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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 03, 1903, Image 1

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PRESIDENTS OF TWO UNIVERSITIES. WHO ASSISTED IN THE EN
THUSIASTIC WELCOME EXTENDED BY CHICAGO AND ITS SUB
URBS TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.'
Continued on Page * 2, Column ¦ 1.
NEW YORK, April 2.— John McQuade,
for thirty-three years -treasurer of Tam
many Hall, died to-day. McQuade was
an • ex-pollce | Justice and { district leader.
He mada . a • fortune ' at a contractor.
John McQuade.
Mrs. McKinley in a Runaway.
CANTON, O., April 2.— Mrs. McKinleys
t^am started -to runaway, as she was
driving to the cemetery this afternoon.
At the West Fifth street hill one' of the
horses fell and the ¦ team was stopped.
Neither Mrs. McKJnley nor the other oc
cupants of ' the 5 carriage were • injured.
HARRISBURG. Pa., April 2.— Articles
of merger were filcd'fn the State Dcpart
nvnt by all the large. coke companies in
the Conncllsvllle region, which have been
abeorbed by the H. C Frick Coke Com
pany, with a capital et ?20,000,000. i^j
Pennsylvania Coke Companies Unite,
LONDON, April 2.— Ijord Itobei is, the
commander in chief, to-day notified .Lieu
tenant Colonpr Lord Denbigh, command
ing ,the Honorable Artillery Company,
that permission. had been granted to the
Honorable Artillery to visit Boston,
Mass., .undor arm«,_ in. September as the
gruests.of the .Ancient and Honorable Ar
tillery Company ofthat city.
Famous Organization to Visit Boston
MSBON. April 2.— The British, royal
yacht Victoria and Albert, with King K<J-
T?nsd on l>oar<1, arrived in tho Tagus to
day from Portsmouth and was. saluted 'by
Hie warships and forts. The yacht
steajned up the estuary, followed by the
escorting Uritish ana Portuguese cruis
ers, and anchored opposite .Black •• Horse
square, where an immense crowd had- as-
Mrrnbled, the windows and roofs of. the
houses and every other, vantage point
bcJnsr racked with people.
Ariother royal ealute was fired as. King
Carlos erobark'vJ at the arsenal,' on , board
th? royal galley, which was built for the
fflarriage of Dona Maria and Carlos -IV.
Portuguese Populace Gives Royal
Visitor Noisy Greeting. '.
EDWARD GUEST OF CARLOS.
western hemisphere It has certain duties «r.3
responsibilities which oblijr- tt to take * Wa3
ins part thereon.
\\> hold that oar Interest* in till*
hpralnphrre are urrntcr than tho«<
of any Roropfnn ponfr po«»ilhly
can be. anil that nur duly to our
idvc» and tt* the weaker repnhlli*«
wh« are onr nelshbortt requires* "¦
tn nee that none of the a real mill*
tary power* from ncroM tho sea*
nhall eneroaeh npon the territory
of the American rcpnblici* or mr~
<inire control tltereoicr. Thl* j»«»'
ley. therefore. n,ot only forbid* «»
to aennleiee In such territorial ac
quisition, but n!*o cannei n* to ob
ject to tho acquirement of a control
which won Id In 1(4 effect be eaaal
to territorial assrundizement. Thl*
1m why the Vniteri States ha* atead
lly believed that the construction of
(he crrent lathmlan canal, the build
ins of which i* tn utand as the
jrreatejit. material feat of the twen
tieth eentnry— orreater thna any
similar feat In any preceding eea
tur> — should be done by no forcl«ia
nation bnt by onr»el»e*.
Th* nr.al must of necessttr go throiish
the trrrllory of on<5 of our smaller »i«-
Continued on Page 2, Column 5.
The President bowed his thanks to May
or Harrison and to MacVeagh, who Intro
duced him to his audience, and expressed
his. pleasure at the cordial reception ex
tended to him on the first stop of his long
trip. Then, turning, directly to the. au
dience in front of him, he proceeded In
Ma peculiarly energetic manner to deliver
his address. He had some difficulty in
commencing, for tho* reason that the
cheers that had greeted his first appear
ance in the hall burst forth with reneweil
vlgo'r and It ¦was several minutes before
he' was able t<> proceed. The , address
throughout was received in the most cor
dial manner and with as 'much approval
for the manner in which It was 'delivered
as for the matter which it contained. In
the course of the address, which was on
tho Monroe doctrine, he said:.
Ever since the time when we definitely ex
tended our boundaries ¦westward to the PaciSc
*nd southward to the Rulf, sfnee the time
when the old Spanish and Portuguese colonies
to the south ot us asserted their Independence,
our. nation has insisted that because of lu
primacy in strength among the nations of the
CHEERS THE PRESIDENT.
the people of Chicago at his visit and
offering to him their be3t wishes for a
happy and pleasant trip during his 'two
months of vacation.
RUDAPKST, April 2.— Three balloon
ists, ex-Deputy Ordndy, lieutenant Kra.1
n. i M. Kubik, a brother of the member
ot the Diet of that name, were fatally
injured in a balloon accident to-day.
While the balloon was being inflated it
suddenly broke away with the car con
taining tho men named and Captain Tol
ry of the navy. M. Ordody fell out of
the car to the roof of the factory. Lieu
tenant Krai punctured the balloon,
which 4 descended with great velocity,
striking with such force that he am! M.
Kubik were horribly injured. Captain
Tolry Vas less seriously hurt.
HELENA, Mont., April 2.— Thomas
O'Brien was to-day pardoned by Acting
Governor Murray. O'Brien's case is most
novel. He made his escape from the peni
tentiary, and with the prison officials in
pursuit, wrote letters to a Butte papor
giving his side of the case to the public.
The letters were published and O'Brien
then returned to the prison, declaring
that- ns the public was aware-. of the
true facts and his innocence he soon
would be pardoned. O'Brien wa3 sent up
for the alleged theft of a rvagonload of
goods.
THREE BALL00NISTS
ARE FATALLY INJURED
PARBON IS GRANTED
TO CONVICT O'BRIEN
Man Who Escaped From Peniten
'tiary to Establish Hisinnocence
Is Given His Freedom.
?.'onsigneur Stonor,' canon of St. John
I-ateran, the highest English prelate
here, has ban intrust<Hl with negotia
tions to arrange a visit of King Kdward
to the Pope.
It is proposed that .the King cither go
to the English ecclesiastical college here
or to the r*- sldenr-c of Prince • Massimo,
whom he met when here, as Prince of
during: the lifetime of Pope Pius
lit. l-'rom cither of these places he wouM
•tart for the Vatican, not in a carriage' of
the King: of Italy, but in a private ve-
ROME, April 2.— Prince Colonna, the
Mayor of Rome, has been officially
informed by the Italian Govern
ment that King Kc'ward will visit
Home at the end of this month.
Private Vehicle to- Con
vey British Sovereign
to Vatican.
Brundidge replied he didn't have to have
it. Clark retorted and they clinched.
Clark is alleged to have struck Brundidge
with a closed pocketknife, firundidge be
ing badly- cut on the face. • .
The trouble Is said to have been the re
sult of a recent Interview published with
Brum^jdge here criticizing Clark for not
having Senator Berry escort' him to the
desk to be sworn in.
'•I don't want your friendship."
LITTLE ROCK, April 2.— United States
Senator F. P. Clark ana Congressman
Brundidge,". both of this State. >rot Into
an argument In front of the Capitol
Hotel here at noon to-day and fought
fiercely -for about ten 'minutes. Clark is
a tall, powerful man and his opponent is
short. ' Clark, according, to eye-witnesses,
attacked Brundidge first, landing a heavy
left on thejaw. The Congressman clinched
and both : men fought hard. Police ar
rlvtd.-and separated ' the combatants.
Brundidge was taken up to hlJT room
bleeding freely -from eye and mouth.
Clark also was. badly used up.
The trouble was caused by a difference
of opinion on a political question. Both
are Democrats. Witnesses say Clark was
talking to four members of the Legis
lature and Brundidge came up and . of
fered to shake hands. Clark is alleged
to have said: . !
The firm- then brought proceedings in
Squire Dumont's court and Constables
Crltchell and Timborlakc started for the
hotel with attachment papers. Chinn
grew indignant at the constable's call and
rushed at them to throw them out.
Critehcir stood his ground and sent the
colonel sprawling over his supper table.
Tie then relieved him of his two guns and
bowie knif«\
The affair was an unexpected event in
Colonel Chinn's career. .He had pur
chased .a bill. of goods amounting to prob
ably $75 at Burkhardt Bros., and agreed
to pay the bill later. Fearing that the
colonel would leave the city and forget
the bill, the firm sent its colored messen
ger to collect it. This angered Chinn and
with his stentorian voice he frightened
t lie. messenger so much that the latter
tnok to his heels.
CINCINNATI, Apnl 2.-Colonel "Jack"
Chinn, the "invincible Kentuckian'' poli
tician and walking arsenal, went down to
defeat here to-day in an encounter with
a constable who came to levy on the
colonel's belongings.
With this defeat the colonel suffers the.
deepest humiliation, for the burly con
stable, not content with punching him,
relieved him of his pocket editions ot re
volvers and a big'bowle knife and left
the colonel in a disordered condition after
the encounter.
When' the President, escorted by the
members of the local committee, appear
ed on tho platform he was met with great
tiilhusiasm. the vast crowd rising to its
feet and supplementing Its hearty cheers
with waving programmes and fluttering
handkerchiefs. *
r r.h*! 'President acknowledged his recep
tion with repeated lions and took his seal
between Franklin MacVeagh, the chair
man of the committee, and Mayor Har
rison. As soon as his voice- ~could , be
heard, MacVeagh in a few, words an
nounced- that the nation's chief executive
would bo made welcome to the city by
Mayor Harrison; who then spoke briefly,
extending to the President a hearty : wel
cume and expressing the pleasure felt by
who were utterly unable to hear a- word
of the President's address. All that'eame
to them was the roar of 1 applause from
within, and with such loyal 'tongues did
they accept their cuo that several 'times
they were giving vent to cheers 'when
those on tho lnaide had died away and the
President had resumed his address. Twice
during the evening Chief of Police O'Neal
was compelled to send word to the pa
triots without tho door that they must
cheer in better time or he would be com
pelled to clear the. stairway.
CROWD PACKS THE STREET.
In the street outside, for. more than an
hour before the time set for the opening
of the President's address, small assem
blies of policemen were kept busy. Thou
sands of persons filled Wabash avenue- in
the rear of the Auditorium, jammed Mich
igan avenue in front of it and blockaded,
to the best of Its ability, Congress street,
which runs at the side of it. The officers
were stretched in double linealong all the
walks immediately adjoining the building
and no person who could not exhibit cre
dentials entitling him to admission to the
hall was permitted upon the walk. The
jam at the doors of the hull for thirty
minutes preceding the time at which the
President was to open his address was of
a character to test the paticn.ee of the'po
lice without and within. ..:.-».
Clark and Brundidge Clash
and Both Are Consider
ably Damaged.
mel ing Him
Relieves the Kentuckian of
His Weapons After Pum-
NEW YORK, April "-Decision was re
served to-day in the Supreme Court on
an application by attorneys for Mrs. Her
mann Oelrichs and Airs. \V. K. Vander
bilt Jr. for a further extension of time
to file their answer to the suit brought
against them by the mother and other
relatives of Mrs. Charles L. Fair, who.
together with her husband, was killed at
Trouvllle, France, August 14 last, in an
automobile accident. Counsel said Her
mann Oelrich3 had sailed for Parls^iu or
der to .ascertain exactly what happened
and It was necessary to have an exten
sion of twenty days to make an answer.
Counsel for the heirs of Mrs. Fair op
posed the motion, and said the defendants
were in possession of all the facts neces
sary to enable them to answer.
¦--¦¦.¦,-
Say They Are Unable to Answer
Suit Until Hermann Oelrichs
Returns From Paris.
RELATIVES OF FAIR /
ASK -FOR CONTINUANCE
ARKANSAS SENATOR
AND CONGRESSMAN
IN A STREET FIGHT
DOUGHTY CONSTABLE
GIVES "JACK" CHINN
THOROUGH DRUBBING
RULER OF GREAT BRITAIN*, THE VENERABLE PONTIFF "WHOM HE
; IS SOON TO VISIT IN HOME. AND THE- PORTUGUESE MONARCH,
WHO RECEIVED THE BRITISH ROYAL PARTY AT LISBON.
The Clyde steamer Xow York, from Xew
York March IS, which reached San Pedro
de Macoris March L'S, has not yet arrived
here and apparently has been preventer!
proceeding by the authorities at Macoris.
All eommuneiation and news from the
interior is interrupted and business is
practically suspended. A quantity of
arms and ammunition was shipped to-day
on a gunboat which la in the hands of the
lebels lor an unknown destination.
The rebels while crossing the river this
morning were attacked by the Govern
ment troop? and an hour's lighting en
sued. -
SAN DOMINGO, April 2.-A severe en
counter is reported to .have taken place
yesterday between the 'Government troops
and the. rebels at San Antonio de Guerra.
about twenty miles from this city. It Is
said that HO men wire killed or wounded.
San Antonio de Guerra.
HEAVY LOSSES IN BATTLE.
Government Tyrees- Engage Rebels :
CAPE: HAYT1EN, April 2.— The situa
tion in Santo Do.mingo City is very criti
cal. The commander of the United States
cruiser Atlanta, which arrived at Santo
Domingo from this port. yesterday, land
ed a detachment of fifty bluejackets to
guard the United States Consu! General
in that city.
A shell fire<] last night by the Dominican
cruiser Presidente, which is on the side
of President Vaa<;iipz. fell on the Ger
man consulate. Tbe damage done, how
ever, was slight, . as the projectile did
not burst.
A battle lasting three hours took place
yesterday morning between the Govern
ment troaps and the revolutionists on the
banks of the "river Osama, which flows
into the Caribbean Sea, at Santo Do
mingo. One hundred men were kitled or
wounded. President Va,squez demands
the surrender of Santo Domingo City, but
the revolutionists are disposed to ¦ resist
up to the last moment.
CHICAGO, April 2.— Six thousand
persons in a hall i he seating capac
ity of -which is but &>W*g&ve en
couragement to President Roose
velt when he stepped upon the stage of
the Auditorium to-night. The great
building' has held many a -throng,
but never one that was more unstinted in
its applause for any man than the crowd
that filled it to-night. From thie first floor
to the roof it .was. packed to* its utmost
capacity. Every seat was occupied, and
although the aisles were kept clear.^all
the spacefill the lobbies and on the stair
ways wa^ taken, and even the passage
ways leading to the hall from the' lower
floor were jammed with hundreds. of men
Shell From Government
Warship Strikes German
Consulate.
His Straightforward
Talk to Chicago
Jiudience.
Foreigners- in Danger
in Republic's Cap
ital City.
President Says We
Must Not Be
"Bluffers."
Land to Protect
United States
Consul.
YANKEE TARS
SET FOOT IN
SAN DOMINGO
*T^'' HE Monroe doctfine is noj international law, and although I .think one day it may become
-£ such this is not necessary as long as it remains a cardinal feature of our foreign policy
and as long as me possess both the will and strength to make it effective. , This last point,
my fellow-citizens, is all important, and is one. which as a people zee can never afford to forget. 1
believe in the Monroe doctrine with all my heart and soul; I am convinced that the immense ma
jority of our -fellow-countrymen so believe in it; but I zvould infinitely prefer to see its abandon
it than to see us put it fofivard and bluster about it and yet. fail to build up the. efficient fighting
. strength which in the last resort can alone make it respected by any strong, foreign power whose
interest it may ever happen to be to violate it. . • •" .
Boasting and bhlstering are as objectionable among nation's qs among .individuals, and the
public men of a great nation ozve it to their sense of national self-respect to. 'speak courteously of
foreign powers, just as a brave and self-respecting man treats •?// around him courteously. But
¦ though i f o boast is bad, and causelessly to insult another worse, yet -worse than -all is to be guilty
of boasting, even zvithout insult, and zvhen called to. the proof to be- 'unable' to make such boast
ing good.— i From a speech by President Roosevelt, delivered in Chicago:.. •• ¦ :', •••' .
KING EDWARD WILL BE THE GUEST
OF THE VENERABLE ROMAN PONTIFF
"BUILD AND MAINTAIN EFFICIENT NAVY AND MONROE DOCTRINE
WILL BECOME INTERNATIONAL LAW' — MR. ROOSEVELT'S ADVICE
SAN FRANCISCO, ; FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1903.
YOLITME XC1II— XO, 124,
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
The San Francisco Call.

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