge : Joseph Story. He con
tinued for several years to apply himself
to study in classroom, office and library,
bringing : to his books a. marvelous mem
ory and ejctraordlnai*}- intellectual indus
try. He spent the years from 1537 to IS4O
abroad, as a stiident and observer, In
London, Paris, Rome. Berlin and other
European centers, becoming acquainted
with the leading, public men* of Europe.
His studies and taste led him toward pol
itics and the law,- His legal studies were
hot such as would develop : . the shrewd
practitioner at the bar; for as his eulo
gist, -.. George William : Curtis*, afterward
said of him, "He was not formed for a
jury lawyer where the jury was less than
a nation or mankind," and. In sporting
language, "though he had a fine eye. for
country, he iiad a poor scent for the
trail." .His tastes drew him rather to
public and constitutional law-^the law of
peace;, and : war and of nations— and in
these he .'had -a'; preparation: that stood
him in good stead in the years to come.
In these ten years of study and travel
and reflection we find developing Sumner
the scholar—a scholar whose attainments
were admirably ; : manifested In his first
Indiana University
in the fact that in his constltulonal argu
ment against the fugitive slave, bill: he
fell: back on the compact theory of tha
constitution in. that he held that the fugi
tive slave clause of that document was
not a power-conferring clause, but merely
a compact agreement among the State**
Its enforcement must be left to State coi.l-
Hy,;,:V -,-;, :.¦;;•:¦.••.¦ ¦,;¦¦•¦ ¦-.- .:.--. - ;~*-*Zt ¦¦
;.". "-'Slavery.* a* re tald'on a former oocaaion.
'where we are parties to It. wherever we ar»
responsible for ft. everywhere within our Juris
diction inuat be opposed by every Instrument of
the political power. It is a mistake to charza
that we seek to Interfere through Congress with
slavery In the States. Our political aims as
well as our polltlca! duties are coextensive only
with our political, responsibilities.' "-. ¦ .-..• ?•
Such -was the message that Sumner
gave the Senate ar.d: the nation in ISS2.
and such- was his constant uncompromis
ing platform in the great anti-slavery
conflict.. :¦¦ :¦ ¦'.•¦." ¦:\'----'-\: .¦¦¦ -' : .--. ..- :;. ¦ .'v
Sumner's Inflexible and Uncompro-
raising Character.
In 1554 Sumner made a plea against the
Douglas repeal of the Missouri compro
mise, calling the repealing bill "at tha
same- time the worst and the best bill in
the annals of Congress." for while it
broke- down an historic barrier against
slavery it at the same time placed the
great antagonists. Freedom and Slav
ery./ face to face and bade them grapple.
He was denounced and buffeted and bad
gered In the Senate as a fanatic, a traitor
and a perjured violator of his oath, on
account of his public utterance against
returning the fugitive slave. "Is thy ser
vant a dog." he answered in the words
©f. the prophet, "that he should do this
thing?" Against his astsailants, Butler of
South Carolina. Mason -of Virginia. Doug
las of Illinois. Pettlt of Indiana and
others, he defended the principles of the
Declaration of. Independence, and facing,
as Jackson faced, an adverse Supreme
Court decision, he quoted JuCkson and
Buchanan as good Democratic authority
for the position that when. a. public ofn
cial swears to support the constitution he
Swears to support it as he understands
it, not as it Is understood by others.
On May 19. 1336. Sumner delivered his
celebrated speech In the Senate on "The
Crime Against Kan
sasj' the speech for
which he was as
saulted by Brooks.
Bumner's speeches
were very offensive
to. his opponents.
When he assailed
slavery its advo
rates felt themselves
to be personally in
sulted. The passage
in this speech to
which exception was
taken was certainly
In bad taste, and it
shows . personal of
fensiveness, if not
coarseness. Mr.
Rhodes, the histo
rian of the period,
finds no apology for
Sumner's per sonn.l :
attack on Senator
Bailer. But Sumner
did not. transgress
the bounds of par
liamentary decorum,
and he was not
called to order by.
the president of the
Senate or by any
¦ Senator. In Sumner
the uncompromising
Southerner met ag
s gression, boldness..
•. -defiance, denuncia
tion, equal to hid
: own- forms .:.' of
¦ speech to which ¦' he..
'.had not been ac
customed. Brooks*
¦ bludgeon merely.re
vealed : the .::¦ 9pirit
and weakness , of
slavery. . '.:•¦-. "• '¦ :
For four years
Sumner was absent
-.from . his st- at In- the
Senate, under mcdi
. cal treatment In Eu-
•.. ' ¦': .' ¦•'• ••¦-.•/. .".- ¦ ' .:rope; He returned
to his seat^ln IS6O. and In the notable
session k>l ¦ IS6O-61: he was a strong', oppo
nent of any. form- of compromise;, lie held
that the- slavery question- did not. admit
of . It -did. not come ¦ within
the domain of expediency. "To be wrong
On this . Is to be wholly wrong. On thia
question there is no other side." '-. In thia
can.-ylction-.- therefore,. -when- at the open
ins of '¦¦': the" war.' as Miss Martlneiu re
lates,-every v public, man in the
'with- -'whom: she : talked agreed- that sl
: lence.iipoh slavery wa4 the sole, condition
of- preserving - the :l"n{on — when.' in this
: crisis ¦' Sumner was appealed to .tor vota
for the Crittenden compromise and save
the country from. -war, he answered: "I
mvst. do. my 'duty; I can vote.for no con
cession to human: slavery." In this ha
spoke. ..more as the morai reformer than
as the statesman, more like, one who has
Seen weir described as "cariscience incar
riate-/*''--'--¦V-rV-'-'-••¦¦•:¦ .¦¦¦./¦•"¦.- ¦¦ • .
•* In other ! phases of Sumner's public
career he filled an important place in tho
history of his country. But these, in the
story of his life, will always be subordi
nate to his career as an ¦ anti-slavery ad
i^vtjcate and. statesman. From 13K1 to 1572
• he was chairman of the. Senate Commit
tee on Foreign Affairs, and In thai posi
tion, so entirely In accord with his tastes,
he contributed materially to the literature
of international law. His great speech on
the "Trent Affair," Januafy 9. li&i. ts one
of his*- ablest productions; i and ft placed
the of Mason and SUdell on
the most acceptable ground— on grourtd
.sounder and more tenable than that, as
sumed by Secretary Seward. That th©
country was ready to acquiesce in- the
surrender of the Confederate envoys, it
has been said, was duo to Sumner, who
made It clear that the. action was in ac
cordance with principles always main
tained by the United States and. ln ac
cordance with our humane and peaceful
traditions of neutrality. •"'-.'
The war over. Sumner spoke far concil
iation and amnesty. He harbored no re
sentment or revenge. But he never wav
ered in his devotion to the cause of equal
civil and political rights for all men. re
! gardies* of race, color or previous condi
tion of servitude, and when he died. In 1574.
it may be said that the struggle for tha
protection by national power of tha
Southern freedmen In their civil and polit
ical.privileges came to an end.
To Sumner's mind politics was an en
nobling pursuit. His life forcibly illus
trated hi.-* maxim that "politics is- but t ha
jtppllcation of moral principles to publta
affairs." He brought to his political Ufa
profound conviction, supreme conscien
tiousness, great resources, careful train
ing, unselfish, devotion to the public weal
and the indomitable martyr spirit of the
reformer. In times like these it is well
that- the American people should turn to
the contemplation of such a life. •
Temple Emanu-El Services.
Divine services at Temple Emanu-El
this evening commence at S o'clock. Rev.
Dr. Voorsanger will give the lecture. The
subject will be "The Decadence ot Civil
ized Nations."
The Talk of the Town
Is the unprecedented import of 109,303 cases
of G. H. Mumm's Extra Dry in 1539. or 72.
495 more than any other brand, accounted
for by the maintenance of the hlghost
standard ;of quality. Their 1595 . vintage
now imported is exceptionally fine, •
Tre belli Recital To-Morrow.
Mademoiselle Antoinette Trebelll will
give an extra recital to-morrow (Satur
day) afternoon at 3:15 at Sherman & Clay
Hall, when the following programme will
be presented: -
"Sombre Foret" (Gulllaume Tell). Ros
sini; "Pur Diccsti" (1685-1740). Lotti; "O
Santlssima Virgine." Gordlglani; "I^e Cal
andrlna" (1750). arranged for Madame
Valrdot. Jomelll; "L'Hotesse Arabe." Bi
xet; ".When -Thy Sweet Glances." Dvorak;
"Love." Grelg; "Good Morning," Grelg;
"Alleluia dv Cld," Massenet; "Chanson
Musette." Thome; "Dolce un :Pen«ier,"
Puzzi;"Tarantclle" (La Tonelli),- Thomas.
Free Day at Hopkins.
°° The Mark Hopkins Institute of Art will
be open to the public to-day free of
charge between the hours of 9 a. m. and
5 p. m. ami in the evening from 8 till 11.
The exhibition of bronzes aj»d vases that
has been attracting much attention dur
ing the week will remain open for visitors
SOUTHERN LINES WILL
RUN INTO THIS CITY
Improvements to Be Made at Third
and Towns ;nd to Accommodate
•¦;¦¦.. ."•..- a New Traffic.
Extensive improvements will be «nade
by the Southern Pacific Company in the
depot at the corner of Third and Town
send, streets. Plans are now being pr-j
pared for a new'depot and enlarged sheds
to accommodate. the extra tracks that will
be built to accommodate Sunset and
Southern trains. ...
When the new coast road Is complied
It is the intention of the Southern Pacific
to run the Southern overland and Los An
geles trains over this line direct to San
Francisco, thus avoiding the 16nger route
by way of Lathrop and doing away with
the ferry service. This will necessitate
the building of extra tracks and other im
provements. • ¦
Just what the new depot will be In ap
pearance is not yet known. Several plans
have been prepared but no selection has
been made. , The entrance to the dfpot
will very probably be at Fourth instead
of at Third street. - . •• -
<3cneral Manager Kruttschnitt soys that
It will not be an elaborate construction,
but merely an occommodation for the in
crease of traffic. ': • ..
CONDEMNED THE WORK OF
THE "REDCOAT BULLY"
WAB, DECLARED TO BE THE
GBEATEST OF" CRTMES, . .
In a Lecture on "The Feelings of Ani
; male" President Jordan of Stan
ford Creates a Sensation. r .
Near the close of a lecture which he de-
Hvered last evening In the parlors of the-
Occfdental Hotel on "The Feelings of Anl
mals,"..President. David Starr Jordan of
Stanford University strongly protested
against in the abstract, and made one
or, two Indirect references of a decldedty
sarcastic nature to the Boer-English mili
tary campaign. His remarks were re
ceived with hearty applause.
The lecture was the first of a series and
took place under the auspices of the So
ciety for the Prevention or Cruelty to Ani
mals. Secretary Charles Holbrook and
wife were present, and Mrs. Holbrook in
troduced the speaker, with the statement
that he was "in the forefront of those la
boring in the cause of humanity." . Presi
dent-Jordan treated his theme purely
from a scientific standpoint, in introduc
tion beginning with tbe single cell and the
protoplasm which It contains, and gradu
ally ascending to a discussion of the high
er types of animal life.
He differentiated the sensations of warm
and cold blooded animals, saying that in
some cases a trout had. been thrown back
into ; the water after a hook had bet>n
baited with one of its eyes, when the fi*h
would return and nibble at its own 'eye.
Nothing similar to this could ever occur
in' the case of a warm-blooded animal, he
Bald, though some men were so impracti
cal and so constituted by. nature that they
played the nickel-in-the-slot machines.
Reaching the broad subject of marrs
inhumanity to man, he said he hoped the
day would arrive— though it might be a
few thousand years hence — when "nig
gerß" and Chinese, and Indians and Boers
would all be regarded as possessing simis
and entitled to the right to live. This
ironical. thrust at Great Britain, as well
as- the reference to the way In which the
speaker conceived that country as regard
ing her opponents," resulted in long-contin
ued applause.. ¦ • •
"The greatest crime in the world;" he
continued. "Is the crime of war. The
greatest imposition rs man's servitude to
the state, which makes it obligatory upon
him to go out and kill his fellow-man. It
war is not wrong, then nothing is wrong.
The redcoat is symbolic of war.' and It is
this same redcoat bully that is hindering
the march of man." ..-.¦•
..:';Qwing.!to.:,the--djls-
cantlhuatipni ¦ of - mv
Oakianil •¦• store : and
.thtehlar^mintofit'e.
Montgomery - street
<or?ylxyft ii ¦/;' ""-. ¦:'..-. !'
For 301)a^s \
;my : en 'ire 6 jk land
stock of wopUns at a
REDUCTION:
: of from .•'..¦; . .
:¦ >$2w50 to $5 do
on a suit;.'. •; •;,;¦ .•.'<; '" ¦;¦
You. cannot get th:
valu: 1 civs you els:-
where for the sams
mon;y.
: Only excellent ma-
terial, t h or o ug H ly
sponge^ and jhrunk,
used in the make-up
of my suits. . ; ;
All -wool Suits to
order from $12.50
Pints fr0m... .......54
Oyercoats fr0m... 515
The suit** I mike
for $20, $25- and
$33 area!! the heart
could wish for.
Cill any time —
don't wait till after
the expiration of the
io days. I .
Joe Ppheim
THE TAILOR.
i no- 11 1 12 Market St.,
201-203 Montg'y St.,.
SAN, FRANCISCO.
AMUSEMENTS.
ALGAZAR THE/\TERK
..••" : •: -I LAST. THREE NIGHTS. .'.: - : ¦ ';' C .
MATINEOO and \ SONDAYv
. . •. ¦. • ' .'Beautiful Pastoral Play, ' : \. . • ¦• "."-' : -
RESERVED vSEATS'ggg^
Nex t Week— F* R I IB NDS
. Engagement cf MARY HAMPTON. .. ...
SEATS NOW nEADY. .
GRAND OPERA-HOUSE.
TELEPHONE MAIN SSJ. /,
MATINEE fO-MORRdW.
LAST THREE NIGHTS. .
Suppe's Famous Comic Opera,
MONDAY NEXT— David Henderson's Fa-
mous ExtravaKanzs,
* ' AL. A DDJ N JR;'
USUAL POPCLAH PRICES.
Good Refen-pd S»-at In Orchestra, Saturday
Matinee, !se. • .
Hrancb Ticket Office, Emporium.
RACING! RAONG! RACING!
1900-CALIFOENU JOCKEY CLUB -1900
January" 22 to February 10, Inclusive.
OAKLAND RACE TKACK.
Racing Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thurs-
day. Friday and Saturday. Rain or sblne. ;
I-'tve or more rac«>» -each day. ¦-*.'¦•¦ -V '•
liaces ctart at 2:15 p. m. sharp.
I 1-erry-bcats leave Ean Francisco at 12 m. and
I ;2:SC. 1. I:*J. -¦ 2:30 and 3 p. m.. connecting
with trains stopolnc at the entrance to the
track. La»t two cars on train reserved for la-
die* and their escorts; no smoking. Buy your
ferry tickets to Shell Mound. All- trains via
Oakland mole connect with San Pablo avenue
electric cars st Feventh and Broadway. Oak-
land. .Also .all train* via Alarneda mole con-
nect with San Pablo avenue oars ot Fourteenth
and Broadway. Oakland. ' Th?fe electric cars
go direct to the track In fifteen .minutes.
rteturr.lr.fr— Trains leave the track at 4:15 and
4:«; p. m. and Immediately after the last race.
THOMAS H. WILLIAMS JR.. President,
n. B. MIIJSOT. Secretary-
CONCERTS AND RESOE.TS.
» ¦ -j ?
CHUTES ANpZOO-LTSiSST 1
MAJOR MITE, the Smallest Actor on Earth.
and r. Great Vaudeville Show.
TO-MORROW (SATURDAY) NIGHT,
GRAND PRIZE
GAKEVVALKING CONTEST !
OAKLAND vs. SAN FRANCISCO.
Phone" for 5eat5.............. ." PARK' 23
ADVERTISEMENTS,
IN HONOR
OF A BRIDE
Mre^ ; Pope Give^ a Dinner
td:M|ss
¦;.¦¦• ;' ; .' ; '/ ¦ '. "Hopkins. :¦! " ;
' Mr. and Mrs, John D. Spfeckels gave, a
dinner last evening-, at •; their home on
Howard street, complimentary, to Mr. arid
Mrs. Arthur. Brander. formerly Gertrude
Forman. The! table decorations were espe
cially beautiful, and were a happy ming
ling of fleecy white tulle, lilies ot the val
ley and violets.. Covers were laid for six
teen.:-; ¦'-.•.¦• ••-.' ••-. . ¦ .:. ' ' . . . ': ,:¦¦¦
Mrs. George Pope, gave a dinner last
evening at her borne on Pacific avtnue In
honor of her brother, Augustus. Taylor,
and. his- fiancee; Miss Helen Hopkins. •
Seated at table were Miss Helen Hop
kins. Miss Gep,rgina Hopkins, Miss Edna
Hopkins, Mlsb Carrie Taylor, Miss Mary
Scott; Miss Caro Crockett, Miss Genevieve
Carolan, . Miss Edith Mcßean, Augustus
Taylor. W. H. Taylor Jr., Mr. McNear.
Harry. Stetson, George Newhall, Samuel
Boardman, C. Felton and Mr. and Mrs.
George A. Pope. . .
In the Divorce Court.
: Mary Far rell has beengranted.a dlvbrcis
from Lawrencie Farrell. bn : 'the ground of
crueltj-. . Decrees of divorce: have also
beeh granted . Lawreriee. S. Graves from
Edith S- Graves; :ori the' grpurid of. deser
tion; Pauline Isaac. from, Joseph Isaac, on
the j: ground of .; desertloriv:" kathertne B.
CHARLES SUiINE
notable public: oration, delivered July. ?.
1345. on. "The True Grandeur, of Nations. '
amagniflcent plea for peace, a severe de
nunciation of .war. : :".- . -..:¦:¦' .¦¦'¦ .:.••- ..
Sumner: :.-..the Free: Soiler.
But of greater interest is Sumner /the
anti-slavery Senator and moral reformer.
The inspiration, of .Sumner's early public
career Is found in : the -cause of free sojl-
He became interested very early, in .the
antl-slavery : movement.'. ¦ He was" a '.sub
scriber to the Liberator in its early, year?',
and he wasa friend of Garrison. Phillips
and Charinihg.- In 1841 he .criticized ..Web-.
ster's correspondence Irt the. "Creole case
as giving Unnecessarily national support
and countenance to;the\slave interest. He :
denounced the admission. : of Texas, arid
he held the with Mexico to be .."un
constitutional In origin.- unjust In charr
acter and detestable Mn object;", ana,
above. all', he held that if additional ter
ritory be forced Up^fr: us "from all such
territory slavery should- be forever . ex
cluded." At the cori«?lu««loi> of the Mexi
can war. with the. iprnspect before" us: of
slavery extension-- toward the- South' and
r Sumrier felt.that the time had come
when men -of all .parties shoulit unite
against, slavery." ¦¦' In- politics- he was. a
Whig. Put he understood, that a party
was a means, hot- in- end; and If his party
.would "not serve hia purpose .he would find
an organization that; would. • ..- . T
Euxnner and the^Fugitive Slave lAw.
On : November $;; IS.V)! In Faneull. Hall,
soon after the passage of ; the. fugitive
slave law of that year^. Sumner. jspoke. on
"Our Immediate. Anti-Slavery . Duties'."
This was a remarkable speech: He de
nounced the fugitive slave law arid; delib
erately, counseled resistance. •¦' ¦
'¦"I will hot,", he said;- "dishonor this home of
the Pilgrims ami of the Revolution, by. admitting
—nay. 1 cannot believe— that this btll will be
executed here.: Among us. as elsewhere, indi
viduals may forget humanity In fancied loyalty
to law, but the public conscience will not allow
a man who has trodden our streets as a free
man to be dragged away as a slave."
This is the speech that is said to have
made Sumner Senator. It sounded the key
note for the Free Sellers of America in
the face of the "finality" legislation and
compromise of ISSO. The speech was de
nounced as treasonable by Southern men
and apologists for slavery, and it is cer
tain that more than anything else it de
termined Sumner's selection by the Free
Soil party as Its candidate for the Sen
ate. In the election of 1850 there wa3 a
coalition In Massachusetts between the
Free Sollers and the Democrats In the
choice "of State Senators and Representa
tives, with the understanding that cue
State officers chosen by the Legislature
should be Democrats and the United
States Senator a\Free Soiler. Sumner
was chosen Senator in April, IS3I. after a
long contest.
"He was not a member of either of the pr«it
parties. H<> was pledged th'nl and always and
only, to his *en»e of right. He stoctl for no
partisan end whatever, but simply and. .solely
for' uncompromising resistance to- slavery."—
Curtis. ...
In the Senate it was with difficulty that
Sumner found ah' opportunity to «*pcak
upon his "one idea." It was not until
August 26, 1552. that by a parliamentary
maneuver he gained his chance. He then
made his celebrated speech for the r^pcil
of the fugitive slave law.. This Is recog
nized as the masterpiece among Sumner ".«*
anti-slavery .orations. Mr. Curtis pro
nounces it "the most significant event in
the Senate" since Webster's reply to
Hayne. and an epitome of Sumner's "whole
career." In 'maintaining, his fundamental
thesis — "that." irce<lom was national and
slavery was sectional"— Sumner held that
wherever there -was national power there
was national responsibility," and that thi*
responsibility could not be discharged un
less that power were used -in restraint of
• slavery,. Therefore he demanded tbeM.i
stant repeal of the fugitive slave bill, the
abolition of slavery in the District of Co
lumbia, that Congress should prohibit
slavery In the Territories.- that the di
mestlc slave" trade be restrained, espe
cially on the high seas under the national
flag, and that the "National Government
should go- to the limit of Its constitutional
power to relieve Itself from all responsi
bility for slavery. This was. substantial
ly, the Free' Soil platform. The conserva
tive, character of Summer's speech is seen
Features New and Interesting.
Have you heard about the, young Culi
fomlan who Is half swell man about town
and half tramp? th.c oddest tourist in the
United States? A : kind of "Dr, Jekyll and
Mr. Ilyde" ipf the road, as it were? ; : ' i
Do -you kno^.that the dreadful padrone
system Is in Vogue here? Or,. possibly -you
have.no Idea what the padrone system Is
.Keep up with the. times and get next,
Sunday's Call. There will be stories wnrt*i
reading; good.; wholesome matter, artis
tically illustrated and- splendidly repro
duced. Listen to a recital. of a : few of the
features: ¦ • •¦.•¦•.-':•: :/;>,*; . ; ''-. f
.An .English Lord was used fbr bait ¦In a
tiger trap In far-away Indla-^a most thrill
ing story-..- , •' .-• ¦••¦ •:;.-. . ;:¦ ' • : •.¦ ; •.••¦'
An Interesting short story by. a popular
fictipri.;writer. ¦:•-..• -..'¦.- ¦• • •>. : .¦:;:.-.
HpW; they kill ducks with a cannon and:
a few: other tricks of the wily Califcrnlsan
market hunter.--: :¦' '¦ '.:¦.'¦' '. ••'•¦¦ • ¦'.'' ": i '
. One tlriie when President. McKlnley cast
aside Tofficial- dignity and patted '•Juba":
for'.the'btick-and-wing dance: '..¦; -. .• 'I
.'lnteresting, review :of the books of the
week.by ProfessorH.B. LathrQp of Stan
ford University. ; : ¦ . •:-.: .¦"•¦ , : ';--. : .•.-¦•'.'
. Robert LJ. Burdette's.. .'funniest ; story,
"What to Do When the: Nurse. Say9 It's a
Boy."- v". '.• \ '.; ;>;.:-::•: ¦-.•¦'• ",..-. " ¦:
.The latest lrivfcntion which" threatens to
revolutionize the scientific; world— the con
centration; arid use of the .sun's rayk.lof
power.-. .• - ¦¦-.;'•• -.: ¦•:.' : ••¦••-.•••.-'.¦
- The college girl at the University "of Cal
.ifdrnia.- '.•.-. ..¦¦:.•.¦ '.' .'¦ -r:- :"•¦¦: ;. ; : i, '
Many, other features besides these, and
all. well worth reading. :' .'¦ : \ ; .; ..;• :
AMTJSEJIENTS.
TAUGHT A LESSON.
Edward Pendergast's ';!. ¦ Boaatf ulness
Leads 16 :. His Conviction by
.'.¦ ¦';;•' ' :: ];¦': /JndgQ. Conlan.;' ?'.':' •;;..;.¦
:. Edward Pehdergast.' a .resldentQf Ocean
View,: gpt:. excited: ; ; Wednesday;" because a
woman was arrested for drunkenness. He
wentUothe poiiee station and/threatened
to have, all the officers brought -before the
Commissioner* and dismissed.- from the
force. ••.:¦ He declared he" knew them well
aht3 they would do anything he asked. He
also announced that he would see that the
four Police Judges were Tempved from
their positions. Ho raised such a dlstrrb
ance that he was :arrested for 'disturbing
the peace, •- •'•' .r'y \. ¦:.,•-'•¦.¦:•¦-, '.:.¦•.%>¦•;•
.Yesterday: Pendergast appeared before
Judge Cpnlan, He admitted that he did
not know any of the : Police Commission
ers and had no ill: feeling toward the of
ficers or Police Judges., The Judge thought
he should be taught not to ; be so fre« with
his tongue, arid sentenced him to pay a
fine .of $5. with the alternative of twenty
four hours. In jail/. < '¦:; i '•'• .-, -•' i: •*-";. ;Vr .•-•;:
ADVEETISEMENTS.: v^^^;
AMERICA SAYS SO.
The Entire Cbiin try Is On
.....> the Move, " • \ ¦ .
Cascaret* Caady Cathaftl; Did It. and
,: Record, a ; Phenoroinal Victory], ./-Five'.
I ; Million Boxes Sod La«t/**eaiv ";•:'• ; : -.
From every part 6f;America cote>es ; the.
news that from constipation
have found\ relief in X?asearet&: Candy Ca-:
thiirtic; the wonderful inpdernr scJentlfle
laxative and. Intestinal lohlc. . Cascarets
are ligTJratively and : literaUjr in every-
body's Thpupands have :trie<J
¦Casearettvivith the niQ^t' p-leas^ant .and ef-
fective results, and voluntarily, testify : to
thtir. Experiences. Here are a few extracts
from- some .iaf . the : leners:.: 1 v-.-'v -.-' " :¦ '/¦ . •¦: ".•i-; '<.
"I have been using Catcarets toi ¦ head-
ache 'and coh>tir>ation- tind have received
sreat benent from them.-' Mrs; M.G ab-
ler.: 512 Larrabee. '"'St.;;- Chicago. ?. , ¦¦"; •".:¦ r.
."I have been taking Cascarets .for. over
a month and tind them just the thing for
constipation:^' Albert. B.: Burt, 70: Jkl^ rt
St..-.Andovtr, ; ilass. i;- ; ' : V .. V-.:'. ;..-; ¦ f :>'\<~.
"1 am using Cascarets and have never
fgund anything sck satisfactory." - Mrs.: C.
\V. Durr^Lnti 17 Emerson gt, Buffala.'.X.
Y. ¦-¦.; ::,.:'.¦ v;: ::;>.;-" : : ¦-'.• v:y- :-:. v :
: "I have taken Cascarets. and cheerfully
recommend them to all mv friends.'' -Mrs.
Q. J. <Jrad well. Frugality; Pa.H^"';"^v>'" ;v
"Cascarfts ; are tine for.. biliousness.'. and
malaria and are so pleasant to take." Mrs.
Mary Cummings; Maud, Oklahoma." '•' ':¦¦:<¦.¦¦
"I'use Ciscaret-s in my family and find
them all you recommend tht m to be." ;B.
It. Ir\in, Cor, Mead and Railroad, Mead-
ville^'Pa,-, .;--.:.< vv . : «. :: ' :¦:;•¦¦ ;,:«¦ r-."t ;'--t 1 -:-. : :.;i<
"You can safely add appendicitis to the
list o;f diseases that Cascarets will benelit
or cure." Eunice J.; Smith, Rich Valley,
0hi0..; : :.. •:,,- . ;;- ; -= :";•• '¦;.?.<¦. i ¦¦>•".: --^ ¦'¦¦¦-¦¦:
."I have used Cascarets: there is nothing
better for constipation.*' j Benj, Passage,
Knightstown. Ind.' '-»."¦ *'¦¦.: '¦¦;¦¦. : ¦.;¦:.•:•;..::•..¦'
."Cascarets are all: right. They have
cured me of constipation, and.l never ex-
pected anything would." Charles H. Nye,
Lock. Box 205. Cincinnati, Ohio. . . ':- -¦""'.. .'¦¦:
'¦' "I am so thfuikful: for your Cascaretsij
They ate better than any medicine I ever
used." Mrs. M.. Rew. LriiCclle, lowa. '.-• ¦
"I do not hesitate to say that Caecarets
is the v*ry best medicine ever placed be-
fore thY people." Andrew Woodruff, Days-
ville. N. V, Y;~ ¦ 'X--\\ '¦ -'V"- -fr ¦¦¦-¦: i^
, "Cascarets are the best cathartic I ever
used." Tom Holt, "Vvellwood, Manitoba.
"1 have tried your Cascareta and I want
to tejl you they are: Just splendid." John
>Viegmink, Box 9€l. Allegan. Mich. \
We could fill the whole paper with ex-
pressions like the above. Thousands of
similar recognitions of the merits of Cas^
carets have been volunteered and prove
that this delightful laxative, so pleasant
of taste, so mild and yet effective, has se-
cured a lirmly. established place In. the
tw-arts of the people. •¦ ¦. . .".¦¦• • ."' . ¦'.¦:
¦Go buy and try- Cascarets yourself to-
day. All . drupgists. 190. 2Sc. 50c. ; Booklet
: and-«ample free. : Address Sterling Rem-
edy •CcrripaTiy,. Chicago or New York>" .*/>.'
j- ' , . / This is the, CASCARET tab-
r «/a«\ let - : Every tablet of the only
I /rip |i T I genuine Cascarets bears the
I V» Va to .J magic letters "C C C." Look
K. A at the tablet b^forei you buy.
-Nj lx and beware of frauds. imltaT :
¦ >¦; ¦ ;' ¦¦tions ..nrid substitutes,'" - •• {¦" ;
PAYS A TRIBUTE
TO THIS COUNTRY
¦ ; W6rds^:.-b^^: ; ;Ja':-^-pa;m-6us;
French Deputy,
; •'PARIS, : -PresU.
dent :df^Ke'i:.CluMiii)Mr^.£>'jpcp^ds^^tpdlt
'-hiis'' the*lA9ad'i- : Eoat.;'tb7d'a'S^':'a4'%'vn?.emb<err'o.f :
emyi\t.d_: wirich*<he:%as;:eleicte<J : in'Bticces.-:
sipn of . the .late/.Edouard ¦ HerVei . A : dis
tiriguished;-audience : was prefeent, .¦'includ
ing^President and : Mrne.:L6ubet» : arid : the
elite j-Q'f the diplomatfc^'ppHtlcal, iiterary
arid artistic; a brll-!
-.Han't -r eitofti .. in' .an eloquent ;perp ration;
he : called . on all : J"r.eri(i^imen : to ; sink; par ty
differences and-' unite .iaroujid -.the .tricolor
and not wait until France jw-js threa tene^
s''Let us.,'.', he. :Coritiriued,-. ; VriOt;.'.walt'for.a
crifcls ¦ before : the; 'signing [of -the;. edict of
Nantes of parties." •"::/¦¦ :.-•¦', -•-.;.-¦•.-.:¦ -?¦'¦'•.
:.M. .Deschanel'^ -appreciation^^^f democ
racy.-in- which, he fmade ¦Iriteregtirig: allu
islpns -to Americai, vwas ..listehpd. to .'with
rapt attention as coming fronv a man who
is universally recognized .:¦ to have -before
him a briniant.. : po.litlcal. careers -He spoke
of -the' giiearitic-' progress ; of; the: United
States, and saldr.. ¦':/¦ ¦¦:" i .¦"¦>¦ - : \^--' ':.*¦:< ?-.•;:•¦
¦ "Not a <iay : passes :ambrig: this practical,
innovating people put Borne State makes
a hew- experiment. in polltlbal' science." \- ,
:M: peschanel later referred to .the "ad
mirable founder of the republic, George
Washington, who first of all brought into
the New World all the flower, all vthe
fruit of Anglo-Saxpri political wisdom." :
WANT SANTA CLARA
COUNTY DIVIDED
Mo^menifc^ Inaugurated
by Cattlemen.
:Bpeciai: Dispatch Xo : Th^' '.CalL
} : vSAN ' idSEr. Feb: ;i.-tTh« . :resldehtB: resldeht8 ..of
Glirpy^and 'the; southern: end: j of v Santa
Clara .': County.^ '.are^discussing the: matter
of ¦ county division and ; the . cohstructiph
of a-rie*^county '/-xp be^ known ! asi Las Ani-;
tnas,: . with -.:. Gltroy:: as : '; the seat. :
lleriry Miller, the cattle kjng.lg, reputed:
Xa be*at ; the: head of ;this ; einbryo^niqye
ment. . According to reports it is proposed
to; lop off i all that portion of the county,
south . of : Morgan iHill'. and : : to? iricprpprate
it .as a :separate municipality.. Miller's
desire for this: division is . : because, of kri
endeavor of the residents of San Jose, and
vicinity!; to have the Supervisors. pass an
drdinah'ce appointing :a ; county:: Veterinary
irispectpr: with power to ; apply the tuber
culin test to : cattle: and ./kill those affect
ed, 'Several years ago this county had
such an inspector and he- idld good -work
until . he inspected some; of .Miller's cows.
The cattle, king refused to allow his stock
to be killed arid took the . matter : :\into
toiirt: :. v The ; Su peryisors then, discharged
the ; Inspector and the : cases \ w^re finally
dropped; .•:. r.. '-'¦'; -;:¦:• •-"¦ ¦-.;¦ '. :'•'''¦ -v:.'^. ¦••.vi:/ •<>? .'¦'•:
A .couple; -;6l weeks agb the SuperA-ispra
wer«i . asked to appoint another inspector.
The cattlemeni and dairymen about Gil
roy opposed it '¦'¦ and the Supervisors re
fused to appoint an inspector, is'ow these
same men and Miller, aresaid to be work
ing: for county, division. They claim their
interests are entirely; different from those
of the fruit growers and that a., separate
county; with Gilroy as the seat of gov
ernment.ip a^ necessity to advance their
interests. It is said a strong organization
will be effected by the cattlemen and an
attempt made to get a bill through the
next regular session of the Legislature
favoring division. ••¦':., :'¦:¦;:-¦' ¦•¦... .¦::¦
; E/fD* -Crawford, a prominent citizen of
that place, an attorney for the dairymen,
admitted to-day that county division had
beert discussed somewhat, but no organized
movement for It had been begun;. He said
It would, be. a great boon i to Gilroy and
although it would not be brought up until
the regular session, of the Legislature
a movement looking. to that, end may ma
terialize at .any -time. ¦'•.•-•.¦•'¦' '¦ . .- ¦ :• "¦¦ ..' '
A. great opposition would undoubtedly
arise to any division scheme in San Jose
and other parts -of the county- arid it 'ls
doubtful, whether such . a ' billv'could be
worked through the. Legislature. : ." •¦ :
At the next meeting of the Legislature
Supervisor . Rea will introduce : ani ordi
nance changing the "boundary: lines of
three of the five Supervisorial districts'
This gerrymandering: will be in the inter
ests of Supervisors Austin and Cottle, who
come up for selection yinv in November:. Rea's
own district Is also to be changed materi
ally. ¦ :- : .'. ¦-' ¦•:> ;;••. . ; •¦ ¦'¦'.':',¦ , ¦ •¦¦¦-, •¦ v.. :
GOOD REPORTS
ON ONE YEAR'S
CHRISTIAN WORK
i r^ Go hy e ritio h;V : I
!NSpILLAT^O^];;;OFtOFFICERS
DR. HEMPHZLIj i.;p.N
¦-.vTbe • 'annual vcorivehtion • bt .. the Golden
Gate. Christian Endeavor \Uriipn '-¦'. was held
last .night In 'the Third Corigregatianal
:Chajrcii- ; on;-Ffit<;i^th''£.t^etI-':v'-0yj^/^.\d|el-"
egates; were {jjit^^i^-iti^iv^^^/-\k\-ii^xii.
who , representSci > the.: Chinese. .churches,
wheri: Chalrmari . Charles '-M].; Whitney; re
'.ttri'hjff'J president ofrth^/ union, called^^the
meeting to order. -
;The:;cbnyentipn. ;was: opened!;? with -a
praise :j service;, led '. . by v-- W; v- : ;C. ¦ : Stad
feldU-iThls/.was .followed^by%iho - readihg
of the ;Scripturee .and 1 a; ; prayer; -by ¦ ReV;
George fc^ AdainsX' The; following retiririg
officers: read their^^ aiihual reports; .. Ja.mes
AV. \ Thompson, treasurer ; Miss IlattteM,;
Hall, .recording secretary; ; Miss N. :M.
Puff/ corresponding secretary, 'and.;' Miss
M.U .: Simpson, superintendent ; of: juiilor
work,: .All told, of prosperity.. -.Miss Duff's
reportcdntained the loilowlnc ihteTesting
'statistics;^ ;:¦.¦¦':;¦:'.'¦¦.-.;: ;^^.-:\" ; v: :/..-¦ ..V.^ : >;. t
i ;There are . at present forty-six societies': ;iri
Goldeti Gate Union, two having disbanded dttr- 1
•Ingf .the -year. -.-.The thirty-three reported socle-
tlfc» :l>ave. a : membership of 1354 active. Iss aasot-r
elate, arid. 174 honoraov . a total of 1725, -. Nine.^
teen ..societies', report . J703 41 contributed : for
honl«r-- missions, . sUteen rave . JIS7 65 f or ¦ city.
mission's- and twenty-One report $96$ 10 for: *or
elgn jnissibns dunnif 1599. .:flje iargest -society.
in the. union is that of the Central Methodist
EpUcppal Church, with ¦, 173 active- \ member? :
the second is that of the First Baptist, with
11?/ and; the third that oT' the Kirst I'resby
terian. with 93. /The Chinese :rresbyteriari So
ciety has glyen $56 for home, ;200 for city and
J4QO for '.foreign .missions: and: has' supported a
native preacher in China. : \ Its membership Is
.onlyAfortj-^.--.^ ::;-¦¦.;_ ;.-,-•;•::; ¦_'. ¦¦':¦:' ¦¦¦../;• -;.;v - : - : :¦¦
Ini. her; report on •¦'•: junior. Work; 'Miss
Simpson said:;,;;. ;;>..--;v.-.-; -; ';.¦¦;¦ : ---~r: ;;>
\Ye hay* . now: thirty Junior ' societies .and
thirteen. intermedfate.- The membership. IS Mi
aqtlv.e : and Z3S associate; total. 752. ltiterrhe
dUtes,: 263 active. 66 associate ; total, 32?. The
Junior: society Was increased bjv 29S and trie : lp
termedlate. by 95: new membera. 'They have
irlven . J132 63 to home mtgsltMis and »il 53 to
fpreljn/ ... •.-.-¦ .':.'...¦ •?•- ¦¦. : -.. .¦,•¦•..-. ¦''?•:-:.•¦¦; '¦;
After /the reading of. the rieports' the
various church societies pledged their as
sistance to Christian Endeavor work' in
a substantiar manner, after which :resolu^
tior.s of respect to themeroory of the latij
Robert Cleiandv who In life was an en
thusiastic member: of.- .the union, Were
adopted..-- •;:•'• ;¦•:¦•. .•;„••¦«. '¦¦¦¦:"¦ . : ¦..'-¦:¦ ¦
,lhe .address of the evening was deitv
ered. by Rev, John : Hemphiili pastor 6f
Calvary Presbyteriah Church, who took
for ;: his • su Wect : "The; • Outlook for the
Twentieth "Century," . After recouriting
the wonderful progress made In the ; cen
tury about to end. Dr. Hemphili predicted
that -New; York will overtake London In
population and wealth- before fifty 1 years
of the twentiethcentury have rolled away
and ban: Francisco will sit enthrdriei ai
the commercial queen Qf. the Pacific coast
The installation of the following oflicers
then, took place: G. B.: Littiefleld, prest
dent; George A, Gielow; fir«t vice-presi
dent; Miss V. S. hunting, second .vice
president; D. F. Parker, treasurer; Miss
Haute M. Hall, recording; secretary (re
elected), and Miss N. M. Duff, correspond
ing secretary (re-elected}.: .-.;•.:; :
The convention was closed with the
singing of a hymn by the delegates, as
sisted by an augmented volunteer choir
of the Third Congregational Church. ; -
years',;. Mr.: Wilson thought;, would 1 require
about: $25,0pQ:pex. annum for ejenerises. All
help possible was prpmiseavby the writer.
Mr. dg : Young said the commercial "mu
seum movement %as; spreading; there be
ing; ft: new one itt lilver pool •••.«trid > . another
in : Germany, •which i$ ¦ supported :byv the
Government: ¦:¦ In - &.¦ short 'discussion It de
veloped that the.Phlladelphia Museum h4s
been vthe means of American., firms Meet
ting a number :bf large conttacts
; through the: distribution '-. of ;informatloiy
sfent- by- its ;forelgn '. agents. 1 . "¦? ; . ¦¦;::''..'> ¦¦t'S '¦;¦'¦'"
Mr.- Rbdgers called :attentldrir to the ne
cessity of haying ;the title of all : museum
property reposed in an -official ;bod>r; ; like
the Bpar»?of Regents, thus exempting it
from tasiatiori;-: ¦ '¦¦ '.•.•.-. ': ~, '¦':¦¦ ".v:- - ¦;-.: ' . ';r~:^/a-:-
Mr. : Upham advised that the plan of. or-:
ganlzation, • etc ; . . be. left -with -a commit;
tee of five for arrangement, but it;
decided that the whole, committee should
handle those mfttters. Mr/ de Young sub-^
mitted such/ a plan, which was very, simi
lar tb one presented by : Professor.jPlehn.
The ; former's plan, was read and .partly
discussed^ In it Mn de .Vqunjr suggests
the name, be "The California Commercial
Museum" ;.. that " the .scope be .to gather
and give information to ,all. industries in
California that: will assist In the develbp
ment ,of commerce with our -hew! Pacific
possessions, as. : well: as all. countries;. of the:.
Orients and also with the rest . ef the
world. A- coll ecii on of raw and manufac
tured products of various countries should
T^e gathered and analyzed and;lnforma
tion concerning them be published* ¦¦¦ln^^ re
gard "to the organization y. Mr; de Young
sußKcets •'¦that: the management v-.bisi vested
in; a board of g&yefcncH-s' of ;; twenty-three
members, representing, the: local commer-';
clal and industrial bodies; who shall seV
lect.a manager with full: executive pow^
ers. : There, should .a'so : be an advisory
board composed of • the Governor; the
Mayors. of the large cities.: of -the: State.
¦.fpr(ff¦gn:¦^l^ld.en r tV./,¦Cp^a'.ul.s;;^?•pr^B^d^nis.¦¦"pf..
oomtnercial ¦•bodies': and .a" -.f,ew-'..: others.
Theee -should be purely advisory.; having
r.6 vote. Members' ; initiation fees, in the
city: and outside, were : also-provided for.
-After, some dtsdusslon as^ta. the. proper
name for the organization, the committee
adjourned to meet at.2 p; ; m; to-day, at ; 2o2
Market-street- : -^j-.Y'::' ¦'.¦¦.:: ..¦.";. : ;/-'(\.v^ /[¦.¦'¦:
COMMERCIAL
MUSEUM NOW
WELL STARTED
Plans of thia Proposed
Organization.
ITS ; SCOPE ; AND PURPOSE
¦ ¦¦¦-'¦ -.'-'¦ ¦•¦¦'.¦/ /;-. ¦ : --. — » '.' '•'¦. '.•'. ¦ ¦'"--. ' : :V? ;*::
MUCH WILL HINGE rTJPON THE
: \ NAME ; ;TO :;BE;;SELECTED^-'.r:: } : :
The ; first ; vorteJv to wiird 5 the .establish-^
merit . of ¦ a ;•' commercial- . rouSeurn;' .ln: ¦thla;
city; Is ¦well under way. " The;. commit tee
«f .ten- of the. original bb&y . :oi ' . telega tes
a jjpoin t ed by . £6mm(>reia 1 : a nd 1 hdus t rial
bodies met yesterday In the -Chamber .of
Commerce rooms . to. discuss ; plans for :or-i
panizatlon. . -Benjarnin'. lde::AVheeler. pre
sided, and Professor ! C. C. : Plehn.'; acted as
secretary. The commlUee .. con.Blisted' -of
M. H. de Young. General *y. ; P. Chipman,
L. Sachs. A; Sbarbbrov- Isdac AY.
It. Wheeler, A. A: "Watkiris. F. j; Symmes,
E. Scott, for Claus- Spr«?ckels.?ana AW
thur Rodger Si fur Mayor Phelani: :=•:. ' •'" -':.-i
Secretary Flehn read a : letter from Di
rector "Wfifton" of the Philadelphia Mu
seum. In which f he- estimated the -first
cost of earn pies ©£ Oriental goods; vwhlch
would occupy no small place ill the."West
ern museum, would be not : more \ than
fcX»#. The museum for the first-few!
ADVERTISEMENTS.
THE SAX FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1900.
JEggrert:;frdm- Thpinas . O. Eggert. on the
ground, off allure tqjjrovlde; AnriaG/ Ed
mond« from James J*: Edmortds f dr.habit-:;
ual ./intemperance, rand ¦'-} Kaihrina ' : Ruef
from Josef ißuef on Uhe. ground. vpfex-^:
tremei cruelty. : i Suits for. -divorce; ; on . the
ground of desertion have been filed by R.
H;rAhnvagalnst Mary E.::Ahn. -and
E. : Brower Against. George W.-. Broker.: . : :
7

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