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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 27, 1901, Image 1

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VOLUME XC— NO. 180.
COLOMBIAN GOVERNMENT BEATS LIBERALS IN BATTLE
AND BREAKS DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH VENEZUELA
TWENTY-SIX
MEN MEET
AWFUL FATE
Boiler Explosion at De
troit Causes a Har
vest of Death.
Without Warning a Building
Is Blown to Shreds and
Debris Set on Fire.
yiv» of the Killed Are Charred Be
yond Identification and the List
of the Injured Buns Up
to Nearly Forty.
DETROIT, Mich.. Nov. 26.— Twenty-six
v «en are dead, five of them unidentified
¦ c^d so terribly burned and blackened that
i?fier.tl£c&tlon Is almost impossible, and!
twenty-four others are lying in the vari
ous hospitals of the city, suffering from
burns and other injuries, all resulting
from the explosion of one of the boilers
in the Penberthy Injector Company's
large plant at Abbott street and Brooklyn
avenue at 9:30 o'clock this morning. The
dead:
A. E. HOFFMAN.
LOUIS HENNING.
PATRICK MALLOT.
A. F. MILLER.
EUGENE BERTRAM.
K. MULKET.
JOSEPH COFFET.
CHARLES MARVIN'.
I JOSEPH KOSEK. v> -i"
STEPHEN CHRISP.
GEORGE SCHENOR.
CHARLES LTDT. -
JACOB KEOBEL.
WILLIAM MANN. .
CHRISTOPHER WALMAN.
ROBERT CREER.
EDWARD BURCH.
JOHN SCHAIBLE.
RICHARD RYAN. r~i~£
DOUGLAS DICKINSON, boy.
peteh DOLL.
- FIVE UNIDENTD7ED BODIES.
Injured at the Hospitals.
The injured at the hospitals are: Sam
uel Riley, engineer, condition critical; A.
T. Gidday. burns; John Hofflain, badly
burned; John Klincwicz, very badly burn
ed, will probably die; German Goldner,
burned; Tony Walker, foreman molding
department, badly burned; John Voght,
bruised; James Hall, back injured; Saul
Graupe, slight burns; Bert Dickson, minor
injuries; John Dingal, injured about head;
Julius Lieben, arm broken and slightly
burned; Edward Ldeben, boy, burned;
George Kelsey, head badly cut; Stephen
Nachtiget, slight; Ignatius Brock, slight;
Gus Galley, head and arm injured; Wil
liam Knapp, head cut: Bert Martin, leg
broken; T. D. Crowiey, slight; Louis Mil
ler, slight; Mike Duranger, burned about
head; William Ager, boy, severely burn
ed; William Begeman, arm cut.
Dozen Taken to Homes.
* In addition to these a dozen or more of
the employes who suffered slight injuries
were taken directly to their homes. Eight
en men and boys have not as yet been
located. The five unidentified bodies ac
count for ten of these and the officers of
the company say they feel positive that
the majority of the remaining fifteen are
by to-night at their homes.
To-night a great force of men is search
ing the ruins and the work will not be
stopped until every foot of the debris has
been explored.
The Penberthy Injector- Company's
plant occupied half a square of ground. It
•was composed of two brick buildings, sep
arated by a sixteen-foot alley. The rear
building, in which the boiler was located
and which was destroyed, was three
stories in height, fifty-four feet in depth
and one hundred feet wide. The boiler
and engine room was located at the
northwest corner of the building on the
first floor. Also on the first floor was the
department for testing the output of the
plant. The finishing and brass manufac
turing department was located on the
second floor, and the third floor was de
voted to the foundry. It is impossible to
tell exactly how many men were at work
in the various departments of this rear
building when the explosion occurred, but
. the company officials insist that the num
ber was not over eighty-five. There were
four boilers in the plant— horizontal
ones, which furnished steam for the en
gines, and two vertical boilers, which
were used solely to test Injectors. It was
the horizontal boilers that were in use
this morning which caused the awful loss
of life.
Awful Crash Comes.
The awful crash^cama without the
slightest warning. Those in the front
building said it seemed like the concus
sion of an immense cannon. The floors
and roof of the rear building bulged up
ward and then crashed down with their
heavy loads of machinery and foundry
apparatus. Walls, roof and all dropped
into a shapeless mass of ' debris. Win
dows in houses for a block around were
broken by , the concussion, and flying
bricks filled the neighborhood. A dense
cloud of dust arose and as it settled and
was succeeded by denser clouds of smoke
and steam agonized cries began to come
¦v from the heap of tangled wood, metal
Hind bricks. Those who were only partly
"buried frantically dug -themselves out
and then as energetically turned to dig
Continued on Page Three.
The San Francisco Call.
Barbacoas Bridge, Midway Between Panama and Colon, the Scene
of an Engagement in Which the Insurgents Are Compelled
to Retreat, After Heavy Losses and Exhausting Their Ammunition
Special Cable to The Call and New York Herald. Copyrighted, 1901, by the Herald Publishing Company.
COLON, Nov. 26.— A battle between
the Government troops and the
revolutionists took place to-day at
Barbacoas bridge, which is near
the middle of the isthmus of Pan
ama. The insurgents were forced to re
treat toward this town because their am
munition was practically exhausted. The
retreat -was conducted ir. good order. Be
fore their ammunition out the revo
lutionists repulsed the Government troops
three times. The latter force lost a hun
dred men in killed and wounded. The in
surgents' loss was comparatively insig
nificant. Two were killed and seven
wounded on their side. The Government's
wounded were taken to Panama.
There was severe fighting. The battle
was begun at 7:30 o'clock in the morning
and ended at 1:30 o'clock in the afternoon.
The Barbacoas bridge crosses the Cha
gres River. Ir is a strategic point, and
the Government troops, it is admitted,
gained an important victory in obtaining
possession of it. Their march toward Co
lon will now be less difficult.
\ Fighting Delays Trains.
Owing to the fighting along the line of
the railroad the morning train from Pan
ama, due here at 11 o"clock, was delayed.
The train did not re=tc!i Colon until 4:30
o'clock this afternoon.
The revolutionists ur.der General Lugo
are now at Bohia Soldado, near the rail
road, while the Government force is oc
cupying Tabemllla, a few miles away. An
other battle is promised to-morrow.
General Alban did not leave Panama 10
day. The trains which crossed the istn
mus had United States marines as guards.
No further news -haa reached here con
cerning the revolutionary force under
command of General Domingo Diaz, who
Is supposed to be at 3<tr Pablo, near the
middle of the isthmus.
It is announced that the Government's
loss In killed and wounded at Culebra and
Empire station was eigJity-three and that
the insurgents' was sixty.
Troops Land From Pinzon.
The, Colombian warship General Pinzon
returned to this port this morning with
only one hundred soldiers on board. She
landed the other five hundred men at
Puento Bello, which is about twenty-five
miles from Colon. It Is said that the
force intends to march overland to join
the Government force marching toward
Colon,
SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1901.
Another conference was held on board
the French cruiser Suchet at 10 o'clock
this morning. Among those present were
the commanders of the foreign warships,
the captain of the General Pinzon and a
representative of the Insurgents. The
General Pinzon left the harbor again this
evening.
There is considerable excitement in Co
lon, but the insurgents are confident that
they will hold the town.
About one hundred marines who were
to relieve others on the battleship lowa
arrived here this morning on the steam
ship Orizaba. They left for Panama in
the afternoon.
MAY BOMBARD COLON.
Colombian Gunboat May Defy the
Edict of the United States.
CALL BUREAU, 1406 *G STREET, N.
W., WASHINGTON, Nov. 26.— 1s Colon
to be bombarded by the Colombian forces
despite the prohibition imposed by this
Government? This is a question admin
istration officials are asking as a result
of dispatches received by Secretary Long
late this afternoon from Captain Perry,
in command of the naval forces on the
isthmus of Panama, announcing that the
Colombian gunboat General Pinzon has re
turned to Colon. This vessel, after an
nouncing her purpose to bombard, mys
teriously disappeared yesterday. If she
attempts to fire upon Colon either the
Marietta or Machias will take station
between her and the city and thus pre
vent her from making an attack.
The return of the General Pinzon to
Colon Is the only alarming feature of an
otherwise peaceful situation. Consul Gen
eral Gudger wired the State Department
this afternoon that trains are running
between Colon and Panama without in
terruption.
Bluejackets on Guard.
Detachments of American bluejackets
are on the trains and other detachments
are stationed at various points where
stops are made. An Interesting question
has arisen In connection with the claim
of the Government forces to transporta
tion on the road. The presence of Gov
ernment troops might precipitate an al
tack upon the railroad, and on the gen
eral principle that it would lead to an
interruption of transit Captain Perry will
probably decline to permit either the
tJovernment or insurgent forces to use
the road.' The authorities say the situa
tion is quite satisfactory, and they do not
believe the insurgents have any intention
of taking action which will bring them
into conflict with the United States.
PREDICTS LIBERALS' DEFEAT.
General Castro of Colombia Believes
the Federal Forces Will Triumph.
NEW YORK, Nov. 26.— Consul General
de Brigard of Colombia said to-day that
he had received a cablegram from Gen
eral Alban describing the situation at the
isthmus. Alban, he said, denied that
Panama was full of Liberal sympa
thizers.
General Diejto Castro, who was at the
consulate, said that both Colon and Pan
ama were free ports, that the temporary
occupation by the rebels would not
amount to much, and that under existi ig
treaties the United States was bound to
preserve order in that Bection. He said
that at the present time Colombia had
32,000 trained soldiers in the field. Qf this
force 16,000 men were with General Valen
cia on the Venezuelan border, in the De
partment of Santander, and another
large force was protecting Bogota, the
capital. At Barranquilla, he said, there
were 1500 men; at Cartagena 2000, and at
Rio Hacha there were 3800 men. The
general said that this force of 7000. men
could be concentrated to support General
Alban on the isthmus, but the Govern
ment did not consider it necessary at the
present time to make an assault upon the
little rebel bands. General Castro said
that General Alban with his force of
100 men, sent to take Colon and now on
board the General Pinzon, would be able
to break up the Liberal bands.
POPE LEO REPORTED
TO BE NEAR DEATH
Physicians of the Pontiff Declare
Their Distinguished Patient Is
Losing Strength.
PARIS, Nov. 26.— The Rappel publishes
a dispatch from Rome stating that the '
doctors attending the Pope say he is
growing slowly but surely weaker, and
the end Is possible at cny moment.
Turks and Armenians Battle.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 26.— Reports
have been received of fighting between
Turkish troops and Armenians at Sas
soun. No details are available.
DIPLOMATIC REPRESENTATIVE OF THE UNITED STATES AT CO
LON, COLOMBIA, AND MAP OF THE COUNTRY NSTVADED BY LIB
ERALS AND INCIDENTS AND SCENES OF THE INSURRECTION.
The United States Is Again Prepared to
Offer to Prevent Hostilities Between
the Two Bellgerent Little Republics
BOGOTA, Colombia, Nov. 20.— The
Colombian Government has is
sued a decree declaring that dip
lomatic relations with Venezuela
have ceased and that the Colom
bian legation in Caracas has been with
drawn.
Senor Concha, Minister of War, says
that the Government has 80,000 men arm
ed for action.
CALL BUREAU, 1406 G STREET, N.
W., WASHINGTON. Nov. 26.— Colombia's
severance of diplomatic relations with
Venezuela has created a sensation in offi
cial and diplomatic Washington.
Rather than that war should take place
the United States will undoubtedly again
tender the use of its good offices with a
view of effecting an amicable settlement
of the differences between the two repub
lics.
An intimation was given to the Caracas
and Bogota Governments in August last
that the President was disposed to peace
ably intervene. Colombia gracefully
acknowledged Secretary Hay's note and
expressed willingness that the United
States should act as mediator. President
Castro presented a reply which was a
practical rejection of the American pro
posal, and he subsequently showed that
his refusal was due to a feeling of en
mity entertained for the United States by
accepting the good offices of Chile.
Does Not Mean War.
• Senor Herran, Colombian Charge
d' Affaires, said to-night that the rupture
in diplomatic relations did not necessarily
carry with it the inauguration of hostili
ties.
"To sever diplomatic relations," he
said, "is to give notice to an offending
nation that you do riot desire to be on
speaking terms. Such action does not
necessarily mean war. Relation's be
tween France and Venezuela were sev
ered for more than eight ' years. Italy
and Colombia to-day are without direct
diplomatic intercourse.
"It Is not surprising that Colombia has
been moved to action in view of the of
fensive charges made against her by
President Castro and the Invasions of her
territory by Venezuelan forces. President
Castro's treatment of the Colombian Min
ister at Caracas caused the latter to leave
Caracas in August. If war should take
place the Colombian troops will probably
be led by General Valencia, an able sol
dier. General Valencia was formerly Min
ister of War and Governor of the State of
Santanfier and is now in. command of 12,
00 troops on the Venezuelan frontier.
Colombia has a well-equipped army of
more than 65,000 men. The troops have
been trained in the field,, are courageous
and would give a good account of them
selves.
Expeditions Against Colombia.
"Venezuela has sent various expeditions
against Colombia, but they have been re
pulsed one after the other. Colombia did
not follow up her victories, because she
was sincerely desirous of peace."
Senor Puli*o, the Venezuelan Charge
d' Affaires, said to-night that he had not
heard officially that relations between h^s
Government and that of Ceiombia had
been broken.
"Venezuela was invaded last July by the
forces of Colombia," he said. "President
Castro asked tor an explanation. He de
sired peace, but Colombia has never satis
factorily explained her hostile action. In
case of an international war Venezuela
could put 100,000 men in the field. We have
now available a well trained force of 15,
00 men. " I am confident that war will be
averted and that a peaceful settlement
will be reached.'
French Cruiser Protet Coining.
SAN DIEGO, Nov. 26.— The -French
cruiser Protet arrived outside from Pan
ama this afternoon, bhe and the
phlon are on their way to Esquimau. Th»
Protet will put in 4k San Francisco on
Saturday.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GIRL SAVES
THE LIFE OF
A BURGLAR
Urges Him to Escapa
Beiore Brother
Arrives.
Prowler Flees Just in Time to
Avoid Volley of
Bullets.
His Capture Soon Follows and 2T«
Time Is Wasted in Sending
Him to Do Time in 4
Penitentiary.
.
Special Dispatch ta The Call.
REDWOOD CITY, Nov. 26.-But for th«
tender-heartedness ot Miss Gertrude
Beeger of this city Burglar David Miller
might now be reclinins upon a slab in
the city morgue instead of being main
tained at the expense of the State. The
young lady, while the midnight prowler
was at her window and her brother was
scurrying for hi 3 revolver with which to
open fire upon Miller, decided that she
did not wish to be a party to the shed
ding of human blood.
"My brother is coming with a revolver
to kill you," she sa^d to the man at her
window. "You had better hurry away."
The fellow, without pausing to thank
her for the warning, made his escape, just
as the brother entered the room with a
cocked revolver in his hand.
Miller attempted to force an entrance
into the residence of Mrs. Henry Beeger
early Sunday morning. Miss Pauline
Beeger awakened her sister at about 1
o'clock, saying that she heard somebody
at the window. They listened and were
not mistaken. In a moment they saw a
man's face. The eldsr sister arose ard
WeUt to call her brother. Carl Beeger. Thi
two returned to the room, by which time
the burglar had forced up the window
and was about to enter. He saw the two
persons- in the room, but did not move.
Carl Beeger then left the room to set.
his revolver. The burglar remained at
the window gazing at Gertrude, and she
stood her ground and gazed at him. Fin
ally she asked him what he wanted, and
told him he would becter flee before her
brother returned. He accepted this ac
vice, descending the ladder he had used
to reach the window, and dashed away
just as the brother reappeared, revolver
in hand.
The Sheriff's office was notified by tele
phone, and two young men, George Botch
and Cnarles Cullen, hearing of the af
fair and being friends of the Beegers,
started out and captured the man within
three blocks of the scene of the attempted
burglary.
Miller's trip to the penitentiary by way
of the courts was a ra ; >id one. On Mor
day his preliminary examination for bur
glary was held, and he was committal
to answer to the Superior Court. Tliis
morning an information was filed against
him, to which he pleaded guilty. He
waived time for sentence, and Judge
Buck gave him a term of ten years ia
State prison.
KING GIVES HONOR
TO A DEAD DIPLOMAT
Remains of Germany's Late Embassa
dor Are Escorted by Troops
in London.
I.ONDON, Nov. 26.— Fu1l military hon
ors were paid to the remains of Count
yon Hatzfeld-Wildenburg, the late Ger
man Embassador to the Court of St.
James, who died here November 22, when
the body was removed from the embassy
here this evening and taken to the Vic
toria Railway station on its way to Ger
many.
* This exceptional step was entirely dv«
to the initiative of King Edward, wh>
quite unexpectedly notified the relatives
of the deceased diplomat that he desired
to pay this unusual tribute to the Em
bassador, who had untiringly labored in
; the interests of the good relations be-
J tween the two nations.
Half a battalion of foot guards was
j stationed at the German embassy and
! half a battlion of the same troops was
! on duty at the railroad station. The eof
! fin was borne to Victoria station on a
i gun carriage and escorted by the First
; Life Guards. One battalion of the Cold
stream Guards and 100 of the First Gren
adiers formed a special guard of honor.
Representatives of the British Foreign
; Office and other departments were in the
funeral procession.
Much significance is attached here to
this unusual military tribute. It is ex
. plained that King Edward commanded
| that these honors be paid and it is un-
I derstood that the British Government in
! so doing desired to show that it was not
j affected by the anti-English tempest in
I Germany.
Calcutta Damaged by Storm.
CALCUTTA, Nov. 27.— The wind blew
here yesterday with hurricane violence
from neon until 7 o'clock and did much
damage. Warning signals of the approach
of a cyclone of exceptional severity wer»
displayed and caused great excitement.
It is feared that the steamers at the
mouth of the Hoogly received the brunt
of the storm. Telegraph communication
is Interrupted and news ia anxiously
awaited from Allahabad.

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