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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 07, 1901, Image 1

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ST. JOSEPH. Mo.." June. 6.— Captain H.
S. Townsend died last night at East Mary
vllle, Mo.*, aged 88 years. He was an In
tlnraU friend of Lincoln and Grant.
• . • . ¦».-.»¦ • . . . ¦ ¦
Of the passengers, "Miss Mary Doughty
of Nagodoches, Tex., was the most seri
ously injured, her arm and hand being
badly crushed. " . :
The trains met on -a sharp curve near
Florence, sixteen miles north of this city,
and but for the prompt action of Engineer
Jones, of the north bound train. In revers
ing his engine, the wreck would have been
more complete, . The- south bound train
was late and was running at a high. rate
of speed 'to make up time.
¦ " • . ">\
Death of Captain H. S. Townsend.
and breast; Ed Montgomery, flagman, and
Engineer. Skillman, slight bruises about
bead and shoulders.
Hcllingsworth (cole-red) fireman,' hip dis
located and Internal Injuries; James Will
iam (colored), fireman, bruised; . W. H.
white, conductor, injuries to shoulder
The injured: Carey Jones, engineer of
train No. 24. shoulder dislocated and in
ternal Injuries, may die; E. S. Larrcta.
flagman, head crushed, may die; -W. 'J.
Harvey, mail clerk, ribs crushed; Ed
VICKSBURG, :Jiss., June 6.— Nine per
sons were injured, three seriously,- In a
head-end collision between two Mississippi
VaJIey passenger trains at 8 o'clock this
morning north of Vicksburg.
and Nino Persons Are
Injured.
Two Trains Meet on a Sharp Curve
BERLIN. June 6.— A sensational case
began to-day In the First .District Court
of Berlin. The plaintiff. Anna 'Millewski,
¦w-as formerly lady-in-waiting upon the de
ceased Princess Amelia of Schleswig-
Holsteln and the defendant Is the brother
of Empress Augusta Victoria. Duke
Ernest Guenther. The plaintiff claims that
PrinctES Amelia received only 12,000 marks
annually from the defendant, who is the
head of the house. She also asserts that
as she had a fortune of her own, amount
ing to 80,000 marks, she made loans to the
Princess, who, being in the last stages of
consumption, was at the time proceeding >
SERIOUS COLLISION IN
THE MISSISSIPPI VAIXEY
GreaUyVDisturbed'by Report of tha
Contemplated* Consolidation of v
American Factories. '
LONDON. June:7.-»There
able alarm in ; Switzerland," B ay a the
Geneva . correspondent . of the Dally Ex
press, "over a report that J. * p. Morgah
contemplates -the} formation of a watch
combination to kill off the Importation • of
Swiss watches and materials. It is Ba id
that \ the combination g will; include . the
Philadelphia; Watch-Case . Company t of
Riverside, N.J., and the Standard Watch
Company, of ; Lafayette; N. J. , as tweir as
other concerns. The , Swiss . manufactur
ers , intend to fight the contemplated
SWISS WATCH-MAKERS
FEABFITL OF COMPETITION
The defendant's counsel; Count Bradow
challenged the accuracy of a number of
the plaintiff's statements, and the court
decided that before the proceedings were
carried further Prince Joachim's adjutant
who Is still in Cairo, must depose. ; ' '
Meanwhile, according to the plaintiff's
declaration. Walker forcibly took plain
tiff's 20,000 francs from her trunk and
with it settled the unpaid bills of the
Princess, then departed and defrayed the
cost of transporting the body home The
plaintiff asks the 20,000 francs be refunded
with Interest. •'
and Inhumanly transported back to Prus
sia, where she became very ill.
slowly to Egypt. While the Princess was
in Malta, according to the plaintiff's state
ment, she engaged as her chamberlain an
American named Walker, who, perhaps
unaware of the financial resources of the
Princess, induced her to incur large ex
penses. Finally the plaintiff, who feared
the loss' of "her entire fortune, made the
Princess, with whom she had now arrived
In Cairo, restore to her the sum of 20,000
francs. ¦ ¦
The plaintiff now declares that at the
instigation of Duke Ernest Guenther, the
adjutant of Prince Jocachim of Prussia
caused the Egyptian police to arrest her
In the street, after which she was forcibly
Having Disposed of All Her Fortune ¦ ttf Her Royal Charge, Anna Millewski Alleges
That She Was Arrested in Egypt and Inhumanly Transported Back to Prussia. \
. Trees ; Axe Uprooted by\ the
:; :, : -Gale.- ¦
SALT' LAKE , June 6.— A miniature tor
nado struck ¦¦ Saltl Lake this evening, ..un
robflhg* a number, of buildings at the face
track.' 'uprooting ; shade'; trees'^luid ; doing
considerable iother c damage.', ';:, The: storm
came from ¦' the ¦' northwest, : and for a few*
mlnuies.the*'. wind 'blew at the'rate of sev
erity, miies an!hour,*;the highest : {ever 're
corded ', here. : ; 'A 'strip* about a \ mile ; wide
was affected," the" wind hardly being i felt
on either' side^ of the district' affecte'd.V%
Boof s Are; Blown Off Houses and
TORNADO ; STIBS THINGS
IN SALT "LAKE CITY
tor-general of the Hamburg- American
Line, who lunched with the Kaiser, said,
in an Interview published by the Lokal
Anzelger," that his company would short
ly open the' first regular line of fast mail
steamers .between San Francisco and
Shanghai. He had assured the success of
the scheme j by purchasing § large quanti
ties of ground . at for [ the con
struction of .wharves, etc., and by con
tracts with trans-American railways.
Herr Ballin fully reported all . this^ to
the Kaiser. He also spoke of J. -Plerpont
Morgan's new undertaking. The direc
tor-general* of the Hamburg- American
Line hopes to 'work on friendly;; terms
with Morgan. He denied the English re
port that Morgan was , In] the treaty for
the. purchase ol.the Hamburg-American
Line. ¦,'-'*: ¦¦¦¦;¦' '¦ • ' ¦.¦"'¦ ¦'; ' ¦' S (¦ v
Director-General of the Hamburg-
American. Line Tells Kaiser ;¦_•.
of a Scheme;
BERLIN," June 6.— Herr Ballin, direc-
FAST MAIL STEAMEBS
FROM HEBE TO SHANGHAI
LADY-IN-WAITING BEGINS MOST SENSATIONAL SUIT
FOR MONEY LOANED TO THE DYING PRINCESS AMELIA
SENATOR M. A. HANNA, WHO .
HAS BEEN HONORED BY G.
A. R. COMRADES.
:hat It was always a source of regret to
iim that he could not have served long
The One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment was
organized at Cleveland May 5, 1S64, to serve 100
days. After being eworn into service it was
immediately placed on cars for Washington
City. On its arrival the regiment was ordsred
to srarrlsoi ' t'orta Lincoln. Saratoga, Thayer,
Bunker Hill, Slocum, Totten and Stevens,
forming part of the chain of fortifications sur
rounding- the national capital. The regiment
remained in these forts during t'.e .whole term
of service and participated in the fight before
Washington, with a part of Early's rebel
corps, July 10 and 11. 1S64. Companies G and K
were engaged, but belnsr behind breastworks
did not suffer much. One man was killed and
three or four wounded. The regiment was sent
home and mustered out at Cleveland August 23,
ISM, havins served 111 days. ¦ ¦
The record which Hanna's regiment
made is given in the official history as
follows:
enough in the war to entitle him to wear
the bronze badge of the G. A. R., which
he considered the highest medal of honor.
Rassieur questioned . the Senator and
learned that Hanna had enlisted in the
One Hundred and Fiftieth Ohio Volunteer
Infantry, which was mustered in for 100
<3aye in 1S64 to guard Washington. This
ptrlod of service was sufficient to make
him eligible for membership and Rassieur
easily persuaded Hanna to join the order.
To Leo Rassieur. Commander-in-chief of
the Grand Army of the Republic, belongs
the honor of being the first to discover
Comrade Hanna. They were talking one
day in Washington of the Grand Army en
campment, which is to be held in Cleve
lanc" next. September, when the Senator in
a burst of confidence told Rassieur that
he was a soldier fcr a short while and
That Hanna's enlistment remained a se
cret for thirty-six years, his veteran
friends say, Is a high tr*bute to the Sen
ator's modesty. Hanna's explanation is
that he didn't think his services in the war
•were important enougti to entitle him to
wear a Grand Array badge or to make
much fuss about it.
It was not generally known until recent
ly that Marcus A. Hanna was a veteran of
the Civil War. The record, however, shows
that he enlisted at the age of 26 and was a
second lieutenant.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, June 6.—Sen
ator M. A. Hanna has been ap
pointed a colonel on the official
staff of General Rassieur, com
mander-in-chlef of the Grand
Army of the Republic. Senator Hanna
was recently mustered into the Grand
Army of the Republic as a member of
Memorial Post in this city.
Austin Chamberlain explained that It
was imperative that the cable -should; be
laid and finding China had already pledg
ed herself to give no landing right to any
companies except Russo-Danish and the
Eastern Extension, the Government had
been compelled to make the best terms It
could. > .
LONDON, I June 6.'— In the House ' of
Commons to-day,. on a motion to approve
the \ agreement of the Government with
the Eastern - Extension Telegraph Com
pany fcr laying . a cable from Chefu
to Wei-Hal- Wei. Sir Charles Dilke asked
whether the agreement would not pledge
the government to resist any attempt by
the United States to establish direct-com
munication with China. 'He contended
that it was Mo Great Britain's' interest
that the United States and China should
by connected by. cable. *
For" a Cable 'in China.
"X have now resigned the functions of
commander In chief, and am to-day leav
ings China by way of Tokio. Strict meas
ures have been taken here to avoid colli
sions between the different contingents.
In company with largo German .detach
ments I attended the funeral of the
French soldiers killed in the recent af
fray."
BERLIN, «June 6.— The War Office has
received the following dispatch . from
Count, von Waldersee, dated Tientsin,
Tuesday, June 4:,
. Trouble betv/een British and French sol
diers at Tientsin continues. ¦-'Brigadier
General Lome-Campbell, in command of
the British troops, and the French com
mander will use their utmost endeavors
to prevent further friction.
Trouble at Tientsin Continues^
PEKING, June 6.— The Ministers have
ceas'ed to hold meetings while making In
quiries as to the desires of their respective
Governments. The majority, of the Minis
ters hold that' Germany should have toid
" the Chinese that all the t powers would
agree .to an Indemnity,- of 450,000,000 taela
at 4 per cent) interest. They also r think
that the withdrawal of Count vori:Wald
ersee and the German troops shows a de
sire to force'ithe powers '¦ to an;;acqulei
cenxre. to Goritiany'a demands;: which > they.
are not . inclined .to do. l.*t*L^j. ¦/{&. s^j • '¦'¦ V .
CALL. BUREAU, 1406 G STREET, N.
W., WASHINGTON, June 6.-In view of
the unwillingness of the powers to reduce
their claims 50 per cent, as recently, urged
by. the United .States, this Government
will insist that its entire claim of $25,000,
000 be paid. .Special Commissioner Rock
hill cabled Secreary Hay to-day that a re
port was' current in Peking that this Gov-.
ernment would reduce its claim. ; The
Secretary cabled In reply, that' this was
an error— that the United States 1 would
insist now upon a full settlement. All the
foreign Embassadors -' In Washlngrton
called upon # Secretary Hay to-day, and
discussed 'the indemnity question '.with
him. They, hope that the United ; States
will see its way clear to^accept thej^Euro
pean suggestion of a loan Instead of
bonds, but "this Government, still prefers,
the later. ? . ' • \ - - : ,
: Place Blame on Germany.
Social Dispatch "to The^ Call.
Trouble Between British and French
Soldiers Continues to "Worry
the. Of fleers at Tien
. • • . tsin.
Commissioner Rockhill, Told
That the ; $25^00,000 :
Has Not Been Out. -
Entire;- Amount
Demanded^
China; ' Must Pay the
UNCLE SAM
INSISTS ON
FULL CLAIM
Officer Who Is to Succeed General -MacArthur Will Collaborate
dent Taft of the Commission in Devising- Proper Means for a Com
plete Division of Civil and Military Affairs in the Oriental Archipelago
SENATOR MARCUS AURELIUS HANNA IS HONORED
BY FORMER COMRADES WITH APPOINTMENT
AS COLONEL ON GENERAL RASSIEUR'S STAFF
For Nearly Thirty-Six Years the Ohio Statesman Remains Silent Con
cerning His War Record, but Is Finally Induced by the Commander
in-Chief to Become Member of Memorial Post, Grand Army of Republic
CHAFFEE IN FAVOR OF THE ESTABLISHMENT
OF CIVIL CONTROL IN THE PHILIPPINES
AT THE EARLIEST PRACTICABLE MOMENT
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, \JUNE 7j; 1901.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
VOLUME XC-NO. 7.
~, _ . ; —^ ; — . •
'.'Sables Ends a Prospector's Life. -
SEATTLE,*- June. RV-A^on -Ewing, a
prospector v from Leetbn, Mo., . dlod on
Hunker Creek in '.the Klondike • in May
from what ' was .' supposed to be . rabies.
The I "patient '.[ had /all .the ¦ symptoms ot V.
rabies .death^and. the camp .was .'.
greatly falarmed.. The patient was bitten
six. •vveeks": before .the disease developed. ..
He . died ' In great acony. ..,__ > ¦' . .'. ,/^T
«_ This was greeted with' more cheers; and
the uproar became so great that some one
Jokingly telephoned^ to the" police "station
that' a j riot was ' irf< progress '. in ; Mart-
time. Exchange.'. jTheT police i'escorted'i the
admiral, who ' was laughing -by -this \ time,
said he would be pleased to shake hands
with' everybody it h'e' would. be allowed : to
go.'; This caused more cheering and i when"
It subsided some one shouted: -VWhat's
thejmatter with Sampson ?'.'V -. '• ? • ? '
' The admiral replied : /.. "Nothing ; he Is ' a
gallant arid . a- good - man.".. ,-...
to safety, only after he had shaken hands
all around.' \ v " .
V NEW;. YORK, /June 6.— Admiral Schley
to-day^ '. went - to '. the i Maritime '] Exchange
'to visit' Lieutenant Commander 'James A:
Sears/ who was* his , flag lieutenant : at'the
battle "of -Santiago'' and who recently'-. was
sent c to '.the ; hydrographic : bureau ''• of : the
exchange." •"'¦"";:".' ,.-.-'¦. ¦;• >' •.*• ' .'.. '"''-'¦ "V-.v^
The rear-admiral "iwas ' recognized iajid
was asked tq meet the members, u He con-'
sented r 'and ' as '' soon as . he appeared ¦; the
brokers ) surrounded : hlm,*\ cheered "them-^
selves, hoarse' and .asked "for/ a' speech.* ,•;-.;
1 r Admiral ; Schley : declined to ; speak, but
Statement -Made by the Jiero of the' Battle of Santiago in Praise
Who i Commanded the Victoribiis -fFieet : lis - Greeted 'With: Cheers. '
SGHLEY RECEIVES OVATION AT MARITIME EXCHANGE
AND DECLARES SAMPSON A GALLANT OFFICER AND GOOD MAN
, cer, is the latest victim of the commissary
I frauds in Manila. - Rear Admiral Rodgere
has cabled the Navy" Department that the
court martial convened to try this officer
has found him guilty, and sentenced him
to dismissal. "A newspaper report cabled
to this country Is responsible for • Lieuten
ant Townley's downfall. ¦ That -report
stated .that the lieu tenant had testified 'as
to his connection with ; the 1 commissary
. frauds. /Acourt of : Inquiry ; asserted . that
Lieutenant Townley, as Intermediary, had
I attempted to* extort money' ; on two occa
sions from .' the firm of _Castle Brothers,"
Wolf &. Sons,". in Manila. -The^.officer did
not seek money for his" own pocket but to
be used- in part .to; clear up accounts of
the" arjny commissary.'
.. Lieutenant' Townley . was ' placed : on . the j
retired * list } in*' 1SS7, and was assigned to
active duty- last year upon his own re
quest. He was sent to Manila,. where , he
was "placed 'in- charge of • the • national
school. By, a special act of Congress the
President was authorized to appoint him;
: after examination.' to . the ' grade of lieu-,
tenant, junior* grade.' '.
New. Civil - Government.
'„¦ .The new. civil government tirbe estab-
lis-hed ,: in • the Philippines Is re
ceiving the.- '. consideration of the
President and the Secretary of War.
It will . differ very little from what
was v first outlined, as there will bo
a Governor "for the . arclilpelago, and* a
Legislative Council and other officers. This
government' will have control of all "civil
affairs,; but, it will bo under the War De
partment to the extent of being directed
by the : Secretary of Wax. * There will b«
a nice, distinction as to ; the oC
the general commanding, the troops In the
Philippines ; and the Governor 'to be ap
pointed under .the ¦ civil ; government. . No
official declaration has .been* made, aa to
which will be the supreme'* authority, but
it Is* known that the Secretary of War
will " be", supreme. While it ; la not tho ln
tentlon to conduct the government of ths
Philippines ,under the Foraker law, that
law will be' taken as sanctioning what In
to be ! done. The new government will bis
similar to that which! existed for a short
time in the early days of New Mexico.
There -was a civil Governor appointed by
the President and a commanding general
of thearmy.' Both had, their functions In
: preserving the peace and controlling . tha
affairs of the Territory.'
PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES COMMISSION AND THE- AMERI
CAN MILITARY . COMMANDERS WITH WHOM HE WILL SOON CON
. FER CONCERNING FUTURE GOVERNMENT OF THE ISLANDS. .
Klchard H.*\ Townley, a* retired "naval 6m-
. x^^ry ANILA, June 6.— General Chaffee
' /•^ll and his staff, who arrived yester-
I 11 day from China, were conveyed
** to the Malacanan Palace,
, where a private conference , be
tween Generals Chaffee and MacArthiir
took place. Chaffee informed a
correspondent that while he was not sure
of. the Oriental's general capacity for, self
government* he favored the establishment
of civil control in the Philippines at the
earliest practicable • moment.- He was, in
full sympathy, with the commission's plan
for native education "and .business ad-,
vancement, because the United States In
terests and native interests lie in the same
line. ., It seems' certain ,that under a plain
division of the civil arid military authority
Judge Taft and; General Chaffee wili'col
laborate admirably. , .. ;.
. Captain Alsalogo and his aid; have been
killed by.Wray's command at Dousel, Al
bay province. : Reilly'sibattery, has sailed
for the United States '. on board the trans
port, Pakllris.) _^ ; . . '• ...
, Commissioners at Cavite.
• Commissioners Taft, .Wright and Ide are
at : Cavi te to-day 'and ; establishing a pro
vincial government: --They- were formally
welcomed by f Colonel r J. VW. ? Goodrell '- and
the local dignitaries J In the j \ town j hall:
Judge} Taft : spoke,; outlining the commis
sion' s 1 , provincial plans. : : .' ,> -;.'.: ¦¦ : •
; The f rngmentary. news received here of
the - Porto Rico decisions- has caused \ ap
prehension' that there ? will; be" such a de- ;
ficit in the Philippine revenues that Con
gress will need to make an' appropriation
to meet it. Fears are - also expressed as
to the result"' of jj the application * of Jury
trials and other \ features of [ the constitu
tion , not suited to, the conditions of jj the
Philippines. ¦(¦¦ Importers . are ; preparing
claims for a refunding of the duties paid. '
a Victim* of Frauds! > j
¦WASHINGTON, June : .\ 6.— Lieutenant
/
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL.

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