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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 13, 1903, Image 1

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CHAIRMAN AND CALIFORNIA
MEMBER OF IMPORTANT
HOUSE COMMITTEE.
PROMINENT CITIZEN OF THE NEW REPUBLIC OF PANAMA. WHO MAYBE ELECTED TO THE PRESIDEN
CY. AND THE ACTING CONSUL WHO HAS ENERGETICALLY CONDUCTED ALL NEGOTLVTIONS ON BE
i HALF OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. *
BRITISH SEA CAPTAINS
TELL STORIES OF ATTACK
Report That About Twenty - Five
Spanish Vessels Fired On
Their Steamers.
FERROL, Spain. Nov. 12.— Two British
steamers arrived here to-day In a dam
aged condition and told a strange story
of being attacked by twenty-five Spanish
vessels, the crews of which threw stones
and fired at them and then took to flight.
Weds Son of Former Italian Premier.
. FLORENCE. Italy, Nov. 12.— Marquis
Carlo Mi Rudlni, son of the former Ital
ian Premier, and Miss Dora Labouchere,
daughter of Henry Labouchere, proprietor
and editor of the" London Truth,' ' were
married • here to-day. - ¦-> ~_»^' <
SAYS CUSHIONED CHAIRS
ARE NOT AIDS TO STUDY
President Schunaan of Cornell Uni
versity Advises Freshmen to Put
Aside Their Upholstery.
ITHACA. N. Y., Nov. 12.— In an address
before a mass-meeting of Cornell fresh
men to-day President J. G. Schurman
said that the model day of universities
ehould be divided as follows: Eleven
hcurs for study, two hours for meals, two
hours for athletics, one hour for recrea
tion and the remaining eight for sleep.
President Schurman also pave it as his
opinio* that a student could do harder
studying: and secure much better results
sitting on an ordinary wooden chair than
when sitting on cushioned chairs and
propped up by pillows. He earnestly ad
vteed new students to put aside their up
holstary. for jOaia, hard -sroooV - ' ,^j
As a matter of fact, he was, for the
Ernfllrtg noan had been selected by the
surgeon after nearly a week of search as
the owner of an ear that could supply the
place cf one which for some reason van
ished from the side of the head of a
Western man, now wealthy.
The man selected to-night Is a German,
*3 years of age, who lost the savings of
«. lifetime •while trying to manage a res
taurant. He would not reveal his name.
The contract is to be eigfced to-morrow
and the operation will be performed Tues
day.
KEXV YORK, Nov. 12.— Five men turned
disconsolately from the doors of Dr. A.
X,. Welden'B home to-night, while the
elxth. with a smile en his face, departed
holding his hand to the right side of nis
head, as if he were concealing something
valuable.
SELLS HIS RIGHT EAR,
TO A NEW YORK SURGEON
Dr. Welden Finally Selects the Man
Whc Will Draw Down S500O
Prize.
A little questioning elucidated his va
garies and he was promptly taken into
custody. After an examination by the
Board , of Police Surgeons Stetson was
committed temporarily to the Government
hospital for the insane pending commu
nication with his family.
CALL BUREAU. 1406 G STREET. N.
W.. WASHINGTON, Nov. 12.— Clad like a
stage countryman, George Harvey Stet
son, a . farmer of Garrield, Rensselaer
County, New York, this morning sought
the President for the purpose of enlisting
his aid in the recovery of $3)0.000,000 which
had been devised to him, but. which had
been kept from him by dishonest relatives
of his benefactor. He also sought to ob
tain redress for indignities to which he
had been subjected. by these relatives, in.
eluding a bullet through the head and fif
teen years in a dungeon.
Stetson says he tramped his way from
Garileld to Albany and went- thence by
boat to New York, where he took a train
for Washington. He spent the night in a
mission, and this morning approached Po
liceman Boswell to inquire the way to the
White House.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
Joins Long List of
White House
Cranks.
MAN WHO PERSONATED
GOELET TO BE ARRESTED
Brother of the Duchess of Roxburghe
Swears to Complaint Against
James Abeel.
NEW YORK, Nov. 12.— Formal com
plaint charging forgery was made to-day
against James Abeel by Robert Goelet,
the Duchess of Roxburghe's brother,
whom Abeel is said to have impersonated
in proposing marriage to Miss Eleanor
Anderson, telegraph operator at the
Grand Hotel in this city. Since the pub
licity given to the proposed wedding of
the pretended Goelet and the. denial of
Goelet that he knew Miss Anderson,
Abeel has disappeared.
Goelet went to the District Attorney's
office to-day and entered complaint against
Abeel, charging him with forging the
name of J. B. Van -Every, vice president
of the Western Union, to, a letter of in
troduction, by means of which Abeel be
came acquainted with Miss Anderson.
GRAND JURY WILL PROBE
, ALLEGED ELECTION FRAUDS
Circuit Judge in Hawaii Acts Upon
Charges Preferred by Home
Rule Party, au "J
HONOLULU, Nov. 12.— Judge George D.
Gear cf the Circuit Court, at the request
of the Home Rule party, has instructed
the . Territorial Grand Jury to hold an in
vestigation into :the reports of election
frauds, which, it is alleged, took the form
of repeating, voting, in the names of dead
or. absentee persons and perjury.
Fifty witnesses will , be called, among
them being the , election officers and the
leaders of the" political parties.
Death of Prof essor ; Friedlander.
BERLIN. Nov.' 12,— Professor Fried
lander - of the Liebnltz Berlin gymnasium
is dead, " . : ~r~ ¦- " ~~— '-—_
CRAZY MAN
ASKS TO SEE
ROOSEVELT
BERLIN, Nov. 12.— Seeing the great
pains Germany took in annoying the Eng
lish in every way during the late war, the
extraordinary bitterness now shown at
the British refusal to let German troops
through their territory, scarcely seems
reasonable. The staid Vossiche Zeltung
to-night acrimoniously says:
"Germany does not need to land her
troops at Port Nolloth. Friendly and
spontaneous assistance from theCapeGov
ernment no man in this country expects.
Who knows what difficulties .England is
preparing for us in our colonial terri
tory?"
A Swakopmund dispatch says that 300
men with five guns, under the command
of Colonel Fiedler, on the march from
Keetmanshoop, GIbon, Rehoboth and
Windhoek to Warmbad has been joined
by 113 of the Witboi Patrols and another
division of volunteers In the approaches
to Warmbad from Ukamas. The posi
tion of the enemy is unknown, ¦'.¦';
Special Cable to The ChII and New York Herald.
Copyright, UmM. by the New York Her
ald Publishing Company.
Press Declares That Friendly Aid
From English Government Should
Not Be Expected. .>• V-
GERMANY IS INDEPENDENT
OF BRITAIN'S ASSISTANCE
That whenever the President of the United
States shall receive satisfactory evidence that
the Republic of Cuba has made provision to
rive full effect to the articles of the convention
between the United States and the Republic of
Cuba, etened on the 11th day of December. l&Xi,
he la hereby authorized to issue his proclama
tion declaring that he has received euch evi
dence, and thereupon, on the tenth day after
exchange of ratifications of such convention be
tween the United States and the Republic of
Cuba, and «o long as the «aid convention ehall
remain in fore*, all articles of merchandise be
ing the product of the soil or Industry of the
Republic of Cuba which are now Imported into
the United States free of duty ehall continue to
be «o admitted free of duty, and all other arti
cles of merchandise being the product cf the
soil or Industry of the Republic of Cuba Im
ported into the United States shall be admitted
at a reduction of 20 per centum of the rates of
duties thereon, as provided by the tariff act of
the United States approved July 24. 1897, or as
may be provided by any tariff law of the United
TEXT OF CUBAN MEASURE.
Thayer of Massachusetts, rising to a
question of privilege, asked if a member
would be considered derelict In his duty
if he would go home to get in his win
ter's wood, with the understanding that
he would return when six or seven men
who, he said, constituted Congress, should
announce that something was to be done.
The Speaker suggested that the ques
tion hardly amounted to a faint assault
upon the dignity of a parliamentary In
quiry. Payne observed that he was about
to request unanimous consent that the
gentleman from Massachusetts be ex
cu&ed for the remainder of the session.
Payne the^n introduced the bill to make
effective the Cuban reciprocity conven
tion, which, without objection, was read
by title and referred to the Committee on
Ways and Means. Payne said a meeting
of the committee would be called to-mor
row and he hoped to report the bill to the
House to-morrow. ':••"*
Democrats— Williams of Mississippi,
Robertson of Louisiana, Swanson of Vir
ginia, McClellan of New York, Cooper of
Texas. Clark of Missouri.
Republicans— Payne of New York, Dal
zell of Pennsylvania, Grosvenor of Ohio.
Tawney of Minnesota, McCall of Massa
chusetts, Babcock of Wisconsin, Metcalf
of California. Hill of Connecticut, Bou
telle of Illinois, Watson of Indiana, Cur
tis of Kansas.
the House to-day introduced a
bill making the Cuban treaty effective
and had it referred to his committee. He
said that it could be reported, at once.
John Sharp Williams, the minority lead
er, gave indication that the Democrats in
tended to delay action. The bill is in a
form satisfactory to leaders of both
House and Senate and that section relat
ing to a possible reduction of duty "by
convention or treaty" during the time
the Cuban treaty Is in force is satisfac
tory to the House leaders, who insist that
it establishes the precedent that the Sen
ate cannot change tariff rates by treaty
without legislation by the House.
The Democrats will attempt to put on
a differential amendment, but whether
they can get enough Republicans to join
with them on this question Is still a mat
ter of doubt. William Alden Smith of
Michigan did not get the place he desired
on the Ways and Means Committee, but
it is not yet indicated that he will take
any action of reprisal by fighting Cuban
reciprocity. Friends of the administra
tion say that the only delay expected in
putting the treaty immediately into force
will be in the Senate, where the rules will
permit the minority to prolong the die
cuss-ion.
WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE.
When the House met to-day the Speaker
announced the Ways and Means Commit
tee as follows:
CALL BUREAU, 1406 G
STREET, N. W., WASHING
TON, Nov. 12. — Chairman
Payne of the newly appointed
Ways and Means Committee of
Special Dispatch to The Call
Measure Making the
Treaty Effective Is
Introduced.
"Why, we have $5 assets for every dol
lar we owe. Is not that correct?" he
asked, turning to Banker Barnard, who
replied, "Yes."
"I believe it." sheuted Dowie. "Do you
believe it?' htf yelled to his followers, who
all replied: "Yes."
"Well, then, if you believe it, and 1
know you do, you've got to do one thing.
On account of these lying reports many cf
you have been keeping your money out
of the Zion Bank. Now^-every one of
you, hear me; every one "ofHou—to-mor
row morning, the first thing you dd" when
you get up, dig^^/wn iii?6,your breeches
and get that" money and march up to the
Zion Bank and leave it there. If you
won't do that, you can clear out, every
one of you. That is the place for all of
your money, and it must be put there.
It is not your - money, anyway — it is
God's, and God demands that you put it
in trie Zion Bank. If I find any of you
holding oat your money you'll be made
to clear out at once."
Dowie "held up" his host at a praise
service which began last night and ended
this morning. He read reports about
Zion's financial condition and then ex
claimed:
WAUKEGAN. 111., Nov. 12.— John Alex
ander Dowie said to-day that he had re
ceived an offer of 30,000 acres of land for
nothing if he would build a Zion City in
California. He said he would do it.
Dowie spoke of his visit with President
Roosevelt and said that many important
matters of state were put aside to give
him an interview.
Special Dispatch. to The Call.
A few minutes before he was shot down
Nink was in the Brooklyn saloon, at the
corner of University street and Second
avenue, where he bought a drink. He re
marked to some men there:
••I am now a free man and can walk
the streets undisturbed. I got a divorce
to-day."
He had proceeded just a block from the
Brooklyn when he was shot. His wife.
Mary Louise Nink, lives In the East and
he had been married to her for thirty-one
years, tut had not lived with her for ten
according to the papers he filed fn the
Superior Court. The divorce was granted
last Eight. Nink has been attentive to
Mrs. Kierchncr. a rich widow, and it is
eaid he is engaged to h»r. She wi!l neither
eff.rra r.cr deny the report. Her near rela
tive* have epposed Kink's suit Nirk may
recover.
REMARK ABOUT DIVORCE.
Dr. Hoye and Dr. Johnson were sum
moned. Nink was conscious all the time.
though suffering from the shock. With
labored breath he denounced the man
v.ho shot him as a coward and an assas
sin, but declared he did not know who
From what could be gathered from
Kink's statement he was walking up Sec
ond aver.ue. and when near the-oorner of
Union street he was shot from behind
¦without a word of warning.
The men who picked up the wounded
Kian saw a man hurryinp up Union street
carrying what looked to be a rifle, and
Patrolman Brown sighted him as he was
crossing Third avenue. Brown had heard
the shot and was going toward Second
avraue. He called upon the fugitive to
halt, but the man only increased his
speed. Brown fired two shots, neither of
v.hich took effect, and ran after the man
ahead of him. The man carrying the
rifle dodged around the corner and was
lest in the darkness of the old university
grounds. Brown searched the grounds hur_
r!edly, but the man had disappeared with
out leaving a trace.
DENOUNCES ASSASSIN.
SEATTLE. Nov. 12.— John Andrew Nink.
a prominent insurance man, was phot in
the back by an unknown man with a rifle
at the corner of Second avenue and Union
street at 1:15 o'clock this morning. The
assailant escaped by running up Union
etrect and disappearing around the cor
ner of the Armory building. Patrolman
Brown f.red three Fhcts at the fugitive,
but failed to bring him down.
Nink staggered to the edge of the side
walk, threw h isarms around a telephone
pole and slowly sank to his knees. The
blood gushed out of an ugly bullet hole
en the right side of his back. Two men
fia5?!n*r helped him into the Munger sa
*looru on Second street, just below Union,
end he was laid cut on the floor of the
Special r»irra*ch to The Call
Mystery Shrouds the Crime,
Which Followed Mention
of a Divorce Suit.
"Elijah" Ordew His Fol
lowers to Patronize His
Bank Exclusively.
Cowardly Attempt at
Murder at Night
on a Street.
Large Tract of Land Is
Offered to Him for
a Site.
»
Dowie Says He Is
Coming to This
State.
Seattle Insurance
Man Shot in the
Back.
ASSASSIN
SEEKS LIFE
WITH RIFLE
WILL BUILD
ZION CITY IN
CALIFORNIA
HOUSE DEMOCRATS
WILL FIGHT CUBAN
RECIPROCITY BILL
AMERICANS IN COLOMBIA
IN GRAVE DANGER AS RAGE
OF THE POPULACE GROWS
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 1903 s
VOIX3IE XCIY-NO. 166.
PRICE FrVB CENTS.
The San Francisco Call
r y. + + ??/(
J THE JTSATSEB.
Forecast jiade at San Fran
cisco for thirty hours «artlnr
nsilniffht Xovember 13, 1903:
San Fraicisco and vicinity —
Cloudy. uLiettlei weather Fri*
day; probably shower*: fresh
southwest wind.
I A. O. ywATtTT!,
f District rorecaster.
Continued on Page 2, Column 6,
Continued on Page 2, Column 1,
PARIS, Nov. 12.— One : of the greatest
triumphs '¦ of dirigible ballooning 'was
achieved to-day by the Lebaudy broth
ers, whose airship in one hour and thirfy
flve minutes covered "the "forty-six miles
separating Moisson and the Champs de
Mars, ; Paris, - — -
Triumph of ; a Dirigible Balloon.
John Mallory, a miner, who Jones said
forced his attentions upon the Respess
woman, was killed by Jones on the day
before his battle with Keayton, and on
the day after the big fight Jones and a
man named Griffin shot and killed F.'B.
Sizeman for smiling at the woman. - Jones
and his accomplice escaped to the moun
tains.
Last Saturday she told her boarders she
was going to quit' business, and informed
Keayton he would have to leave the
house. Keayton learned that Jones would
remain, and he became wild with jeal
ousy. A duel was agreed upon, and the
men armed themselves and met in the
street a few minutes later. Keayton fired
first, sending the contents of a double
barreled shotgun into Jones' body..
Although seriously wounded, Jones suc
ceeded in getting back to the house, where
he crawled to a. window, and as Keayton
passed shot him with a revolver, killing
him. ' •"->>;.! - • .- ¦ .
PARKERSBURG, W. Va., Nov. 12:—
Three men lost their lives because a wom
an smiled upon one of them and' he smiled
at the woman in Geary, a small mountain
hamlet in the western section of West
Virginia. Mrs. Sarah Respess, a widow,
kept a boarding-house in the village. Hay.
wood Keayton and Charles Jones were
among the boarders." The woman is hand
some.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
William L. Cathcart was appointed to
the Naval Academy in 1ST3 and was grad
uated in June. 1S77. receiving his commis
sion as assistant engineer in the same
year. He reached the grade of passed
assistant engineer in 1SS4. resigning with
this grade in 1331. During the Spanish-
American War he again entered the naval
service as chief engineer, receiving aa
honorable discharge at ta« cIom «C the
.war.
His actions aroused the household and
an attempt was made to get him quietly
to his room, whereupon he made an at
tempt to attack Senor Pastor, breaking
a glass door with his hands in an effort
to reach him. When Senor Walls Merino
remonstrated Cathcart attacked him. At
this time was standing at the top of
a flight of stairs, and In protecting him
self the Spanish diplomat struck Cathcart
so that he fell downstairs, dislocating his
elbow. _Cat heart had to be carried from
the house bodily. "
CALL. BUREAU, 1406 G STREET. JT.
TV.. WASHINGTON. Nov. 12.— William L.
Cat heart of New York, formerly a naval
officer, this morning forfeited $15 col
lateral by his non-appearance In the Po
lice Court to answer to charges of assault
and profanity. The complaint was lodged
against Cathcart by Edgar Blair, a local
architect," but the injured persons were
Senor Don Louis Pastor, secretary of the
Spanish Legation, and Senor Don Manuel
Walls Merino, second secretary.
The Spanish Ministry occupies living
quarters in a furnished apartment house.
Last summer one of the lodgers at thi3
house was Cathcart. To-day Cathcart
arrived from New York to serve as con
sulting engineer to the Navy Department
In some construction work and engaged a
room at his old apartments. He returned
intoxicated. None of the other occupants
were up except a maid, and Cathcart be
gan chasing her through the house with
threats to kill her.
Special Disj>etch to The Call.
Attacks Members
of the Spanish
Legation.
Provoke a Series
of Duels and
Murders.
The people of Barranquilla have been
swept off their balance by the suddenness
and seriousness of the news. Revolution
ary talk .'began Immediately : and threats
were ¦ made against the Congressmen re
sponsible for the non- ratification of the
Hay-Herran canal treaty.
. Fears are entertained for the safety of
Americans In Colombia and of the possibi
bility of . the anger of the populace being
The Prefect followed the reading' with
a speech, in which he declared 'that the
Colombian Government would never per
mit the secession of the isthmus and
would win back the lost territory at any
cost." The crowd in the plaza indulged In
many extravagant threats impossible of
execution.
United States Vice Consul Lovelace was
sitting on a balcony of his house at Bar
ranquilla to-night when several stones
were thrown at him. Me retired Indoors
and was not further molested by the Co
lombians.
The Barranquilla authorities had In
tended .sending 300 Colombian troops by
the- Orinoco to Cartegena, but- learned
that the vessel had -debarked General
Torres and .his men and decided to keep
the troops at Barranquilla. . The . excite
ment at Barranquilla increased with the
spreading, of the news of the secession of
the Isthmus, which was supplemented by
exaggerated accounts of the alleged part
played. by: the United States therein.
Panama's declaration of Independence
was read from a newspaper by the Pre
fect to a. crowd assembled in the plaza,
and was greeted by furious outcries. and
shouts of "Death to the Panamans!" and
"Death to the Americans!"
On the arrival of General Torres and his
troops at Cartagena the neVs of the
events on the Isthmus quickly spread and
caused excitement. General Torres and
his officers were threatened with arrest
as traitors, but the threat was not put
Into effect. The populace, greatly excited,
soon crowded the streets, crying "Down
with the Americans!" United States Con
sul Ingersoll. fearing violence, remained
shut up in the consulate.
after the proclamation of the
republic of Panama. The soldiers behaved
well on the voyage.
'OLOy. Nov. 12. — The royal
Jy r^. mail Reamer Orinoco arrived
ff .. this morning.. bringing news of
£jl ' General Torres and the Colom-
bian troops he took from here
ONE WIDOW'S
SM I LES COST
THREE LIVES
NAVAL MAN
ON RAMPAGE
IN CAPITAL
Mob Hurls Stones at
a United States
Consul.
THE THEATBBS/ * * .
Ale&z&r — "The Prlrata^ Se«r^ .
California — Herrmann th« Ore*?.
Central — >r Cacl« Tom's Cabia/*" v
Columbia— "The Stork*. 1 *
Fischer's — "Babes and Boies."
Orand Opera-Xouss— "Ben Xox."
Orphetun — Vaudeville.
Tns Chutes — Vaudeville.
Tivoli — Grand Opera.

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