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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 28, 1903, Image 14

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Charge? preferred by George Morgan
against Policeman W. T. Rice of the
Harbor Station for conduct unbecoming
to an officer were dismissed. Rice was
charged with having roughly handled an
sRwi men which duingr police duty on a.
wharf on the day of the public reception
aboard the cable ship Silvertown.
Albert 1-. Martin, Eugene Sweeney and
Slade A. Earl Jr. were appointed patrol
men.
In the case of Samuel I>overich of the
Palm. Commissioners Xewhall and
Howell stated that they were opposed to
the renewal of hit licence, as he had
h*"en warned to change the character of
his iiou'e a year ago ami that he had not
complied with the warning of the board.
Commissioner Newhall even went so far
a* \o say that he would vote for a re
vocation of his license.
At lb« regular meeting of the Board of
Polio*? Commissioners held, laft night the
application made by Jamw Schwartz,
proprietor of the Thalia, lor a renewal
of his licons*? was denied. Commissioners
Hutton. Howell and Drinkhouse were
opposed to the renewal. Commissioner
Newhall. in presenting the decision of
the beard in the t-as«\ stated that person
ally he f**H that if such places as the
Thalia would segregate thf women from
the men at all times, he thought that
thev should be allowed to continue to
run undisturbra.
The remainder of the board, however,
objected to the granting of licenses to
any house? conducted along the same
line* as the Thalia.
The proprietors of the Olympia. Kapp
& Co.. and the Palm Concert Hall
were up before the board on citation.
Reports of policemen doing patrol duty.
in the section of the city where the halls
named are located were read, showing
That In ?'ach hou^e women of the under
world were allowed to congregaie. All
of the Hcenses of the places named expire
in a s=hort tim«-. The cases were passed
over until next Tuesday in order that
each proprietor may have tirce to secure
an attorney.
Cases of the Other Concert
Halls Come Up Next
Week.
Police Commissioners
Decide to Close Turk-
Street Resort.
Resolution to Adopt Title "The American Catholic Church in the
United States" Is Introduced During First Day's Session,
and Matter Is Referred to by the Bishop of the Diocese
EPISCOPAL CONVENTION DELEGATES
SEEM TO FAVOR CHANGE OF NAME
DENY A LICENSE
TO THE THALIA
In commenting upon the lack of ab
stinence j from social functions durinjf
Lent the Bishop said:
"I appeal to the clergy and I appeal to
our honest hearted members and com
municants to. abstain from social func
tions from sheer loyalty to the church
during the forty holy days. 'The time
seems to have come to call a halt unless
we are to become pure formalists in the
matter. I hope that our social leaders
will kindly exert their influence to pre
serve the holy season from this desecra
tion of its privileges."
After the address : Rev. R. C. Foute
arose and moved that the chair appoint
For Croup and Inrantllej coughs, contains no
narcotics or stupefying drugs. 25c. 60c. Drug
glits. • -
In speaking of the late Rev. Mr. lAon
the eloquent prelate dwelt feelingly upon
his sterling character and love of the
church.
Adams' ' Irish Moss Cough Balsam.
ESPECIALLY FOR CHILDREN,
A peculiar feature in the law of Illinois
was brought forth during the hearing. It
was shown that In that State if a man
deserts his wife it may be presumed
that he is either dead "or divorced after
a certain number of years and she may
marry again without getting the consent
of the courts. Judge Cook wanted aji
authoritative opinion on the question and
held the defendant so that an appeal
might be taken to the Supreme Court.
The decision settles the case so far as
California is concerned.
Garwood, who lives at 314 Third street,
married the woman In the case at Au
gusta, 111., in 1877. After living happily
together for ten years the husband came
to this State without letting his wile
know where he was . going. Six years
later she married A. W. Byers. The
last named, who was possessed* of a
small fortune, died last year and almost
simultaneously Garwood returned home.
He and his wife became reconciled and
were ready to enjoy the money that had
come to them when other heirs objected.
The case will be fought out in the courts
of Illinois.
The Supreme Court gave Lorenzo Gar
wood his freedom yesterday afternoon
after hearing: the arguments of the oppos
in~ lawyers. The defendant had been
committed to the County Jail by Judge
Cook until such time as he might see tit
to tell whether he had ever secured a di
vorce from his present wife.
It was shown In the evidence that Mrs.
Garwood had married some one elBe in
the sixteen years intervening between her
husband's departure and return. His re
fusal to answer the vital question was
based on the statutory provision that a
man cannot: be compelled to testify
Hgainst his wife without her consent. Had
he stated that , he had never been divorc
ed a blgraniy charge could have been
placed against the woman. The court,
with the single exception of Chief Justice
Beatty. upheld : Garwood. •
Rest of Battle for Estate
Will Take Place in
Illinois.
Supreme Court Sustains
His Refusal to
Answer, r
GARWOOD GAINS
A VITAL POINT
The attendance for • the ; first day- of
the convention,; taking into consideration
the inclement weather and; the distance
that some of the clergy and. lay. .dele-
The proposition to change ; Ae name
of the church to "The American Catholic
Church in the United States" was intro
duced in a resolution nearly at the end
of the meeting yesterday, and was laid
over for action- until. Thursday morning,
when the important question Is to be
made a spec:— order of business for the
convention, i * r*T ~
name ' was the all-absorbing
topic among the delegates to the gen
eral convention of the church in the
diocese of California, which opened yes
terday in Grace Church. There are
many things to be decided, but to the
members of the congregations and to the
shepherds of the flocks the one burning
question is, "Shall the name ' of the
church be changed?'
There has been a strong movement to
change the name of the 6ect to
that of "The Catholic Church in
America," "The American Catholic
Church in the United States" or "The
Holy Catholic Church." and whatever
opposition _has been developed to the
change of"" names* appears among the
present delegates to the convention to
be one of choice. Apparently most of
them seemed agreed that a change of
name Is advisable,, but the split appears
to be as to the new title which the sect
shall select. V V-
DISCUSSION' of the much-mooted
¦"Question as to i whether or
not - the Protestant Episcopal
church shall assume a new
At this juncture Bishop Nichols ascend
ed the pulpit and read his annual ad
dress. He took occasion to say. several
pertinent things . relative to the lack, of
abstinence ' of the society set during ¦ the
- W. A. M. Van Bokkelen, a member of
the committee on "general clergy relief,"
_ippolhted at the last convention, Vead an
individual report on the matter referred
to the committee, in which he stated that
he deemed. itjnexpedient to transfer the
custody of the "disabled clergy and the
widows' .'and- orphans' fund" of the Cali
fornia diocese or the administration of
the income , of the same to the trustees
of, the general clerical relief fund. , The
report embodied a resolution to that ef
fect and upon motion the report was
adopted. Mr. Van Bokkelen stated that
there was'no fault to find with the man
agement of the general relief fund, . but
that it was. his opinion that owing to
the distance from the scene of the , offi
cials in charge of the fund the same
amount of benefit could not be accom
plished as where the diocese' had charge
of its own fund and was able to apply
it where it did the most good. -
The rules were suspended and upon
motion . Rev. William A.' Brewer of
San Francisco was re-elected registrar of
the diocese. It is antlcjpated that Albert
N. Drown will be reappointed chancellor
by Bishop Nichols. Nominations were
made for the various standing commit
tees and members of the board -of mis
sions and the elections- will be held as
scon as printed lists of the nominees have
been prepared. • <
VAN BOKKEIiEN'S REPORT.
, Comjnittee on the State of the Church— Rev
F. M. Clampett,; D.D., Rev. L. C. Sanford and
F. ¦ W. Van'Reynegom.
Committee; on Unfinished Business — Rev w
B. Shaw, George Brallaford and R. M. Owens
Committee on Church Charities— Rev B M
¦\Veeden, Rev. Ni B. W. Gallwey. E. D. Bey
lard. A. S. -Price and F. E. Mason.
Committee oh Christian Education— Rev J
O. Lincoln, -Rev.- \V. A. Brewer. Rev. . C.'-E
Hitchcock, W. A. Merrill, Ph.D., and Tracy R
Kelley. '_;, : ¦
Committee on Canons — Rev. R. C Foute'
Rev. D. O. Keller, Rev. F. J. Mynard. A. M.
Drown. Vincent Neal and W. E. Dean.
Committee on the Incorporation and Admis
sion of. Parishes and Missions— M. Lennon
William Mintier and Itev. E. U. Parsons •
Committee on Finance — W. B. Hooper L M
ningwall. CD. Haven, Dr. H. C. Davia: W. a'
II. Van Uokkelen. treasurer, ex-offlclo member.'
Committee on Credentials — George H Hooke
W. K. F. Deal and Rev. Mardon Wilson, ex
offlclo member. .
The convention opened at 10:30 a. m.
with the celebration >of the holy.com
munion. Bishop William F.Nichols offici
ating: as celebrant, and the Rev. B. M.
AYeeden as preacher. 5 Rev. Mardon D.
"Wilson of San Jose was re-elected sec
retary, and he appointed as his assistant
George H. Hooke. The preliminary
organization having 'been perfected, the
roll of delegates was called and the ab
srntees noted. / Upon motion the secre
tary was Instructed to send greetings
from the convention to the Salt Lake
convocation, which is now in session. At
noon an adjournment was taken until
2:30 p. m.
The afternoon session was called to or
der at 2:30 o'clock by Bishop Nichols, who
announced the following as the personnel
of the regular committees appointed to
serve during the convention: . ,
CELEBRATE COMMUNION.
gates-elect are compelled to travel, was
very gratifying, and it is anticipated
that the second day of the convention
will show an attendance larger than has
been had for several years.
After dwelling at length upon the con
oiuon of the diocese and the reading of
"Is official acts during the year, the
Bishop paid eloquent tributes to the
memories of the late Rev. W. I. Kip Jr
Rev. Robert Ritchie of Oakland and Rev'
ii , Llon> rect <> r of St. Stephen's Church,
all of whom died during the last year
The question of changing the name of
the church, which has caused so much
agitation and a divided opinion, was also
touched upon by the reading of the reso
lutions adopted by the committee ap-
P °u? i? f rom the Hous e of Bishops,
which is endeavoring to ascertain from
the various dioceses the opinion relative
to the Important matter. Bishop Nich
ols^ advised that the matter be referred
to a comrnitttee to be appointed with in
structions to report back at the next con
vention.
Lenten season and the newspaper notor
iety that the church 1 : has secured attend
ant upon the differences arising In some
of the parishejs.
REGARDING CHANGE OF NAME
PHOTOGRAPH OF THE. INTERIOR OF GRACE CHURCH, TAKEN YESTERDAY MORNING, DURING THE OPEN
ING SESSION OF THE FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL
CHURCH IN THE DIOCESE OF CALIFORNIA, AND SOME OF THE SPEAKERS.
No headache, no gastritis, follows the tisa of
"Jesse Moore" pure whisky. It does one good.
There Is none other to equal it. •
The case of Ernest Alexander, the for
mer policeman, charged with accepting a
bribe from Lulu Wilson, was called In
Judge Lawlor's court yesterday for trial.
Attorney W. \V. Foote for the defendant
asked for a continuance till to-morrow,
which was granted.
Alexander's Trial Postponed.
Stephen J. Hanlon, first officer of the
steamer J. L. Luckenbach, who was
charged with beating Jose Barbosa, a
coalpasser, when on the high seas, was
tried • yesterday by United States Com
missioner Heacock. He ,-was dismissed
on account of lack of evidence.
Charge Not Substantiated.
But O. G. Freeman, purser on the
steamship, clears the mystery up by stat
ing his positive assurance of the fact
that the dead coal passer was trying to
desert, owing to the fact that, like all
Japanese deserters," he took all of his
belongings with him. The autopsy failed
to disclose, the expected fracture of the
skull below the scalp wound and also
developed the fact that the deceased had
a weak heart, which probably contributed
to the. hastening of his death brought on
by exposure.
The fact that the dead man had a gash
on the head and was found devoid of
his clothing led the police to suspect foul
play, and Detectives Harry Braig, Jerry
Dinan and James Freel were detailed on
the case. Their susplcloi was further
strengthened by the fact that K. Na
kamura, storekeeper, and J. Yoshlda,
fireman on the Hongkong Maru, the men
who Identified the dead Japanese, said
that they saw him asleep In his bunk at
12 o'clock last night.
After jumping over the side of his ship
in the dead of night bent upon deser
tion, and after having lost all of his
clothing In hia battle with the storm
tossed waves of the bay, I. Kageyama, a
Japanese coal passer of the steamship
Hongkong Maru, spent the early hours
of yesterday morning wandering naked
through the driving storm. Bernard
Veeder, a stationer of 216 Brannan street,
found the half dead Japanese and sum
moned an ambulance, but the Japanese
expired on hia way* to the Emergency
Hospital.
I. Kageyama's Dash for
Liberty Ends in His
Death.
WANDERS NAKED
IN THE STREETS
a commttteee of seven, consisting of four
of the clergy and three laymen, to whom
the matter of changing the name of the
church be referred. The motion was
adopted and the report of the committee
will be made a special order of business
Thursday morning. After the reading of
the reports of the varlou* officers and
committeees, the convention adjourned
until to-day at 10 a. m. Addresses will
be made to-day by Rev. N. B. W r . Gall
xey. Rev. Jonathan Nicholas, Rev.
George Maxwell. George E. Butler, F. M.
Lee and Tracy R. Kelley.-
Owing to the deaths of -several rectors
during the year the reception by Bishop
and Mrs. Nichols, which had been
planned to take place at the Occidental
Hotel this evening, has been abandoned.
Friday will be given to the Woman's
Auxiliary and several Interesting ad
dresses will be heard.
THE PAN FEA^CISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1903.
14
N ADVERTISEMENTS.
Our January Sale of Linen,
HandKerchieis, Embroider-
ies, Muslin Underwear, Rib-
bons and House Furnishing
Goods will be continued all
this week.
1 trfl dozen extra aualitu, all linen, Irish
lull H'uck Towels, large size and hemmed
readu for use, S3.00 dozen
nprfj pairs Lace Curtains in Arabian, white
L\j\j and ecru, New and exclusive designs.
30 different patterns, &3.OO pair
/ C A dozen ladies 1 linen cambric, hem-
TrUU stitched Handkerchiefs. % and X
inch hems. S1.5O dozen
//finn uards cambric, swiss, lawn and
nainsook Edgings and Insertions,
5c to 5Oc per uard
07 C pieces 3^-inch soft finish Satin Taffeta
0 / u Ribbon in all the leading colors. Also
whites, creams and blacks, 2O C ud,
OC dozen ladies' Muslin Gowns. Made from
L\j extra aualitu muslin and trimmedwith
line embroideries, $/. OO each
Qf| dozen ladies' cambric Muslin Skirts,
uU made with cluster tucks and trimmed
with two rows of fine lace, also lace
trimmed dust ruffle, S2.5O each
411, 113, 115, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
For Man's Eye
The emollient* sanative, anti-
septic, cleansing, purifying and
beautifying properties of Cuticura
Soap render It of priceless value
to 'women.
Millions of women use Cuticura Soap,
assisted by Cutjcora Ointment, for
beautifying the skin, for cleansing the
scalp ana stopping of falling hair, for
softening, whitening and soothing ! red
rough and sore hands and for ail the
purposes of the toilet, bath and nursery.
Millions of women use Cuticura Soap
in baths for annoying irritations, in-
flammations and chafin^s, too free or
offensive perspiration, in washes for
ulcerative weaknesses, and for many
sanative, antiseptic purposes which
readily suggest themselves.
Sold throughout the world.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
B.KATSGHINSKI
FKILADELPHIASHOECO.'
10 TURD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO.
. ADJOINING CALL BUILDING.
Who Can Beat This ?
Our customers fully realize the
fact that we give the best values
In this city, but yet there are many
people buying elsewhere, and it is
those people we wish -to convince
Hnd have them -trade with us. Here
is a special offer, and we defy any
shoe dealer In this city to show
such value: Ladies" Fine Box Calf
l^ace Shoes, coin toes and tips and
heavy soles with fair stitched ex-
tension edges, military heels and
Union Stamped, AND THE PRICE"
ONLY « 1.45. Sizes . 2Y> to 8;
widths B to EE. Just the shoe for
wet weather.
Strictly Up to iiaiB. I
LADIES' SWELL LOOKING IS •
VICIKID LACE SHOES, coin toes 1 ;
and patent leather tips, heavy soles |
with fair stitched' extension edges N
and military heels. OUR PRICE m
ONLY JM.7K. Sizes 2& to 8; ¦
widths B to EE. H
LADIES' BUTTON SHOES i
ONLY «Oc Odd lines and small 13
sizes, 2\<z to 4; widths A A to E. a
MEN'S CONGRESS AND LACE M
ONLY S5<«. Odd lines of calfskin fcf
and vicl kid. Sizes 5 to 7; widths H
A to C. . ' M
CHILDREN'S CLOTH TOP BUT- 1
TON SHOES, with spring heels PI
REDUCED TO <JOc Sizes 4 to 7'4; E
widths A to E. "||
"We cannot guarantee to fill coun- H
try orders on the above sale goods. B
for while we have some sizes of |
every style advertised, yet we have I
not every size of every style ad- I
vertlsed. «J
B. KATSCHINSKI, 1
Philadelphia Shoe Co. 1
1O Third St., San Francisco P
ADVERTISEMENTS.
j Clark Wise 8i Co'.s J
> GREAT \
Everything from
Pianos to
Sheet Music
a t SLAUGHTERED
. PRICES (
CkrliiseM 1
ffinot Agency
CocCfar/St.^CiantAve. |
|l f^^Si^i^j©^^ Dr.Pif rr e'« Electric 7V ««
'rf^&5^r^3^3^ is * i: » rr «'. Nothing like i
Of 0 *^ "• K** ««Uiner on r»rth i
Ul-'J I(A£** * n * fgntuine Curt for Rupture. (
V ' uf\\ i w orid-renowned. 27 inprotemU.
Y t _ j: W\ t M ruptured inresti;atc %t once. I
*™"~^ Caflor wrlte/or"BooKi,iTNo. I "
MIGVETJC E. f RLSS CO- 33 T,e»t 24th Street. K«w !
¦*¦¦>«>(. X. V. or 256 P«»t Street. S«a Kr»nci»co, C*U i
WESTERN HOTEL.
•/SAnrCT AND WASHINGTON* ETS.— Re-
~* rr.odeled and renovated. KING. Ward &
CAJ. European plan. Rooms 5Oc to $1 Do <Jay-
• .*. to $fr ¦*«k; »)» lo $20 month. Free balti^' '
bet and ccld water every room; lire crates in
every raom: elevator run* all nieht.
f^ S § S\ P rnrnunitf0 '?- Jluntins and I
S K 1 1 i\8 nock. Fewest prices, trtrni '
W U i « SHP.EVE & UARBER CO.. !
739 Market et. and S1J j
ADVERTISEMENTS^
TREATMENT ALIKE. WHETHER YOU
COME. TELEPHONE OR WRITE.
WE TRY HARD FOR TOUR ORDERS. TVB
WANT MORE OF YOUR TRADE.
PURE LEAF LARD.: 3-lb pail 39o
White as snow. Kettle rendered. Vsua.17
60c.
EGGS. Best Larce Select, doz. 35c.
EASTERN CODFISH. Georges pound 5c
White, boneless, whole. Usually S lbs. 23c.
GOLDEN DATES. New, pkg. 5c.
LAUNDRY SOAP, "Corona". .8 bar* 25c
Made by Queen Lily Soap Co. Box of 100
bars. $2.05.
SWIFTS WASHING POWDER. 2 pkga. Dc.
PINK SALMON, Holiday brand
full Ib can 6c
Open for sampling. New pack. Case limit.
Dczen. t)5o. Usually 10c.
DOOR MATS. 50c size. 38c.
ENGLISH TABLET JELLY. .3 packages 25 C
Sold regularly at 13c. Each tablet makes
tasty dessert for 8 persons. 10 flavors.
CREAM. All Brands, can. He.
TOMATOES, with Chi i Peppers..
3-lb can |Qc
Best solid pack, ripe red tomatoes.
PURE MAPLE SIRUP, 13c bottles. IOC.
SALAD OLIVE OIL, "N. Rubo: & Co."
gallon can SI. 05
Made in Franc*. Our guarantee with ev<»rv
can. Money back willingly. Usually $1.50.
TOILET PAPER. 10c square?. 5c.
ASTI WINES. 6->ea -old gal 85c
Port. Sherry, Madeira. Angelica. Mellow
Tonic Wines. Usually $1.23.
JAVA AND MOCHA BROKEN. 3 lbs. 5Oc.
MEDICINAL BOURBON WHISKEY .....
* V^:... ..i flt- *><>* 69c
Test it as you will: Knell it. tasta it.
There's quality, there's excellence, there's
economy. Usually $1. m
NEW 63c TEAS. Trial Price 43c.
SATURDAY NIGHTS, 20 Specials
Pee list at stores.
Eastern Best tiugar-Cured Hams, Ib. .t2H"
Port or Sherry. 40c bottle. 4 for OOc
Fels Naptha Soap. 6 bars 2."lc
Clears, any T>c brand. S for S5e
ALL ORDERS DELIVERED MONDAY.
1001 FtLlMORE - 119 TAYLOR
PARK 1S3 Phones HOWARD 1021
aBmk fir A \ a 3 Hl5£:
ea^sIj I* 3 9 n I [' ys\ gt
n Ftf3 N lit n I lilifla
**i Emm I u^l 1 5 '
_____ADVERTISEMENTS.
¦p:WM\l\
I Prescriptions. 1
S Expert Pharmacists .only aft
Uj .employed at the highest, wi
,y wages. We never Ssubstitute H
| — every prescription checked • H
¦ I by two 'clerks. JH
\ : Abbey'3 Salts 15 C ffl
> ¦ Bromo Seltzer, 10c size K
' Ca sea rets!!.'] Vie, 2 for 1 He H
Dr. Charles' Flesh. Food.fJOe m
1 Fellow's 'Syrup, $1.50 size. ._. . u
w ¦ LiOla r'Montez Cream. ... .!>Oc 1
M f - Peruna .................. <JOc fi
t« . Pears' Soap 1Oc IP
E Packer's Tar Soap. .lf»e H
! Swamp 'Root ... .;{,%«? I
I* Wilson AVhlskey. '.0>>C I
. W Wine of Cardul , 5e M .
% The Owl Drug 1 Co. jj
' weak :-XE8 made
Ftron S and healthy; 2 drops
J5?SK3»to of Ue0 - Mayerle's eyewater
' MeTlSSS^^ « ive in* tant relief in ail ey*
'M^gJ^^^* troubles. Price 50c. Geo. May.
. •• - ,-. ; erle, v German Ootical Insti-
tute. 1071 Market it.. San Francisco.

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