OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 27, 1901, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1901-11-27/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

2
ONLY ONE JUROR
CHOSEN SO FAR
Modoc County Lynching
Case Proceeding
Slowly.
Affidavit by Defense Alleging
Prejudice of Court Is
Filed.
ALTURAS. Nov. 26.— The selection of a
3ury in the case of People vs. James W.
Brown, the alleged lyncher. progresses
Very slowly. Only one venireman was
examined during the entire day. Lee
Murphy, who was accepted as a juror
under objection of the defense. Murphy's
idea and understanding of circumstantial
and direct evidence was very hazy' and it
look the combined explanations of both
prosecution and defense to convince him
that he should believe facts adduced
through circumstantial evidence. At ad
journment at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon
the defense was just commencing the ex
amination of the second venireman.
Out of the venire of one hundred tales
men nineteen were reported absent or ex
cused, leaving only eighty-one to choose
from. It is probable that a special venire
•will be necessary before the jury can be
completed ,as the case has been so thor
oughly discussed, not only in this county,
but in all sections of the State, that a
man without an opinion as to the guilt
or innocence of the defendants is almost
» novelty.
When court was called to order this
morning an affidavit by the defense al
leging prejudice on the part of Judge J.
W. Harrington and a counter affidavit of
the prosecution were submitted. They
were denied admission as evidence. The
affidavit alleging prejudice was in sub
¦ cc as follows:
Jrhn A. Brown, being first duly sworn, de
and says that he is personally acquainted
*mh and knows the defendant James W.
Brown, said James W. Brown being af
fiant's nephew; that affiant is acquainted
With and knows the attorneys for de
fendants in this case, to wit, G. F. Harris,
Clarence A. Raker and Spencer & Raker; that
on or about the 15th day of October. 1901. af
fiant met and talked with Judge J. W. Har
rißgton in the little back room of the saloon
of J. H. Derevan in the town of Alturas, and
that J. W. Harrington said that if he could
Set the case back for trial before him, J. W.
Harrington, he would rule favorably to de
fendants, James W. Brown. leom Eades and
K. E. L.evanton. and give them the benefit of
every legal doubt tha» might arise; that if
he. Judge Harrington, could get the villains
Raker and Harris (meaning John E. Raker and
G. F. Harrisl removed from the case as at
torneys for the defendants it would be but a
phort time until all of the defendants would
got their liberty, as they had been held in Jail
: and only by reason of the actions of
their present attorneys.
Judge Harrington further 6tated at that time
that the defendants would have long since been
liberated but for the action of their attorneys
and that he ' 'hoped to God that affiant wouid
have them thrown out of the case."
Said J. W. Harrington has repeatedly stated
In substance to me the facts above stated since
the lath day of October. 1901. and repeatedly
urged upon affiant as uncle of said James W.
Brows that the attortieys be thrown out of
the case; that affiant being thus acquainted
with sai.l attorneys for said defendants, verily
believes that the discharge of said attorneys
¦would have been and would be a detriment and
an injury to said defendants and their case.
JOHN A. BROWN.
This affidavit was allowed to be filed,
but was not admitted in evidence by
Judge Harrington. John A. Brown, the
uncle of James W. Brown, the defendant,
is a lawyer — one of the head counsel for
the Northern Pacific Railroad In Idaho.
MEXICO IS WILLING
TO MAKE COMPROMISE
Case Growing Out of Detention ot
American Boys Reaches the
Diplomats.
SAN DIEGO. Nov. 26.— A sequel to the
detention of George Holmes and Brownie
Pitman, two American boys, by the Mexi
can officials at the line at Tia Juana last
July is told in offers made by the Mexi
can Government of a compromise. Holmes
and Pitman were taking a drive south
from National City, where Pitman re
sides. They secured permission to cross
the line into Mexican territory and were
to return with their horse and vehicle to
this side. They drove a little farther
than they expected, with the result that
they did not get back at the time ap
pointed.
The Mexican officials would take no ex
cuse, but placed the boys under arrest on
the charge of attempting to smuggle the
horse and carriage. Collector Bowers of
this port assured the officials that the
boys' story was correct, but they 'would
hear no explanation. Later the Collec
tor secured the boys' release, but could
not secure the return of the property.
Ho therefore took the matter up at Wash
ington and had his letters referred to the
American representative at the City of
Mexico, with the result that the boys
have received letters within the past few
days from the officials at Tia Juana say
ing that under orders from the City of
Mexico they are prepared to turn over
the proceeds of the sale of the horse and
vehicle. As the outfit was the family
horse and carriage of the Pitman family,
and as it had been sold for $20, less than
m. fifth of its value, the offer has been
refuseo. Meanwhile the Mexican Govern
ment has made no reply to the United
States Minister nor to the authorities at
"Washing-ton, and the case -rill be again
tliken up there.
ALEXANDRA MINERS
DECLARE A STRIKE
Piemier Dunsinuir's Manager Cuts
Wages and Refuses to Recog
nize the Union.
NANAIMO, B. C, Nov. 26.— Two hun
dred and fifty men and their families at
the Alexandra mines have before them
the prospect of a very poor Thanksgiving.
Manager Faulds last week attempted a
cut in wages, and wi>en interviewed by
the miners' committee would not recog
nize the union or give the men any satis
faction. Work was at once stopped and
a strike declared. Faulds says he c=*n
do without coal for two months. Last
December a strike suited at the same
mine and lasted six months.
The Alexandra mine is worked by the
Wellington Coal Company, of which Hon.
James Dunsmuir. Premier of British Co
lumbia, is president. He is expected to
arrive there in a few days.
Suisun Burglar Caught.
PETALI'MA, Nov. 26.— Patrick Murphy,
wanted for a burglary committed in Sui-
Bun several months ago, was arrested
here to-day by Officer Charles Meyers
Murphy was identified through a circular
advertisement. He admitted his identity
This evening Constable Downing took the
prisoner to Suisun.
M]M|Piano alley B. Ato Co.
' "*" ' TV^'' • V'l'r^T^f-"'"- 11^^ ' ~ L ¦--'•^ >^^ s -^=^ With much pride we announce the
ag@^^sSßJ^^^^^^^'-u«j|aajUßß ' fact that we now control the sale" of
A^jy^^K^flH^SSH cine Coast.
'^'^^fe^^'2 sMbgESJ/fc 12 * 25 '!^! Piano has been sold and recommended
S^^^^^^vElfe^^^JCj/cTrS^/sfl and most popular throug-hout Calif or-
JT ¦^y|\ \\\lV and the Baldwin Piano (which we also
3 ji"y/fK vl'IJ rfy^^^jS^aS^^^^S control) were the on!y two American
%^f^--^^^Wf^^S&^^^^~^ pianos which took medals at the Paris
T^ffiffi - I^^^S^^Sg-^^^^^^ 1 World's Fair, and at the recent Buf-
actually received THE HIGHEST
wflfk<V*''^T^ FOR prices and further ' particulars
THE WILEY B. ALLEN CO., 933 Market St., San Francisco,
, Or ,951 Broadway, Oakland. ' ; %f .
TRIAL OF EX-POLICEMAN WILSON
ON CHARGE OF MURDER IS BEGUN
Bullet Taken From a Shipley-Street Fence Is Introduced in Evidence,
Presumably to Show That Little Maggie Hartwell Came to Her
Death From a Wound Ir.ficted by Some One Unknown
THE taking of testimony in the
case of Robert G. Wilson, an cx
policeman, charged with the mur
der of little Maggie Hartwell oi=
the evening of Jaly 4 last, began
in Judge Dunne's court, yesterday. With
the exception of the introduction in evi
dence of a bullet taken cut of a fence by
Corporal George W. Kussell the proceed
ings were devoid of gentral interest.
EX-POLICEMAN ROBERT G. WILSON. CHARGED WITH THE MURDER OF LITTLE MAGGIE HARTWELL ON
THE EVENING OF JULY 4, AND HIS WIFE. AS THEY SAT IN SUPERIOR JUDGE DUNNE'S COURTROOM
ON THE OPENING DAY OF THE TRIAL.
At the time Wilson was arrested for the
crime of killing Maggie Hartwell he de
nied that he owned api jtol. Subsequent
ly he admitted he had a pistol and that
he fired a shot from it on July 4, but said
he had no intention of killing anybody.
The revolver contained three cartridges
and two shells, and one chamber was
empty. How to account for the sheik?
was Wilson's chief aim. He claimed one
was emptied months previous, and that
the other was fired into a fence in the
neighborhood. Be this as it may, the
bullet introduced in court Vill be alleged
to be the one fired on the evening of the
murder, the effort being to convince the
jury that murder was not intended by the
defendant on the evening in question.
Dr. A. H. Giannini .^stifled to the na
POLISH EXILE
DIES IN FRESNO
Baron Mandausch's Ec
centric Career Is
Ended.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
FRESNO, Nov. 26.— Baron Mandausch is
dead. An attack of pneumonia, superin
duced by excessive drinking, sent him to
THE SAN FRAXCISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1901.
ture of the bullet woi*pd that caused the
death of the little girl while she was cele
brating the Fourth vith some youthful
companions opposite her mother's home on
Shipley street, between Fourth and Fifta
streets. The call entered the girl's arm
near the elbow, and passing throujrn
punctured the abdomen. Death occurred
nineteen hours after tne wound was in
flicted.
Mrs. A. Cademartori, a neighbor, test!
fied that she saw Wilson fire the fatal
shot. She was standing before his resi
dence when he left his porch, walked to
the corner of a little al'eyway near nis
house and gazed at the frroup of children
who were playing about a bonfire. Pres
ently he drew Ms hands from his pockets,
and then came a flash, followed by a
scampering of the children and the report
that Maggie was shot. The witness was
closely cross-questioned by counsel for do
fendant, but her strry as to Wilson's
movements remained Unshaken.
George Hartwell, a brother of the mur
oered girl, said that ha saw Wilson leave
his porch and fire the shot. Immediately
afterward his sister exclaimed that she
had been shot by Wilson, and she begged
to be taken home to ruv mother. Wilson
had been annoyed by some of the chil
the County Hospital last week and yes
terday he succumbed. His body Is in the i
Morgue here at present and will be
shipped to his relatives in Poland for in
terment.
The Baron Mandausch, or, as he was
better known in this city, the "Count,"
has been a character around the Fresno
saloons for' several years. His real name
was George Mandausch, and he was a
native of Beuthen, Oberschlen. Every
few months he received a remittance from
the old country and then would follow a
protracted spree, always ending with the
Baron on the verge of delirium tremens.
After the spree the Baron would work at
anything he could get to 'do, often going
to the lumber camps in the mountains
above Fresno and sometimes doing ranch
work. He would remain sober for several
weeks and then all of his earnings would
go the way of his remittances.
Little is known here of the Baron's
story. From what has been gathered,
however. It appears that he was a Polish
nobleman and at one time was high in the
politics of his native country. Because of
alleged intrigues against the Russian Gov
ernment he was exiled. He went to Bra
zil and became a soldier of fortune. He
was noted for his daring and attained the
rank of colonel in the. Brazilian army.
Theme he came to California.
In Fresno the Baron became known be
cause of his ability to talk upon almost
any subject, even when he was under the
influence of liquor. He was said by those
knowing him best to have been possessed
of many excellent qualities. A short time
before his death he confided to a friend
that his exile would end next year and
that he then expected to return to Poland.
He claimed to have a son now being edu
cated in Germany.
STOLEN CHECKS ARE
RETURNED BY MAIL
Thief Who Bobbed Santa Rosa's Tax
Collector Sends Back Part of
His Loot.
SANTA ROSA, Nov. 26.— City Marshal
and Tax Collector Charles H. Holmes Jr.,
whose office was robbed c. few nights ag-o
of $1599 40. tax collections, to-day received
an envelope from San Francisco through
the mail containing between $300 and $400
in checks, part of the paper stolen. There
was nothing about th^ envelope to give a
clew to the identity of the person who
mailed it. The checks were those drawn
by local taxpayers in settlement of taxes,
and, of course, were useless to the rob
bers.
dren, who threw firecrackers on his
porch. In his testimony before the Po
lice Court young Hartwell made state
ments which did not asree to those made
by him subsequently. He explained that
"he was tangled up ir. the Police Coun,
and that he did not then know fully what
he was saying." Hartwell's testimony
implicated the defendant as the slayer of
his sister. >
Corporal Russell, a member of the polica
force, testified that he had taken a bullel
out of a fence near the Wilson residence
at the request of the attorneys for t"ne
defense. The bullet vas introduced in
evidence, subject to objection by Prose
cuting Attorney Greaney. It is expected
that the testimony for the prosecution
will be completed to-day.
TEAM AND BOAT
VERSUS RAILWAY
Redding May Have Com
petitive Freight
Line.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
REDDING, Nov. 26.— Redding may have
a competing freight line through to San
Francisco. It is proposed to bring car
goes hither by boats and teams at a cost
less -than that charged by the Southern
Pacific Company. Several local merchants
were interviewed on the project to-day.
Captain J. H. Roberts of the Sacra
mento Transportation Company is the
man who would establish the rival line.
He has just retired from the presidency
of the steamboat line and is succeeded by
Major J. P. Harney, ex-Harbor Commis
sioner. Roberts and Harney spent the
day in town quietly advocating their
proposition. They propose to put on a line
of teams from Red Bluff to Redding. Be
fore they left town Major Harney inti
mated that they had received encourage
ment enough to warrant their going
ahead. His company proposes to deliver
freight at the merchants' door at a re
duced rate.
Considerable freight now comes to Red
Bluff by water and then to Redding by
rail. The saving is small. The railroad
rate on general merchandise from San
Francisco is about 60 cents and fr<yn Sac
ramento about 50 cents per hundred. It
will require close figuring to cut under
these rates.
Captain Roberts once applied to the Te
hama County Supervisors for a franchise
to widen the roads to run a traction en
gine line to Redding and was refused.
Stops the Cough
And works off the cold. Laxative Bromo
Quinine Tablets cure a cold In one day. No
Cure, Mo Pay. Price 25 cents. *
BUNKERS EMPTY
ON THE NEWPORT
Steamship Has Tempes
tuous Voyage From
Alaska.
Runs Short of Coal and Is
Compelled to Use Wood
on the Trip.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
PORT TOWNSEND, Nov. 28.— After a
tempestuous voyage of thirty days the
steamship Newport arrived here this
morning from Alaska with her coal sup
ply exhausted. During a portion of the
trip she used wood, which was gathered
at various places along the route. The
Newport for some yeara has been carry
ing mail from Juneau to the west coast
of Alaska and Captain Moore reports that
the recent storm along the Alaskan coast
has been the most terrific during his ex
perience. The Newport met the mail
steamer Discovery 400 miles west of
Juneau, battling with the elements and
at that time the Discovery was five days
behind schedule time.
The rigors of the Alaskan winter are
driving people from the interior points to
the coast and the steamer Dolphin, arriv
ing this morning, brought 200 passengers.
Joseph J. Rogers, newly appointed
United States Gold Commissioner for
Skagway, was sworn in on November 21
by Judge Brown of the United States
Court at that place. ,
SEATTLE, Nov. 26.— The steamer Dol
phin came in this morning from the
north with 200 passengers, of whom sixty
were transferred from the disabled
steamer Farallon, which anchored in Car
denas Bay, near Kennedy Island, Alaska.
The Dolphin also brought the largest
cargo of fresh halibut ever reaching port
on any single vessel.
The Dolphin left Skagway on Novem
ber n. She reports that the Yukon River
froze over entirely on November 19.
Preparations were being made to put sleds
and horses ,of the overland transporta
tion companies in readiness for service, al
though it was expected that the trip, couid
not be made over the ice until about the
middle of the month.
Last Saturday the Dolphin reached the
vicinity of Cardenas Bay, where the help
less steamer Farallon was hove to. Sig
nals of distress from, the vessel attracted
the attention of the Dolphin's officers and
she stopped. It was found that the Faral
lon could not continue the voyage under
her own steam and her sixty passengers
went aboard the Dolphin, which brought
them to this, city. Afterward telegrams of
distress were sent to the Seattle office
from Vancouver and the tug Pioneer was
dispatched from Port Townsend. It is ex
pected that the tug and her tow will reach
port on Wednesday or Thursday.
The Farallon's officers say that the
trouble on their vessel was due to a de
fective propeller blade, whioh, while re
volving at a high rate of speed, became
detached from the hub, striking the stuff
ing box near the stern with terrible force.
The blow broke the stuffing box and pre
vented any further use of her motive
power.
OF INTEREST TO PEOPLE
OF THE PACIFIC COAST
Changes Made in the Postal Service
and More New Pensions
Granted.
"WASHINGTON, Nov. 26.— The Postofflce
Department to-day announced the follow
ing:
Postmasters commissioned: California —
Willis L. Roby, Jewetta. Washington-
Ellen Wyatt, Holly. Postmasters ap
pointed: California— W. H. Merrifield, Li
dell, Napa County, vice \V. L.. Mitchell,
resigned. * __
These pensions were granted: California
—Original (war with Spain)— Elmer M.
Nelson, San Francisco, $12; George Rob
ertson, San Francisco, $10; Henry G.
Davies, Presidio, $36; Allan Cunningham,
Pasadena, $10; William H. Fletcher,
Riverside, $10.
Oregon — Original — Perry E. Jackson,
Portland, $8; Thomas J. Phillips, Alsea,
$12.
The following patents were issued to
day: California— Martin P. Ross, San
Francisco, self fastening shaft key (2);
Robert H. Botts, Richmond, steam
boiler; Jacob S. Brown, assignor one-half
to F. Eichenhofer, Los Angeles, reaming
tool; Albert T. Derby, San Francisco, at
tachment for automatic piano or organ
player; George A. and R. F. Dunn, Din
uba, traveling spraying apparatus; Dlxon
Elrod, San Francisco, combined tri
square, circle square and bevel; William
G. Hawley, assignor to Bates-Hawley
Postal Box Signal Company, San Jose,
mail box; Asa A. Hoyt, Watson ville, tree
support; Francis King, San Francisco,
massage machine; Daniel F. Leahy, San
Francisco, hose nozzle; John T. Scott and
C. G. Hightower, San Francisco, tube
flarer; Paul J. Stuparich, San Francisco,
photographic card mount; Anna W. Tres
cott, Oakland, scholar's companion; Frank
E. Williams, Alhambra, assignor two
thirds to W. Terriberry and J. A. Flomer
felt, New York, button or stud.
Oregon— Albert A. Gabriel and E. M.
Atkinson, Portland, parcef carrier for bi
cycles; John K. Mount, assignor one-half
to A. G. Wolford, Silverton, hop drying
box.
Washington— George W. Giles, Garfleld,
picture exhibitor.
FALLS IN A FAINT
ON GASOLINE STOV.S
Woman Overcome by Fumes Meet 3
Horrible Death in Los
Angeles.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 26.— Mrs. R. A.
Brown, wife of a deputy in the county
Tax Collector's office, was killed tc-da-y.
supposedly by Inhaling the fumes from a
gasoline stove. Mrs. Brown was alone at
home at the time. Neighbors saw flames
in the kitchen, and on entering the house
found the body of the woman lying across
the gasoline stove, with all her clothing
afire. It is supposed that Mrs. Brown,
who had recently been ill, fainted after
inhaling the gas from the generator of
the stove and died from the effects of the
gas and the subsequent burns. She never
regained consciousness. Four children
survive the unfortunate woman.
Shooting Follows Quarrel.
BAKERSFIELJD, Nov. 26.— As the re
sult of a row over real estate on Union
avenue near the cemetery, G. Romerez
lies in a critical condition at the County
Hospital with a bullet imbedded in his
body, and Juan Forres, his assailant, is
locked up at the County Jail. The wound
ed man and Forres are neighbors. Angry
words followed a dispute as to who owned
the land on which Romerez had his house
and Forres drew a revolver from his
pocket and fired. The bullet struck Ro
mtrez on the arm and glanced, presuma
bly into the pleural cavity. It is feared
that there is but little chance for the
wounded man's recovery.
Difficult Digestion
That is dyspepsia.
It makes life miserable.
Its sufferers eat not because they want (a
-bat simply because they must.
They know they are Irritable and fretful ;
but they cannot be otherwise.
They complain of a bad taste in the
mouth, a.tenderness at the pit of the stom-
ach, an uneasy feeling of piiffy fulness,
headache, heartburn and what not.
ThCT effectual remedy, proved by perma-
nent cures of thousands of severe cases, is
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Hood's Pills are the best cathartic.
ftIPT nnifll Corner Fourth and
UHIL nUIHL! o teai sve\ nn c d oa^ r a
| valises checked free
SMOKES AFTER
THE SHOOTING
Salt Lake Youth Tries
to Kill a Traveling
Man.
Officers Arrest Him While
He Is Puffing at a
i Cigarette.
SALT LAKE, Nov. 26.— William S.
Haynes, a traveling man from Chicago,
was shot and probably fatally wounde-i
to-day by Roy Kaighn, the 19-year-old
son of Colonel M. M. Kaighn, who is
prominent in law and Urand Army circles
of this city^
The shooting occurred in the lobby of
the Knutsford Hotej shortly after 1
o'clock this afternoon and created a pin
ie among the guests and employes of the
hotel. Young Kaighr. was immediately
placed under arrest und the wounded
man* was conveyed to a hospital. The
surgeons after a carcfu> examination of
the wound said there was a slight hope
for recovery.
After firing the shot Kaighn coolly
lighted a cigarette, sat down and waitad
for the officers to arrest him. He posi
tively refuses to give any reason for the
shooting.
Much mystery surrounds the whole af
fair. Haynes, the wounded man. acted as
best man for Colonel Kaighn at the lat
ter"s wedding several months ago, and 't
is thought that che trouble is associated
in some way with that event.
CARRIAGE FALLS FROM
A HIGH EMBANKMENT
Wife of the Mayor of Monterey S«
verely Injured in an.
Accident.
MONTEREY, Nov. 26.— Mrs. R. F. John
son, wife of Mayor Johnson of this city,
and her children had a narrow escape
from death while driving yesterday af
ternoon on the Seventeen-mile drive.
The horses took fright at an au
tomobile and bolted, breaking a portion
of the harness. The carnage was thrown
down a twenty-foot embankment and
smashed into kindling wood, but the
horses escaped injury and continued on
their way to Monterey.
Miss Annie Johnson and two of the chil
dren jumped out before the carriage went
over. The children were not hurt, but
Miss Johnson was severely Injured. Mrs.
Johnson and one little girl and the driver
remained In the vehicle and were badly
hurt.
-. ; •; v ; ADVERTISEMENTS.
i THE OLD WAY
Of Treating -Stomach. Trouble . and
":¦ Indigestion, a Barbarous and f
Useless One.
We say the old way, but really it is the
common and usual i one at ¦ the . present
time, and : many dyspeptics, and physi-
cians as well, consider the first step in
attempting to cure indigestion is to diet,
either by selecting certain food and re-
jecting others or vto greatly diminish the
quantity of food usually taken. 30, \ •
"'? In •• other words, the starvation J plan .!s
by many supposed, to be the first essential
in the cure of weak digestion. "" v .-,• '•:* . /
>¦ The ; almost certain failure of the star-
vation cure .for stomach trouble has been, j
proven time and again, but still the usual
advice, when dyspepsia makes its appear-
ance, is a co.urse of dieting.
"' All this is radically wrong. It Is fool-
ish and unscientific to recommend diet-
ing or starvation to a person suffering j
from dyspepsia, because indigestion itself
starves every organ and every nerve and
fiber in the body.
What is needed ,is abundant nutrition,
not less, and this means plenty of good,
wholesome, well cooked food and some
natural digestive to assist the weak
stomach to digest it.
, This is exactly the purpose for which
Stuart's j Dyspepsia Tablets are adapted,
and this Is the way they cure the worst
cases of stomach trouble. '¦-.' V
' The patient eats plenty of wholesome
food, and Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets di-
gests it for him. :
And this is in accordance with nature
and common sense because in this way
• the whole system is nourished and the
overworked stomach rested, because the
tablets will digest the food, whether the
stomach works or not. One of Stuart's
Dyspepsia Tablets will . digest 1800 grains
of meat, eggs and similar food.
Any druggist will tell you that Stuart's
Dyspepsia ' Tablets is a remedy of ex-
traordinary value and probably is the
purest • and ' safest remedy for stomach
troubles. _ ' ... "
No person suffering from poor digestion
and lack of appetite can fail to be Im-
mediately and permanently benefited If
they would make it a practice to take
one or two of Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets
after each meal.
d visit DR. JORDAN'S great d
(MUSEUM OF ANATOMY?
f SB .1031Hmi3SI.t«i.S:h*7a.S.r.Cai. A
\ Cy ''¦ ' The Larreit Anatomical Museum in the \
0 *, inij^. World. Weaknesses or uj contracted m
Z. VSS H *«e«e pMltlvnl? nr by the oldest '.
0 JsSJI Specialist on the Coast Est j6 years. C
4 fISjJ OR. JORDAN-DISEASES OF MEN A
\ ffCmV Consultation free and strictly private. \
m I jOTV n Treatment personally or . by letter. A m
1 \ ¦ W il N P**itiv» Curt in erenr case undertaken. > V
ill IB' Write for Boole. PHILOSOPHY A
¥» II ll 1 " ninniAGE, MAILED FREE. (at
1 £ /I valuable book for mm) ¦ \
f OR. JORDAN * CO., 1051 Market St.. S. F. 9
TJ'DTTC'XII7Q F O R BARBERS, BAK-
DtlUljllCiO en bootblacks, bath-
>T7.~ ?.7f. w rr~~^'!T. houses. > billiard tables,
brewers, - bookbinders, candy-makers, canners,
dyers, flourmills, foundries, laundries, paper-
bangers, printers, .. painters, ; shoe factories,
stablemen, , tar-roofers, * tanners, tailors, etc.
.BUCHANAN BROS., " '.?..-]
Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento St
¦^T>v DR. MEYERS & CO.
/^p^^\ SPECIALISTS FOR MEN.
/§§r_.,J.\ Established ISBL* Con-
§Dß. MEYERS CO.
SPECIALISTS FOR MEM.
Established 1881. Con-
sultation and private book
r ; Vfc!"«/aij *r free at office or by malt.
'- \ iSB&moIrl Cures guaranteed.
viSsfl/ 731 MARKET ST.
BAN FRANCISCO. CAi*
DIRECTORY
OF RESPONSIBLE HOUSES.
Catalogues and Pries Lists Mailed
' ' on Application.
GOAL. COKE AN J PIO IROM.
Jr WIT CAVT £ rti '¦• *°0 Battery Street.
• y nILMJr! tt tU-i Telephone Main 1884.
i FRESH AND SALT MEATS. X
• lie cnVL'C m Shipping Butchers, 104
JAS- BUI EjS tU- Clay. Tel. Main 1294.
;¦;,."; ';. ¦:. , ..-•.¦• ..-; ; oils. ',•:'.'
L.UBEICATTNG OILS. LEONARD & ELLIS.
.".1,-418 Front . st., S. F. -Phone Main 1719. ¦-/*¦•
;.-i • , PHINTINO.
EC. HUGHES, m B ™*™? : a, „
' ?: /. PRINTERS. ; BOOKBINDERS.
THE HICKS- JUDD CO^&SSSSWMSHH
'¦^\i ¦£.•:•-;. •:•-;. • , ; . v ¦;¦ : ;'.' • 23 First street,'. San Francisco.'
ADVEBTISEarENTS. f
TA&TOCTA
TlieH-OCom- W
I ~ pany is the mak- ft
I erofH-o(Horn- ||
I by's Steam M
I Cooked Oatmeal) 11
I easily first of all 1
I oat products or |
1 modern breakfast ffJ^
i I foods. TheH-O 1 1
i j Co.'s Tapioca is I
! I the root of a trop- I
| ical plant care- !/ j n
Mi fully selected and If
H prepared. jl
i — —
OCEAN TRAVEL.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co.
.• Steamers leava Broadway
aft^_ Wharf, San Francisco:
Y*£^ii~ For Alaskan ports— ll a. m..
fl%L_ Nov. 27. 12. 17. 22. 27, Dec. 2.
WCMBk Change to company steam-
I BUBlwl ci For Seattle. Vancouver fB.
Bc^LSl For Victoria, Vancouver iB.
H|B mU c.). Port Townwnd, Seattle,
l^^^^H Tacoma, Everett and Saw
"Whatcom Wash.)— ll a- m..
•m— • t i» 17 22. 27. Dee. 2. Change at
Vor I |anVe,o% D oPP l n* on£ at San£ *JT
bara. Port Los Angeles and d0 "«° (Los as.
«eles)-Steamer Santa Rosa. Sundays, 9 £ m.
and Newport-Steamer Corona, -aturday..
9 For'Ensenada. Magdalena Bay. San Jose^ del •
Cabo. Mazatlan. Altata. La Paa. Santa >*«¦»;
Ha and Guaymas (Mex.)— lo a. m.» 7ta or e*ca
m further information obtain the company's
fO ThTcompany reserves the right to change ,
steamers, sailing: days and hours of 'a.liitff
¦without previous notice. ¦ _•
TICKKT OFFJCE — * New Mor ,-avrr
"^SSTraß^hw * co.. a-
10 Market St.. San 'lin.viKO..; ¦
O. R. & N. CO,
Only St««in a bl ? Xil»* **»
PORTLAND. Or..
And Short Rail Line from Portland to .M
points East. Through Tickets to »M
paints, mV rail or steamship and rail, at
I,O"WSST HAa'iSS.
BTEAMEK TIC2BT3 INCLUDE BSBTHmmJ MIALS
S3 COLUMBIA Sails. . ..Dec. 4. 14, 24, Jan. 3.
s. GEO. YT. «*3&'*iv»"iKr.Y» *®J
te f^. f G^.l^rfVont^"s.r.
TOYO KAISBA/
STEAMERS WILL LEAVE WHARF. COR- i
ncr First and Brannan streets, at 1 p. m..
for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, calling at
Kobe <Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai and
connecting at Hongkong with steamers for
India, etc. No cargo received on board on
d«iy of sailing.
S.S. NIPPON MARTI •••;;•,-,„
Wednesday. December 11. 1901
B.3AMERICA MARTT V—-
Saturday. January 4. 19«
8.3/hONQKONG MARU U",.-.
Thursday. January 38, 1901
Round-trip tickets at reduced rates. Jffor
freight and passage anplr at company^ office.
421 Market street, corner First.
W. H. AVERT. General Agent.
AMERICAN LINE.
Of TOM. SOTTTHABPTOII. LOMDOW. PASTS.
Stopping at Cherbourg, westbound.
From Now York Wednesdays at 10 a. m.
Philadelphia ....Dec. 4 Philadelphia ....Dec. 25
St Paul Dec. 11 1 St .'Paul Jan. 1
St Louis Dec. 18 1 Zeeland Jan. 8
RED STAR LINB;
New York and Antwiri,
From New York Wednesdays at 12 noon.
•Zeeland V*c. 4 *Vaderland .....Dec 25
Fries i/nd Dec. 11 Kensington Jan. I
Soutiwarlc Dec. 18|*Zeeland Jan. S
•Slopping at Cherbourg, eastbound.
INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION CO..
V- CHAS. D. TAYLOR. _
General Agent Pacific Coast. 30 Montgomery st.
PANAMA B. Mi line
TO NEW YORK VIA PANAMA DIRECT.
Cabin. *105: Steerage. 140; Meals Free.
6. S. Argyll mils Saturday, !>•;. 7
S. 6.* Leelanaw - sails
S. 6. Argyll «ails
From Howard-street wharf (Tier M.> at 1 p. a.
Freight and. Passenger Office. 330 Market ft.
F. F. CONNOR. Pacific Coast Agent.
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
And Cia Sud Americana de Vaporas
To Valparaiso, stopping at Mexican, Central
and South American ports. Sailing from How>
ard 3. Pier 10, 12 m. IWgjjMHUIIMfW
PALENA Nov. 29|TtTCAPE'L- .....Dec M
CHILI Dec 7IAREQUIPA ....Jan. 4
These steamers are built expressly for Cen-
tral and South American passenger servlc-.
(No change at Acapulco or Panama.) Freight
and passenger office. 313 California street.
BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO.. Gen. Agents,
oceanic 5S2b
S3. AUSTRALIA, for Tahiti
..'..: Nov. 29,10 a. m.
8. SIERRA, for Honolulu, Samoa. Auckland
and Sydney Thursday. Dec 5, 10 a. m.
S. ALAMEDA, for Honolulu
-"..;.- Saturday, Dec. 14. 2 p. m.
J. D.SPSECXELS 4 BIOS. 51., tab Ugaits. 327 far* SI -
Gen'l Passer OSes, (43 Market St., fiar Xa. 7- Paoifc ft JK
COMPA3NI3 SESS3AI.S TBAHSATLANTIQC3
DIRECT LINE TO HAVRE-PARIS. ..-.^
Sailing every Thursday, instead of iHiJ' »m
Saturday, •at 10 a. m.. from pier 42. irfHHaH*
North River, foot of Morton street.
• First class to Havr3, $70 and upward. Second
class to Havre, ' 145 and upward. GENERAL,
AGENCY FOR UNITED STATES and CAN-
ADA. 32 . Broadway (Hudson building). New
York. J. F. FUGAZI & CO.. Pacific Coast
Agents, i 5 Montgomery avenue, San Francisco.
Tickets sold by all Railroad Ticket Agent*.
BAY AND RIVER . OTIS ALTERS.
FOR U. S. NAVY YAR) AND VALLEJ!
Steamers GSN. FRI3BIS or MONTICELLO
9:45 a. m., 3:13 and 8:30 p. m., except Sun-
day. • Sunday, 9:45 a. m., 8:30 p. m. Leaves
Vallejo 7 a. m., 12:30 noon, « p. m.. excepc
Sunday. Sunday,* 7 a. m.. 4:15 p. m. Fare 50
cents. Telephone . Main 1508. Landing and
office; pier 2. Mission-street dock. HATCH
BROS. . - .
1 fj^mmw injection.
f A PERMANENT CURE v'
' 5 •of the most obstinate cases of Gonorrhoea ?
2 and Gleet, guaranteed in from 3 to 6 5
' < ; days ; nc other treatment required. . 5
.'j S "- »'- - --¦*. Sold by all druggist*. • .;-. > '»<

xml | txt