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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 06, 1901, Image 1

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SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, JXJSTE 6, : 1901;
VOLUME XC-XO. 6.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
American Owner, Rider and Trainer Triumph Jn the Contest for the Blue
Ribbon Trophy in One of the Most Exciting Races Witnessed in Many
Years at Epsom Downs— Morney Cannon, on William III, Is Second
WITH WILLIAM C. WHITNEY'S VOLODYOVSKI
JOCKEY LESTER REIFF WINS THE DERBY BY
THREE-QUARTERS OF LENGTH IN RECORD TIME
Popular Chief Surgeon of the Department of California Is Selected to
Perform the Duties- of the, Ranking Medical Officer While the Latter
Makes Tour of Inspection of the Philippines With the Adjutant General
COLONEL FORWOOD IS ORDERED TO WASHINGTON
TEMPORARILY TO RELIEVE SURGEON GENERAL
STERNBERG, WHO GOES TO MANILA WITH CORBIN
established. By this means the large
number of. men doing duty in the out
lying districts can be recalled. It is be
'lleved in military circles that the experts
favor the subdivision of the islands into
districts and the establishment therein of
garrisons, thus rendering It possible for
a • lesser number of men to control tha
natives. Such a plan would greatly re
duce the expense of military operations.
It is also believed that the visIJIng offi
cials .will investigate the charges of mis
use of army provender and that the cor
ruption alleged to exist among the army
will result in a great reduction in the
United' States forces now doing duty in
the Islands. If the conditions existing
render suoh action possible, in all prob
ability a post government system will be
WINNER OF THE GREAT ENGLISH DERBY, THE AMERICAN JOCKEY WHO PILOTED THE COLT TO VIC
TORT IN A MOST EXCITING RACE AND WILLIAM C. WHITNEY, THE AMERICAN OWNER, WHO HAS
WRESTED THE BLUE RIBBON TROPHY FROM THE BRITISH.
First — William f C. Whit
ney's brotvn colt Volodyovskl
(Lester Relff), FlorUal II-La
Heine. Time, 2:4O 4-5. \
Second — Dulse of Portland's
bay colt William in, St. 51
mon-Gravitr.
Third .— Donfclns ' . Baird'g
chestnut colt Veronei, Dono
van-Maize. '.
Conditions of the RiMse— The
Derby stakes of GOOO ' sover
eign* by subscriptions of 50
sovereigns each, for three
jrear-oldp, the nominator of
the. -winner to receive 6OO sov
ereigns, the owner of the sec
ond horse 300 and the owner
of the third 2OO sovereigns
. out of the stake; about one
mile and a half. There frere
279 subscriptions. ;*.'/,
FINISH OF THE DERBY.
Although Volodyovski Is owned and
trained by", Americans, he is an Erigish
bred colt, being by the King's horse Florl
zeli II out of La Reine! He was bred by
Lady Meux, and , leased by her' to the late
Lord William Beresford. At the death of
Lord' William .his executors held the opin
ion that the lease of the colt did not lapsed
but 'Lady Meux took a contrary- view.
Litigation ensued and the colt was re
turned'to .his breeder. Subsequently he
was leased to Mr. Whitney. -But for the
¦v • . ¦;. •: ¦ • /.. ¦ ¦ -. . . - .....
Volodyovski's victory was very popular,
and his success has taken a lot of money
out of the ring. "He was cheered a§raln
and again on returning to weigh In.' Time,
2:40 4-5,- Is the record for the race!.
. There was some delay at the start, but
eventually an excellent one was eff ected
and Foxhall Keene's Jockey, Henry, on
Olympian, got away like a shot from a
gun. He set a cracking pace and before
Tattenham Corner * was reached- had
spread-eagled his field. As they rounded
and came into the straight it was. seen
that Volodyovskl was right -there, run
ning with great resolution. A tremen
dous roar went up when it was seen that
he had got on even terms a quarter of a
mile. from home, coming along at a rare
clip, with William III In hot pursuit.
"Volly," as he Is called, left his opponents
In 'great style, all but Morney, Cannon's
mount, hard ridden, which was j running
as game ' as a .pebble at the favorite's
girths. "And so the pair passed the post. ,
"Volly's" Great Victory.
crltlclem. The favorite was a different
horse altogether elnce St. . MacLou beat
him in the spring. His size, quality and
nice short back belong to 'the son of the
King's famous Florizel II, while he had
thickened out and muscled up beyond all
recognition. All day • the favorite had
stood firm as a rock In the betting. -
for furnishing the greatest attractions of
the day. There is nothing In the world
which can make that "bursting," to use
a police phrase describing closing time at
the theaters, of the people of London upon
the fragrant roads which converge upon
Kpscm Downs. Every year the number
crows larger and given fine ¦weather,
such as to-day, and the fun grows more
and more characteristic, the best humored
people in the world enjoying the holiday
on the course. To-day's gathering eclipsed
all records, and the details of Frith" s fam-
mon assent -would give the road the palm
LOrCDOX, June 5. — The race for the
Derby, the blue ribbon of the
English turf, run at Epsom to
day, resulted "In an easy victory
for the 5 to 2 favorite, William
C. Whitney's Volodyovskl, whom Lester
Relff steered hone three-quarters of a
length In front of the Duke of Portland's
William III. Douglass Baird's Veronez, a
40 to 1 chance, was third, four lengths
away, and the French Jockey, Watkins. on
Floriform. Just missed the place by a
head. Thus for the fourth time In the his
tory of the Derby it has been won by a
foreigner. Once before, in 1S81. the race
was won by a citizen of the United States.
Pierre Lorillard. In that instance the
jockey, Fred Archer, was an Englishman.
To-day was the first occasion on which an
American horseman proved successful.
The day appeared to have been made for
the occasion. One glarce at the white
flecked clouds In the dome of blue forbade
the thought of umbrellas or waterproofs,
and the pretty dresses of the many ladies
on coaches, or the flaring colors of less
fortunate members of their sex who trav
eled to the famous Downs In every-de
scription of vehicle, ran not the slightest
risk of being spoiled by rain.
Great Crowds on the • Road.
If the whole of what is comprehended in
the term "derby" were dissected Into sev
eral portions — rail, road and course— com-
WINNERS SINCE 1894 OF THE DERBY, THE GREAT BLUE RIBBON TROPHY.
There was a great rush to the paddock
for an Inspection of the Derby candidates.
It has been said often that it was a' mod
erate lot that was to . contest in to-day's
race, and a glance over '¦ the . twenty-five
competitors to some* extent bore out the
¦ : Stands and lnclosures were packed and
the line of coaches and j other vehicles
reached the whole length of the rails op
posite the errand stand, j "
ous picture, "The Derby Day," were once
more reproduced in all their motley con
trasts.
"By. road and rail traffic was enormous,
although in the last mentioned depart
ment there was less congestion than
usual. The Southeastern Company, hav
ing opened a new line with a terminus at
Tattenham Corner, gave the other com
panies a relief they did not desire. .
¦' CHICAGO, June 5.— The .'Atchlson,''To
peka and' Santa : Fe -, Company ; announced
the following appointments: '?• J;.W. : Kend
rlck,-< third ( -vice": president,"* ia -'charge r of
Santa Fe Company Appointments.
fall-should our. people despair of a. settlement
creditable to both dlep'utants. ;..•¦'
_The : proceedings were ' brought' to - an
end with ; a - few .words \ from . Mr. : Choate,
who \ declared ¦ that : Londoners had , done
'a^. noble act In extending .. the".-hand of
friendship to a most" formidable rival.
,' ."Commerce," ha ' said,* "will '¦ be ,the real
peacemaker, and • a '; blessing, to ; mankind." 1
Any., real ¦ conflict" between our two coun
tries Is ! Impossible." ¦ . '"".-'. ,
' . The horoscope of the future shows that com
mon dangers arc likely 1 to draw us 'closer, and
closer, : and < If ,' ever ¦ the ' banners here • entwined
together^ have- to ; be unfurled' eide by .side ; In
self-defensa asclnst ' any 'foe - or > combination
of foes who "may ¦ undertake /, to disturb _the
peace,". I ]¦ pity ' that : enemy. ¦ . The chambers : of
commerce of the .world carry for : their motto
"Peace and'^Good "Will 'Among; Men. "y If .cab
inets^"should".ever*fall to ; preserve between us
•'.•peace' with' honor,',' -I suggest as a tribunal of •
last resort the* Chamber of Commerce ' of ; Lon
don and that in New Tork; and not until they
theeveningj.then 'rose.;; He c dwelt- upon
the i importance f of ; the growing I friendly
relations between .the two countries and
continued as 'follows: . : ' . . \
\ LONDON, June 6.— The Chronicle reit
erates that five and 1 100 men
are in English Jails j for J traitorous - deal
ings with. the Boers." Most of them were
convicted for^ allowing arms and ammuni
tion to reach the burghers. The officers
belonged to ..the": auxiliary, forces. They
were at first ordered to be . shot,^but Earl
Roberts a: commuted : their sentences ;. ; to
"penal servitude ¦ for life* and the men's of-
fen se was altered to. being asleep on 'post
.There /have been such cases; since, ac
cording to the Chronicle.:; and General
Kitchener has had the delinquents ; shot,
returning them as 'having died from'en
teric'fever.' ' ' • ' ._ ., . , . ¦>
/CAPE :TOWN, . June 5.— The. garrison. of
Jamestown, Cape Colony, which surrend
ered to. Kritsinger's command," ; June 2,
numbered' sixty, men" in 'all. Kritsinger's
i ST. BRIETJX, ' France, June 5.— Five
fishing boats which went on a fishing
cruise in Iceland waters have been'miss
ing for " two 1 months and are "now believed
to have foundered in a gale April 6. s ; Their
entire crews, numbering 117 men, are sup
pesed, to have perished. ; There is , general
mourning here and in the neighboring tU
•taie»v V • "' " >«
Five Fishing Boats Lost.
operation; y W. - B. V Jainsen, assistant to
president, in charge of Chicago office and
the. company's coal property: Captain A:
H. Paysbn,; assistant 'to president, tin
charge*,' of *; Northern California" affairs,
I headquarters In San Francisco.
ALIWAL NORTH, June 4.-Col White's
'column/ came In contact. with Kritsinger's
command northeast ' of_ Jamestown," Juna
S, ' drov-i the Boers , back, capturing fifty
hcrses;and munitions and recovered the
stores looted from Jamestown.
force is. estimated to have totaled 1000
men. ¦ The British killed twelve- and
wounded fifteen ¦ Boers .before they were)
oy erpbwered by ; numbers. . - :
According to the London Chronicle- Lord, Roberts Showed Mercy to Offenders, but
Since Then General Kitchener Has Had the> Delinquents Shot.
TWO. OFFICERS. WHO ARE GOING TO MANILA AND A THIRD WHO
WILL LEAVE HIS MANY FRIENDS j HERE j TO TAKE CHARGE OF
". THE MEDICAL ¦ DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMT. TV >
FIVE FORMER BRITISH OFFICERS AND A HUNDRED
MEN IN JAIL FOR TRAITOROUS DEALINGS WITH BOERS
Forwood to duty in Washington was- not
to . go '¦ into ! effect until the , arrival '•¦ of
Colonel Greenleaf, but the intended de
parture of General Sternberg prompted
the chief surgeon to request his selection
as temporary head of the medical "corps.
The .". departure of Colonel ".. Forwood is
deeply regretted by the hosts of friends
he has made since his 'connection with
the -Department- of California. % He ; has
been on j duty here since December, 1838,
and his courteous treatment of every, one
visiting headquarters has made" him most
popular. Colonel Forwood Is to ,be~ con
gratulated, however,', on 'his .transfer.
His selection to temporarily fill the posi
tion of surgeon general is a recognition
of his merits as a surgeon and* an ac
knowledgment; of; his great ;' executive
ability. It also means that -after the "re
tirement of, the.? present medical chief
Colonel^ Forwood will be. his successor.
Colonel and - Mrs. Forwood T . while" in
Washington 1 will occupy the house ' of the
surgeon in chief, General Sternberg hav
ing ¦ tendered \ them the use k of • his home
during ' hla absence. .
-.Surgeon General, Steinberg is to accom
pany Adjutant General Corbln.Inspsctor
General . Brecklnridge %. and „" Paymaster
General Bates to Manila. / The J inspection
made will be most thorough; and embrace
an.lnqulry Into the needs of every branch
of -the army,' It is' not known positively
"¦what J will \ be the /result of the j trip, but
it j is generally,' believed by - army ; officers
that the 'visit of these military experts
officers In Manila will be thoroughly In
vestigated.
The, care of the disease stricken and
wounded soldiers In Manila Is the object
of the I visit of General Steinberg. , The>
chief medical officer has under his direc
tion 200 volunteer surgeons; In addition
to. the medical' officers connected with the
regular establishment. The ¦ medical ' de
partment of. the army has been greatly
handicap /ed through lack of facilities to
handle) the large number . of patients
which climatio conditions and Filipino
bullets .hare made. General Sternberg
believes that the condensing of th« field
of operations . and the '. establishment of a
larger base hospital < will - render the el
forts of - the surgeons more effective.
jb^ OLONEL WILLIAM : h! FOR
/f- WOOD, ' assistant surgeon gen-
VV^v/ eral of the United States army,
— ' chief surgeon ¦ of 'the Depart-,
ment of California, has been
ordered to report to Major General Stern
bert;,, surgeon general of the , army, at
Washington. He_will leave here' Monday.'
Colonel Forwood will assume the duties'
of the chief medical officer "of .the. army
while the latter , Is .making a tour of; In- i
spection of the, Philippines. '-. Lieutenant
Colonel A. C.'Girard will assume the for
mer duties of Colonel Forwood at, depart-:
ment headquarters, until the' arrival of
Colonel Greenleaf, who has been assigned,
to duty as chief ,'surgeoif of? the Depart
ment of California. , Colonel : Greenleaf is
now en route from Manila. -
The '' original . order- assigning Colonel '
."We do not forget how you instilled Into' our
minds habits of industry, thrift and fair deal
ing, so that now In the dawn of the twentieth
century we are able* to state with some pride
that the business relations between the two
countries amount j to - the astounding : sum of
$960,000,000 yearly. We' do not ' forget ' how you
have during ? the .past j 130 ; years^ aided • us to
produce : this result, • primarily ! by; the inculca-'
tion through your example of those principles
of Justice, religion and law .which we have Im
bibed from you as the , foundation of all com
mercial . transactions, ; and secondarily, ¦ by 7 the
free . loaning ¦ of capital to ' enable us :' to make
use 'of our great resources, ' our' mines,
build our railroads and extend our commerce.
Mr." Jessup was 'followed by. Lord, Ave
bury, A. Foster* Higglns -and', Aj , Barton
Hepburn. •; Hepburn % aroused* interest ' by
an' intimation sthat.the' United States 'was
enteringupon the; stage. of tariff relaxa
tion..;. ¦ . ¦' ¦ ,'; .'¦ ". . •¦ . •:'.' \ .. ; ! . .-; '''¦:¦'. :
. The Right Hon. William James ; Plerte;
who i followed, admitted the supremacy, of
the United States in! many directions^ but
asserted "Great ; supremacy; In
the : matter of ship-building.
• - Carnegie, ' who bad the' best reception : of
It is said that kind words are the music of
the world. . For the gracious and kindly word*
with which you have made us welcome and
for the" generous • warmth of our "reception
manifested. in every, eye and felt in the clasp
of every hand, it Is my privilege to express
the' thanks of the New Tork Chamber of Com
merce, : and especially of my associates here
present, as your j guests at this memorable
banquet. It was a happy inspiration that dic
tated your kind Invitation, . and I assure ¦ you
that.it was accepted In the same spirit, and if
our coming together at this time serves to
bind in' closer ties the relations between the
two . nations, ' our hopes and expectations' will
be fulfilled, and we "count. It a high privilege
to have been here. ;
Praise for Generous Hosts.
Mr. Jessup, : president of the Chamber
of Commerce, , replying to the address of
welcome, spoke in part as follows:
All those who, like myself, are servants of
the public feel that they hold an unwritten
commlssloln that no pains shall be spared to
maintain the most friendly relations. "With re
gard to President McKinley, we think of the
great efflce he fills and, in addition to his
public cares, we remember the burden of pri
vate anxiety he lias to bear, and it Is the
prayer of our whole country that his wife may
be restored to health and that he may con
tinue to t>J to the whole world a potent Influ
ence for ' the cood of the human race.
I imagine that this honorable duty has been
assigned to me because I am connected with
the Department of Foreign Affairs and be
cause it may be that a toast, coming from my
lips, may seem to denote something more than
a mere private expression of admiration and
rcoi will. I think I may say that to all the
subjects of his Majesty it requires an effort
to think of our relation with the United States
as foreign relations. (Prolonged cheers.)
There was a' murmur of expectancy as
Lord Lansdowne, the Foreign Secretary,
rose to toast President McKinley. He
said:
To no other nation are w» drawn as we are
to our kinsmen across the Atlantic The wise
ly directed friendship of our two peoples— not
as yet, and perhaps never to be, cemented by
formal alliance— should be a potent influence.
Working together for the common good of all
mankind, we may keep open the door for
trade, we rr.ay spread civilization, we may
protect the oppressed, and we may establish
p»ace amongr the nations. «
Grocers' Hall, Just opposite the Bank of
England, has the reputation of being the
most Interesting 'chamber of all city com
panies. The tables to-night were deco
rated with a profusion of flowers and his-'
toric plate. Around the hall is a gallery ;
which, as the evening advanced, was filled
with ladles, who attended to hear the
speeches.
Lord Brassey presided. On' his right
was Embassador Choate and on his left
Lord Lansdowne. Morris K. Jessup, An
drew Carnegie, Cornelius N. Bliss, Lord
Alverstone (Lord Chief Justice of Eng
land), Mr. Griscom, George, G.- Ward,
Lord Srathcona and Mouhtroyal. Lev! P.
Morton. Lord Avebury (president of the
Associated Chambers of Commerce), and
J. Pierpont Morgan were among those
seated at the table of honor. In all near
ly 300 were present. In welcoming the
guests Lord Brassey, who made the first
speech, said:
"Welcome by Lord Brassey 1
•We welcome them as the repr«sentatlyes cf
the skill and enterprise •which har*: turned th«
vast ~resour*sB -'<>« J th«VAnieric«aV«»ntinent J fa'
the servic* of mankind., Ware largely shar-;
ers In these benefits^ Our teeming" millions
could not live" without the food America prc
duces and the' raw . materials for our indus
tries. America teaches us • lessons not only In
the creation, but In the liberal distribution of
wealth.
LONDON, , June 6.— The banquet ten
dered by the I>>ndon Chamber of Com
merce to the delegates of the New Tork
Chamber of Commerce at Grocers' Hall to
night was one of the handsomest affairs of
the kind ever given in a city famed for
lavish hospitality. No effort was spared
to 'honor the American guests. All the
speeches teemed with extreme friendliness
and faith In the* establishment of perma
nent friendly relations. • All the speakers
expressed the belief that. Great Britain
and the United States would rule the des
tinies of the world and their unwritten al
liance, would .'always work for peace and
the benefit of mankind. * . •
Embassador Clioate Says .. Any Real
Conflict Between the Countries
¦ Is Impossible. •
Significant Utterances
at a Banquet in
London. #
New York Merchants Are
Entertained by. English
Notables.
BRITISH LAUD
THE PROGRESS
OF AMERICAND
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL.
Year.
I
Horse.
I
s
Oirner.
'¦ Jockeys.
\ol of
Runners
Time.
1S1»4 |
1KO5 I
lsrm...*. I
1S97....
1R9S-. . . I
3 S»9 .... I
I9OO
| Ladan j Lord Ro«eberr - •*• Watts
I Sir Vloto I Lord Roiebeir ....'.. S. Loates. . . .
! Perxlmmon . | Prince . of Wales. J. Watts '
Galtee More -Mr. Gnbbfns C.Wood..;..
j Jeddab ! Mr. J. I-nm»ch O. Madden ...
j I'Jj-incr Fox Dnke of Wpitmimter. >!• Cannon ...
Diamond Jubilee Prince of Wales '. f «-.v-| H. Jones. ... .
J5
11 ¦
11
18
12
14
St45 1-2
2l43 3-4
2:12
2:44
2:47
2:42 1-2
2:42
Year.
I
Horse.
I
s
Oirner.
'¦ Jockeys.
\ol of
Runners
Time.
1S1»4 |
1KO5 I
lsrm...*. I
1S97....
1R9S-. . . I
3 S»9 .... I
I9OO
| Ladan j Lord Ro«eberr - •*• Watts
I Sir Vloto I Lord Roiebeir ....'.. S. Loates. . . .
! Perxlmmon . | Prince . of Wales. J. Watts '
Galtee More -Mr. Gnbbfns C.Wood..;..
j Jeddab ! Mr. J. I-nm»ch O. Madden ...
j I'Jj-incr Fox Dnke of Wpitmimter. >!• Cannon ...
Diamond Jubilee Prince of Wales '. f «-.v-| H. Jones. ... .
J5
11 ¦
11
18
12
14
St45 1-2
2l43 3-4
2:12
2:44
2:47
2:42 1-2
2:42

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