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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 24, 1904, Image 1

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PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SAN FRANCISCO, ; TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1904.
GREAT ASSEMBLAGE OF CALIFOllXIA'S SOLID MEM
FORMS RIVER IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION FOR
FINAL BATTLE AGAINST DEVASTATING DELUGES
Continued - on Pago ¦ 2, '• Column 2.
Senator .Stands Journey, but la Grad
ually Growing Weaker^ — Sauer- ,
kraut Cause of Illness.
PHILADELPHIA.- May 23.— Senator
Quay has returned to his old home at
Beaver, thoroughly convinced that his
case is hopeless. He stood the journey
well, but is rapidly growing weaker to
night. The Senator's sickness is d*io
to an overindulgence in his favorite
dish of sauerkraut.
QUAY GIVES UP IIOPE
AND RETURNS TO BEAVER
Director, in Letter, Incidentally
Estimates Population of United
Stntrs at 89,011,-136.
WASHINGTON. May 23.— In a letter
defending, the' estimate of population
recently Issued by the Census Bureau
Director North incidentally gives an
estimate of 'the population of the
United States under the census to be
taken In 1310, . placing the figures . at
£9.00,436.
NORTH DEFENDS FIGURES
OF THE^CENSUS BUREAU
.WASHINGTON, May 23. — At the
imperial German embassy official an
nouncement Is made that the wedding
of Miss Ivy Langham, sister of the
Baroness Speck von Stemburg, the
German Embassador, to Lieutenant
Commander Vicomte de Faramond de
Lafajole, naval attache . of the French
embassy, will occur at St. Matthew's
Church at 11 o'clock Tuesday morn
ln. May 24. ¦
Wedding of Miss Ivy Lansham to
French Diplomat to Occur at
* Washington To-Day. -'.-;
WILL EXCHANGE VOWS
AT ST. 3IATTHEWS CHURCH
The Panama Congress has provided
for the coinage of subsidiary currency
to the amount of about $1,500,000. The
Colombian silver, now current on the
isthmus, will be melted down and re
coined at the San Francisco Mint. The
new coins will correspond - to the
"conants" now used In the Philippines.
San Francisco Mint Will Provide
With Silver
Currency.
WASHINGTON, May 23.— Down in
Panama, where American dollars, Mex
ican dollars, South American dollars
and any kind of gold have always
proved thoroughly acceptable to the
natives, there will soon appear a num
ber of official coins of the republic
which owes its being to the isthmian
canaL
NEW REPUBLIC TO HAVE
>A COIN OF ITS OWN
ST. JOHN, N. B.. May 23. — A mes
sage received here from the south
branch of Oromocto Lake states-that
John H. Thomson, a wealthy vessel
owner; E. P. Stavart, Inspector of the
Bank of New Brunswick, and R. P.
Foster, manager of the Royal Bank of
Canada, all of this city, probably have
been drowned while fishing. Their
boat, overturned, was found to-day.
Finding of Overturned Boat on Lake
Oromocto Causes Search for
Amateur Nimrods.
FEAR DROWNING IS FATE
OF WEALTHY FISHERMEN
NEW YORK, May 23. — It was an
nounced' to-night that detectives from
the District Attorney's office have been
searching in - vain for Dr. R. C.
Flower. Dr. Flower is under bonds
to appear in the Court of General Ses
sions to-morrow to stand trial on five
indictments charging grand larceny in
connection with the failure of the Ari
zona Eastern and Montana Ore De
velopment Mining Company. For
some time he has been out on $23,000
bail, furnished by Mrs. Cornelius
Storrs. widow of the late Deputy Con
troller.
Sleuths Unable to Locate Physician
Who Is Enjoying Freedom Un
der Heavy Bonds.
DETECTIVES MAKE ¦ VAIN
SEARCH FOR DR. FLOWER
CARTHAGE, Mo., May .23. — The
Dunkards, or the German Baptist* of
the United States, met here to-day in
annual conference, with more than
100 delegates present. One of the
first acts of the conference was the
adoption of a motion to change the
name of the organization. Hereafter
they are to be known only as German
Baptists, and not as Dunkards.
One of the First Acts of the Confer
ence at Carthage Is to Adopt
New Title.
DUNKARDS TAKE NAME
OF GKR3IAN BAPTISTS
Gage is immensely wealthy' and de
clared he would disinherit his 19
year-old granddaughter, but he re
lented and the young couple will re
turn to Wyoming after an Eastern
visit and live in the West on a fine
ranch donated by Jessie's grand
father.
The cultured Eastern girl not only
won the heart of Rollinson, but those
of other cowboys. One night at a
dance strenuous objection was en
tered because Rollinson danced too
frequently with Miss Jessie. Rollin
son was given fifteen minutes to leave
town. He did not go and a fight en
sued, in which, luckily, no one was
killed. The grandfather, who had fol
lowed his granddaughter West, ob
jected to the suit of the young man
because he did not know him. so early
one morning Rollinson and Jessie
eluded the grandfather and flew to
Gering, Neb., where they were mar
ried.
OMAHA, May 23. — Three years ago
Jessie Evarts and "Jack" Rollinson
attended school in Buffalo, N. T. Now
they are man and wife, after passing
through a long string of startling sit
uations. A year ago young Rollinson.
who is but 21 years of age, left home
for Hartville. Wyo., where he be
came a cowpuncher. "While there he
learned that Mrs. C. D. Fletcher of
the mining camp was mother of the
Jessie Evarts he had known at school.
Jessie had not seen her mother since
she was a small child. She had been
living with her grandfather, named
Oage, until a few months ago. She
was sent to Wyoming to visit her
mother.
"Jack" Rollinson Fights for Bride
and Finally Wins Home and
Forgiveness.
PLUCKY COWBOY'S WOOIXG
BRINGS HI3I HAPPINESS
LONDON, May 23. — It is learned
that the gravity of the Tibetan situa
tion is spoiling the Cabinet's enjoy
ment of its "Whitsuntide holiday. It
is believed by those in closest touch
with the condition of affairs in Tibet
that Colonel Younghusband will be
forced to retire from his position near
Gyangtse soon. > This, it is pointed
out, will prove a blow to British pres
tige in Tibet, for It is possible that
such retirement will arouse the fron
tier tribes and force the campaign for
a conquest of the whole Hlmalyan
hinterland. The task would prove an
incalculably . difficult one. Viceroy
Curzon is now blamed for supposing
that the Tibetans were a spiritless na
tion. It is evident that they have the
fighting spirit common to all moun
taineers.
Fears Withdrawal of Younghusband
Will Be JRlow to British Prestige.
Blames Curzon.
ENGLISH CABINET WORRIES
OVER TIBETAN* SITUATION*
The disastrous floods which occunwd during:
the winter Just passed have called attention
In an emphatic degree to the . Importance : of
tti* river system* of the StaU of Calif.ornia,
The platform adopted is in part a
plan for the education of the public,
but it also outlines a scheme of prelim
inary work for river improvements of
the widest scope. In accordance with
Its provisions the convention will to
day appoint a committee of twenty
flve empowered to establish a commis
sion of: engineers. It will be the duty
o^ this commission to submit to, the
next Legislature", a plan for such per
manent changes In the drainage sys
tem of the great valleys as will pre
vent the damaging floods that are now
destroying so much of the. State's
Here is the platform in full:
,. . Half a thousand solid men of busi
ness, industry, science and commerce,
representing all parts of the great Sac
ramento and San Joaquin valleys, met
yesterday in the Maple room at the
Palace Hotel and organized a move
ment of the first importance to the
vast interior of California, and of hard
ly less moment to the entire State. It
was the first session of the "River
Convention." called by the commercial
bodies of Sacramento, Stockton, -Fresno
and other interior cities, in connection
with the California Promotion Commit
tee and leading San Francisco organi
zations. No recent gathering in this
city has stood for interests so vast or
debated so ably questions of such wide
reaching import.
The fact that 750,000 acres of rich
lands in the valleys are under water
from the freshets of the spring, that
nearly 100,000 acres of actual farms, the
finest in California, have been buried
beneath the floods by the breaks in the
Sacramento levees, and that the dam
age to the agricultural interests of the
State already is estimated at more
than $5,000,000, constituted the imme
diate cause of the convention. Its aim
was Jo discuss ways and means to meet
this situation, not by temporary make
shifts, effective for. this year or a few
years, but by a comprehensive plan of
river improvement that will, for good
and all, open ample outlet for the
mountain floods, reclaim the vast areas
now annually inundated and secure
against future deluge all these rich
deltas. The convention is largely edu
cational, and the keynote of all its de
liberations is the need of organizing
public sentiment throughout the State
to back so great an undertaking.
With this end in view, the platform
adopted last evening on report of the
committee on resolutions embraces the
most vital work of the gathering. But
the papers read, the informal speeches
delivered and the debates keenly fought
out were all noteworthy.
THE FLAN OP CAMPAIGN'.
'-'< It is recommended that this 'convention form
itself . Into a ' permanent organization - to ' be
known a* the RIVER IMPROVEMENT. AND
DRAINAGE ASSOCIATION OP CALIFORNIA^
and that 'each memberlof this -convention- be
a ¦ member -thereof and : that said . association
shall also - admit • to • membership ' such other
persons of ¦' the : State ¦' of California as are ' la
»vThatsald general committee -select from It*
number^ a. president: .and a committee -of six
members . who. , with the President.", shall form
an executive committee. . ._ ... ....
: We recommend that for the purpose of car
rying on the work of .this convention after
Its ' ¦ adjournment a general . committee - be
nominated by the delegates to this convention
from the, following '. named districts respect
ively: North of Sacramento, .4;" Sacramento
City, 2: i south of Sacramento, 3; llokelumne
River District, 2; San Joaquin River 3; Stock
ton, 2; old • river, 1; middle river,. 1- San
Francisco and vicinity, 5. , And the said .dele
gates so nominated . shall be appointed by - the
chair.'- ,-.;¦¦ -.'. i ¦'.'.' ;;-' .."."¦• ¦• ..
The National Government In the -past has
concel^d It to be Its duty to do no more than
to provide' for the maintenance of the naviga
bility of' these streams, but we note with
pleasure that the Government s«ms of late to
have adopted a more liberal policy, and In
many caccs has made provision for the per
formance of work that will benefit a large
numbfr of people where the work could not
have been done. by private enterprise.
The improvement of these rivers la a sub
ject that should engage the attention, of the
best engineering skill of the world, -We be
lieve the State 'of California Is fully awake
to the importance of adopting; any plan which,
after discussion, may seem the best adapted
to accomplish the desired result. Other States
of the Union having water systems have been
compelled to meet the question, and the time
has now arrived In California when the sub
ject should receive our earnest attention and
any plan adopted our united support.
We suggest that any plan that Is adopted
should enlist the aid -of the Federal and State
Governments and . of the property-owners di
rectly benefited by the proposed work.. Ac
cordingly, we. recommend to the convention
that- the subject of comprehensive Improvement
of the waterways of California bo as , to In
crease their facilities . for navigation and also
to protect the ', adjacent lands from overflow
oe submitted to a commission to be composed
of five engineers to be appointed as follows:
One by .the Commissioner of Public Works of
the State, one to be a United States engineer
having charge of river work in California and
thre^ other -eminent engineers residing out *of
the State of> California who have given par
ticular attention to river improvement, to^be
selected by the executive committee herein
after designated. Said engineers shall bo re
quested to report such plan in time to prepare
bills to be presented at the next session Of the
Legislature for such portions of the w L £&•¦
they may be able to report on at that time. .
We sugcest that all plans and suggestions
for the Improvement of rivers and reclamation
of lands be referred to said commission of
engineers, and that each member of this con
vention shall pledge his good faith to use all
honorable means to secure the adoption and
execution of such plans when adopted.
Inasmuch as the work to be performed by
thp non-resident- engineers , will be of vast
benefit to the whole people of the State we
respectfully request the Governor of the State
the Commissioner of Public : Works and the
auditing board thereof to make out of the' funds
at their disposal the ¦ necessary appropriations
for the payment of the., services and expenses
of. the said, engineers.'. / - ' - •
not only as navigable streams, but as water
ways for the drainage of the valleys through
which they flow. The lands lying adjacent to
these rivers arc the most fertile in the world
and are capable of supporting a large anii
prosperous population. Many millions of dol
lars have been Invested In the reclamation of
these lands and they form no inconsiderable
portion of the as5essment roll of the State.
. Mr. . Chairman. Ladies and Gentlemen:
Speaking for myself it seems that this con
vention-Is one, of -the greatest Imnjortancexnot
only for. the great valleys' of the Sacramento
and San Joaquin buf for the whole State of
California. It is a • gathering of people who
are \ Interested, directly most of you. the rest
of you indirectly. In the .reclamation of -a
body of - land, richer, perhaps than .any other
that lies undsr the sun. ; It has been subject
to great dangers, hag been the goal toward
which many men have turned their highest
ambitions, their hopes, their expectations -and
upon: which they have expended many hun
dreds of thousands of , dollars and with par
tial success they have been reclaimed. -Tho
floods of the last ; winter have v demonstrated
that ¦ Individual ¦ effort as put forth upon *• this
i Arthur R. Briggs next moved the
appointment of a committee on per
manent organization and order of busi
ness. It was also moved by P.J. Van
Loben Sels that a committee of "three
be appointed on credentials. Both mo
tions carried.
PARDEE'S WELCOjrE. \
„" Governor George C. Pardee then ad
dressed the convention. He said:
sympathy . with the movement and that the
dues be Axed at $1 per annum, payable in
advance. .. * A
Resolved. That the thanks of this convention
be tendered to the chairman. Rufua P. Jen
nings, and the .secretary. Morris Brooke, for
their services. . : .
ROBERT DEVLIN. Chairman.
LEE A. PHILLIPS.
R. M. WELCH.
JOHN W. FERRIS.
R. E. WILHOIT. ?
, E. A. FORBES. •
SAMUEL FRANKENHEIMER.
. ... P. J. VAN LOBEN SELS.
The convention was called to or
der at 10 o'clock yesterday morning
by. Morris Brooke, secretary of the
Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.
Temporary organization was immedi
ately accomplished by the selection of
Rufus P. Jennings as temporary chair
man and Morris Brooke as secretary.
Mr. Jennings, on taking the chair,
said:
It la highly gratifying to me to b« made
chairman of this convention, the objects of
which must appeal to every man who has
the welfare of California at heart. We should
keep In view the enlightenment of the people
concerning the proposition confronting them
and Its importance -to the entire State of Cali
fornia as well as to the sections more ap
parently affected. In the deliberations of this
convention the omission of . details and of
controversial subjects Is obviously desirable.
Such matters properly are within the scope
of committees.' We have before , us a (treat
problem, one that must be dealt with on broad
lines and with a ; clear , realization that in
bringing the problem to a solution we must
b»ar in mind that the good of one Is the good
Of all. i Therefore there- must be a unity of
purpose in the entire proceedings. The neces
sity for action 13 imperative. The past year's
damage by floods In lands tributary to the
San Joaquin and the Sacramento rlvtrs is
fresh In the minds of all. The damage that
will be done in the future unless some plan
of. relief Is devised no man can tell. This
great . undertaking, when accomplished, will
make our great State still greater, our people
still richer, our products still more diversified
and prove still more conclusively to the world
that Californlans are equaj to any emergency.
(Applause.) .
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay, May 23.—
President Ordonez announces. a victory
over the revolutionists by the Govern
ment troops under General Nuniz.
Eighty of the revolutionists were killed
and 200 wounded.
Plans Comprehensive and Permanent Works to Con
trol Waters of the Sacramento and
the San Joaquin.
Eighty Killed- and
Turo Hundred
Wounded.
OFFICERS OF THE RIVER CONVENTION' WHICH MET IN THE PALACE HOTEL. YESTERDAY MORNING. AND THREE WELL.
KNOWN CITIZENS WHO WERE PROMINENT AMONG THE MANY ABLE SPEAKERS THAT TOOK PART IN- THE DIS
CUSSIONS AT THE OPENING SESSIONS.
Captain Bonsor of the Hazelton got
wrathy at this, and suddenly his vessel
plunged bow foremost into the broad
side of the Mount Royal. Another foot
and th° Litters engine-room would
have been flooded, so that she would
have sunk. Cartain Wood accused
Bon.«-or of purposely colliding with his
vessel. Bonsor called Wood a liar and
added many similar epithets. Each
man then sent for his revolver, and the
paFsens»rs sought the engine-rooms for
shelter. Accounts differ regarding the
number of bullets that were passed,
but no actual damage was done. Final
ly both men gave up the bombardment
as the Haz»lton got under way. The
Mount Royal is badly damaged. Her
ownera are making complaint to the
Government. .
VANCOUVER, B. C, May 23.—Pas
sengers arriving by the steamer Co
quielam from Port Essington to-day
tell of an exciting gun fight which took
place last Friday between rival steam
boat captains on the Skeena River. It
was the first trip of the season for the
two boats, the Mount Royal and the
Hazelton, which ply on that stream.
Many bets were made as to which
would reach the upper river first. The
Hazelton, Captain Bonsor, had the ad
vantage at the start and several times
jockeyed the other vessel pretty nearly
to the bank. But by a bit of luck the
Mount Royal turned the tables on her
rival and was soon zigzagging the
course! trying to keep the Hazelton
bt hind.
Special Dispatch to The Call
REBEL ARMY
IN URUGUAY
IS ROUTED
Two Riyer Captains
in Sensational
Encounter.
BOAT RACE
ENDS IS A
GUN FIGHT
Admiral Bowles continued:
"I believe that it is worth while to
have a merchant marine, and the
cheapest and most direct way to get
It would be for the Government to step
in and equalize the cost of building
ships; and then It should pay a bouity
to th<» shipowners for the additional
cost of running the ships under Ameri
can laws. This should operate for a
fixed period, 6O that capital might be
invited in."
Representative McDermott asked if
it is not a fact that the price of steel
rails r.as absolutely maintained by the
Bteel pool, and the admiral replied:
"I believe it is so."
"On July 1 of last year," he continued,
*'I made a list of the battleships and
armored cruisers building in this
country and England. To my sur
prise I found that the cost was the
same here as in England. Why? If
the American builder bid in a business
way this would be impossible. But
there has been cut-throat competition
to get the contracts for battleships.
There Is not a battleship building at a
price which the builder can afford."
Rear Admiral Bowles, president of
the Fore River Shipbuilding Company
of Quincy, Mass., said that the only
advantage we had over Knglish and
Scotch builders was in wood, very little
of which was u^ed in cargo carriers.
Steel plates here were 50 per cent
higher. The wages here exceeded those
in English yards by from 30 to 60 per
cent.
Nixon paid that foreign countries paid
526.0OO.C00 in bounties. He was in favor
cf differential duiies.
WARSHIPS BUILT AT LOSS.
"You would have to take the tariff
off everything, because everything
goes into a ship. If we had free ma
terial and free ships we should have
to have free labor, too, because you
recognize that labor is protected as
well."
C B. Orcutt, president of the New
port News Shipbuilding Company, told
the commission that ships could be
built in Ungliuid for 75 per cent less
than they can be built for here. The
cause of this difference, he asserted,
¦was that 75 per cent more was paid for
labor in the yards of this country
than in Great Britain and at the some
time there was 40 per cent in the cost
<if material in favor of the English
builders. He said the protective tariff
was responsible for the difference in
cost of material. In a later statement,
however, be corrected his estimates to
from 40 to 50 per cent.
Lewis Nixon said builders in this
country had been constructing too
pood ships for American use. There
vas no demand for the English tramp
type of vessel in this country. He said
the cost of the building here was
greater than lu England.
•Suppose you should take the duty
off :.!! ship-building materials, do you
think that would be of benefit?" asked
Senator Lodge.
HIGH' WAGES FOR LABOR.
Thomas Clyde of the Clyde Line,
the first witness called, strongly advo
cated a ship subsidy. After a deep
study of the problem he was con
vinced that this was the best course
to pursue. He presented a chart show
ing the status of the chief mari
time net ior.s of the world. The United
States stands at the bottom. All of
the nations, he said, had given aid of
some sort to natural conditions. Clyde
said the United States must pay the
builders the difference in cost of build
ing arid also enough to enable them to
operate the ships, on account of the
much higher rate paid sailors under
the American flag.
NEW YORK. May 23.— Th« Merchant
Marine Commission, authorized by the
injty-elghth Congress to consider and
recommend legislation for the develop
ment of the American merchant ma
rine, began its first session here to
day. Senator Gallingrer of New Hamp
shire Is chairman of th« commission,
¦which is coir posed of members of
both branches of Congress.
Senator Gallinger, In opening the In
quiry, pointed out that more than 90
per cent of the foreign commerce of
this country was being carried in for
rign chips and paid that the commis
sion would be fortunate if the decision
here and elsewhere sheds as much
light on the subject as would enable
It to recommend to Congress legislation
of a remedial character.
"A sympathetic strike will be adopted
only as a last resort. -If the railroad
company wants a fight we will give it.
for with the men we can call out we
can tie up all the freight transporta
tion In New York and stop the move
ment of food supplies, raw material
and poods of every sort. But we do
not want to do that if it can be
helped."
At a. meeting of representatives of
the teamsters' and freight handlers'
unions late to-night it was decided that
unless the officials of the New York.
New Haven and Hartford system con
sent to meet a committee from tho
strikers early to-morrow the tearastera
will go out in sympathy with the
freight handlers.
The freight clerks and the marine
firemen were also represented at tha
meeting to-day. About thirty delegates
acted for 58,000 employes. President
Curran says that the delegates from
the other unions pledged their support
to him for a sympathetic strike at the
moment he should ask for it. He con
tinued:
NEW YORK, May 23.— Because of a
strike of firemen and oilers on the
transfer boats of the New York. New
Haven and Hartford lines. President
Roosevelt. Mrs. Roosevelt and Secre
tary Loeb were obliged to-night to
take a cross-country route and suffer
considerable delay and inconvenience
in going from Washington to Groton.
Mass.. where the President's sons are
attending school.
The President's car left Washington
at 5 o'clock, over the Pennsylvania
road, and the party was to have come
direct to Jersey City, transfer there to
one of the New Haven boats and con
tinue the journey over the New York.
New Haven and Hartford Railway.
Whether the Pennsylvania Company
disliked to subject the President to pos
sible delays under present conditions
or feared something more serious
might occur to retard him, it changed
the route. and at Trenton hi3 car was
switched' off the main line and sent
over the Belvidere division. At Belvi
dere it was again switched to the Dela
ware and Hudson tracks, and at May
brook. N. Y., it was again transferred
to the New England road and wen*
over the Pgughkeepsle bridge.
Officials of the company would give
no. reason as ,to why the President's
route was changed. It was rumored
early in the evening 1 that the company
had been informed by strikers that the
boat would not be permitted to make
the trip and that it would be better
wisdom to take the President by some
other route.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
More Than Ninety Per Cent of Conn
try's Foreign Commerce Carried
in Alien Vessels.
Trip From Washington to Groton,
' Mass., Is Made by a Round
about Course.
Chairman Gallinger Points
Out America's Great Lack
of Merchantmen.
Private Car Not Permitted
to Cross on New Haven
Road's Ferry.
Congressional Com
mission Begins Its
Session.
Takes a Circuitous
Route on Rail
Journey.
SEEKS WAY
TO UPBUILD
OUR MARINE
PRESIDENT
IS DELAYED
BY STRIKE
Alcazar— "A Posslole Case."
California— "When. We Were
-' Twenty-One."
Central— "A Great Temptation.'*
Chntes — Vaudeville.
Columbia — "Ivan the Terrible. 1 *
Grand — "Pedora."
Orpheum — Vaudeville.
Tivoll— "A Bunaway Girl."
THE TXXA.TZTOS.
Forecast mad* at San Fran
cisco for thirty hours ending
mid&Urfct. May 94:
Baa rraadsoo and vicinity —
Cloudy, unsettled weather Tues
day, possibly llrht shower* ;
brisk westerly winds, with for
la the afternoon and nljrht.
A. O. MoAPIE,
District Forecaster.
TIE WS&TXSS.
VOLUME XCV— NO. 170.
The San Francisco Call

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