OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 27, 1904, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1904-04-27/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Nor. Substitute.
Not even, the best ; raw cream, equals Pio
neer,. Brand Evaporated \ Cream 'for. tea,
coffee. ; chocolate, cereals and ' general
household cooking:. It is the result of for
ty-five years' experience in. tho. growing,
buying, handling and* preserving of milk
by Bcrdcn's Condensed Milk Co. *
ANOTHER CHARGE AGAINST KEN
NEDY. — The police are determined net to lose
their crip on William B. Kennedy, alias Rich
ard Jackson, alias "Yellow," whose secend
trial on the charre of murder In connection
with the ehootln* and killing of Policeman
Kupone C. Robineon on January 21. l»02. Is
pending In Judge Cook'a court. Yesterday he
was booked at the City Prison on a charge
of assault to rob on complaint of R. Alkyo,
a Japanese merchant, who was held up a few
minutes before the slaying of Robinson.
Appointment Not Yet Settled.
Mayor Schmitz stated yesterday that
the appointment of a City Engineer
to succeed C. E. Grunsky would not
be made until May 1 next. The situa
tion remains practicallj* unchanged,
the three strongest candidates still be
ing Henry Lynch, Charles Rogers and
Commissioner of Works Woodward.
as similar questions had brought like
objections every time the detective had
been called by the defense. The Fed
eral attorney cited the decision handed
down by the United States Supreme
Court' within the last fortnight in the
postal frauds case ( of G. W. Beavers,
holding that the Indictment itself, until
contradicted by positive testimony, es
tablishes a prima facie case sufficient
to hold a defendant for trial, and that
the defense is not entitled to impeach
the indictment even by testimony tend
ing to show that the Grand Jury acted
on insufficient evidence. Heney con
tinued:
This Is another fishing excursion, but, under
the doctrine of the Beavers decision, the de
fence has no right to expose what occurred be
fore the Grand Jury. When this hearing;
opened tb« defendant* first attempted to at
tack the indictment. Then, finding themselves
In a bole, they said: "We canont be hurt
worw than we are now, «j let us find out
what evidence they presented to the Grand
Jury." Hence they have been weeks calling
Government witnesses and questioning them in
order that they, when the trial comes on at
"Washington, may have manufactured evident*
to meet that of the Government. I will go
farther and nay that they have manufactured
evidence right here and arc trying to prevent
your Honor from eeeing the marks of author
ship upon it.
"We insist that we have a right to
question Burns as to facts bearing on
the authorship of the anonymous let
ters," said Knight. "We challenge
counsel to put his finger on a bit of
manufactured evidence."
"I can point out a dozen," retorted
Heney.
"That comes with poor grace when
the Government is picketing my office
with detectives and shadowing Dimond
day by day," was Knight's rejoinder.
"Nonsense," laughed Burns in the
witness chair. "The Government is
doing no such thing. No detective on
my staff Is bothering Mr. Knight or
his client." i
"We propose to ask this witness as
to his knowledge of certain facts stated
in the anonymous letters and to show
by his testimony that these facts were
locked in the bosoms of two or three
men, of whom Dimond was not one."
"I will permit you to ask your ques
tions," said the commissioner, "and
will rule on them when I hear them.
But I will limit the questions very
strictly to the lines dellned in the
Beavers decision."
HE REFUSES TO TALK.
Then, in answer to Wheeler's ques
tions. Burns told the court that he had
first come to California to work up
this case in June, 1903, and had re^
mained here until the following Sep
tember, not returning till February of
the present year. He had marked the
money Harlan and Valk received from
Benson In December last, but had not
telegraphed anything about these mat
ters to any person in California. Burns
added: "I never knew that Town Talk
and the Examiner had received anony
mous attacks on Hyde until Mr. Heney
told me yesterday that he had ; this
information from counsel "for . the de
fense."
"Did you ever report that a woman
named Ellen Ellsworth, had 'been writ
ing anonymous letters to Hyde?" asked
Wheeler.
"Yes," said Burns; "I told Mr. Heney
that she had been writing such letters
to Hyde — letters that related to his do
mestic affairs."
"Whence came that Information?"
"I decline to. say."
Heney objected to the question, and
Commissioner Heacock sustained the
objection. ¦'¦'¦* . . ' : - *: > •'."•".
"Have you ever met that woman?"
"No."
"Have you had an agent dealing with
"NO." „ :. \ . - • •
"Has any one who met her come to
you with a statement from her?"
"I decline to say."
"Did you see Walter K. Slack in San
Francisco in June, 1903?" •
"I decline to'answer."
% So it went for some time, the com
missioner refusing to compel the Gov
ernment agent to disclof^ evidence In
his possession or the source from
which it was derived. At last Wheeler
and Knight gave it up and permitted
Burns to go. "Then they called a num
ber of respected citizens to testify a3
to their client's good character. These
were William B. Bradford, Charles W.
Kellogg, L. S. Pease, Judge James M.
Seawell, E. G. Scott of the Cham
ber of Commerce, ex- Judge Charles
W. Slack, G. H. Thompson, Henry
Eickhoff and John H. Miller, all 'of
whom declared in the regulation phrase
that they had known Dimond for
many years and were acquainted with
his reputation for truth, honesty and
integrity, and that that reputation
was good.
The rest of the day was given to the
testimony of Harry E. Steece, a former
agent of the Interior Department, and
of Charles R. Gagen, the' official ste
nographer, who,' with Clement Ben
nett, is turning out massive volume-*
containing the testimony taken in the
case. Steece and Gagen are almost the
only witnesses the Government has
called during the hearing. The former
related the story of his interview with
Dimond in February, 1903, when the
latter had written Judge Pugh asking
for a conference. He admitted that
he had failed to get any information
from the defendant regarding, land
cases, Dimond confining himself to an
exhortation to the witness to inquire
among Hyde's associates as to his high
standing in the community.
DIMOXD'S ERRORS PROVED.
Gagen's testimony was more impor
tant. He corrected the record as to
the errors- Dimond had made when on
the stand in regard to the names of
Susan Dickinson, Colonel Zabriskie and
Steece. Dimond had said "Anne Dick
inson," "Brohaski" and "Stace," juft
the same blunders. made in the anony
mous. ,ietters now in evidence. This is
one of the strong points, in the Gov
ernment claim that *" Dimond wrote
these letters. Gagen said that, not
understanding the importance of a lit
eral transcription of the witness' mis
takes he had followed ' the rule . ob
taining among court reporters every
where to correct such errors in the
record. The defense made no objec
tion to the testimony, McEnerney im
proving the opportunity to "perpetrate
one of his innumerable witticisms.
"The only persons who, never make
mistakes are the lawyers and the
newspaper reporters/' said the. big at
torney. '"'*.'., :':,
The examination was' adjourned over
till to-morrow morning, as -the •_ com
missioner, has another case on hand to
day. The attorneys for 'the defense
told his" Honor that' they would prob
ably conclude their case by the end of
the week. The commissioner, could I not
restrain a" sigh of : relief at the pros
pect of release from the long, hearing.
SONS' DIFFERENCES DID NOT
' CAUSE MOTHER'S DEATH
Frederick \Y. Lawton Admits That
He Wholly Misunderstood IIJs
Brortier's Position.
In yesterday's newspaper accounts
of the death of Mrs. Franklin Lawton
one of the causes of the unfortunate
woman's untimely taking off was said
to have been a letter from her son,
Frederick, to his» brother, Louis. Fur
thermore, it was stated that quarrels
between the brothers hastened their
mother's death. The following letter
from Frederick W. Lawton puts the
case in another light:
SAN FRANCISCO. Ai>ril 26. 1JKH.
Editor Call : In regard to the letter pub
lished in Tuesday's Call from me to my
brother, Louis I. Lawton, I wish to etate
that I was en.irely misinformed as to the
particulars and wish to retract anything I
may h%ve said a.ra^r.Ft him at that time.
I Also with to *ay that our misunderstand -
las was 4a no possible way the cauw of our
mothers death. FREDK. W. LAWTON.
GOVERNMENT AGENT WHO TESTIFIED IN LAND FRAUD CASE THAT HE
TRIED IN VAIN TO OBTAIN ADMISSIONS FROM DIMOND REGARDING
HYDE; ALSO COURT STENOGRAPHER WHO WAS CALLED TO TESTIFY.
Benefit for St. Brendan's.
The exchequer of St. Brendan's
booth was considerably increased as
the result of the musicale given last
night at the home of Mrs. Catherine
Dugan, 526 Harrison street. Early in
the evening many of the residents of
the parish assembled and by 8 o'clock
the house was filled to overflowing.
Full dress suits and handsome gowns
lent a pleasant charm to the event.
The following programme was thW
oughly enjoyed:' "'.
W. J. Hynes, humorous selections; Harry
Wood Brown, barytone solo, selected; Robert
Mitchell, monologue; Miss Grace Muller. violin
solo; Frank W. Thompson, bass solo; selected:
Mr. O'Connor, reel and Jig Irish dancer; Miss
McHugh, soprano; Mies Camille Wye, recita
tion; Garden City Quartet; Mr. McBrlde. bass
solo; dancing. . • ¦
The Board of Education fears that
the revenue received from the State,
based on the number of children of
school age, as found by the census
marshals, will be materially decreased
as the result of a communication re
ceived yesterday from State" Superin
tendent 'of Schools Kirk. '•¦• ¦
The board had requested Kirk for
permission to ignore the law compell
ing the securing of the signatures of
parents or guardians when they £estl
fled, as to the number of children un
der their control. , Kirk in his reply
stated that he had no authority to
grant the desired permission, and that
the law must be obeyed to the letter.
>The Board of Education had ex
plained to. Kirk that the law had re
duced the daily taking of names from
about 6500 last year to less than 4000
this year. As the school census, ac
cording to law, must be taken between
April 15 and April 30, it follows that
the total will fall far short of the
number taken last year, when it was
in excess of 90,000.
Relative to the extension of time
asked for by the Board of Education
for the completion of the census, Kirk
states that his office does not require
the returns until July 1. The board,
however, .deems, this small comfort In
the premises, as the law on the point
Is explicit that the census must be
completed by April 30.
The importance of the matter to the
schools is. apparent when it is known
that the , State pays $9 to. the local
school fund for each child of school
age. Last year the sum realized was
more than $310,000 on a census of 90,000.
The refusal of some parents and
guardians to. give their signatures nul
lifies the census so far as their children
are concerned, and the delay in secur
ing signatures will mean the loss of
at least 10,000 names and a consequent
reduction in the revenue of $90,000.
There remain but four days more to
take the census,. and the board makes
a last appeal to parents to furnish
their signatures on request of the cen
sus marshals.
. Valiooa schools having boon selected
!'n the general San Francisco commit
tee to make an educational display in
brha'.f of this city at St. Louis, an im
portant meeting of principals of these
schools was held yesterday afternoon
with the finance committee for the San
rrancjsco exhibit at Ft. Louis. The
purpose' of the gathering was to gen
orally discuss the situation and to
asree" upon a general color scheme of
installation of exhibits, so that a har
monious effect might be produced. The
schools 'represented at the conference
are the Humboldt Evening School, the
Douglass Primary School, the Hamil
ton Grammar, the Lick School, the Cal
ifornia School of Design and the Lowell
High School.
There will be a general display of
?chopl work, school photographs, etc.,
illustrative of the educational system
of the State of California as a whole
in the education building at St. Lo-uis.
For this reason the general committee
found if advisable not to duplicate in
the space that is available for exhibits
in the San Francisco building, conse
quently schools that are types were
selected. The technical education, in
which San Francisco has more insti
tutions engaged than any city west of
Chicago-; will make a strong feature
of the San Francisco display. In addi
tion to the school principals that were
present at the conference yesterday
afternoon Miss Kathryn Ball was in
attendance to represent drawing in the
public schools.
Various suggestions were made and
adopted. The school principals prom
ised that the school exhibit would be
ample to do credit to the city. The
general color scheme will now be care
fully worked out. a general understand
ing having been reached with the school
principals.
Among the prominent educators In
vited to the conference were:
Principal Taafe. Frank Roberts and C. S.
Henry ot the Humboldt Night School; Mis*
Krthryn Ball. Miss Winifred Tarpey, principal
of the Douglas? Primary School: Principal H.
Ji. KeRoipr of the Hamilton Grammar School,
Principal .George Merrill or the Lick and Wii
mtnltng srhnois. Captain Fletcher of the Cali
fornia 6ehool of D**!m and Principal Frank
Morton of the Lowell High School.
' Others were also present and took
part in the conference.
Board of Education Fears
Be venue Based on Number
of Pupils Will Diminish
Counsel for Henry P. Dimond, one
of the defendants in the land frauds
case, made an unexpected move yes
terday in their attempt to controvert
the Government charge that their
client wrote the anonymous letters
which have suddenly become the turn
ing point of the preliminary examina
tion before United States Commissioner
Heacock. They tried to put Dimond's
co-defendant and former client, Fred
A. Hyde, on the stand. Hyde refused
to testify on behalf of his alleged fel
low conspirator. Had he consented, he
would have been asked to produce a
series of other anonymous letters with
which, for three years, it is claimed,
lie had been annoyed — letters of a scur
rilous character.
On Hyde's refusal to testify Wheeler
and Knight. Dimond's counsel, alleged
that the commissioner should or
der him to the stand. They declared
that these hitherto unmentioned let
ters would conclusively appear to have
been written by the same person that
wrote the epistles sent to Secretary
Hitchcock of the Interior Department,
to William J. Burns, the Government
detective, and to Dimond himself. But
the commissioner was unwilling to
make an offhand ruling that Hyde
must take the stand, and the question
was reserved for decision later.
Dimond's counsel then recalled De
tective Burns and tried to force him to
answer Questions regarding his knowl
edge on the subject of the anonymous
letters already in the case. But the
secret service man told no more than
he wanted to, the commissioner sus
taining the objections of Government
Counsel Heney that under a recent de
cision of the Supreme Court many of
Wheeler's questions were inadmissible.
These questions brought into the case
a mysterious former friend of Hyde,
one Mrs. Ellen Ellsworth, who. It is
hinted. Is the author of the letters
which Hyde does not want to disclose.
Th° claim of Dimond's counsel now is
thai this woman wrote the letters al
ready in evidence at the suggestion of
Government agents in order that they
might be used in some way against
Dimond.
On the opening of court defendant Di
mond was recalled by Samuel Knight,
of his counsel, for further redirect ex
amination. This proved brief. Knight
merely calling out additional denials of
knowledge regarding facts mentioned
in the anonymous letters. Then the
witness was permitted to leave the
stand temporarily, while his counsel
tried a new line of attack on the Gov
ernment's charge that he wrote the
letters.
OTHER AXON'YMOFS EPISTLES.
"We desire to call Mr. Dimond's co
defendant, Frederick A. Hyde," said
Knight, "in order to prove the receipt
by him of a series of anonymous let
ters during a long period before the
beginning of this case. The scurrility
of these letters is such that Mr. Hyde
is extremely reluctant to produce them,
but their importance to our client, Dl
monl. is so great that we are forced
to disregard this objection."
"This is a Joint proceeding," inter
jected Garret W. McEnerney, of Hyde's
counsel, "and therefore you have no
right to call Hyde. He will decline,
under our instructions, to be sworn."
This brought Dimond's other attor
ney, Charles S. Wheeler, to his feet.
He said:
The authorship of these anonymous letters
has for the moment overshadowed all ©ther
1**ues in this case. We have suddenly been
stunneJ by the assertion that our client, a man
cf unim]>eached character, Cescended to the
contemptible course of writing these letters,
and he i* now charged with adding blackmail
and perjury to bis alleged conspiracy. We
are content to let his pu'lt or innocence nar.il
upon the question of his authorship of the
letters. It is not too much to fay that we
know he did not write them, and we purpose
to show who did. If the court will authorize
us' t-> put Mr. Hyde on the stand we shall
ehew that for years before the letters now in
evidence were concocted Hyde was receiving
other anonymous letters — letters that exhibit
the scoun<3relie>m of a demon and the cunning
of a rat. These letters arc in exactly the same
style of typewriting as the anonymous com
munications received by Dimond. by the Sec
retary of the Interior and by Mr. Burns.
We are also prepared to show that on Au
gust 2. 1003. Town Talk received an anony
rrnus letter containing similar charges against
HyJe and the «un« allegations regarding the
confession of J. H. Schneider to the Govern
ment. With this letter was inclosed a $29
gold certificate to pay for its publication. A
similar letter was later in the came month
sent to the Examiner, with $10 inclosed.
These communications were not published. So
v.~e ask your Honor to call Mr. Hyde to the
ets.nd. In order that we may prove that for
three years he ha* U*en getting such letters
through the malls. We shall al*o ask for an
orfier for the production of all such letters
now In his possession. I think an examina
tion of them will come near giving your Honor
a clew to the real author of this whole fries
cf anonymous- epistles.
"Dtt you mean, Mr. Wheeler," asked
Government Counsel Heney, "that DI
mond's writing on the stand yesterday
and the letter sent to the Secretary of
the Interior were not the product of
the same hand?"
"Yes, most assuredly," was Wheeler's
response.
"Very well," said Heney quietly. "I
asked the question because I just
wanted to know how much weight to
give your assertion. We shall do all
we properly can to aid you in getting
these other letters into the record. But,
while I have not had an opportunity to
look up the law on the subject, I am
disposed to agree with Mr. McEnerney
that Hyde, being a codefendant, cannot
be compelled to take the stand.- We are
unwilling: to express an opinion that
may adversely affect the Government's
right to hold Hyde for trial."
*"In my present feeling on the sub
ject I shall decline to grant Mr.
Knight's motion," ruled Commissioner
He-acock. "If he satisfies me as to his
right to ask it I will swear Mr. Hyde
later."
This ended the important subject for
the day. Counsel will probably present
briefs on the law point involved, and
the commissioner will then decide fin
ally whether to call Hyde to the stand.
BUIIXS IS RECALLED.
"William J. Burns," called Wheeler,
and once more the widely ' known se
cret service man returned to the stand,
where the defense had already made
many attempts to force him to disclose
the evidence on which the Federal
Grand Jury indicted Hyde, Benson, Di
mond and Schneider. He was asked
when he first took up this case for In
vestigation, and the .question at .once
brought an objection from Heney. Just
ADOPT SUITABLE PLAN
Assurance Is Given That in
.Educational Line There Is
.Enough Heady for Display
CAN AFFORD NO RELIEF
Will Not Produce Another Series of Anonymous Communications That Were
Sent Him— Question of Authorship Is Turning Point in Land Frauds
Case— Attempt to Implicate Detective Burns With the Documents
Exliibits by Pupils in City's
' HniMiiig at St. Louis Are
Theme for Some Discussion
State Superintendent Says
Parents' - Signatures Are
Required, in School Census
MUST STRICTLY
OBEY THE LAW
HYDE REFUSES TO AID IN PROVING
DIMOND DID NOT WRITE LETTERS
SCHOOL CHIEFS
IN CONFERENCE
THE SAN FRANCISCO ; CALL, DAY. : APRIL 27, 1901
9
AMUSEMENTS.
IDEAL VAUDEVILLE!
L«w Sully; La Petite Adelaide; SI?.
Abraaoff; Wilfred Clarke and Com-
pany; Ethel Levy (Mrs. Georg-e IS. Co-
han); Tony Wilton and Helolse; Mile.
Amoros, assisted by Mile. Charlotte; 4
Mortons and Orphenm Motion Pic-
tnres, showing: a complete reproduc-
tion of the
OPERA OF " FAUST/'
Regular Matinees Every Wednesday. Thurs-
day. Saturday and Sunday. Prices. 10c, 2So
and 50c. ¦
0 ' :
E I VvLI house.
ONLY MATINEE SATURDAY.
TO-NIGHT-EVERT NIGHT.
Grand li/ucat Military ,
Revival WliClM Spectacular
of the Comic '
I JOHNNY °^ ;
I COMES MARCHING |
•Music I HOME IBook by
by Julian I , ..^ . *• I Stanislans
Edward*. » I Stance. .
Popular Prices ..23c. 50c. TSc"
Box and Mezzanine Seats. $1.
Next Production— "A BUNAWAT GIRL."
¦ THE CLOSING WEEK.
f\ imUSICAL
JOLLY I SHOW!
CHOW-CHOW
So Much Better Than Any Other.
With This Funny and Great Cast*':' *•;
RICHARD F. CARROLL, ,
JOHN P. KENNEDY
BEN T. DILLON «t*
ROY ALTON.
CAHL YOHO. t ¦"- - I
HELEN RL'SSELL.
NELLIE LYNCH. ml*
Strenuous and Handsome Chorus.
POPULAR PRICES.
. THURSDAY NIGHT— Ttitcter Party of th*
A. O. K. Seats novr on sale. ,-
MAJESTIC
Market St.. Opp. Larkin.
' KOW THOROUGHLY HEATED.
TO-NIGHT AND ALL THIS WEEK.
MATINEE SATURDAY ONLY. ..>": ¦.>$
The Success of the Season. J
ISABEL IRVING I
(Mar-agcmeBt James K. Hackett.) , ¦
In Winston Churchill's Great Play, ¦ j
"THE CRISIS"
Prices — $1.50. Jl.CO. 50c; Box Seats. $2.00.
Box Office Open 0:00 a. m. to 10:00 p. m. '
FLO ADLER
And a Great Show Every Afternoon and
Evening- in the Theater.
TAKE A RIDE ON THE
MINIATURE ELECTRIC RAILROAD
This Afternoon an<l Evening. OutlnR cf
NORTH END CAMP. WOODMEN OF TUB
WORLD.
amatius zraoxrr thuesday.
' Admission. 10c; Children. 5c.
When Phoning. Ask for 'The Chutes."
Pure Food
« AND
Industrial
Exposition
MECHANICS' PAVILION.
April 3pth to May! 5th.
ADMISSION. 25c: CHILDREN. lSe.'
klSCELLANEOUS AT6XI8EMEJST&L
BASEBALL
'-: - AT . RECREATION PARK.*
Eighth . and Harrison Streets. '.-,
SAHFflxHCISGO Vs. LOS AN6ELES.
WEDNESDAY. .THURSDAY and FRIDAY.
X:30 P. M. . i*
SATURDAY. S P M. . . f
SUNDAY. 2:30 P. ;M.
' Ladies' Days — Thursday and : Friday.
Advance Sale of Seats at 5 Stockton Strsct.
CALL!!
IT COMES.
• Jivefy iirst-class hotel has
Grppe-Xuts in the kitchen for
guest's that WILL HAVE IT.
It is sometimes left off the
menli, for it costs something, and
flic proprietor had rather serve
some less known food that is
given to him free for the privilege
of being named on the menu.
However, if one likes Grape-
Xuts prcdigested food and values
the feeling of strong, vigorous life
that comes with its use, call and
GRAPE-NUTS.
Skin Diseases
of the most stubborn and chronic kind
•re promptly relieved and eventually
cured by- the use of
Hydrozone
This powerful germicide is ab-
solutely harmless. It has cured
cases pronounced incurable and
will cure you. By killing the
germs that cause skin diseases, it
allows Nature to restore a healthy
skin. Used and endorsed by lead-
ing physicians everywhere for the
last 12 years. ; Booklet on request.
Sold by leading: druggists or trial
bottle sent prepaid on receipt of 25 cents.
61 O Prince St., New York.
, HOTELS AND RESORTS.
(New)HOTEL BUTLER
SEATTLE.
REMODELKD AND UKBUILT at expeosa
Of fZGU.OOO — New ManuKemem — ENTIRELY
FIREPROOF.
¦ LOCATION — Very ' accessible to street, car
lines, theaters, etc. EUROPEAN PLAN.
223 ROOMS with LUXURIOUS BATHS—
Several nrlvate rooms in antique decorations,
Turkish Baths in Hotel. .
UNSURPASSED RESTAURANT. D« Stel-
eer. Chef, (unit rly ¦ of . Waldorf-Astoria and
Chef to Prince of Wale*. . *
• HOTEL • ORCHESTRA : Telephone Connec.
tions in every room; long distance connections
made with any part of the coast.
Wire for rvservn tions. at our expense. : ; ¦¦';"
HOTEL BUTLER. Seattle. Wash. - f ;
Paiarp Pont tail to
1 aiaWW ,e e ti,- beautiful
« COURT Lounging
/I fill room, tha BMPIRB
aUU PARLOR, th«
r J PALM ROOM, tho
lirflflU LOUIS XV PAR.
111 emu Lo]^ and the u^
U 1 A U DIES' WRITING
Hotels 1 room.
AMUSEMENTS.
Racing I^^^^RacjnT:
OAKLAND RACE; TRACK
NEW . CALIFORNIA , JOCKEY CLUB.
, . Racine ' Each •¦ Week". Da '• " Rain* or Shin*. '."
Six or; More Races Dailyv
Kace s commence at 3 : 15' p. m." sharp. • ? - ; t .
For special trains stopping at the track tak«
6. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, at 12. 12:3u,
1 :00, 1 :3O or 3 o'clock." No smoking; In .last . two
ears, - which - are reserved for - ladles and thctr
•seortSv^Kg&SSTftSfi^lS&K - - | ; .'.-1. 1 I .. ;
' Returnins trains Ieav« track at 4:10' and
' «:45 -and Immediately after ; the Mast rac*. r
THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, Prtsldeau ;
; PERCY W. TREAT. Secretary
AMUSEMENTS.
A#l| IIUDI A m FRANCISCO^
IgULUBfiOlJi. LEADING WHS
— — XiAST FIVE HIGHTS-—
MATINEE SATURDAY.
Mr. Fred Niblo Politely Proffera
1 Four Cohans
AND A COMPANY OF 72 PEOPLE
In Geo. M. Cohan's Immense Musical Comedy,
"RUNNING FOR OFFICE"
NEXT MONDAY— FIRST TIME HERE.
Klaw and Erlanger Present
GUS and MAX
ROGERS
In John J. McNally's Latest.
"THE ROGERS BBOS. IN I.OKTDOH."
NOTE-SEATS NOW READY.
ONLY FIVE NIGHTS MORE
Kolb and Dili. Barney Bernard, Winfleld Blake,
Maud Amber, Hope & Emerson. Charlotte Vldot.
LAST H1GHT
FIDDLE-DEE-DEE
* Bsafinrrjra to-mobbow wight
WHIRL = I = GIG
1 —AND—
BIG - LITTLE- PRINCESS
i SUNDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
POSITIVELY I. AST PERFORMANCES
Beginning- Heart Monday Hight
Melbourne McDowell
Zir SASDOU*S I.A TOSCA
POPULAR PRICES— 15c, 23c. 50c. 75c,
SEATS READY THURSDAY.
CALIFORNIA
fB THIS WEEK ONLY. B|
GREATEST HIT OF THE SEASON,
Brightest of All Musical Comedies,
A GIRL
FROM DIXIE
By Harry B. Smith, Author of
"Robin Hood."
11 Original New York Company of SIXTY
Eg PEOPLE.
f\ Music by Twelve of .America's Most
jj • ' Noted Composers.
Sunday— "TOM'S WEDDING GIFT."
— ~- .
A Y i*\ ATA T1 Belasco & Mayer.
ALCAZAR zsttzm
. General Manager.
TO-NIGHT— ALL THE WEEK.
Souvenir Matinees Saturday and Sunday.
Evg 25c to 75c; Mats. Sat. & Sun., 25c to 5Oc.
The 'London and New York Comedy Success.
of the Alcazar
AT 1 A yif Stock Company;
"The funniest thing In many a week." — Ex-
aminer. •*; ¦ ; .:V'_'
FRIDAY, APRIL 29, SPECIAL MATINEE.
/WMWGMRET Vl/YGHERL^V
In Wm Yeats" "LAND OF HEARTS DE-
• SIRE" and "THE HOUR GLASS."
Seats now sellln;. -
Monday, May 2 — Arthur W. Pinero's
THE PROFLIGATE.
Market Street, Near Eighth.. Phon« South 533
TO-NIGHT— ALL THIS WEEK. .
' MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.
' The Matchless Drama' of a Fireman's Life,
THE STILL ALARM
, Joseph Arthur's Most Famous , Play.
'Fully Equipped Engine House Interior!
Real Fire Engine and Trained Horses!
Specialties by Quartet of Firemen! .
pDIfCC Eveninso. ..;...... 10c to 50c
IKIVEJ Matinees. ....Y .10c, 15c, 25c
Next— DR. JEKYLL AND 'MR. HYDE. ¦
SembrJeh
SEAT SALE - .
TO-MORROW MORNING
9 o'clock, SHERMAH, CX. AY • ft CO.'S
2 CONCERTS ONLY?
ALHAMESA , THEATER .
Thursday Night, May 5
SaturdayiMatincc. !May 7
::'-.¦;/:;,, seats $3, gg.'gi. ¦' -•¦.-.¦; . ;
f Biltdtr 11 $11 sefYear
PBAOEBS
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Is the Last* Wednesday
l here W ill Be Something ¦
|| ALMMfS RELIABLE
1238- 1250 MARKET S,T.jS£.

xml | txt