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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 21, 1900, Image 7

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Shriners' Night at Techau Tavern.
The public will please take notice that
on Wednesday evening. February a. IDOO.
Techau Tavern will be closed to the gen
eral public after 8 o'clock, the entire build-
Ing being reserved by the Mystic Shrine
for their after-theater banquet and ball. •
He Wants a Divorce.
Robert. A. Stltt has sued Mary E. Stltt
for : a divorce. -alleging cruelty as cause
of action. .
Identified the Books.
The trial of Thomas A. Burns, John J.
O'Brien and Edward D. Swift, charged
with defrauding the city of School De
partment lumber contracts, was continued
before Judge Cook yesterday. William
W. Wells, W. E. Cunary. John H. Han
*en, T. A. Burns, the defendant. Dr. G. I.
Drucker, R. P. Hoole and R. H. Webster
were on the stand during the day. The
testimony of all of the witnesses went to
establish the Identity of books, the fig
ures In which are relied upon to obtain
the conviction of the defendants. The
books were Identified and to-day the work
of connecting the defendants with the al
leged frauds will begin.
ages and attorney's fees, but primarily
for the purpose of testing the validity of
the ordinance. •
OF INTEREST TO THE COAST.
Patents, Pensions, Postoffice Changes
and Army Orders.
Special Dispatch f The Call.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.— Pacific Coast
patents were granted to-day as follows:
California— Peter- Beanston, San Francisco,
assignor to G. R. Fletcher, crematory carriage;
Alexander G. Carter, Fresno, clow; James L.
C*cll, Los Angeles, machine for digging pota
toes: Hugh C. Davey. CalUtoga. quicksilver
furnace; Frank B. tHjffy, Low Angeles, Incan
descent vapor burner; Lester R. Leland. Los
Angles, acetylene gas generator; Coby Loren
zpn, Oakland, protector against steam for ket
tles; Charles T. Meredith. San Diego, educa
tional chart: Lewis H. Mertz. Lcs Angeles,
telephone directory: John O. Miller. San Fran
cisco, fare register; James H. Northrop, Tus
tin, roving stop motion for spinning frames;
Cnlvln Osrburn. Riverside, acetylene gas gen
erator: Jnrnes L. Patterson, Madera, and G. T.
Hill. Mer<vd. feeder for threshing machines;
Alfred J. Salisbury, Los Angeles, pump piston;
George F. Sculer and M. Granat. Stockton,
acttylen* gas generator; James R. Thame, Hol
oomb Vali-y. fiber pulley.
Oregon— Ll2i!e M. Adams, Portland, ward
robe.
WHfhlnglon— Edward R. Gould. Spokane,
shirt; William McCaffrey. Tyler, railway switch
stand.
Q. H. McLean was to-day ' appointed
Postmaster at Julian, San Diego County,
vice S. L. Harrett, resigned: also C. L.
Wallace at Keyes, Kern County, vice G.
M. Hell, resigned.
Army orders: By direction of the Secre
tary of War the following acting assistant
surgeons of the United Spates army will
proceed to San Francisco and report In
person to the commanding general of the
Department of California for duty:
Palmer Hi Lyon, New York City: Charles
Roemelt, Elmira. • : f
Pensions— California: Original— Charles Peter
son. San Francisco. J8; Lorenzo D. Jared, Es
tella. S3; Daniel E. Nichols, Fresno, J«; John
A. 'Martin, San Francisco, $6: John Schout. San
Francisco, $6. Increase— Richmond Rating, Lln
don, $0 to III; Perry M.' Johnson. Rohnervllle,
IC to $12: Orange S. Caullfield. San Diego, JIS
to f4. Mexican war survivors. Increase—Rob
ert Fitzgerald Williams, Veterans' Horn»
Xarn, ?S to $12.
Oregon: Increase— Joslah Martin, Oregon
City. ?6 to ? 14.
Washington: Increase — Daniel I* Druse
North Yakima, $8 to $10. .
Will Contest Commenced.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
WOODLAND, Feb. 20.— A will contest
was commenced in the Superior Court to
day. A few months ago W. E. Kelthly
died,. leaving all his property to his young
widow. Mrs. Bernice Kelthly. His
mother/Mrs. A. Keithly, has brought suit
to annul the will on the ground that he
was unduly influenced and not in his light
mind when he executed the same. The
trial is likely to develop some sensational
features. *
Will Prohibit Bookmaking.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
. WOODLAND, Feb. 20.— The directors of
the District Agricultural Association
have decided to prohibit bookmaking at the
race meeting to be held In August, for the
reason that they believe. U to be detri
mental t#o district fairs.
INSURGENT
TO BE TRIED
FOR MURDER
Guerrillas Are Classed
Now as.Bardits.
MANILA. Feb. 20.— A military com
mission will meet at Cnlamba to-morrow
to try a Filipino member of the guerrilla
band which attacked a squad of Ameri
cans on February 2. killing a corporal.
The charges are murder and assault with
intent to kill.- The case is important as
foreshadowing the policy of trentin«
guerrillas as bandits. It .is supposed that
one reason which hns hitherto deterred
the American authorities from adopting
this policy is that the Insurgents have
more-t-han fifty American prisoners and
may retaliate. - although only a few of
them were captured while flghtlng.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.— Judpe Taft.
president of the Philippine Commission,
had a lons conference with Secretary
Root at the War Department to-day in
regard to the proposed work of the com
mission. It Is expected the commission
will be completely organized In the near
future and that it will start for Manila
about April 1. Only two members of the
commission have been appointed so far,
viz; Judge Taft and Professor Worcester
of the original commission. Colonel Den
by of the old commission, who was In
vited to c-erve on the new commission,
hns declined the offer. As the commis
sion will concist of five members it re
mains for the President to appoint three
others.
General Otis to-day cabled the War
Department the following list of casual
ties: ¦¦¦."•«-• ;.v
MANILA. Frb. 19.— Deaths^- Malarial fever,
January 2. j Arlington Mayse, Company H,
Twenty-second Infantry: February 10, Willis
McMartln, corporal Company G, Forty-fifth In
fantry; February 12. Azarlan Harron. Company
K. Thirty-eighth Infantry; drowned. January
15, Albert Jay L. Perry. Company A. Thirty
second Infantry, bathing in Rio Grande Flor
ida Blanco; February 14, John Magnusen, band
Thirty-fourth Infantry, bathing Rio Grande Ca
banatuan. : iAicon; February 15, Jbsoph F.
Carnes, Company F, Thirty-fourth Infantry;
Rio A*?no. near San Nicholas, accidental; Feb
ruary 9, Daniel P. Jenkins, Company M. Twen
ty-second Infantry, grunshot; January 20. Wil
liam Crawford, corporal Company X, Twenty
elxth Infantry. Angeles, Luzon, fell on dagger
worn by him; gunshot In action, January 27,
Amos O'Neill. Company F, Thirty-ninth In
fantry: heat iwsTatlon. February 9, Frederick
Uegweln, Company H, Twenty-seventh Infan
try; pneumonia. February 11, John P. Hill.
Company C, : Twenty-ninth .Infantry; variola,
February 5, Porter McGuyer. Company D,""For
ty-fourth Infantry: February 12. Cyrus E. Brlt
tay. Company A. Thirty-sixth Infantry; dysen
tery, February 14. Andrew Andersen. Company
H, Thirty-fifth Infantry; Carl Nessel, Company
C. Fourth Cavalry; typhoid, February 16. Clar
ence Van Border, corporal Company B, Thirty
seventh Infantry.
try with his life. You know how well he
has ke^t his promise.
Cloverilule has a brilliant future before It
•In another line. For several months you have
seen surveyors in your vicinity seeking; the
moet convenient passare to extend your rail
roud to the forests near the coast. I have no
doubt that through the enterprise and energy
of Mr. Foster, the model railroad president of
California, and his able directors the road will
soon be extended far north, perhaps to con
nect with a new transcontinental line.
An excursion rate of one fare for thu
round trip has been arranged from San
Francisco, poing and returning: durinp the
fair. Sonoma County day, which w'U be
on the 22d. will undoubtedly be the big
day of the fair. There will be present that
day the California Glee Club and Mando
lin Club, under the name of the "Califor
nia Entertainers." composed of fifty mu
sicians and comedians. Besides this there
will be the Petnluma band, as well as the
local and Healdsburg bands.
Exhibit at the Cloverdale Citrus Fair.
ADVEBTISEMSNTS.
gSQEBBBHEBHBBDSfInBBaBB
I Free Tickets i
B TO THE H
I Orpheum! I
H Q
2 BUY TOUR W
gb a a
D H mtt — mi
B SAVE TOUR WRAPPERS AND B
GET FREE TICKETb TO THD W
E ORPHKL'M. pj
E fcj
J Tbe JohnsoiHLocke g
g Mercantile Co., |
B 204 FRONT STREET, §
|! BAN FRANCISCO,
H Will Exchange for I>«nox and Ivory (a
»-j Boap Wrappers ¦•
M FREE TICKETS TO THE ORPHEUM H
5 UNDER THE FiM.TA>\VINO CON- W
X DITIONS: fc3
E If You Want a 25c Reserved Seal £¦
D Send 25 Wrappers of LENOX SOAP M
Eg Or U Wrappers of IVORY SOAP «
m Or eiee send U Wrappers of LENOX 2
S: EOAP and < Wrappers of IVORY SOAP £»
H If You Want a EOe R-servpd Seat E3
B Send 53 Wrappers of LENOX BOAP |S
CJ Or 24 Wrappers Of IVORY POAP. ri
m Or etse send 25 Wrappers of LENOX n
2 SOAP ar.d 12 Wrappers of IVORY SOAP »
CBBBSEBBBCBBSaBBSSBEBa
DEATH OF A NOTED
PAINTER OF ANIMALS
William H. Beard, a Member of tlra
Academy, Succumbs to
'Apoplexy.
NEW YORK. Feb. 20.— William H.
P-card, the artist, died at 11:57 o'clock to
right. Mr. Beard'? death was due to
apoplexy. He had been ill since Januarj
£7. His condition changed for the worse
yesterday and he was unconscious for a
considerable time before hie death.
William H. Beard was famous as a
painter of animal?. He was born at
Palnesville. Ohio, in IS2J. He began his
professional career about l£4t>. Ten years
later lie studied and painted in Europe.
His wife was the daughter of Thomas
Le Claire, the portrait painter. He was
elected a member cf the Academy in 1562.
preme Being? Says the Incarnate Lord .
mi, erro:
I am the origin and end
Of all this changeful universe.
Th*re la, O hero, naught b«yondl
For all ia strung on Me atone.
As the beads upon the thread.
I am the freshness of the waters.
The splendor of the iun and moon.
The essence of the holy writ.
The sound of sounds, the man In m«n.
I am the life of life. O prince.
All true devotion's centered power.
All beings' seed am I. the strength.
The wisdom of the strong and wise!
And how, then, are mortals to know
him? Says again the divine teacher (xll.
6(1):
Lo, those who worship 'Me alone,
« Committing all their acts -to Me.
Regarding Me their aim and end.
And thinking above all of Me,
Their hearts. O prince, do dwell in Me,
And I to them shall b«, forsooth.
A savior from the ¦urtrinx flood
Of death and migratory ut*.
Thus the who<e teaching of the Bhaga
vad-Gltd. Is to fix our soul upon the Lord,
to the exclusion of all things tending to
draw us from him. Not that we should
neglect our duties in life, but that these
should be sanctified by recognizing all
blessings as faint rays of him "who is the
life of life, the splendor of the sun and
moon."
Our of Brahrranlsm grew Buddhism aa
a reformed faith. Ita tenets were ex
pressed In Pali, a slater dialect of San
skrit. The sweetness of many of its
teachings may be Inferred from a few
quotations of the words attributed to
Buddha himself in one of the canons of
I3ud<3hiam. the Dhammapaden "Virtue's
Way," translated by Max Muller. "Sacred
Books of the East'):
Hatred is never conquered by hatred; hatred
Is conquered by love. • %
Let man overcome anjer by love, let him
overcome evil by good; let him overcome the
greedy by liberality, the liar by truth.
As the vaasika plant sheds Its withered flow
ers, men should shed passion and hatred.
Him I call indeed a pious man who is tol
erant with the intolerant, mild with fault
finders and free from passion among the pas
sionate.
If a man conquer In battle a thousand tiir»'»
thousand men. and If another conquer iiimself.
he is the greatest of the conquerors.
But Hindu literature, though largely re
ligious and philosophical, is &J3O ia no
small degree secular, even if then usually
permeated by religious conceptions. The
lllnda possesses at least two gTeat epics,
of which one. the Mahabharata ("the
great Bharata War") Is the moat famous.
Thla huge epic of about 200.000 verse-llnea
describes the contest between two royal
families, both descendants of Bharata.
But being the production not of one man
but of sucessive ages, the chief narrative,
probably rooted in a simpler one of his
torical foundation, la Interwoven with nu
meious unalien episodes, breaking the
chain of events and filling by far the
larger part of the epic.
Lvrlc poetry also found rich expression
in Sanskrit. Among larger lyric poems of
recognized worth, the most celebrated is
MegbaDuta ("The Cloud Messenger."
translated by H. W. Wilson, London.
1814). This poem, composed by the great
dramatist Kalidasa, who is supposed to
have lived in the early part of the sixth
century. A. D.. is really overcharged with
striking poetic imagery.
Strange us it may seem. India la yet
more famed for its dramatic than for Its
lyric and epic poetry. Among the dra
matic poets Kalldasa, the author of "The
Cloud Messenger," stands foremost, and
"Shakuntala," the gem of Indian dramatic
composition, and one of the great world
poems. Is his masterpiece. .
When llrat made known to Europe
more than a century ago It was hailed
with expressions of unreserved admira
tion by the foremost literary men. Hum
boldt said that "Tenderness In the expres
sion of feelings and richness In creative
fancy have assigned Kalidasa his lofty
place among all poets of all nations."
Only some salient works of the Sanskrit
literature have been touched upon In this
necessarily brief sketch. They may suf
fice, however, to show that this literature,
among much that is valueless from an
esthetic point of view, also contains
works of no small merit. It may be true
that even the best Hindu poetry contains
elements that are at times offensive to
our esthetical taste; gorgeous colorings
to the neglect of finer shades, grotesque
leaps of Imagination and supernatural in
vention. But. after all. no literary work
of a remote time or a foreign civilization
can be appreciated without that degree of
general literary culture and broadness of
spirit which will enable us to discover
real beauty even through the veil of un
familiar ideas and associations. It may
be true also that our superior culture pro
vides for poetic forms that were beyond
the Hindu. As our knowledge ripens into
a better understanding of the secrets of
nature, of society and of religion, not only
our store of words but all kinds of ex
pression are wonderfully enriched. How
could the ancient Hindu, with his limi
tations, have framed a figure like Long
fellow's "The clock kept time with the
revolving spheres." or Colerldge'a "There
are errors which no wise man will treat
with rudeness while there Is a possibility
that they may be the refraction of some
great truth below the horizon?" But
where poetic expressions are suggested by
a more Immediate observation, by first
Impressions from external forms and or
dinary human conditions, the Indian muse
is. in her better moods, nowise unworthy
of her Western sister, besides having a
peculiar charm of her own. Perhaps In
all the wide world's literature there Is not
a womanly character more charming for
pure, delicate tenderness and devotion
than are Damayanti and Shakuntala.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION.
:'. I Spring Term, 1000.
Mondays — American Political Par
ties.
Tuesdays — Twenty Lessons in
French Conversation and Recent Sci
entific Discoveries.
Wednesdays and Thursdays —
Golden Ages of Literature.
Fridays — Photography for Ama
teurs.
Saturdays — Biographical Studies
for ' Girls.
These courses will continue until
June 7. 1900. Examinations will be
held af their close as a basis for tha
granting of certificates.
A LITERATURE 4000 YEARS OLD.
Copyright, 1900, by Seymour Eaton.
AUSPICIOUS OPENING OF
CLOVERD ALE'S CITRUS FAIR
ADVERTISEMENTS.
vsfeo have been relieved of
painful menstruation by
Lyilia E m Pinkham's Vege-
tztle Gontpoundf are con-
stantly writing grateful
letters to Mrs, Plnkham,
I'-y-ii* E. Pinkh^n's Vegetable Compound I
cured them. It always
relieves painful periods
and no woman who suf-
fers should be without
this knowledge.
If early all the ills of
women result from some
dorangemont of the
female organism, Mrs,
Pinkham's great medi-
cine makes women
healthy / of this there is
overwhelming proof.
Don't experiment. If
you suffer get this medi-
cine and got Mrs, Pink-
ham's free advice. Her
address is Lynn, Mass,
AMUSEMENTS.
Tl;'.ri sr.ii T*Ft Week, the Famous
BOSTONIANS.
TO-NIOHT em SATT'RDAT NIGHT anJ j
S=ATT"RI>AY MATINEE.
"ROBIN HOOD.", 1
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY.
"THE SERENADE."
Be£. NEXTMGNDAY,
DENMAN THOMPSON;
And an Entirely N*"w- Production at
THE OLD HOMESTEAD,
VC'TE-Mr. Thompfin will positively anpe-r ;
AcrttSS lh:s ;nga?»ni'nt <fnr the first time j
her'- in ov»r twelve yenrsi, presenting his ortg- |
i:ial creation cf Joshua Whitcomb.
A BLIZ7.ARI> WOCXD NOT EFFECT
THE TKEMENIiOUS CBOH'DS THAT AXE !
COMING IN TO SEE
WHO IS WHO.
IM LAfGHS IN 130 MINUTES.
sfecialT
UAXOiZB TO-MOIUtOW. WASHINGTON'S
BIRTHDAY.
Reserved Spats. 2r<- and ZOc.
PEATS NOW ON PAKE FOR
"THE EILKNCE '>F I>F.AN MAITLANP." ]
Sunday afternoon next. &t 2:15. the Eminent '
ATr. H. R. ROBERTS, and MISS MAOOIK
"< 'ORE and her Australian Company.
ALCAZAR THEATER.
TONIGHT w^K ENTmE
MORE FUN THAN EVER.
THE PRODIGAL
FATHER I nmmfflmiM'f
EXTRA MATINEE THURSDAY,
WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY.
15c, 25c R ||^f D 35c, 50c.
Ne« Week— "THE NEW safc-'TH."
"HOOT MON, THEILASSIES LOVE ME!"
43d PERFORMANCE TO-NIGHT
Of the Cyclonic Suece»»,
Evening at 8. Matine* Saturday at 2.
Grand Holiday Matinee Thurfday
POPULAR PRICES— 2Fc and 50c.
Telephone Bush 9.
<TIIE PEOPLE'S POPULAR PLAT HOUSE.)
PHONE SOUTH 770.
LAST TIME? THIS WEEK.
Utandins Room at Ev*ry Performance.
EVEfI V EVENINO AT B:IS.
MATINEE DAILY AT 2ilS.
TH.PP.. JEFFRIES-
THEEEA SHARKEY
CONTEST PICTURES.
VEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON and NIGHT.
LAST PERFORMANCES.
Th!» Thf<tt<*r will remain c!.«««v1 for two week*
c.-inuTKT.ciwt Monday. Ffbruary M. to ajlo'*- for
KTrtH-IVT Stace Improvements.
NEXT— "HAVE YOU SEEN SMITH?"
OLYMFJA c E o D f.%ni,'
THE ONLT FKEE VAUDEVILLE SHOW IN
THE CITY.
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY.
TRIXEDA,
Thu Creatett Beauty on the Vanderill* £tar«.
MLLE. THELMA,
la New reset riast!<jue.
Tbe Famous DE MEIR SISTERS,
AND A HOST OF OTHERS.
ADMISSION FREB.
MATINEE EVERY SUNDAY. . !
AMATEUR NIGHT EVERY FRIDAY.
JVEW WE«TER.>I MOTEL.
KEARNY ANL> WASHINGTON JJTb.— RE- :
modeled and renovated. KING. WARD A ,
CO. European plan. Roomo. £0c to .1 10 day,
Uto Ji week: Ik lv CO month. Free bat hi; hot 1
and cold umiT every room: lire grates In every
roooi; elevator run* all night.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY^ 21, 1900.
HOT WATER TO
THAW DYNAMITE
Fatal Explosion Occurs
at Cheyenne.
DENVER. Feb. 20.— A special to thi Re
publican from Cheyenne. Wyo., say*: A
fatal dynamite explosion occurred in the
t'nion Pacific gravel pits, thirty miles
west of Cheyenne, at noon to-day. The
dead ere:
JOHN BOULANGEZ, laborer, disem
bowel fd.
ROBERT PARKER, labcrcr. both legs
blown off: died shortly after explosJ.vn.
The injured: George Parfrcv. legs shat
tered, eku'il crushed, will die: Phil Forpan.
legs mangled and hack injured, may re
cover; James KOwards, neck badly lacer
ated, will probably recover. ' . • •
The live men were employed in the bl.iFt
lng of rock at the gravel pits, and whiie
thawing frozen dynamite with hot water
the explosion occurred. The laborers v.'ere
blown from th» pits and a considerable
dis=t3nce away trom the track. A numb* r
of ether men vho were at work sorno dis
tance away were knocked rensel^ss by
the concussion and slightly injured by fly
ing pieces of rock.
ihe accident was at once reported to
headquarters and surgeons sort from
Laramie to care for the Injured, who with
the dead were picked up in the meanlim«,
carried on board a spatial train and start
rd for Laramie. The railroad property
was damaped tut slightly.
Poundmaster Sued.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
WOODLAND, Feb. 20.— A few months
ago 'the Supervisors passed, a pound ordi
nance to prevent stock from running, at
large and apolnted George Tobias pound
master. H. P. Eakle has brought suit for
the recovery of ten head of cattle,, dam-
, Madame Martin of the City of Paris mil-
linery department has Just returned from
Paris and New York with a complete Hue
of novelties In millinery. •
Quality Merits Reward.
The output of the Anbenster-Busch Bnswtn^
Association of St. Loul*. Mo., for 1130 was the
largest In the history of that great establish
ment. The fiscal reports of the Internal Rev
enue Department show a d«cr*as« of 912, KM
barrels In the consumption of be«r against the
preceding fiscal year, which may. In a meas
ure, be attributed to the war tax of SI.OO per
barrel Imposed on July 1. IS9S. The output of
the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association be
ing the largest In the world, should nnturalty
have ihown the greatest loss; yet thair sales
for the fiscal year Just ended exceed those of
any previous year In the history of the asso
ciation.
Their sales of bottled beer alona have In
creased 10 4-10 per cent, which U conclusive
evidence that a good article finds a good mar
ket among an appreciative public. And tha:
"quality merits reward."
famous Italian-Swiss Agricultural Colony. Be
fore eelectlne the -land I Joined a committee
of the board of directors and we txamlned
o*er fifty different pieces of property, visit-
Ing all parts of the State from Los Angeles
en the south to Yolo County on the north, and
the committee finally unanimously decided to
make its purchayc four miles south of this
town. The remarkable success of the colony
und the well filled school now occupied by
children horn on the promises proves the place
to have been most favorable both as to the
production of the soil an-1 the raising cf fami
lies.
It swmi that the pure air of Cloverdale has
anctl'er virtue— that of producing hcrops. Two
years Ago I. had the honor of representing one
of the c.-mm^rcinl Indies of San Francisco
which Dror»nted to the First California Regi
ment at th»» I'rfsldlo n beautiful American
flag. The v*rson who received the emblem of
our country was Colonel Smith of Cloverdale.
He thanked us for the presentation to his regi
ment of that emblem of liberty and assured
us that he would defend the flag of our coun-
CLOVERDALE, Feb. 20.— Claverdule's
annual citrus fair opened auspicious
ly to-day. For an opening day there
was a fair attendance. The exhibit"?
have not all been placed, but there lb, a
goodly array of Sonoma's choicest fruits,
and when all the displays shall have brten
completed the exhibition will far surpass
any previous citrus fair in Sonoma
County.
This evening there were ceremonies
formally opening the fair. One of the
speakers was A. Sbarboro, who in the
course of his address said:
Old Sonoma county was one of the first set
tled by civilized people In this State. Since
the raising of the liear flag the county has
made steady progress, and to-day It Is the
banner county of the State for the produc
tion of wine, hops, hay, poultry- and other
pmductß.
About twenty years ago I organized the now
GOLDEN AGES OF LPERATURE
11. LITERATTJBE OF INDIA.
BY A. H. EDGREX, PH. D. ' *
(University of Nebraska.)
India, rich and sunny India, has tcr
ages been the tattle ground of raors an«l
the home of deep religious meditation^ and
literary activity.
It was once occupied entirely by that
dark-hued race which yet makes up the
bulk of Its population, especially In the
Bouth, where this race has even preserved
Its language. But about 4COO or 5000 years
ago— seme claim much earlier— a llsht
complexloned race penetrated Into the
peninsula from the north, gradually sub
duing and forcing ita language upon the
ancient Inhabitants. That language is yet
preserved in the early hymns sung t>j' the
Invaders when, occupying the river basin
of the Indus and In many later monuments
of a growing literature. Its «arly name,
possibly, was Aria, although this Is not
certain. But when one of its dialects,
coming to be the recognized idiom of the
higher classes and the vehicle of literary
composition, was brought under deili.ke
rules that idiom was called Sanskrit (sara-
Fkritft. perfect, holy) as distinguished
from the other so-called Prakrit dialects
(prakrita, common). It continued to be
the living Langi'age for many centuries,
until finally it was superseded by popular
j dialects. But It has never yielded its «r*vay
j as the language of learned intercourse in
India, being yet used as such.
j Sanskrit le of especial Interest to us for
j three reasons. In the first place it belongs
to that large family of languages, ordinar
ily called the Aryan or Indo-European,
which is spoken from India through al
most entire Persia, Armenia, Europe and
America, being thus akin to our own. in
the second place, representing by fat the
earliest phase of any Aryan dialect, it re
veals on the whole more"'fa!thfillly than
any of them that early growth of the Ar
yan language by composition and internal
j change which has later been gradually
obscured and obliterated, not, indeed, by
| a process of decay, as some prefer to call
It. but by a process of fusion ever tend
ing to centered strength and simplicity.
Aside from its linguistic interest, the
transparency of Sanskrit, by revealing to
a large extent the metaphors hidden with
in the comportite forms of the language,
also lends a peculiar picturesquenese to Its
poetic expressions. In the third plaoo.
Sanskrit contains an abundant literature
of varied historical, philosophical an i
esthetical interest.
The Rig-Veda ("Hymn- Veda," "Sac-e.I
Book of Hymns") is the oldest llurary
monument of Sanskrit and of the Aryan
speaking nations. It is a collection of
about a thousand hymns and lyrics som
• posed during centuries and handed Jov.n
; by faithful tradition from the time tht
j Aryans stood on the threshold of India
: to the time they were collected into the
i hymn material we now possess. These
hymns, invoking the gods, extolling heroic
deeds and contemplating the mysteries at
existence, though rarely of a higher order,
are in part .full of life and charming ly
their naive and objective simplicity, but
also in part utterly trivial and uninterest
ing. They show the invaders to have been
a vigorous semi-barbaric people, loving
life and Ita enjoyments, but also imbued
with those deeply religious tendencies
, which later took such a prodigious devel
opment, leading to the loftiest specula
tions on the' one hand and to the most
degrading superstitions on the other.
Their religious conceptions were based on
nature worshipl Struck with wonder anJ
awe by the mysterious phenomena of na
ture, they conceived behind them llvin?
powers, which, being personified, became
their gods.
The beaming sun (Surya, akin to T-atln
Sol) was Joyfully hailed by the slngor
(i, CO-42):
The mornlnft rays already brlns
The mUhty Surya, heaven's god.
For every being to behold.
And 1«! the stars up yonder steal
Like thieves away, and hide their beams
Before the luna all-searching eye.
The same prosperity us grant.
Thou wise and wonder-working god.
That once thou didst our fathers grant!
Help ua to conquer our foes.
Make smooth and easy our path.
Life-bringerl grant us vital strength!
The rosy dawn (Ush-as-Aur-ora) was
affectionately invoked:
Thy path is beautiful above the mountains.
Thy glow through clouds suffusing all the sky.
Bring, heavenly daughter, mighty Dawn, en
throned
In the broad east, us nourishment abundant.
O Dawn, approaching with thy seeds tri
umphant.
Bring us the riches that we do desire.
In early morn, already, heavenly daughter,
Thou comest richly laden like a goddess.
But more than anything the peal and
flash of thunder stirred the soul of the
beholder. That was the mighty Indra
(the cloud-compelling Zeus of the Greeks,
the Thor of the Scandinavian.^ crushing
with hissing bolts the cloud demoft and
his dark cloud cavern, thus compelling
the downpour of abundant showers, and
drinking strength for his deeds out of the
exhilarating soma juice prepared by the
invoker (11, 32):
Now will I praise the heroic deeds of Indra.
The deeds that once the lightning-armed ac
complished.
He slew the dragon, set the waters flowing
And burst the caverns of the clouds asunder.
With hissing bolts, by Tvashtar fashioned for
him.
He slew the dragon stretched upon the cloud
banks;
And suddenly, like lowing klne, the torrents
Poured gushing down into the mighty ocean.
And eager like a bull he sought the soma
And quaffed three pallfuls of its ft>ry juices.
Then grasped the mighty god again his weapon
And slew the brood, the firstborn of the
dragon.
To propitiate the gods the singing of
these hymns was early accompanied by
simple sacrificial ceremonies. which
gradually became ever more complicated.
And around them grew up a priestly
caste, the Brnhmans (originally brahman,
"performer of the prayer," from brah
man, "prayer"), whose influence deeply
affected the destinies of India:
Such were the beginnings of the Brah
manical religion. More than a thousand
years of speculation, expressed In numer
ous theological and philosophical works,
are included in the Brahmanic literature,
gradually evolving out of early polythe
ism the conception of one universal
power, finally merging Into pantheism.
The germs of a uniting conception may be
traced already in some of the Vedic
hymns. But it found full expression only
in much later workH. especially In the so
called Upanishads ("Teachings.") To the
speculative Hindu the material world was
then but an emanation of the spiritual. It
had come from the Supreme Soul (At
man) "as the wave of the river from its
source." "as the spark from the flame."
and it was destined once to return unto
it. Man when cleansed from the slime of
Ignorance was to be reunited with the
Eternal Soul. Until then he was con
stantly reborn Into the material world to
begin a new existence varying. from the
very lowest to the highest.
Except in their coarsest form these uni
tary conceptions never reached the
masses. To them the gods with various
substitutes and metamorphoses continued
to exist, while even in ordinary literature
they kept their place without reference to
the exact belief of the author.
The ripened Hindu philosophy found a
beautiful expression in the Bhagavad-
Glta ("The Lord's Lay," rendered Into
prose by Chatterjl: Houghton, Mifflln A
Co.. 1892). This work occupies a high
place among the Branmanic scriptures,
and has been a great influence upon the
spiritual life of the Hindus. It represents
the teachings of God Incarnate to a hu
man prince. The object of life, he says,
is the attainment of true knowledge,
which is a beatific vision of the Supreme
Being. Having known even Him. man
attains to deathlessness. There Is no other
way (Cf. the Scriptures, "And this Is life
eternal, that they might -know Thee, the
only true God," etc.) Those who do not
gain such knowledge remain fettered to
material existence by repeated births and
deaths. But who. then, is He, that Su-
Common whfoky is a curse— the Old
Government Is a blessing. •
THE CALL'S
HOME STUDY CIRCLE
AMUSEMENTS.
MATINEE TO-DAY (WEDNESDAY). Feb. 21.
Parquet. 25c, any seat; Balcony, 10c; Chil-
dren. We. any part.
I A REMARKABLE BILL OF ALL 600 D THINGS
i KATHKYN OSTEKMAX AND COMPANY.
HAKKIS & FIEI-DS: DE WITT & BURNS;
HAPPY FANNY FIELDS; CUSHMAN.
HOLOOMBE & CURTIK; MONROE & MACK;
DEETS * DON: BOMALO BROTHERS;
AMERICAN BIOGRAPH.
Special Matinee To-Mcrrow, Thursday,
Wash n£to-'ss Birthday.
Tickets Now on Sale.
GRAND OPERMOUSE
. TELEPHONE MAIN IS2.
CROWDED EVERY NIGHT.
...HOLIDAY MATINEE THURSDAY...
Immense Success of the Third Edition of
DON'T MISS THE IRI3H CAKEWALK.
USUAL POPULAR PRICES.
Good Reserved Seat In Orcheftra at Thurs-
day and Saturday Matinee, 25 cents.
Branch Ticket Office, Emporium.
CHUTES_AND ZOO.
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENINQ:
MAJOR MITE: LILLIAN VO., TILSE: the
BLACK BARTONS: OUHANA: PAUL LA
CROIX: GEORGE BYRD and * MOVING
PICTURES.
TO-NIGHT—
(INSTEAD OF THURSDAY.)
The Amateurs' Garden Party!
TO MO2ROW, Washhgton's Birthday,
Balloon Asc:irhn in the Afterncoa.
Fireworks zt Ni^ht. '^
Phone for Peats PARK a
WESTERN TLRF ASSOCIATION.
¦ ; TANFORAN PARK.
FOURTH MEETING. Feb. 12 to 24, Inclusive
Six hicl>-c)ags running races every w«wk
day. rain or shine, hr-glnnlug at 1:20 p. m.
The ideal winter racetrack of America. I'a-
trui c Ftep directly from the railroad cam Inta
a eu peril grant! rtand, Klass-enclosed, where,
comfortably hotitert In bad weather, they caa
enjey on unobstructed view of the races.
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at
• ;G0 10:49 and il 10 a. vi., and 12:15. 12.Z3, lt; o \t
and I:2S p. ni., returning Immediately alter
Intt race at 4:41, p. m. Beats In rear can re-
ecrved for women and tbelr escorts. No emok-
jnc- Valencia atreet, 10 minutes Jater.
tian Jose and Way Stations— Arriv* at San
Uruna at 12:43 p. ni. Leave San Bruno at 4:00
and 4:43 p. m.
HATES— San Francisco to Tanforan and re-
turn. Including admtsrlon t > track. 1 1.23.
W. J. MARTIN. President.
F. 11. GREEN. Secretary and Manager.' : |
ADVERTISEMENTS.
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Call and examine and lest these
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LION DPtUC CO.,
Cor. Market and Stockton Sts., San Francisco
e«^^^"^^^*at.^
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