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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 03, 1904, Image 14

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A public meeting of the Chinese
King's Daughters wa^ held yesterday
afternoon at the Chinese Presbyterian
Church. All the officers and members
o* this society are Chinese. An inter
esting programme of vocar and instru
mental musHc was rendered. This was
followed by addresses in Chinese by
Mrs. Chang. Miss White and the Rev.
Wong Dong Sham. A "baby -band"
was also organized and promises to be
a great success. The object of, the or-
5 r Jw. to do sood t0 the poor children
of Chinatown . . >
Chinese King's Daughters.
Owins to the great success which has
followed the use of this machine, the
present suit will.be watched with great
interest by those interested in this class
of gold mining. ¦.,.«^".
The patented apparatus claimed to
have been infringed is what is com
monly known as the "Postlethwaite Ro
tary Separator Gold Dredge," which Is
the machine in general use on the
leather River and on the property adja
cent to Oroville. California.
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive
Works of San Francisco, California, has
instituted — in the Circuit Court of the
United States for the Northern District
of California— equity suit number 13,605
against the "Western Engineering and
Construction Company and the Central
Gold Dredging Company, as Joint ln
fringers of certain patented gold dredg
ing machinery, which la owned and con
trolled by the Risdon Iron and Locomo
tive Works. h ¦-•.•:• *,
To Users of Gold Dredging Machinery.
Michael Egan, a helper employed
by the San Francisco Gas and Elec
tric Company, was accidentally suf
focated shortly after noon yesterday
by illuminating: gas in a trench. Egan
and Thomas McKeon, the foreman,
had been sent to lay service pipes to
the residence of H. Cullener on Twen
tieth avenue, between H and I streets.
McKeon says he left Egan on • the
ground at 12:15 o'clock and that when
he returned he found the man lying
unconscious in the bottom of the
trench and the gas escaping* from the
point at which Egan had tapped it.
The unconscious man was taken to
the Park' Emergency Hospital,: but
died - before the ambulance reached
there, i It was found that Egan had
attempted to plug the pipe with soap
instead of clay. . .
Michael Egan Dies From Inhaling the
Funies While Making a Connec
tion With the Main.
WORKMAN* SUFFOCATED
IX A GAS TREXCH
Will Visit Bay Points.
- The Congressional Committee on
Merchant Marine will visit Oakland
harbor on a tour of inspection to-day.
The committee will arrive there from
San Francisco about 1 o'clock on the
Government tug General Slocum.
The members of the committee will
be accompanied by Senator Perkins
and several members of the San Fran
cisco Chamber of Comerce and also
by the harbor and water front com
mittee of the Oakland Board of Trade.
The members of this committee are
HughHogran, Edson F. Adams, James
P. Taylor, E. P. Vandercook, R.
Whitehead and Secretary Edwin
Stearns.
MISCHIEVOUS YOUTHS MAY
FACE JUVENILE COURT
Presidio Heights Improvement Club
to Take Steps to Capture Boys
Who Disfigure Residences.
The Presidio Heights Improvement
Club held a meeting in *Jjr United
Arts and Crafts Hall, PreslaTT avenue,
last evening. A: Sbarboro, the presi
dent of the club, was in the chair.
There were about flftv representative
citizens present, and numerous mat
ters pertaining to the improvement of
streets of the district were considered,
with - the result that the Board *~of
Works will he visited by a committee
that will lay before it the needed re
quirements of the locality.
Dr. Regensburger, among other
complaints, laid particular stress upon
the delinquencies of scavengers, who
are said to be extremely careless in
their handling of refuse to the dis
comfiture of persons passing on the
streets, as well as to householders.
The. matter of youths defacing houses
by writing on and otherwise disfigur
ing doors and posts caused a resolu
tion to be adopted which is to be sub
mitted to the Chief of Police with the
idea of bringing the offenders before
the Juvenile Court. i ¦
WORK . OF CHINATOWN . EQUAD.—Ser
geant Christiansen filed with Chief Wlttman
yesterday the report of the work of hi* squad
in Chinatown for last month. During the
month 152 arrest* had been made. S3 charged
with bavin* lottery tickets - in possession. 1
keeping an onium place, 0 visiting an opium
place aad 1 60 '¦ misdemeanor*. ' Of the number
60 were convicted and paid fines. 12 convict
ed and confined, 85 dismissed and 5 pending.
The * total fines and forfeitures amounted to
$270. .: ,
Burnett's*. -Vanilla' Extract . used.
a hi*hiv ladonMtd by all leading, hotels. •
SAULT STE. MARIE. Aug. 2.— An accident
to-day at the Shakespeare -gold mine. Webb
wood, resulted in the suffocation of five men.
DETENTION HOME FOR JUVENILES.—
The members of the Suaervlsora* Finance
Committee yesterday made a visit of in
spection tr> the proposed detention home for
juvenile offenders at -tol-433 Polk street. Aftsr
determining up-'n the necessary alterations
and repairs to the Dlace, which tM Mayor
has been authorized by resolution to lease,
the committee decided to Invite bid» for the
work. In the meantime the juveniles ara
cared for at the Boys' and Girls' Aid Society.
The most far-seelr.g economist of this aga
has .recently declared that at the dawn of
history the tragic stage of eommerct was in
the Mediterranean; that the discovery of the
Cape of Good Hope and America transferred
this tragic stage to the Atlantic Ocean, and
that the completion of the Panama canal and
the awakening of the Oriental nations will
transfer the tragic stage of the world's com
merce to the Pacific Ocean, where it will ac
quire a magnitude hitherto unknown in the
history of man. _
. We are to have rivals for supremacy on th«
Pacific Ocean; Russia and Japan are present,
with China in reserve, eventually to surpass
all other nations ic the potency of its Influ
ence upon all the affairs of mankind.
W. H. MILLS.
terterrltorial steamship communication, and
second, reciprocal commerce. These two poli
cies would constitute a combined force which
would give to the Pacific Ocean & vast mer
chant marine.
The Importance of this merchant marine is
obvious. When the war between Spain and
the United States waa declared and the Phil
ippine Islands were conquested. w- did not
have sufficient steamships on the Pacific
Ocean to serve the purpose of Government
transports. Great nations are to arise on th»
eastern shores of Asia;. Russian-Siberia, Ja
pan and China are from this time forth to be
come factors in Pacific Ocean commerce,
which will eventuate in a commerce far .ex
ceeding in volume that existing on the At
lantic.
The Swedish Republican Club met
last night at 161 City Hall avenue for
the purpose of ascertaining 1 how many
members had registered for the com
ing elections. Also many members
who have not yet been naturalized
were persuaded to take out papers.
Monthly meetings will be held by the
club until after election. The annual
picnic will occur on October 16 at
Shell Mound Park.
Swedish Republicans 3Ieet.
In the midst of the excitement^ the
horses attached to the carriage In
which the union men had been riding
became frightened and suddenly dashed
up New Montgomery street to" Market
and down that thoroughfare. At - the
Junction of Market and Second streets
the vehicle struck a fire hydrant and
was promptly demolished, but not until
It had broken the hydrant off at. its
base, from which shot a torrent of*
water hleh into the air, much after
the fashion of a Yellowstone "gusher "
Freed from the. hack, the frightened
horses, with traces dangling -at their
feet, proceeded in their flight down
Market street, but were finally cap
tured and safely tied to a telegraph
pole. Meanwhile the volume of water
A wordy war between angry hack- I
men on New Montgomery street yes- j
terday terminated in a series of ex
pensive incidents that kept a big crowd
deeply interested for half , an hour.
Shortly after 2 p. m. a number of
union hackmen. including Peter Burns
and Percy Benson, drove up to the
New Montgomery-street entrance of
the Palace Hotel in a carriage and
proceeded to chide the drivers of the
hacks standing there for opposing the
union in its strike. Finally "Dud"
Kelly, one of the members of an up
town hack firm, became involved In
an altercation with the union men, and
a big crowd gathered in anticipation of j
a fight. Just as trouble seemed Imml
nent, however. Patrolman D. J. Dris- j
coll appeared on the scene - and pro- I
ceeded to quell the disturbance. !
While this work was going on, how
ever, the water rushing down Second
street had thoroughly flooded that
thoroughfare and finally found its way
into the basements of several business
houses on the west side of the street,
where it did about $1000 worth of dam
age. By the time the gusher had been
checked Police Officer Driscoll had
gathered in Hackmen Burns and Ben
son, who were conveyed in a blue
wagon to the southern station and
booked on charges of disturbing the
peace.
from the broken hydrant was shower
ing down upon the sidewalk and rap
idly converting Market street . into a
lake and Second street into a surging
riven Thousands of people had as
sembled to watch the interesting spec
tacle, which was allowed to continue
for half an hour before a detachment
of firemen arrived on the scene. Boldly
submerging themselves in the deluge,
they finally managed to reach a stop
cock in the street and stop the waste
of water. The broken hydrant was
tdien replaced by anew one.
WATER SPURTING SKYWARD FROM A BROKEN' HTDRAN'T ON M4RKET
STREET YESTERDAY AFTERNOON. A TEAM OF RUNAWAY HORSES AT
TACHED TO A HACK HAVING CAUSED THE SPECTACUI^AR ERUPTION
The legislative delegates Indorsed
are: William J. Harrington, Walter
Larsen, Edward W. Haughey, Law
rence Conlon. Peter J. Kelly, George
Rae, Edward Drew, Frank Kelly, M.
M. Miller and P. J. Sheehy.
The Roosevelt Republican Club of the
Twenty-eighth Assernbly District has
elected the following officers: Peter
J. Kelly, president; John A. Barr. sec
retary; Walter Larsen, treasurer;
George Cooney, sergeant at arms.
The following have been indorsd for
delegates to the State Convention, to
meet at Santa Cruz: Nelson H. Burn
ham, Luke Battles, Fred O. Peterson,
George Cooney- and Fred Hawes.'
Neither of the Gallaghers mentioned
above is the veritable "Good Galla
gher." but both are good men and true
Democrats. O'Brien "points with
pride" to Delmas, Creswell and Mc-
Enerney and challenges McNab to
name their equals for integrity and
fidelity to the principles of Jefferaonian
Democracy. It is admitted that Mc-
Nab can name James D. Phelan and
Franklin K. Lane, but the question is
asked, "Can he 'name E. B. Pond?"
One of the eminent Democrats men
tioned In the league's list was at
O'Brien's headquarters at the Grand
Hotel last night, and the same was
John J. Barrett.
THE REPUBLICAN'S.
floor of the Grand Hotel, and is sur
rounded by a large staff of workers
and advisers. At O'Brien's headquar
ters the declaration is made that many
well-known men of high standing are
lending their support to the Democratic
League. It is said that the banner of
the leasue is borne by Livingston
Jenks, Garret W. McEnerney, W. H.
Alford, John J. Barrett, John Galla
gher, George Gallagher. William F.
Humphrey, Ed Scully, Charles J. Heg
gerty, John Gleason, John S. Drum,
Stephen Costello, Joseph E. O'Donnell,
William A. Breslin, Dr. John King
well, John F. Mullln, Dan O'Callaghan,
Frank Kaufman, William T. Kearney,
Charles (yByrne. James Cronin, John
W. McDonald, Harrv Creswell and D.
M. Delmas.
As supplementing the foregoing outlined pol
icy, the Government of the United States
should address itself to the question of recip
rocal relation with the Orient, analogous to
that recently established with Cuba. It is the
consensus of opinion among far-seeing states
men that the Oriental countries are to have an
awakeninc. We have strenuously demanded
an own door - policy with reference to China.
The best way to secure and maintain an open
door policy with that vast reservoir of human
life, ultimately, to become. an object of most
profitable commercial relation, will b* to en
courage a trade relation by reciprocal duties.
Reciprocity between China. Japan and America
would be the beginning of a commercial rela
tion which would inevitably expand, i
In this view we have two perfectly tenable
propositions; first.* the encouragement of in-
We have in the Pacific Ocean many group*
of Islands; the principal of these are the
Philippines, with a population of 8.000,000
subjects of the United States; second, in mag
nitude are the Hawaiian Islands; but there are
other groups, euch as the Caroline Islands,
Ladrone Islands, etc., also the Territory of
Alaska. Commerce demands and deserves- the
fosterinc care of the nation. A bill to-subsi
dize steamship lines -under the American flair
plying between American- ports should be .pop
ular because- It will cheapen ocean transporta
tion and promote the export of American
products to American territory. This would
Cive to the people of America a measurable
monopoly of the. trade with the colonial de
pendents of this country, and in this way ail
portions of the country ¦ would share equally
lu the benefit of Government munificence.
Though a general subsidy is not or may not
be possible, a restricted subsidy is not amen
able to the charge of Impracticability. It is
competent for the Government to subsidize in
terterrltorial communication under the pro
vision of the constitution which gives Con
gress control of interstate commerce. A sub
sidy to steamships carrying on Interstate
commerce between Interterritorial ports would
be - in line with the policy of internal im
provements. Railroads have been subsidized
to promote interstate commerce; likewise
steamships may be subsidized to promote in
territorial commerce. ... . '.
The commission appointed by the
• Congress of the United States to In
quire into conditions of the merchant
marine service ' and ascertain what
measures are necessary for its expan
sion will arrive in Sain Francisco .to
day. Senator Galllnger of New Hamp
shire is at its head and several prom
inent national legislators are amonjc
the party. The aim of the commission
is to ascertain the needs and demands
of ocean shippers on the Pacific Coast
to the end that proper legislation may
be passed by Congress for the upbuild
ing of sea-faring commerce under the
flag of the United States. *
During, the . last and present week
conferences have been in progress be
tween the business. men of this city and
the traffic managers of the transconti
nental railway lines and the Pacific
Ada.il Steamship Company. These meet
ings were held for the purpose of ad
justing freight rates tor shippers. The
governmental control ; of the Panama
.Railroad has given the shippers of the
State an opportunity to unshackle the
bonds which have made them slaves
to the transcontinental railroads in the
matter of exporting their produce.
Fortuitously the visit of the Con
gressional Commission on Merchant
Marine is contemporary with the an
nouncement of the opening of the Pan- i
ama Railroad to all shippers. Its-mem- j
bers will spend two days in this city,
gathering information that will tend
to frame national laws for the benefit
of marine commerce. The commission
has announced that it wants fact, not
history. To that. end it has asked that
not only steamship men and traffic
managers generally be invited to talk,
but that men representative of those i
who stand before the mast and tell
their troubles in the forecastle be in
vited to the meeting. Among these will
be Andrew Furuseth, the eloquent sec
retary of the Coast Seamen's Union.
William H. Mills gave out a state
ment last night emphasizing the im
portance of the independent marine
service on this coast. His statement
follows: ._..: .r
A general subsidy measure to i all ocean
transportation is unpopular. No law can be
enacted that would meet the views of the en
tire nation. The Interior of a country does
not believe sufficiently in the direct benefit of
such a measure to favor- it. The question
which Is being considered by the Congressional
committee and on which a report is to .be
rnado on the first day of the coming session
of Congress is, how can the Government pro
mote the growth of shipping under the Amer
ican flax?
WISHES TO HEAR ALL
W. H. Mills, an Authority
on Traffic Matters, Issues
an Interesting Statement
In the Democratic political field the
rival chieftain?, Gavin McNab and
James H. O'Brien, are lining up their
respective forces for the general en
gagement at the primaries next Tues
day. In every Assembly district of San
Francisco each leader has filed a ticket,
but the assertion is made in both
camps that the tickets- were prepared
by the party leaders in the several dis
tricts without any pressure from head
qyarters. \
Gavin . McXab is apparently serene
and tranquil, being confident that the
forces of the regular organization will
win a complete victory. His scouts
have not discovered the presence of
formidable opposition in any district of
the town. The chief is in close touch
with the district leaders.
James H. O'Brien has established
campaign headquarters on the parlor
Tilt DEMOCRATS.
Governor Pardee xvill be home in a
day or two, end one of the first sub
jects to engage his attention will be the
appointment of a Prison Director, to
succeed R. M. Fitzgerald. He will also
be called upon to appoint two members
of the State Board or Library Trustees,
one to succeed Or. Thomas Flint, de
ceased, the other to succeed W. C Van
Fleet, whfcse term of four years expired
February 2S, ]?04.
It is expected that the Governor will
also appoint a major general of the
National Guard of California. It is said
that Brigadier General Muller will be
promoted and then be retired at once
with the rank of major general. The
tame honor will be accorded to Briga
dier Central W&rlield. who will go to
the retired iifct wfth the rank of major
general, 'lhei waiter the real appoint
ment to succeed Gtneral Dickinson as
division commander will be announced.
Thtre is gossip in official circles of the
guard to the effect that the Governor
entertains a high opinion of the mili
tary merits of General George Stone.
All the Signs Point to a
Lively. Combat at the
Polls on Next Tuesday
DE3I0CIUT1C FIGHTEBS
Congressional Committee on
Merchant Marine to Ar
rive in This City., To-Day
Crowds on Market Street Walch for Half an Hotir
an Interesting Spectacle Created by the Aerial
Flight of Water from Mouth of a Broken Pipe
Governor iPardce. Is Coming
Home to Shake Down
Fruit for the Expectant
JUICY PLUMS
ON THE TREE
DELUGE FOLLOWS A COLLISION
BETWEEN HACK AND HYDRANT
NATIONAL BODY
WILL INQUIRE
THE SAT\ FRANCISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY; AUGUST - 3. 1904.
14
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Ye Olde English Inn.
144 Mason at. Music by the great Pan-
American Quartet.* *
. advertisements!
If you -»*nt *o rent or buy a piano later.
why-nt.* tet it now? - -
AH This Month It Will Cost
• . You iMottiing.^
After that you can pay rent, installmer.t or
cash, or gtt. it on our new rent purchase
eveteci.
On Clffereat ir.ekes to select from
u inciting the Matchless UC|MC
, ¦ cf which rfcere arc more In flCIitL
use tfcan any 2 other makes.
_ -— — , u- .,.. i
HEINE PIANO COMPAHY,
. 235-237 QEAR7 ST2XET. S. F.
C.akland — 1252 Bread way.
•" 'LEADING BCSIVEFJI CCL^KGE OF THE '
WEST. I
Ov»r ?4 Post f -... Sir rranrisru Ca!. >
Ff^nb- 4(t v««ar«. 'T*n T*tn F*ar.day & n'rht. '
Writ* l"«r efrcnlara <rr*#>.
i VftV MFYFB'Vrt scHodi. of mvsk..
**AN FBAXCISCO. Embiishtd I««V
Plf.-«flJnent!f tbt iRrg^t and !¦««:
•^Ti'pr*^ fdiic! "n -.h~ ParlSl <~o»st— ofTrr-
¦nc ell' tfc» advantages <if Ks't'rn «rv!
Kurrj-.»«n cca**rratori*a (or a thorough
rrT.r'.i~*i (tfaratfofi. r»rost>e<?:'i(t upon :ip-
rV<-e<!cn. Visitors to the Worl<T« Fa.'r. Ft
I.'u!*. «r» irv::«"l it »x-rr.inf th» *xhib't
<' th* ttSwrl. B;il!dine Call*
FnnHa p-«i"~t ¦=>':ihit.
-• — i
: Polytechnic Ensi- i
' is^SS^^^i Scbco1 of "wrt-1
• Cal^Largest and
\Zn-.~i~£%k. •-«I^i < lS L 6nd *n*ineerlag west (
. ¦ c!!matf. Expen.e. j
:-" -f. lew. Write for fr*e !
.00-pagg catalcgue.
Mills College and Seminary !
CONFEUS DEGREES AXD GHANTS DIPLO-
MAS.
Efra'.nary course accredited to th« unlversl- '
t'.t* «r.4.1e«iJinir Eastern colleges: rare opportu- :
( Xitiet offered In music, art and elocution. Thir- ;
¦«y-r.inth year. FaJl term opens August 10l
. I9Ch; write for cm taloin* to •
MRS C. T. MILLS. PRESIDENT
.• MILLS COLLEGE P. O.. CAU *
An. ace: edited preparatory school for the uni-
versity. !aw and medical colleges, is well
• known for its careful and thorough work. Come '
•end be with ire: r.e prepare you well; rerer- I
222 fi?ffigS&« w ' Stwl£ora >">¦ \
¦ ; • ' L H. GRAU. Ph. P.. Principal
i VV/S 1 J 3fe3 BUSINE SS COLLEGE
• Ifi-fl . <J FSv\ Miorthand, ivr.rr:an.«hir.
*¦ •II \y& TA' A Individual instrnc-tion, !
. fg I tJ U^ Combined Course. fS a j
• month: day and eve.
Bancroft Bldg.. 723 Market St.
HAIAILSIV SCHOOL
AHD VAST ITESS SEKU.A3T,
. 1M3. • Jackson ft.. S. F. Boarding and day
•chvi tor rirU. Accredited by the leadlnc
colleges and universities. Special attention
given to music Reopens TCESDAT. August
t. Il>04. 6ARAH P. HAML1.V, Principal.
fiELMONT SCHOOL
FOB BOVfi. BELMOXT. CAL.— Opens for new
MPQa Aug. 15. For former pupils Acg. I"
T-". T. HEID. A. M.. Harvard. Head Master.
St. Mary's College,
• OAKL AITD. CAt.
f^' C8 w111 fce Te * u ™<* MOXDAY. Augun I
100<. BRO. ZEXOXIAX. President.
WESTERN 7 l b Z TO Z£L, basint!S * course. Eng-
ili.tfii.iin i Ua< bookkeeping shorthand, ar-
• P II\!ilT^C 'l, CBl «^c. <>tc. f Civil Ser-
LUclRCdd tfre- Individual instruction Po-
• #>«*• ¦ rnr- titlcaK t0T graduate*. 6 mo. fday)
-CO LIEGE ?f- 5*5 Scho ° 1 - 6 «ao.. ?24
no< Market tt cor^ seventh.
, /TTV1 : rv ; An enrollment ot
S^-»Ii O ri\l Ov <50 etudents tell«
' *../-:.». i»— the **ory of our
AAAlvI t\,Cv^» fwcces*;new bulld-
V "JJrL^r I „ ;ek ' new idea*.
lOIIC CV CJ «-holeaoni» col leg*
Km ,-. V-^ — * life; Catalojue.
.•ZS Co! den Gate tve.. S. T.
ANDERSON ACADEMY,
-IRVIXGTOX. California
•. .first term of 190.V04 beglnn on August 10
WILLIAM WALKER AXDERSOX. Principal!
«USS WEST'S SCHOOL FOB GISI.S
M14 VAX XESS AYE.. C pen« Aog 'tf I
Hctce acd Day School. Accredited by lading
W^££3£f*£S«? •"«" MARY B S !
•BOONE'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, j
BZBXBXJBT. I
ISS0PSKS MOWDAY, AUO. 8. \
p. a. Booarn. ' ;
Oitchcock Military Academy !
8AX RATAEU CAXw 1
WILL BEOPES oa Au WIt n j
• A PP'y to tat Principal i
IRVINQ INSTITUTE.
Boardlcg and day school for younr ladiea .*«
«tUe gtrl^ 21T8 California rtmtwm %££ •
•Mount Tamalpais Military Academy ;
CAN PwATAEL, CAL. \
Juclcr acheol separate. Fall terra begins Anr
!l._fg«ro CRO8BT. P.P.. H«rtMw»:
h$S&i&$E&ttZ7%N * 8 t * 1 * most practl-
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Pp-Jflf^MKaiiHO °y expert court re-
tftMtfZKRsnih&L ? or l er »- Send ior
Ii U I I 1 tJ * Uo * e * r 'acuity thJi erer;
1 1 W I I I V perfect Mtcltatlon: ; uIum-
trated catalogue. ¦ • W - J '
MCRED1TO. Viet PrladoaJ. Meclo Par*.' Cat*
• COLLEGE O7 X7OTBS SAStX.
6AN Jvtt CAL. Exclusively for boarding
•-tudenta. Kutv-tliird >isr. Coursea: Clasjicai
Literary. bcit-r.tiiic. Conaervatory. Cuileg* 1
rreparntory accredited. Intermediate and Hrt- i ¦
faary Clat»ec Stodie* resumed Tuewl^y Aug- I*
u»t 2. ISfti. ' I ,
—. , __>j;
DALO ALTO ACADEMY, one mile from i <
¦ fctanrcTd Cnlveraity — Boya and young meg I ,
prrpured ior Stuntord. Berkeley tr Ka«iern ' J
colleger. Excep:u>oal Advaatagea In Modern ! ¦
Languages and H<rber Matbeznatlo. Fall term I '.
bcgibr Aufuit 92. For catalogue addiea* -
V.'TVtPP gHTP'XT. Palo Alto. Jal. ,
Weekly Call, $1 per Year!;
;•••;; ADVERTISEMENTS. ¦
NEW COLORED AND BLACK
— FOR FALL WEAR-—
We have fust opened a large shipment of NEW DRESS
MATERIALS in colors and black, solid, colors, mixed effects;
Tailor Suitings in checks and stripes and Silk and Wool
Fabrics. All the latest styles and newest colorings.
54 inches wide, all wool fH«t #%«
NOVELTY TAILOR TWEEDS Xl # 25
Neat, mixed effects, stylish colorings. Hr Yd
50 inches wide, all wool -
REDFERN TAILOR SUITINGS dj-j pa
Small checks and stripe patterns, hard finish, jftjr*^
rich dark colors, mannish style. . . . T^ Yd
36 inches wide, all wool
NOVELTY STRIPE ALBATROSS CfiC
Fancy colors, including cream, suitable for !5lJ
house wear. "^ Yd
38 inches wide ¦ . « 0\f+
FANCY TAILOR SUITINGS §0^
New color combinations in small check design. .
«
— — SPEClAi>=^^
43 inches wide, imported-
FDENCH SILK and WOOL FIGUBED EOLIENNE d**j OC
In all the new Fall shades, solid colors, small I 9^^
design self color. Extra value T^ Yd
IN OUD BLACK GOODS DEPARTMENT
We are now prepared to show new qualities in the following
stylish weaves:
CHIFFON VOILE CREPE DE PARIS
SILK and WOOL SAMITE CREPE IMPERIAL
CHIFF.ON CREPE VEILING CREPE EOLIENNE
ALL AT POPULAR PRICES.
/111 to 121 POST STREET.
I LIBER At CREDIT
fc|j ; Wi are adding* 24,000 «quara feet— two more storie«— on to the top of what li already the biggest furnl- 9
Kj tnre honse on the Pocifio Coast. Our increased trade demanded more room— expansion. Now our expansion »
Kg demands more trade, and we are making big offer, to get it. We have begun by cutting every metal bed H
B| xrom one-third to one-haU thig week; and by offering the ca»le«t of terma in bnying them. ; ¦
SI iijSE-jc 1 • • $3.25 ENAMEL BED— Any sire; standard make . . $1.83 fl
EBr *15.00 BUTTEETLT BED-A beautiful design I "^iBSlMM Mlli^^l I ¦ \J^f^^\vWWll\
j^Si j^white enamel; a brass spindle holdlnl the I I lV^tfvLl\ iwH r*/ V\k U fl# r IXiiyll/
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Rich Furs
You really cannot* afford to bay
anything in furs— a jacket.— « cape—
a stole— a collar— or a muff— until
you visit* our store.^
It* b not* selfishness that* makes us
say this. It is enlightened sslf -inter-
est*. We know that* no better —
handsomer- or more elegant, furs
than ours can be made. And we
also know that* we give better val-
ues than any other fur bouse on this
DON'T FORGET OUR. NUMBER
GRAND OPENING
tNew Fall ISd Winter
Woolens
ALL WOOL. SUIT-
INGS in ail shades to
order for *15 end *2»
and o f25. fSTJJO ami
Fine* Imported English
novettie«\ to order for
trousers $5 to * I »
Overcoats from *
915 to *4o
Full dres» satts from..
«3O to if r.o
You- will sav« 25 to 40
per cent by calling on
JOE POHEIM
The Tailor
Perfect flt ana' test i>r
wotkmanship guaranteed
• >r Ut> salt.-. • , '
301 Montgomery Strttt, Corner B-isi
1110 aad, 1112 Mariot Street.
SAW 7BASCX3CO.
, IIS S. Sprtnz Street. Loa Angel: ».
' lASTHMANOLAl
Ii tb« only enra for Hervcms and
Bronchial ASTHMA.
Tour Dru»«i«t or at S3S HAKJHT *T_
8an Fraaciico. C*L j

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