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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 09, 1903, Image 1

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Continued on Page 3, Coluaft 1*
The Buke of Tetaan Bead.
MADRID. Feb. R.— The Duke of Tetuan,
formerly Minister of Foreign Affairs, who
has been iil for tome time past, died to-
Elliot, Lyons Who Killed an Oregon
Sheriff, May B* Captured
This Morning;.
EUGENE, Or., Feb. 8.-Word was re
ceived from Irving to-night that Elliot
Lyons, the fugitive murderer of Sheriff
Withers, was tracked by a posse to with
in seven miles of. that place. A large
number of armed men are on the outlaw's
trail and It is expected that he will be
captured by morning.
ARMED MEN ARE CLOSE
TO FUOITxVE MURDERER
archipelago is of coral formation.,
and from six to eight feet is the
average height of the land above
the sea level. The vegetation
consists principally of palm trees,
and tropical grasses.
Beyond; the fact of the visita-.
tion of the tidal wave and of the j
desolation: which was left in its :
wake the news of the occurrence
is • meager. Almost no details
were'ay'ailable at the time of the:
sailing of the Mariposa. The
first advices were received from •
the French schooner Eimeo on
January, 26. The crew of that ,
vessel' brought -to Papeete the in-
formation that there had been a !
terrible hurricane in that section |
of -the Pacific which stretched!
away toward the east. On the day j
following and two hours before \
the Mariposa sailed for this port !
the French \ steamship Excelsior •
arrived in the harbor with 400 '•
survivors aboard. J. E. Short, |
purser of the Mariposa. with com
rnenclable forethought, sent a man !
to see the refugees and get their j
story. ;
They stated that the sky began
to assume a peculiar aspect on
January 1 1, and that the inhab
itants of the islands ¦ were all
greatly alarmed. The air was
very oppressive and something
strange seemed pending. The
wind commenced blowing fierce
ly from the southeast. Hour bv
hour it increased in violence, and
every wave was higher than its
predecessor. The natives on sev
eral adjacent islands succeeded in
making their way to Hikueru.
which has the greatest elevation
of any in the group.
When January 12 had dawned
a hurricane the like Bf which had
never before been seen was rag-
FORT WORTH. Tex., Feb. 8.— At the
regular meeting to-day of R. E. Lee
Camp, United Confederate Veterans, a
resolution indorsing the Senator Hanna
bill to pension ex-slaves was introduced
by State Historian Judge Cummlngs and
passed by an almost unanimous vote.
There was some objection on the ground
that the resolution might be construed as
political. ' The resolution suggests that
the Texas representatives in Congress
support the Hanna measure to the ex
tent of rewarding all ex-slaves who re
mained at home within the ages set forth
in the bill, or those who went with their
rnasttrs in the Civil War, but that those
be excepted who were enlisted in the
United- States volunteer Bervice and ure
already on the pension list.
Texas Camp Passes a Resolution Fav
oring the Granting of Pensions
to Ex-Slaves.
CONFEDERATE VETERANS
INDORSE KANNA'S BILL
SAN FRANCISCO DENTIST AND HIS WIFE WHO WERE IN PAPEETE WHEN A GROUP OF ADJACENT
ISLANDS WAS SWEPT BY A TIDAL WAVE, WHICH DESTROYED THOUSANDS OF LIVES. AND PHO
TOGRAPHS OF SOUTH SEA ATOLLS AND NATIVES.
GENEVA, Feb. - 8.— Counsel for the
former Crown Princess of Saxony an
nounces that owing to great physical and
mental depression caused by the refusal
tc allow her to visit Salzburg or to see
her sick child, the Princess to-day en
tered the sanitarium at Nyon in order to
seek the quietude and medical attention
necessary In ner delicate condition. Nyon
is situated on the shore of Lake Geneva,
ir the cantonment of Vaude. The sanita
rium Is well known for the treatment of
mental and nervous disorders.
Sick Child Upsets Her Nerv
ous System.
Refusal to Allow Her to Visit Her
FORMER CROWN PRINCESS
IS NOW IN A SANITARIUM
/' "*\OR the fourth time
_^ within \ a period of' ten
months the world is
shocked with the tale of
an appalling disaster, in which
thousands of human lives are.Iost
and an almost incalculable amount
of property destroyed. One of
the most terrible tidal waves in
history has swept over the Tua
motu Islands, in the South Seas,
leaving a chaos behind.
Multitudes of natives were
swept away forever in the seeth
ing waters, others perished horri
bly from hunger and thirst at the
tops of cocoanut trees, where they
found a temporary respite from
death, and the. few who survived
the awful experience face life de
prived of everything they owned.
The news of the disaster
reached this city yesterday on the
Oceanic Steamship Company's
Mariposa. It is related that 400
refugees had reached Papeete and
that aid had been sent to so/iie of
the islands in the affected group
on January 27. The occurrence
took place Tuesday morning, Jan
uary 13.
The Tuamotu ¦ archipelago is
about 500. miles to the east of
Tahiti. There are between sev
enty and: eighty 'islands -in the
group. Alb .were inhabited and
were commercially valuable on
account of their products of pearl,
mother-of-pearl and copra. , Dur
ing the Winter months the popula
t^)n is' usually heavily augmented
by an influx of pearl fishersfrom
the Samoan Islands. The entire
LONDON, Feb. S.-The Influential com
mittee headed by the Duke of Sutherland,
Lord Strathcona, Lord Charles Beresford
and a number of members of Parliament,
admirals and other prominent men, which
was formed February 1 to agitate the
question of the security of Great Britain's
food supply In time of war, issued a state
ment to-day In which the opinion is ex
pressed that in the event of Great Brit
ain becoming involved in a European war
the country must be prepared to see bread
at practically famine prices. Various rea
sons are given as a basis of this opinion.
The chief reasons are that the greatest
source of Great Britain's food supply is
the United States, where the price .of
wheat can be raised artificially, and that
the corn trade on both sides of the At
lantic would expect to make profits on a
scale commensurate with the war risks.
cally Famine Prices.
Investigating Committee Says That
Bread Would Command Practi-
ENGLAND WOULD SUFFER
IN THE EVENT OF WAR
The reports brought by the Para indi
cate the possibility of another revolution
in opposition to the Panama Canal treaty.
WASHINGTON. Feb. 8.— The report
that General Tribe-Uribe had committed
suicide causes considerable surprise here.
After his surrender to the Colombian au
thorities he performed valuable services
for the Colombian Government, inducing
various guerrilla chieftains to desist in
their opposition to the Government and
to surrender. * Subsequently he went to
Bogota and was cordially received. He
was less than 40 years of age, was a bril
liant fijjhter and was Ions a thorn in the
side of Colombia.
Colombian officials here also are sur
prised and grieved at reports of a threat
ened revolution In Colombia. Dr. Ilerron,
the Charge (V Affaires of Colombia In
Washington, says he can conceive of no
reason why there should be a revolution
ary movement. He said he could not re
alize hew it could be on account of the
Panama canal negotiations, as the treaty
prov.'dlr.g fcr that waterway had not been
ratified by the American Senate, much
less by the Colombian CoRgre^, which
had not yet been elected.
m INGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 8.— The
M British steamer Para, which arrived
1 here to-uay from Colon, brings' news
• of the suicide on January 33 of the
% former Colombian revolutionary Gen
»eral Uribe-Uribe. General Uribe-
Uribe published a letter on December 12
advising Colombia to await the lapsing of
the Panama concession in 1904, which
would leave the Colombian Government a
free hand in the matter of. the canal.
Rising May Follow
Uribe-Uribe's
Suicide.
COLOMBIAN REVOLUTIONARY
LEADER WHO HAS KILLED
himself!
The Prime Minister, In denying that
Bulgaria had aided the Macedonians, said
that if necessary the Government would
dissolve the Macedonian committees in
Bulgaria.
Observers who recall the official state
ments that were issued when the coup
d'etat of 18S3 was being prepared in Phil
ippopolis say that the denial of obvious
facts is more suspicious than the facts
themselves.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Feb. 8.— The Aus
trian and Russian Embassies will present
to the Porte this week the plan of the
proposed reforms in Macedonia.
Much attention has been attracted here
to the statement made in the Bulgarian
Sobranjo on Friday by M. Strachlmiroff,
a member of "the - opposition, that the
Macedonian movement did not result from
Turkish oppression? but was; the ontcome
of the growth I of ¦¦ national • sentiment
among the Macedonians. The epeaker
declared that, there would be a revolution
whether the reforms were introduced or
not, and assistance given by • Bulgaria
would hinder rather than advance the
revolution.
VIENNA, Feb. S.— It is persistently as
serted that Austria is preparing a partial
mobilization of her military forces in
view of possible events in the Balkans.
Specia.1 Dispatch to The Call
Joint Note to the Porte
Will Be Presented
• This Week.
Macedonians Are Re
ceiving Aid From
Bulgaria.
NEW YORK. Feb. R.-An effort was
made to-day to see John D. Rockefeller in
regard to the telegram purporting to have
.been sent by him to various Senators, but
at hie home he sent out word by a serv
ant that he '"befrged to be excused.'.'
WASHINGTON. Felt. S.-John D.
.'Rockefeller or a "wicked partner" has
supplied the sensation of the .hour .and
h-*j> i!iaa> H absolutely certain that the
Department of Commerce bill will pass,
with an amendment inserted by the con
ference committee of CongTeKfi orovldl-s:
I01 publicity on tne lines advocated oy
. Attorney General Knoi.
There is great deal or mystery regard
ing the alleged Rockefeller ttlfjjrams to
Senators asking them to defeat the pub
licity feature of the Department of Com
merce, bill, and most of the members of
the Senate discredit the repjrt on the
general principle- that Rockefeller Is too
adroit a man to resort to such open
methods in influencing the legislation; but
;here is no room for a successful denial
of the fact that telegTams were sent to
members of the Senate, and the House a_s
well, and that they were signed "John D.
Rockefeller."
SOME OF THE "INSTRUCTED."
It was stated In a reliable quarter lato
to-night that Senators Allison. Aldrich,
Spooner and Lodge were among those who
had received telegrams signed with
Rockefeller's name. One of these Sena
tors expressed the opinion that the tele- j
grams, while bearing Rockefeller's name,
were really forgeries.
A Senator who is known to have re- !
reived one of the Rockefeller telegrams
said to-night that he has received no mes- j
page from Rockefeller since the publlca-
Uon of the statements tUat he had at
.fmpted to Influence legislation by tele- '
graph.
In congruence of disclosures in oonnee- j
tjr.n with the alleged Rockefeller tele- i
grams, these things appear to most expe- j
• rlcnced Senators as absolutely certain: J
Kjrst — An sijrr<»ement between the Sen- \
etc and House to adopt the report of the
conference committee on the Department \
of Commerce bill, which will introduce
.into the Federal statutes the publicity;
principle for which the President has been
font, ending.
Second— Passage by the House of the I
.. Klkfnp interstate commerce bill in relation
vv rebates, which has already passed the i
Senate.
Third— An avoidance of an extra session
«>f Congress. In consequence of action
having been taken on the trust question.
¦ OPPOSED TO PUBLICITY.
Kittle concealment has \>oen made re- ]
c-ntly to ihr- fact that the Standard Oil j
Company is opposed to the publicity fea
tore of the Department of Commerce bill, j
Friends «nd foes of tho bill alike have j
known this for several days.
J. ]'. Morgan and the capitalists h«* rep
resents and < o-fipcrates with had already
accepted the Knox publicity plan. When
. Morgan went away last wr-ek he was sat-
Lfled that if the trust question were not
settled by thi* ''onsress It would be set
tled disastrously to combinations at the
next session.
Friends of the Rockefeller interests rest
ed easily until about a week ago. when
they were told the situation had changed;
that trust legislation was inevitable: that
the President had won his fight, and that
the struggle novr would be to prevent Con
gress going too far.
It was then that the Standard Oil men
teem to have awakened to the fact that j
.!h»- influence of the President in Congress ¦
"had been underrated. They wore not of i
the same mind as Morgan and determined \
. "*? I
F-ecial Dispatch to Tho Call
Exposure Makes Certain the
Passage of Anti-Trust
~ Bills.
Generous Senators Say
They May Have Been
Forged.
Partial Mobiliza
tion of Austria's
Forces.
Declines to Talk
Anent Those
, Telegrams.
PREPARING
FOR A CLASH
WITH TURKEY
COLOMBIAN
REBEL CHIEF
ENDS LIFE
ROCKEFELLER
PROFFERS NO
EXPLANATION
Forty Feet High a Roaring Wall of Water Crashes Over
the Tuamotu Islands in the South Seas, Leaving
Death and Ruin in Its Seething Wake.
OA January 13 a wall of water forty feet high and several hundred miles wide swept over the Tuamotii Archipelago. The resulting loss of 'life is said to be from 5000 to IO.OOO. Four hundred pearl fishermen U'CTC brought
to Papeete, together with the iicics of the horror, by the French schooner Excelsior. Hundreds of other survivors, wJw had temporarily saved their lives fry climbing to the tops of coeoannt trees, were left behind to suffer death
from Starvation and disease. Ii is thought that very few of these latter will be rescued. The loss of property is total. It is feared that thirty schooners engaged in intcrisland trade were in the path of the destroying zcatcrs.
The flags at Papeete arc at half-mast and the whole populace is in mourning. This disaster is the fourth- of world-zvidejmportancc within ten months, and one of the greatest in all history. \
The San Francisco Call.
VOLUME XCI1I— NO. 71.
SAX FRANCISCO, MONDAY; FEBRUARY ,9, 1903.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TIDAL WAVE ENGULFS
TEN THOUSAND NATIVES

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