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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, July 20, 1904, Image 9

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At a meeting recently held by the
residents of the Potrero in Davidson's
Hall, corner of Twenty-second street
and Pennsylvania avenue, it was re
solved to organize the Potrero Im
provement Club, with the object of ad
vancing the interests of the property
owners of the district. Frank J. Weiss
was appointed president of the club;
Gaun Graham, vice president; H. B.
Davidson, secretary; P. Ward, finan
cial secretary; Jeremiah Twomey,
treasurer, and B. O'Donnell, sergeant
sit firms*
Potrero Has Improvement Club.
General Manager Chapman and Su
perintendent of Repairs Lane of the
United Railroads yesterday risked
Commissioners of Public Works
Schmitz and Maestretti relative to a
formal request made by the board
that' the corporation begin the work of
repaving between its car tracks. The
officials of the company informed the-
Commissioners that they would co-op
erate with the city in repairing all
pavements that are in bad condition.
They acknowledged that there was
much of this work to do and expressed
a desire that most of It be done before
the rain sets in.
At the suggestion of the Commis
sioners of Works it was agreed that
the repairing between the tracks be
done simultaneously with the repair
of the rest of the street in order to
Insure a perfectly uniform pavement
on the entire block. The city has $40,
000 to expend in that direction and
the United Railroads will be com
pelled to spend a similar amount. The
work will be done by F. M. Yorke.
who secured the contract for the city's
portion of the work at a very low
price as compared with former years.
Commissioner Schmitz expressed his
.satisfaction at the willingness of the
United Railroads to dr its share of the
work. The first repairs to be carried
out will be on Folsom street, which
has been in a sadly neglected state
for many years. . !
Officials of the Corporation Will Co
operate Wltli City In Repairing
Bad Pavements. /
UNITED RAILROADS WILIi
REPAVE BETWEEN TRACKS
day's programme will be a discussion
of the relative merits of the English
cooking ranges as opposed to those of
American make. To-night a banquet
will be given at Delmonico's at 6:45
and all day to-morrow will be spent on
an outing to Alum Rock Park, near
San Jose. This will conclude the three
days* convention.
Unites States Immigrant Commis
sioner Hart H. North received instruc
tions yesterday from the National
Commissioner of Immigration at
Washington, D. C, to allow Alice E.
Soon to be landed. Miss Soon is a
Chinese lady, a native of the Portu
guese settlement of Macao. She ar
rived at this port recently on the
steamship Mongolia with a certificate
setting forth that she was a student.
The document was Issued by the
Portuguese Consul at Shanghai and
it v had been vised by the American
Consul there.
Chinese Student Landed.
Colonel John M. Denny, M. P., who
lately completed his thirty-fourth
steamer for New Zealand waters, pro
posed "The Guests," which was re
sponded to by the Honorable H. B.
Lefroy, one of the Australian agents
general, in a fitting strain.
The last' toast of the evening, "The
Chairman," was proposed by Hon.
Alfred Dobson and responded to
made a very happy speech. He said,
among other things, that the trade
act, passed within the last year in
New Zealand granting preferential
treatment to British manufacturers
would in a very few years be of enor
mous benefit and service to the manu
facturers throughout the United King
dom.
W. PEMBER REEVES. WHO PRE
SIPKD AT THE NEW ZEALAND
DINNER IN LOXDQN.
Company A will visit the biff trees
to-morrow and the regimental band
will go to Capitola.
SANTA CRUZ, July 19. — The non
commissioned officers of the League of
the Cross Cadets gave a ball at the
Casino auditorium to-night and it
proved to be a most enjoyable affair.
It was attended by many of the younff
ladies of this city and by a large num
ber of visitors from San Francisco
and San Jose.
Ball Given at the Casino Auditorium
by Xon- Commissioned Officers
an Enjoyable Affair..
LEAGUE OF THE CROSS
CADETS EXJOY OUTING
Levy said that it was intended \o
distribute copies of the pamphlet to
the pupils of the public schools on the
opening day next Monday for presen
tation to their parents. One hundred
thousand copies In all have been
printed.
The Supervisors' Printing Commit
tee is averse to permitting the Health
Board to print the names of its mem
ben on the pamphlet about to be is
sued, entitled "Health Hints for the
Household." Deputy Health Officer
Levy appeared before the committee
yesterday and said that the pamphlets
were printed, but the board desired
to print on the cover thereof the
names of the members. The commit
tee cited the charter, which prohibits
the names of city officials on station
ery, and also objected because it
would in effect be an advertisement
of the doctors on the board. The com
mittee was inclined to permit the
name of Health Officer Ragan to ap
pear on the pamphlet, but Levy In
sisted that all the names be printed.
The matter was taken under advise
ment by the committee, which will.
render its decision to-day.
Snper\-isors Object to Free Advertis
ing Sought by Physicians Through
Pamphlet for Distribution.
The first day of the twelfth annual
meeting of the Pacific Coast Gas As
sociation began at Mechanics* Insti
tute, 31 Post street, yesterday mornmg
at 10 o'clock. The hall was tastefully
decorated and the walls were hung*
with pictures of the association's for
mer presidents. The convention will
last three days. Night meetings will
be held.
At the morning session the ordinary
business of the association was trans
acted. The report of the treasurer
Bhowed that the organization was in a
flourishing condition. The princi
pal features of the session were
the election of fifty-four new
members and an address by
the president, "W. A. Aldrich, on the
growth of the gas question during the
last fifty years, the operation of gas
engines in large units, the labor ques
tion and its solution. President Aid
rich holds that the only way to over
come the present antipathy between
capital and labor and the elimination
of strikes is to give employes a share
of the profits according to the efficiency
shown by the workmen.
The afternoon session was occupied
in listening to an address by E. C.
Jones on. "Pressure Points." Mr. Jones
dwelt on the differences in piping, the
required pressura for the operation of
gas engines and the safety devices to
prevent the escape of gas in the event
of a light being blown out while at low
pressure. At the finish of Mr. Jones'
address the members began an active
discussion of the several topics touched
upon. The rest of the afternoon was
taken up in listening to a review of
gas history by T. R. Parker.
After deciding, to hold meetings at
night the association was informed
that Professor Edward Booth, who
was to have lectured on "Radium," was
111 and could not be present. There
upon it was decided not to meet until
to-day at 10 o'clock.
The most interesting event on to-
SAN JOSE July 19. — Miss May Ham
ilton, who was secretly married to
George W. Smith at San Rafael last
December, accompanied by her sister,
Mrs. Hendy, and her husband, arrived
here this morning to ask her father's
forgiveness for marrying against his
wishes. Her father. A- B. Hamilton,
and family, however, were not at
home. They had gone to Pacific Grove
for a vacation and will not be back
for a couple of weeks. The party then
went to the Hamilton home on South
Fifth street and took possession of the
house. Mrs. Smith sent word to her
parents to-day that she was married
and at home and would await their
coming. It is said that when the fam
ily returns she will receive the paren
tal blessing.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
After Barber had received his money
from his credulous agricultural stu
dents, of whom it is said he had six or
eight, he absconded, and his where
abouts are not known to the Federal
officials. He had advertised in cer
tain newspapers In London that he waa
conducting an agricultural college at
Mountain View where farming and
fruit growing would be taught practic
ally, and he received many remunera
tive replies. Shortly after Barber's
sudden disappearance the United
States Immigrant Bureau at this city
instituted an investigation and the
matter was reported to United States
District Attorney Woodworth.
It is further asreed upen and promised by
the party of the second part that he will
! ¦•;» tits lin •¦ ? to such work as shall bi in
quired o! him hy the party of the first part,
and in all matters pertaining to the work ic
quired of him <io as the party of the fl'ft
part or his representative directs and orders.
Also <n the matters of and In such mat ers
a^i punctuality at meals and the hour of re
tiiinK at night the party of the second part
promises and aerees to conform to the rules
of ths party of the first part's establishment.
Inwood and Parez paid Barber one
hundreds pounds sterling each on No
vember 2, 1903, and each contracted to
pay fifty pounds sterling additional not
later than May 2, 1901. In return Bar
ber agreed to furnish them board,
lodging and washing at his home at
Mountain View, California, "for a
period of not less than one year nor
more than eighteen months — the exact
tSme to be decided by Barber." He
also agreed to furnish them with in
struction during the period mentioned
in the different branches of
etc., "engaged in by the party of the
first part." He also guarantees "at
the expiration of one year or eighteen
months employment at a salary of not
less than $50 per month with board
and lodging." The contract recites:
By direction of United States District
Attorney Marshall B. Woodworth, As
sistant United States Attorney Charles
M. Fickert filed five complaints yes
terday in the United States District
Court against George W. Mosher and
H. C. Barber for violating the act of
Congress approved March 3, 1903. en
titled "An act to regulate the immi
gration of aliens into the United
States."
Mosher is a contractor and builder
doing business at Palo Alto. There are
three complaints against him to recover
an aggregate penalty of $3000 and costs
as provided for by the act. There are
two complaints against Barber to re
cover an aggregate penalty of 52000 and
costs.
It Is alleged that Mosher on April
3, 1904, went to "Windsor, Nova Scotia,
Canada, and entered into an express
parole contract with Edgar C. Burgess,
Everett Burgess and Warren E. Harvie
to employ them as carpenters at Palo
Alto at wages of $4 a day, and that
under this contract they went to Palo
Alto and worked as carpenters.
The complaint against Barber
charges him with having made a writ
ten contract with John Inwood and
George Neaves Parez in London,
England, on November 1, 1903, where
by they were eventually to be em
ployed on Barber's farm at Mountain
View as farm hands at wages of $&0
per month each. The contracts are
identical, with the exception of the
names. They contain the following
conditions:
HEALTH BOARD MEMBERS
WANT NAMES IX PRINT
Family Is Off on Vacation
and She and Her Husband
Take Possession of House
Business Will Occupy Two
Days and the Third Will
Be Spent in Sightseeing
Mountain View Farmer
Absconds After Having
Started a Bucolic School
PAPEES AEE SUBMITTED
KETUBNS TO OLD H0MK
by Mr. Reeves in a short but apt
speech, In which he took occasion to
give the lion's share of the credit for
the success of the work of his office
and of the dinner to his very efficient
staff and his fellow committeemen.
The Duke of Marlborough, in propos
ing "The Colony of New Zealand,"
The usual loyal toasts were proposed
by the chairman and enthusiastically
responded to. All of the speeches were
commendably brief and the formal pro
ceedings were over by 10 o'clock. This
gave the company ample opportunity
for exchanging views ana Indulging in
reminiscences.
The Hon. H. F. Wigram, mem
ber of the New Zealand Legislative
Council, gave the toast. "The Imperial
Forces of the Empire," and referred
to the part which New Zealand tocrk
in the Boer war, when she supplied no
less than ten contingents — a larger
number in proportion to the population
probably than any other colony of the
empire. The increase in the subsidy
for the British navy, he said, "indicat
ed the sympathy of the colony with the
imperial forces, while the preferential
tariff in favor of British goods showed
a desire to meet the mother country."
Mr. Wigram was followed by the
Earl of Glasgow, who said: "The mag
nificent way in which New Zealand
came to our assistance would never be
fcrrgotten."
The British Australian of London, in
its issue of June 30, gives a full and
interesting report of the "annual New
Zealand dinner," held on June 23 in
that city at the Trocadero restaurant.
There was a large and distinctly rep
resentative gathering of New Zealand
ers and a number of distinguished
guests, among whom were the Duke
of Marlborough, Under Secretary of
State for the Colonies, ana the Earl of
Glasgow, formerly Governor of New
Zealand. The Hon. W. Pember
Reeves, agent general and chairman of
the committee, received the guests on
entering and presided at the table at
which were seated over 200 persons.
With the Duke of Marlborough as
practically the guest of the evening the
chairman made a new departure In the
toast list and instead of giving "The
Colony of New Zealand," as usual, left
that toast to the Under Secretary for
the Colonies and replied to it himself
in an incomparable manner, without
introducing any subject of a contro
versial character.
ALIEN LAWS VIOLATED
Members of the Pacific
Coast Association Begin
a Three Days' Convention
San Jose Belle, Secretly Wed
ded at San Eafael, Now
Wants Parental Blessing
Duke of Marlboi-ough
Is the Guest of
Honor.,
W. Pember Reeves a
I Witty and Genial
Toastmaster.
Palo Alto. Contractor May
Have to Pay Uncle Sam
Three Thousand Dollars
HOPES TO WIN
FORGIVENESS
GAS AFFAIRS
UNDER DEBATE
HEAVY FINES
ARE SUE D FOR
ANNUAL NEW ZEALAND DINNER PROVES
INTERESTING AND ENJOYABLE EVENT
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL', WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 1904.
Cornelius Maher, a railroad man
employed by the Ferries and Presidio
Railroad Company, living at the Junc
tion of Octavia and Lombard streets,
was reported at the Morgue yester
day as mlssingi He drew his wages
last Saturday night and has not been
seen by his friends since.
Railroad Man Missing.
9
- GRAPE-XUTS.
Every Brain-worker wants a strong 1 , keen thinker in his HEAD QUARTERS. Many successful men and women
regularly eat the brain-making food — GRAPE-NUTS.
For the Phosphates necessary for this purpose are intentionally supplied in GRAPE-NUTS in liberal quantities
and will positively rebuild the worn out brain and nerve centers. ,
The Inventor of GRAPE-NUTS
About 10 years ago found himself badly off from overwork and weak digestion.
He experimented about two years, seeking to perfect a food that would contain the elements required by Nature
to rebuild the depleted nerves and brain.
BUT such food must be made easy of digestion, else the weakened organs of the body could not extract the re-
building elements.
Finally success came, after dozens of experiments and failures. The right parts of Wheat a^nd Barley were se-
• lected, skillfully blended in the right proportions. Subjected for hours to moisture, then hours more to slow heat,
gradually producing chang es and mechanically digesting the fool. Further processes follow, until the food is finally
delivered fully cooked., pre-digested and ready for instant service with a little rich cream.
Years have gone by and experience has shown that the now famous brain food planned for a purpose, accom-
_— It does supply pre-digested food that a babe or an atlilete can digest.
It does furnish the nerve centers and brain with the delicate, microscopic particles of natural Phosphate of Pot-
ash which combines with Albumen to make the gray matter filling the nerve centers and brain.
It does prove itself to users in a very few da vs. ' >>»
________ *
It is known to, and used by, our most famous' Physicians, Teachers, Scientists, Capitalists.. Professors, Clergy-
men, Authors, Journalists, Merchants and successful,, thinking Farmers.
"There's a Reason" and a profound one for
sfftrTsW EbSXi stttfifi . * \ ___fl^ __tS3R "jg__g__j_ w __Bp SS . ~j_flj3r_f^ V&jSjL JBBM **• 1 ¦«_.
Get the little book, "The Road to Wellville." in each pkg.
c
1-EADING BUSINESS COLLEGE OF THE
WEST.
Over 24 Tost rt.. San FrmneJsco. Cai
E«ab. 40 y*T*. Open entire year.day & night
•¦¦ Write *or c'.rculara <free).
VflV tfFYFRIVClT SCHO °^ of mush-
U» ViLI LKMWfl 641 FILTON KT
SAN FP.ANXISCO. Established JS35
Pre-rreir.ently the largest and be*t
ecu!pr>e<S rchocl cr. the Paclflc Ccait— offer-
lr.r all the advantages of Eastern an 1
Eurcpean ccrifervatorJes for a. thorough
rruslral education. Prospectus upon ap-
plication. Visitors to the World"* Fair St
!yra'.». are brrtted to examine the exhibit
cf the school. Educational Uulldlnr Cali-
fornia Kohonl Exh'.hH.
New Quarters — More Space
FXI7EK -IOO3.IS.
Ju*t ncvefi Into cur new rooms; new flre-
rroof. bcflainr. 3 elevators, electric lirhti
treats r««t. Do more .Tor etudenta than trtr
before. Th!« is the collega that secure* «o
r-ar.y r°5'i:rns.
San Francisco Business College,
¦ 73S Mission St.. Near Third.
-^^Sjp-jips. seta Oollere and
i-'irr'T.OTTffeJEfcSa bt * t • rt ' ul PP e4 «chooi
xStPwJi* .i^C?J- > r2nf of business, shorthand
', *"**'*;7 "ffilM and ' n e1 n **rtn» west
l^Ffiwn^WvSifsy t y t £««*». Perfect
-' - -J-LlZJL" rL>*^y ;r>^~ cllmat*. Expense*
,.„. _ "7-, — low " w rlt« for fret
Iim-page catalogue.
Mills College and Seminary
CONFERS DEGREES AXD GRANTS DIPLO-
MAS.
* Jl*'r i! l? a I rT^ Course «ccredite<l to tha unlrerai-
S£t**5-**^*»« Eaatern colleres; rare opportu-
MOM offered In music, art and elocution. Thir-
jwn Write for catalcpue to
C - T MILLS. PRESIDENT
MILLS COLLEGE P. O.. CAL.
THE. LYCEUM.
,.^'?.* CC " <1U " 1 P pe P»™«cry school for the unl-
*»r f ny. law and medical colleges. Is well
ex; r Fh:f;n'Vu,i^ or any 8unftia pr °-
L. H. GRAL-. Ph. P.. Principal.
HAMLIN SCHOOL
ASTO TAH IJESS SEMINARY.
1fe i S J^kson Ft.. S. F. Bcardins and dav
•¦chool for Ctrl*. Accredited by the leading
«...e S es ar.d universities Social attention
tlven to music. Reopen. TfESDAT August
t. ISOL BARAH D. HAMLIX. Principal
/^»ir>i««. 1 ~. An enrollment of
(lAfllOriMOi 450 students tclla
< f'"5 ki*ik \« ** tllc story of our
A_S___. S • tV€C<L success ;new build-
< *OV"_S| 1 r~ Ing. new ideas.
(OH v CV £J wholesome coilege-
V»*^ —^ v life; Catalogue.
rrr. Otfaea Gate ave.. S. F.
St. Mary's College,
OAXZ.A2TD. CAL.
Studies will be r^uire.1 MONDAY August 1
?'•'¦*• nP.O, ZKXOXIAN. President.
WrATFRN Thomuph business couree. Kr.g-
I. LOICnH i; fh . bookkeeping, shorthand, ar-
rfl";ti"CC lthm*>tlc. alcetra, etc.. Civil Ser-
lU.lntOO vice. Individual instruction. Po-
sitions for graduates. 6 mo. (day)
' 0LIF8E f3 " ; Kv *- School. 6 mo., fit.
auuL 11O7 Market St.. cor. Seventh.
MISS -WEST'S ECHOOXi FOB OIELS.
•J1H VAX XE.SS AVE.. openg Aug.' 17.
Home and Day School. Accredited hy leading
<• llese*. For ratal sue address MARY B.
V. »T. Principal. Kindergarten. Applications
received between 1:30 end 3:3v p. m.
EOONFS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL,
BERKELEY.
BEOPEZ7S MONDAY, AUG. 8.
y. a. boohx. _^
SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATION
PARTIXGTnX'S. <24 PINE ST.
Oldest School 1n America.
New Term Bejcini. MOXDAY. Aujt. L
DAY AXD EVEXIXG CLASS.
SAITTA CLAB& COLLEGE.
S&sta Clara. CaL
StufiVs will be resumed en Tuesday, Aosust
2 For further Information «pp!y to REV.
KOEERT O. KEXXA. S. J.. President.
ST. JOSEPHS ACADEMY,
PERALTA PARK. BERKELEY.
Kef rdingr and day school for boys under 15 rr«
f>: hge. gmdie* commence MONDAY, Aug IstI
:rt)4. Smi for prospectus to Bro. Genebern.
OPTICIANS EAKZT $10 A SAT.
Vf^S^Ji. Individual instructions: a!«o
j|j|f«f~S5fZ?)fc cia " course.. Call or write for
tSrjf^mSik^^ I.TOFpectuw. CLlSE OPTICAL
•zf/Tyfijt — ' IJC?T *TUTE. 10M Market »t..
"^^gPZY E - *"* E>" e> examined free.
hitchcock Military Academy
SAN RAFAEL. CAL.
WILL REOPEN on Aucu't 1«
Af&Iy to the Principal.
IRVING INSTITUTE.
Mount Tatnalpais Military Academy
SAN RAFAEL. CAL.
JuriorVfcoct •*parat«. Fall term begins Aut
It. ARTHVR CROSBY. D.D.. Head Master.
LWvfMj^p^l^jLJ most PracU-
r ~ Market St.. 8. p"
ANDERSON ACADEMY,
IBVIXUTOX. CALIFORXIA.
Hold* pre-eminently the conndenc* of lu pa-
trons and the loyalty of Its pupila.
TVILUAM WALKER ANDERSON. Principal
Ull! i T" V bt '* in * Au «- Sth: larger and
M I I I ' I A » lI ° n eer faculty than ever;
1 1 W I 1 I V perfect sanitation; Illus-
trated eatalcruc. W. j.
SJKI'.KDITU. Vice Principal. Menlo Par*. Cai.
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL
2310 CLAY STBEET.
Will iiEOPEN en August 1 with
BERT X TCCKER. M. S..
PrindpaL
COLLEGE O7 2TOTE.E DAME.
£AN Jcti;. CAL. Exclusively for boa-tlln*
•tuienta, KiXty-ihird year. Courses: Classical.
Literary. Scientific. Conservatory. Collet:*
preparatory accn-dlted. Intermediate and Pri-
mary dailies. Studies resumed Tuesday Aur-
ust 2. 1»C4.
1} ALO ALTO ACADEMY, one mile from
¦ Stanford Unlve— tity — Boys and younr men
prepared for Stanford. Berkeley or Eastern
colleg-ee. Exceptional Advantages In Modern
L*nruar« and Higher Mathematics. Fall term
betlns August 22. For catalogs* address
y atx Ann phiplt— . p a To Alto aL
¦DDTTCU17C FOR BARBERS. BA-
D£lUOilL\u k «™. bootblack*, bath-
houses, billiard tables. '
bre— ers. bookbinders, candy makers, canners. J
Cyrre, Soar miUs. foundries, laundries, paper-
har.rere, printers, painters, thoe factories,
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc
BUCHAKAH BROS.,
Srush Kan ui a ctur ers, 609 Sacrameoto St.

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