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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 29, 1904, Image 16

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¦WASHINGTON. April 2S.— Acting Secretary
of War. Oliver to-day transmitted to the Houi*
a cablegram from the Tobacco Workers* Guild
of Manila, repeating their petition for a reduc
tion of the Dlngley tariff on tobacco. .
Bnrnett'a Extract of Vanilla— la
purity and strength pre-eminently superior. •
Examination Continues.
The investigation into the financial
affairs of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Ex-4
press Company by Commissioner*
Charles A. , Rasbury of Texas contin
ued In the offices of the company yes
terday. James Bunnell, general audi
tor of the company, was the only wit
ness called and was examined at
length on matters pertaining to the
profits of the corporation in Its ser
vice In Texas. The examination will
be resumed to-day and may last sev
eral davs/JBHi
Change of Time.
The summer schedule of the California North
western Railway will take effect Sunday May
1. 1804. H. C. Whiting. General Manager- R
X. Ryan, General Passenger Agent •
NEW TOBK. April 28.— Mme. Emma Calve.
the prim* conns, was. a paw.nrer on the
stramvhip La Savole. «iiich sailed to-day. She
said that ehc would return here next season.
gflaatJnaMtJSi 4
ST. LOUIS. April ' 281— Prince - Pu Lun. the
imperial Chinese Commissioner General to the
Wqrld'a Fair. . arrived , ¦ in \. St," ¦. IjouIs r to-day.
He was met by 'a reception* committee headed
by President David R. Franels of the World'*
Fair and Mayor Rolla Wells. *
The .Youngest Baby
Can readtfy dftrest and assimilate . Bor
den's Kafrlr Brand Condensed Milk be
cause the casein, which Is. In' ordinary'
cow's. milk, undergoes phj'sical alteration'
In the process of condensation. " which
makes It digestible. It brings the result
which every parent 1 is looking for. viz..
rtronc and healthy children. •
The Most- for' the 3Ioney.
TV'hen you add toa;eth«r' sfeed. tafpty, com
fort and aceaery you \ will ' acknowledre the
through tourist, cam ;of 'the Southern and
Union Pacific to, Chicago; or. St. Louis to b«
the beat. Thry are large, , clean, cool and run
smoothly. Buy your berth from " S. F.' Booth
General Agent, U. P. ,R. /R.,*l Montgomery
•treet. .- ¦ ... • . • .
Former Bank President Is Indicted.
NEW YORK, April 28. — Two in
dictments for grand larceny in the first
degree were reported by the Grand
Jury to-day against David Rothschild,
former president of the'Federal Bank.
antly, ns betraying something not In
tended to be repeated in open court.
"I heard him tell Mr. McEnerney that
he did not want what he said about a
person whom he called 'Curtis' to be
introduced."
This let the cat out of the bag, Some
one had told Mrs. Curtis that Hyde
charged her with writing or knowing
who wrote the anonymous letters.
When that excitable lady called him
to account- Hyde had denied having
made such a charge. It is agreed by
all persons in the case that Mrs. Cur
tis had no connection with the letters,
and it is probable that a statement to
this effect from Hyde or his attorneys
will be Incorporated in the record in
order to clear her from so undesirable
a suspicion.
"Will your Honor certify the ques»
tlon as to our right to call Hyde to the
Judge of the District Court for deter
mination?" asked Knight when Bonnet
had left the stand. This attempt to get
around his ruling struck fire from the
generally imperturbable Commissioner.
"Mr. Knight," he said, "I have passed
on this question and I am an inde
pendent judicial officer, responsible for
my decisions. -If you do not like my
aqtiori it wlllbe*open to you to appeal
at the close of the examination. I will
give you an exception to my refusal of
your motion." • '
WHAT STEARNS KNEW.
Horace Stevens, called thenby Wheel
er, said he was a* newspaper reporter
and had known .Hyde -for more than
twenty-one years. He did ; not know
Judge A. B. Pugh;. the attorney for the
Interior Department, who came here
from' Washington to work up the land
fraud case and who is advising "Heney
on the; present hearing. He had met
Detective Burns. AHthis'in answer to
Wheelerfs \queries. ..
"What is, the object' of these ques
tions?", asked Heney, .who never con
sents' to be left "long in the dark as to
the purpose of any move by the de
fense. ' But though the Commissioner
sustained the. Government counsel's ob
jection, Wheeler wouldn't tell. He just
poured out more questions.
"Were you ever in Hyde's employ?"
"No."
"Ever have a share in his land deal
"Ever promised money by Hyde?"
. "No.". : • v • . ; /.
Stevens told the \ Commissioner that
in June, 1903. he. had been sent by the
Ghronicle to Interview "Burns as to the
object, of '.his visit to California. The
veteran detective had been too shrewd
for the witness and instead of submit
ting gracefully to being interviewed he
had interviewed the reporter, arid after
pumpjng him dry had turned him away
without any. information. Several later
calls on Burns resulted with no .more
success. • The secret service man kept
his own - counsel.
Wheeler, had Stevens tell of his work
in. trailing land .grabbers. The reporter
had varied his newspaper work by trips
into:. the" mountains in the interest of
the Southern Pacific Company to look
after men who were stealing the com
pany's timber or for | the State Mining
Bureau to ; investigate squatters who
were trying to , '/locate", mineral lands
under the pretense, that they were non
mineral. , His reports on this subject
had *,been\ made to his employers, and
he ,had used the ; Information thus ac
quired : in . preparing newspaper • articles.
This ,\vas what .Burns -had got out of
him* when, he 'was sent to interview the
detective. V", 5-'
: The further .declared that
his relations .with Hyde had \ always
been cordial, ' that ¦ hV .was in the [ habit
of s.vlsiting -Hyde's ;oftjee •. at ; short in
tervals, but > that - he never j had access"
to Hyde's ; office papers and . was never
taken i into the V, land ," operator's: con
fidence regarding -.the investigations of
the " Interior- Department. \- •
"Did : you : not '• offer; a ; story on the
land; frauds to, the San Francisco Call?"
asked; Wheeler. S ;
"No. 1 ' Mr.Walker of r The Call » went to
I*: EM Aubury, ..the • State Minerologist,
f or^i information | relating s to $ the ;• inter
ferences with ithe mineral : lands result
ing from the attempts of Eastern spec
ulators Ho ; locate^ a • great '•' deal of • land,
lntc the position of trustee of the State Nor
mal School* and' some of the leadlne clube.
H,e is a ereat public .denouncer of all Gov
ernment and city political frauds, which seem
ingly folds around him a mantel of honor and
purity of character which he oo dearly loves
to shine In. but under it all K. A. Hyde Is
one of the most unscrupulously daring VIL
LAINS, a dangerous enemy, an unsuspecting
treacherous friend. Youra trull'.
MR. I. S. WIN T N\
P. S. — I denlre my name guarded from the
public. " ...
There are many misspelled words in
the original of this letter. In particu
lar the word "dangerous" appears as
"dangerious." It is worthy of note that
the same misspelling occurs in the
anonymous letter which Dimond testi
fied he received about two weeks after
the Town Talk letter was \ mailed.
Hence Wheeler ; claims that the two
letters were written by the same hand.
THE CURTIS INCIDENT.
Heney asked only " one important
question in cross-examination — Had
Bonnet heard Hyde make any state
ment regarding Mrs.. Curtis?
"Yes," the "witness answered reluct-
ATTORNEY FOR DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WHO PREPARED LAND
FRAUDS CASE FOR TRIAL. AND IS ONE OF GOVERNMENT COUNSEL IN
PRESENT HEARING; ALSO TWO WITNESSES WHO TESTIFIED.
in the northern part of the State. This
had. nothing to do with the land fraud
cases. Mr. Aubury turned Walker
over to me and I furnished him the
Information for an article that was
printed in The.lCalland copied In pa
pers all over the State. This occurred
before February, 1903. I do not recall
that I ever gave any other paper an
article on these land frauds. Still ' I
may have. I have written a ton of
stuff. If you will refresh my mem
ory by citing any case you have in
mind I will be able to answer defi
nitely."
Heacock said this was fair, but
"Wheeler had nothing but general ques
tions. After making it clear that he
had not- sold a "story" to the Exam
iner on the same subject, Stevens was
permitted to go.
. BURNS OXCE MORE.
¦William. J. Burns was then-recalled
by "Wheeler and the old . attempt to
force the detective, to disclose the evi
dence in his possession was renewed,
only to be blocked at Wheeler's first
vital auestion: > •
V When did you first learn of the
bathroom incident from Benson's 'pic
ture man,' Woodford D. Harlan?" the
attorney aslted.
"We object," shouted Heney, "unless
Mr. "Wheeler discloses the purpose of
this questioning.'*
' The question was not answered, but
"Wheeler asked about Burns' first meet
ing with Heney in "Washington. This
brought statements from both the wit
ness and Heney, and it came out that
Hfney had visited the capital In No
vember, 1903, to consult with Attorney
General. Knox regarding his engage
ment to prosecute the Portland fraud
cases, but that Knox had not even then
told the San Francisco lawyer that he
was to be retained for the Hyde-DI
mond hearing. In fact,. no word to this
effect had reached him until after the
arrest of the defendants.
This ended ' the day's evidence, and
the rest of the afternoon was occupied
by "Wheeler in an impassioned argu
ment that the evidence already in
showed Dimond could not have written
the anonymous letters. He also de
clared that unless Hyde was compelled
to produce, the Ellsworth letters his
client might not be able to clear him
self of having written the attacks upon
Hyde.
The, Commissioner , tried to relieve
the strain between "Wheeler an<J Mc-
Enerney by asking why the scurrilous
parts of the Ellsworth letters might
not be blotted out and enough of them
put in evidence to support "Wheeler's
claim' that they were written by the
author of the later letters, now in evi
dence. Heney said i he would gladly
consent, provided the communications
were first shown him in their entirety,
but this suggestion created no enthu
siasm on the side of the defense. Still
the Commissioner's idea may be adopt
ed. The case will go on this morning.
It is expected to end early next week.
Yesterday's sessions in the land fraud
hearing now drawing to a close before
Federal Commissioner Heacock ' were
full of sensations. Fiercely counsel for
Henry P. Dimond battled throughout
the day to free him from the Govern
ment's charge, fatal if not disproved,
that he wrote the anonymous attacks
upon his co-defendant and former,cli
ent, Fred A. Hyde. The three features
of the day's work were a strenuous ef
fort to obtain a reconsideration of 'the
Commissiom-r's refusal to compel Hyde
to testify on Dimond's behalf, the fail
ure to connect Horace Stevens, a vet
eran newspaper man, with the author
ship of the anonymous communica
tions, and Hyde's uwn consent to the
introduction of the Town Talk letter,
with all its vilification of the rich land
speculator. • . . ¦ .
Wheeler and Wright have had several
theories as to who wrote the letters.
First they deelared\ them part of a
Government plot to 'trap the defend
ants, and charged Detective Burns
with full knowledge of their author
ship. Then they acquitted "Burn^ and
hinted that the mysterious documents
were the work of a woman— a she devil
possessed with an almost uncanny
hatred of Hyde and a long-abiding de
sire to accomplish his ruin.
But the evidence to prove the
woman guilty has failed to ap
pear. Yesterday it was again de
manded from Hyde, but again Hyde
refused to produce the anonymous let
ters sent him during half a dozen years,
as Burns testified, by a woman whom
the land dealer had long known.
These letters. It is conceded, are filled
with attacks on Hyde's family and
contain no reference to his business
methods, such as are found in the
epistles already in evidence. * But
Wheeler, after McEnerney had per
mitted him to read them, announced
that they were undoubtedly written
by the same h»nd that wrote the
anonymous letters now before the Com
missioner. When Dimo-nd's counsel
called Stevens and tried to show that
his connection both with Hyde and with
Burns made him a possible author, the
reporter soon ; cleared himself. What
to-day may bring forth no one can pre
dict, but the shrewd lawyers seem to
have nearly exhausted their resources.
THK TOWN TALK LETTER.
As soon as Commissioner Heacock
opened court Knight renewed his mo
tion that Hyde be compelled to testify
as to the receipt of letters from his
alleged woman foe. He argued the
question at length, but McEnerney set
tled the matter by announcing Hyde's
refusal to take the stand and reading
the Federal crimes act of 187S. which
provides that in a joint trial either
defendant may testify at his own re
quest and not otherwise. To all
Knight's pleading that he listen to fur
ther argument, the Commissioner an
swered with emphasis: "Mr. Knight,
the act of Congress is decisive. We
are now in the twenty-first day of
this hearing and I intend to wind it up
without further undue delay. No more
argument will be permitted on this
pclnt."
Unable to get the so-called Ellen Ells
worth letters into the record. Knight
and Wheeler succeeded better with the
anonymous attack on Hyde that was
sent last summer to Town Talk. Theo
dore P. Bonnet, the proprietor of that
publication, was called and testified
that he had received the letter, which
was postmarked August' 4, 1903. and
which inclosed a $20 gold certificate to
pay for its publication. After reading
it he at once turned it over to Jere T.
Burke of the Southern Pacific Rail
way's law department, who told him
afterward that he had given it to his
fri.end Hyde.
"We now call on Mr. Hyde to product
that letter," said Wheeler.
"We do not admit that we have such
a letter in our possession," McEnerney
responded.
"Will your Honor issue a subpena for
Mr. Burke?" Wheeler requested. "It
will be necessary for us to prove that
he gave the letter to Hyde."
Then came a conference, between
counsel for the two defendants,- at the
end of which Wheeler's request for the
subpena was withdrawn. But Govern
ment Counsel Heney was not willing
to lose the chance to score a point. He
demanded that the subpena issue, on
behalf of the Government. This
brought out the letter, McEnerney
gracefully yielding and turning it, over
to Wheeler. It was read in evidence,
as follows: '
SAN FRANCISCO. July 5. 1903.
Gentlemen: The Government land agent* are
in the city, trying to unearth II r. K. A. Hyde'a
land business, and It seems mighty queer. they
don't track him. It Is thought they are paid
hush money, for Hyde's land frauds are an
plain 8s daylight to every one. ¦
There is n man In Tucson, Arir.', by the
name of J. H. Schneider who could ' In ten
minutes tell enough of Hyde's fraudulent busi
ness to put Hyde in the penitentiary for life,
and the Government detectives are right there
now working en this man Schneider, but
Hyd«r« men and lawyers are standing , over
this man constantly with redhot irons,' and
the man is afraid of his life.
' Hyde would kill him In a minute before he
would have his land frauda exposed.
If vie has manufactured thousands • of bogus
names to land titles, then worked them- around
In his full control, and it Is amazing how he
has thus far e«caped the penitentiary all these
years, but he is such a .wonderfully cunning,
wily, crafty, keen, discriminating. . skillful. In
genious character, he has so far dodged the
laws, but fOich characters - usually risk . one
chance too many.
The facts are the Governors of the • States,
bankers, trading lawyers and. many, other In
fluential business men of supposed honorable
standing are all In with Hyde, and he glvea
them a large share of hi* enormous land prof
its, and these men have kept the people (blind
ed a» to their relations with Hyde by loudly
talking, TALKING against land frauds.
ROTTEN HYPOCRISY.
Even Hyde himself tells the people and de
tectives that he does hope they will put a
mop to this fraudulent • land grabbing, as he
bcve It confounds his name to strangers' with
tbOFe of other disreputable business ¦ parties,
says it hurts his HONORABLY conducted busi
ness Now all .this kind of talk from Hyde
is ROTTEN hypocrisy, for he Is right now the
chief instrument In obtaining these present
gigantic combination timber companies.
Hyde stands behind, the whole thine.
This John Benson of San - Francisco, ' land
lawyer, civ'l engineer and land surveyor,' has
been Hyde's SECRET partner for a. great many
yf-ans. but before the people Hyde does not
claim to know who this John Benson Is.
Hyde has for years pald.the firm of Britton
& Gray of Washington, D. C. flO.OGO a year
to keep him posted on every movement in the
Washington land department. :. - .. ¦
Of ' late . Hyde . has grown . a little afraid of
manufacturing so many bogus names to his
land titles and he goes hunting around col
lecting hundreds of names from -a class cf
poor people too ignorant to scarcely read or
write their names. ¦•••'- : , . .
He tells them some misleading story, helps
them to sign their names to. these land r tlu>n
and power of attorney, gives them $1 or $2
and then no . one ever knows what - become*
of the class of people to prove It against, him.
He\ has been known' to -.¦* give .- them « pas
senger tickets to ship .them s.to". another' part
of the, world, knowing they would never have
money; enough to come -back 'again. - •
. Those people . have no . ideas , of the nature
of • those • papers ' they have j been <• tricked ' Into
signing their names to and in this way Hyde
Is .grabbing up millions of acres of lands, to
file away in such.- a manner- that 1 ; he .. can
wholly control - it • for his : personal profits. , .
¦ To- those . who • do- not ; fully .. know • Hyde'fl
inside life he appears. to be" a most -charm
ingly, interesting, refined man of excellent prin
ciples, and by a', long course of manipulations
and' money he succeeded in pulling himself
Hyde Is Still Silent
as to tpistles ¦
Sent" Him.
AUTHORSHIP OF ANONYMOUS LEPERS
ABSORBS INTEREST IN FRAUD GASE
THE SAN FRANCISCO ; .CALL,- r FRIDAY, > APRIL; 29, 1904.
16
ADVERTISEMENTS.
liTjiricF"
. FINNEMORE
Judge of the Natal Sopreme
Court, Sends flie Following
Remarkable Testimonial
TO CUTIGURA
The World Is Coticnra^s Field,
Used Wherever Civilization
Has Penetrated. k
" X desire to girt my rolnntary testl-
m oh j to the beneficial effects of your
Coticara Remedies^ ' I hare »nffered
for ions time from an excess of nric
acid 1b the blood ; • tad tince the middle
of last*. year, from a serere attack. of
Eczema, chiefly ob the ecalp, face, ears
and neck and on one limb. I was for
sereral -months ¦ under professional
treatments, bat the remedies prescribed
were of no avail, and . I '_ was gradually
becoming .worse/- my ; face ¦ was dregd-
fnlly dislgared and I lost nearly all ray
hair. At last, ray wife prevailed upon
me to try, the Coticarr. Remedies and I
gave them a "thoroogh" trial .with the
. most satisfactory results/ The disease .
: soon began to disappear and my hair
commenced to grow' again. A fresh
growth of hair is I covering '< my • head,
and my limb 1 ' (although: not yet quite
cured) is gradually improving. . My wife
thiaks so highly of. your remedies that
she has beta purchasing them in order
to make presents to other persons suf-
fering "from • similar • complaints, I and,
? as President ;of ",thel Bible 'i Women's
Society,' has - told the '. Bible women to
; report if any case i should come under .
their notice when a poor person is so
afflicted, so that your remedies may be
resorted to." y V
ROBERT IBAJlC i PTNNEMORE,
(Judge of the Natal Supreme Court) :
Pleterm^tzburg, Natal, ;Oct.> 29, ¦ 1901:
*4>\i thraseiMMt UMTaM. " Ortlewi' BmoIvwC At.
. flv him ef CbaeoUta CoatcdPtUa, lie. par rtal efflO).
, Ointment, »e.. *c*n,tie, Dngki L«t4on, 9 Chartar-
\<n* Bt.i P«rl». I Bm it la faisi Bortoo, \X1 CoUsi-
' few Ara . Fattar Drac * Cham. Cory.. Sela Frifa. . .
: StrSami sk « All i!sml lbs Skla h4 Saal*.- _ '
¦'¦•¦¦¦' ' ' . ;.."l;-. ¦•
I ¦¦'JKv M B II "*Z3 l\ worn CEa
I lifflA n 4 bm m f&K
I m& JOOBk « C? A a K \*rti& A
AI.Ii CBEAMS 3 cans 2Sc
Carnation. LJly. Pet or Poppy.
JELL-O— 3 PACKAGES S5e.
BEST CBEAU CHEESE pound 10c
Made of pure cream. Mild and tasty.
Usually 13c.
BO-lb SACK ROCK SALT. 2Sc.
BEST JAPAJT BICE 6 lb«. 25c
Large train. Cooks whole and white. Just
half price.
GOLD DUST— 2 PACKS Oc.
BEOKEN JAVA AZTS MOCHA 3 lbs. SOc
Our Special Coffee. Quality am»-nrice alwa; i
the same. Slngla pound "Or. • '
Fresh Butter 29i
Choice of/ beat Marin County Crearaertes.
DOLLAR WZXTES rallon GoC
Six-year-old Tort. ' Sherry. RelsliR*. ZlnfanUel.
32c saved an each calfcn.
8 BEST SAXD SOAP. 25c.
ATTEBNOOH TEA. pound 3oO
Ycur choice of SOc kinds — Uncolored. Green.
Black. Oolone or mixed. Rica
and fracrant.
8 ARMOUR'S LAUNDRY SOAP, 25c
BOUBBOIT WKXSKST. qt. bot.'69c
7-year-old Sour Mash. Good for the heaith.
Elsewhere $1.
'2 ¦WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 25c.
BEST HAMS... ..poflad 12^C
Genuine Eastern Sugar Cured. Mild and Flumo.
Usually 16c.
100 STUFTED SWEET PICKLES, 6c. I
1001 flLLMORE ST. 119 TAYLOR ST
Cih. ......
HDHHHBHiBlBBHH»HB»BlBaHB»llBBBHHHBB«naHaiHBBaaH
S -^" ' —^ " '• ' ; - ' * ' ' ' : ¦'¦''' ' '¦ ¦
I GUT BATE PRICES I
¦s ¦ ' ¦ " ' ' ' • ' ' li
I .BARGAINS... I
f Novelty Tailor Suits f
I $12.50, $15.00, $17.50 and $20.00. f
g Not only the very Latest Styles at such low prices, but a better •§
B • . • quality material and better make than elsewhere. &
I JACKETS SKIRTS j
¦ Cut Rate Prices., Cvt Rate Prices. I
H J 10.00 TAX AND CASTOR KERSEY J2.50 GOOD QUALITY WALKING w
¦ COATS. SKIRTS. m
Si CVT SATS. $6.00. . CUT BATE, .S 1 .7.".. {£
g $10.00 BLACK VENETIAN JACK- $3.50 EXTRA GOOD QUALITY B
g ETS, satin lined. WALKING SKIRTS. +'\ «
H CUT BATE, S7.50. CUT BATE, $S.5O" . y g
5 $10.00 BLACK CHEVIOT COATS. $7.50 BLACK NOVELTY SKIRTS. B
m satin lined. '„ handsomely trimmed. %. ¦
m CUT BATE, S6.OO. CUT BATE, S5.OO- a
B $12.50 TAN NOVELTY COATS. jio.00 BLACK AND NAVY BROAD- B
ZJ trimmed and satin lined. CLOTH SKfRTS ES
¦ CUT BATE, 89.OO- CUT BATE, 87.5O. 3
H $16.00 NOVELTY MIXTURE , -, H
« COATS, 60-inch long, velvet col- — ¦
S lar and cape. * . jn
a cut bate, sio.oo. All C, i I lr * n A i\£ ®
5 $15.00 NOVELTY COVERT COATS. ¦ rvl£ t -' lllv auu . Q
¦ strictly man-tailored. ¦— «., • i— % • i j ' B
g cut bate. «i2.5o. .-:• Etamine Skirts at a
B $25.00 NOVELTY COATS, exquis- " # ¦
| te "cut bate, 820.00. Cut Rate Prices u
g 1230-1232-1234 MARKET STREET. I
¦BBHBBBBBBBBBBBBflBBBBBBBBflBBBBBflBBflBBBBBBBBB
C"C? /^Z w- T , ,,.\ x -„ mm J M „ JjUfTTjffSS"^-''^^
lr^^^S«Si^X«M»»L4JiA^a^8t^^i^^aWlJBBkL2^L»Ss«2ffiB»Js^s«^**"***"'^^ <^^*\^
FIVE SPECIALS FOR
FRIDAY AMD SATURDAY
Cfilldren's Daus at Maonin's.
Infants' Wear Dept.
CHILDREN'S REEFERS, mide JPU?'
of English canvas duck; prettily / MtT%\
shaped sailor collar, inserted with /
four cmbroid<r>' medallions; trimmed / f * 4 \hr^
with pearl buttons; full sleeves; J V^Sl
strictly tailor made; sizes from i to 'V/*' T" "i la
4 years. iSee illustration.) $2.50 /^^Ai'tlfl
value. Special for Friday and Satur- **€£(srf 5«wv^
day only < bkJ^J^
Children's Dresses. , Jfl
Made of Scotch zephyr, in neat ><IhMH|V j^
designs of pink an<i blue check;
Mother Hubbard y»»ke; bo.\-plaitcd
front and back and trimmed with nar- ffc<flP^li9rfl
row taiior-^titclictl bands oi white y^3pj|Sg|tt
linon; turnover hemstitched collaf ySu^^^^^^,
and cuffs-: 0 months to 3 years.
1 See illustration.) A good $i.5ovalue.
Special for Friday and Saturday only " K£eS :
$1.00 jp
Children's i^
Russian Suits. /Mm
An entirely new model, made of /** '§§H 1
imported Scotch zephyr, in colorings fy' ; 'Wm^
of red. pink and blue; sizes 5 to 7 \*^4|^^'H8
years. (See illustration.) This drcs? **£$**^^''&r
is an exceptionally pood value for '^-^'Mitjtla
$4.00. Special for Friday and Satur- :<
Children's m^^
Sailor Suits. m^m
Made of Anderson"? English *
zephyr: Mnali checks in neat design? jf56gffffifo5^
of pink and blue: solid color collar
and cuffs, trimmed with tailor-stitch- &&s*=iift^&*
ed linon bands and crocheted Batten-
berjr buttons; .-izes 4 to 14 years. J^^^^^^^^i
(Sec illustration.) Regular $4.50 GSe/si^Sl^^^
value. Special for Friday and Satur-
$3.00 -
Children's j|§
Coats. % . i^mh
Made of fancy mixed material; this / iri : J
season's newest style; collarless ef; |&^ir
feet; sizes 10 to 14 years. A £<x>d
$6.00 value. Special for Friday and jfsttftHfigjHfl^
$3.00 ;W:
Children's and Misses' Millinery
Dpnf"
We make a specialty of Children's and Misses'^lillinery.
Every effort is made in order to execute the most becom-
ing styles, and although the designs are different 'from those
'.ordinarily shown, our prices are no higher. . .,
LINGERIE HATS, made of good quality of : lawn;
neatly trimmed with lace, 50c, $1.5O and up.
CHILDREN'S STRAW HATS, made of plain and fancy
straws; substantially made and lined with satin;, ages' 2 to
12 years; 60c, 73c, $1.00 and up.
CHILDREN'S FRENCH BUTTON-ON -HATS," elab-
orately corded neatly trimmed with French braid and
embroidery; sizes I- to 6 years; a practical' summer hat for
children; 3Oc and f l.OO. -
We call special attention to our new models- of import-
ed hats for children from 7 to 16 years of age.. '
918-922 MARKET STREET
i § \L N ? Bil ? fill "»j I } 1 1 1 A -n^BB^^^y
AS VEBTISEMEUTS.
KJjjfgjffijw] -."¦'"' ScrfTYrtin
111 GENUINE KONA, 17ds. POUND ||
||1| 6 pounds $1.00 |T||
111 SPECIAL MOCHA and JAVA,25cis. POUND Ig
IJJ S pounds $1.00 1^8
K^ffi ~ ===== Q «^3
Hss^B Lower Prices for Larger Lots Sr3f^fl
BJmiB F»rlce List Mailed on Request » 9 S^
uwQS| ¦.¦'¦". ¦ • .%."¦¦ ,*•*;" |y ww g}\
¦ 145 Stockton Street, near 6eary ¦. Cj, n p f « nr : crA pi|
B Opp. City of Paris Dry Goods Co. *3all ridllClSCO W»M

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