OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 15, 1904, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1904-11-15/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Wigwax — Gotrox has more money
than he knows what to do with. Hen
peckke — Then, of course, ho isn't mar
ried.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 14. — Orders
to naval officers: Passed Assistant
Surgeon E. G. Parker will be detached
from the Buffalo on November 26,
1904, to the naval station at Tutuila,
Samoa. He will also have additional
duty on the, Adams and will sail from
San Francisco on December 1. ' Passed
AB8istanf Surgeon H. B. Odell is de
tached from the Adams at the, naval
station at Tutuila, Samoa, and ordered
home to wait orders.
Naval Orders.
large audience showed Its approval of
Dr. Baker's paper. Among the speak
ers on the subject were Dr. Francis
M. Larkin, Dr. E. R. Dille, Dr. George
W. White and Dr. George Guth.
NAPA, Nov. 14. — A human skull
was scooped up from the bottom of
Napa River to-day by a dredger.
There, is a bullet-hole In the skull
just above the right eye. The skull- ia
believed to be all that remains of the
body' of Charles Borchelot, a former
resident of Napa, who mysteriously
disappeared several years ago.
The grewsome relic was found off
the asylum wharf, about a mile and a
half below Napa.
Skull, Believed to Be That of Man
Who Mysteriously Disappeared,
Found by Dredger.
WATERS OF NAPA RIVER
GIVE UP RELIC OF PAST
San Franciscans at the Fair.
ST. LOUIS, Nov. X4.— The following
San Franciscans have registered re
cently at the California building at
the World's Fair: R. W. Douglass,
G. German, T. W. Mahony, G. S.
Gels, J. Irvine, A. Seavey, I. M. Wil
liamson, Mrs. E. L. Baker, C. R.
Splivalo, J. A. Landsberger, C. F.
Scott. Mrs. T. Darks. J. R. Corbus and
family and R. Strandslg and wife.
• YOUR PRINTING ON TIMBl— <3&briel Print
ing Co. print anything. 418 Sacramento at. *
STOCKTON, Nov. 14. — The trial of
Howard Buckland, the 15-year-old
slayer of his father, continues to at
tract crowds to the Superior Court.
Mrs. 'Buckland, the boy's mother, tes
tified to-day to acts of cruelty, on the
part of her husband, and stated that
on the morning of the shooting he
slapped her. knocked her down and
kicked her. She called her son to
protect her.
She afterward told her eon that she
hoped never to look uppn the face
of her husband again. ' Within an
hour Howard shot and killed his
father.
Cruelly Abused by Man Slain
by Youth.
Woman Tells Court How She Was
MOTILER OF STOCKTON'S
BOY MURDERER ON STAND
Scherf 's Trial Postponed.
The case of Gustave Scherf, deputy
poundkeeper, charged with shooting
and killing Rudolph W. Schultze on
August 25, was on Judge Lawlor's
calendar yesterday for trial. The
Judge said he had been Informed that
Frank J. Murphy, the defendant's at
torney, was sick and desired. a post
ponement. Turning to Scherf, the
Judge said that the trial would be
continued for a week, but at that time
it would be proceeded with whether
Murphy was sick or well. All the wit
nesses were instructed to . return on
that day. Murphy says he will find
means to stop the trial from proceed
ing next Monday if he is unable to be
present^ ;
Fails t o Voice Objection to Voting
Machines Before Election Board.
P. H. McCarthy was busy with
other matters last evening, bo he
failed to appear before the Board of
Election Commissioners to establish
all he has said and all it is said he has
said against the mechanical perfection
and honesty of the voting machine.
Mr. McCarthy will be heard at a later
date.
A. W. Reiber and Charles A. Bred
erman, both of the Hotel Cecil, 960
Bush street, complained that they
were denied their right to vote at the
election. Both testified that they were
registered, but when they appeared to
vote they were informed that they
were not on the register. The case
went over until the next regular
meeting of the board.
Attorneys -T. F. Curran and Fran
cis Dunne filed a protest with the
board against the employment of a
non-civil service man to take care of
the voting machines Instead, of J. J.
Beatty, who heads the civil service
machinists' list. The matter went over.
DEFENSE TELLS- ITS SIDE
OF TABOR-ROGERS CASE
Another Version Regarding Accusa
tion of Woman for Alleged Theft
of Fiance's Watch.
Judge Graham devoted another day
yesterday to the hearing of - the suit
of Octavine Tabor against Charles H.
Rogers and George W. and Teresa
Shriner for $30,000 damages for false
imprisonment. After the cross
examination of the plaintiff Judge
Maguire moved for a nonsuit. . This
was ¦'denied. H. J. Brodi; called for
the defense, told the Btory of a scene
a*- the Regina Hotel bar when Rog
ers' Bister, Mrs. Shriner, took a watch
from his pocket and handed it to the
witness for -the purpose of showing
Rogers that he could . be "touched."
This was before the affair later in the
night, when Rogers accused his
fiancee of stealing the timepiece and
had her taken to the police station.
Both Mr. and^ Mrs. Shriner gave
their version of the incident. . They
said they retired about 1 o'clock
on the night in Question, while Rog
ers and Mrs. Tabor went out to a
restaurant. At 3 a. m. the Shriners
were awakened by • Rogers, • who j came
to their room with ; Mrs. Tabor and
Intimated that she had ¦ taken the
watch- He asked Shriner to send for
a detective, which was done. They
declared that Rogers did riot lay a
handon the woman and that he did
not forcibly take his rings from her
hand. Mrs. Dora Bishop, housekeeper
for Rogers, was on . the stand telling
of her objections to Mrs. Tabor's vis-
Its to the Rogers home whan the trial
was adjourned until to-day.
McCarthy not present.
"Theology of Ritschl" was the
theme of an address delivered by Dr.
E. E. Baker before the Methodist
Ministers' Association yesterday. The
The Rev. J. H. Laughlln presided
over the deliberations of the Presby
terian Ministers' Association yester
day morning, when an address was
delivered by Professor Guy W. Wads
worth of the Occidental College, Los
Angeles, on . "The Problem of the
Christian College." •
"Reminiscences of the Early Min
istry of California" were interestingly
given before the Congregational Min
isters' Association yesterday by Dr| S.
H. Willey.
San Francisco's adaptability as a
city for conventions Is again being
demonstrated. This time it is by the
Christian church demonination,
whose national gathering, which met
lately In St. Louis with an assemblage
numbering 4 0,000. is to come to this
city. The Christian church minis
ters of San Francisco and cities across
the bay met yesterday in the Y. M. C.
A. building, the Rev. P. C. Macfarlane
presiding, and listened to further pre
liminary reports regarding the con
vention which will assemble in this
city August 17 next. ." «
Letters from Cincinnati. Chicago
and other cities East give the assur
ance that the convention will be one
of the most important magnitude. It
Is estimated from reports already re
ceived and also from the etrong and
enthusiastic feeling shown at St. Louis
when the convention was given to San
Francisco for 1905 that fully 10,000
will come here.
Church Exp*"ctcd to Bring Ten
Thousand to This City.
National Assemblage of the Christian
First United States Deputy Collector
of Customs Newton S. Farley has re
ceived a printed copy of the proposed
revision of the Philippine customs
tariff. Suggestions as to changes
therein are invited and should be in
Deputy Farley's hands by Friday at
noon of this week. Or the sugges
tions may be written and mailed in
time to reach the bureau of insular
affairs. War Department, Washington,
D. C, not later than November 23.
Mr. Farley .says the proposed re
vision does not contain many changes
in the figures, the additions being
principally with reference to the
technical construction of the sched
ule, in order to make it more clear to
the understanding and to avoid pro
tests and appeals as much as possible.
Deputy Collector Farley Will Receive
Suggestions Up to Friday Noon
and Will Forward Them.
PROPOSED PHILIPPINE
TARIFF BILL HERE
GREAT CONVENTION" TO «
3IEET HEBE NEXT YEAR
Other divorces were granted as fol
lows: By Judge Murasky to Rose J.
Turner from Robert J. Turner for
neglect; by Judge Graham to Grace
Calef from Erwin Calef, neglect; to
Florence M. Bowman from George H.
Bowman, neglect; -by Judge Troutt to
Maud A. Collins from Frederick Col
lins, desertion; by Judge Sloss to Jo
seph C. Boyd from Annie Boyd, deser
tion: by Judge Seawell to Albert E.
Bartlett from Josephine Bartlett, de
sertion.'
Nine suits for divorce were filed, as
follows: By Ethel Reed against
Christopher C. Reed, intemperance;
W. S. Skinner against Rilla Skinner,
desertion; Rose Pedigo against Grason
Pedigo, desertion; Jean B. Lannes
against Catherine Lannes, desertion;
Ottille J. von Hagen against Robert
A. von Hagen, neglect; John E. Beck
er against Amanda Becker, infidelity
with George Keogh; Frank B. White
man against Clara S. Whiteman, de
sertion; Ethel Gottstein against Na
than Gottstein, neglect; John Sarnik
against Mary Sarnik, desertion.
Another reconciliation of married
persons who had been through the
first stage of a divorce was credited
yesterday to Judge Graham, who set
aside the Interlocutory decree granted
to Nellie J. Fronk from George Fronk
on November 16, 1903. Fronk is a
grocer in the Mission. His wife sued
for separation on the ground of cru
elty, but they have since made up and
are living together again.
Vera Karusa, whose husband, Nich
olas Karuaa, twice pawned her wed
ding ring to get money with which to
gamble, obtained a divorce from
Judge Kerrigan, with $25 a month ali
mony. Judge Hebbard annulled the
marriage of K. A. Hedberg and Alma
Hedberg,, which took place nine years
ago. The bride disappeared on the
evening of the wedding and has not
been seen by her husband since.
Fronts Are Reconciled — Wife of Man
Who Pawned Wedding Ring Is
Free — Other Cases.
DIVORCE DECREE NEARLY
A YEAR OLD SET ASIDE
The national board consists of twen
ty-one members, including officers of
the army and navy and militia officers,
trustees of the National Rifle Associa
tion and civilians from all parts of
the country, so that whatever plah of
procedure is adopted it is safe to as
sume it will be one which will be fair
to all the States desiring the establish
ment of such ranges.
The same Is especially true of the
Southern States, where the popula
tion is largely rural, and It is con
tended that it would be very unfair
to Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi,
Florida and other Southern States If
the plan should be adopted establish
ing ranges in States according to the
population of their cities. A proposi
tion to establish these ranges in the
States according to the quota of their
National Guard is also being consid
ered, but the plan of establishing one
range in each State before other States
shall be allowed more than one range
is receiving favorable consideration.
CASE OF THE SOUTH.
In the case of Indianapolis a fort has
been recently established there. Fort
Harrison, which offers an excellent lo
cation for a range, which could be used
by riflemen within a radius of fifty
miles of Indianapolis for practice on
Saturday afternoons and holidays, and
for those from Cincinnati, Louisville
and Chicago who desire to spend sev
eral days on the range. There is a
Bt/ong influence being exerted to secure
one of the ranges for Indianapolis.
The question of property value in
end about New York will doubtless be
a source of concern when allowances
are made for ranges In the vicinity of
Greater New York. It requires a large
stretch of territory, as ranges of at
least 1000 yaeds are desired, and prop
erty of such an extent within easy
trolley distance of New York is ex
tremely valuable.
There has been some discussion as
to the method of procedure in acquir
ing and locating these ranges. On the
one hand it is thought that the na
tional board should, first provide for
the establishment of ranges in the
vicinity of the larger cities, beginning
with New York, Chicago, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Boston, St. Louis and so
on down the list. On the other hand, It
is contended that under such proced
ure States like Indiana, with approxi
mately 1.000,000 men eligible for ser
vice in time of war. would be one of
the later States where ranges would
be established, as Indianapolis is
quite far down the list of cities ac
cording to its population.
PLEA OP IXDIAXAPOLIS.
CALL. BUREAU, HOTEL BARTON,
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15.— The fact that
the national board for the promotion of
rifle practice will ask Congress at its
coming session to appropriate $1,000,000
annually for the next few years to • be
devoted to the establishment and equip
ment of suitable rifle ranges in the
vicinity of the larger cities and to the
issuing of arms and ammunition under
certain restrictions has awakened a
great deal of interest throughout the
country, and applications are pouring
in for the location of these ranges. It
is contemplated that ranges shall be
established in the vicinity of Boston,
New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Balti
more, Philadelphia, New Orleans, Den
ver, San Francisco, Salt Lake and Los
Angeles.
. While the selection of these cities
would naturally be gratifying to the
residents thereof who would like to en
gage in rifle practice for the exercise
and pleasure connected therewith, the
riflemen in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Louis
ville, Indianapolis, Mobile, Savannah,
Buffalo and other cities feel that they
the quite as much Interested in the
proposition and as much entitled to
recognition as the riflemen of the other
cities mentioned. .New York has ah ex
cellent range at Creedmoor, and the
range at Sea Girt, N. J., is accessible
to riflemen of the Eastern States. It is
therefore represented that when the na
tional board secures the initial appro
priation it should set about establishing
ranges in States which are not so fa
vored.
Special Dispatch to Tb« Call.
When Edwin E. Stoddard appeared
In Judge Cook's court yesterday for
trial on a charge of felony embezzle
ment he pleaded guilty and waived
time for sentence. His attorney, John
J. Barrett, made a strong plea for le
niency, in which he was supported by
Attorney Bush Fennell, special prose
cutor. The Judge sentenced Stoddard
to serve eighteen months in San Quen
tin.
Stoddard was head of the bicycle de
partment in the warehouse of the Dun
ham, Carrigan & Hayden Company and
was discharged on January 1. An in-'
vestigation of his books showed a short
age of $4000. His peculations had been
going on for two years.
After leaving the company's employ
ment Stoddard went into the automo
bile business at 128 Fremont street,
with J. B. Spaulding as a partner. He
was arrested on February 6, the day
before the formal opening of his auto
mobile establishment, but was released
on bail the following day. It Is said
that his wife will carry on the business
while he is serving his term in San
Quentln. Stoddard was a well-known
wheelman and a member of the Bay
City Club. \
About the time that Judge Cook was
passing sentence upon Stoddard, W. T.
Robertson, secretary of the Auto Liv
ery Company, 1138 Market street, made
application before Police Judge Fritz;
for a warrant for Stoddard's arrest on \
a charge of malicious mischief. Stod
dard Is a stockholder in the company,
and on Saturday he tore up the carpets
in the office and attempted to take
forcible possession of the premises.
While the warrant was being written
out the" Judge was notified of Stod
dard's sentence, and when it was pre
sented to ' him for signature he tore it
up, explaining to Robertson that Stod
dard had been sent to San Quentin.
Telegraphic advices are to the effect
that the board of engineers employed
to investigate the reclamation problem
is about to meet in the East to draw up
the final plans and specifications. Prank
D. Ryan, State Commissioner of Pub
lic "Works, will leave for the East in a
few days to confer with the board of
engineers having the v ork in hand. Its
final decision on Oie work to be per
formed will soon follow this conference.
The board is composed of Henry B.
Richardson of Louisiana, Major T. O.
Dabney of Mississippi and Major H. M.
Chittenden of Yellowstone National
Park.
Congressman-elect McKlnlay said
yesterday that though he would not
take his seat until March 4, he would
attend the coming session to familiarize
himself with the work of Congress, and
especially to aid his associates in de
ciding upon the most promising mode
of procedure to secure the appropria
tion for the carrying out of the plans
of the board of englneera.
With eight Congressmen and two
Senators, all Republican, bending their
energies to carry the plans to comple
tion there is no question that they will
succeed, and California will reap its re
ward for the splendid plurality it gave
the party in the battle that has just
been merged into history.
READY TO DRAW PDAN T S.
After Mr. McKinlay had left head
quarters it was given out that an agree
ment had been reached by the Con
gressmen and Congressmen-elect to
make the question of the reclamation of
the inundated lands of the State the
main fight of their incumbency. Early
in December the board of engineers em
ployed by the River Drainage Associa
tion of this State will file its report as
to the most feasible plan for the recla
mation of inundated lands, and then
the time will be ripe for Congressional
action.
It is not probable, however, that the
question will be laid before Congress at
the coming session. The plan pi the
board of engineers must be first studied
In detail and the matter of cost of the
proposed 5 improvements as suggested
by its members carefully calculated
before the California Senators and Rep
resentatives will be in a position to de
bate the question and answer any ob
jection that may be raised by any mem
ber of the Senate or House that feels
so inclined.
AGREEMENT IS REACHED.
Citizens of the great Sacramento and
San Joaquin valleys are to be congratu
lated over the fact that at the election
of a week ago . the entire Republican
Congressional ticket of the State was
victorious. It means to them that their
dream of years — the reclamation of the
inundated lands of the basins— Is about
to be realized."
Although the reclamation of the In
undated lands of the State affects di
rectly only four of the Congressional
districts, it is admitted that indirectly
it affects every citizen of the State.
With this fact in mind a movement is
now well under way looking to a united
effort on the part of . the eight Con
gressmen and two Senators of the State
to secure a sufficient appropriation
from the Government to reclaim the in
undated lands of the State, confine the
great rivers to their natural channels
and utilize their surplus waters for the
irrigation of the arid lands . of the
southern districts.
Congressman-elect McKlnlay was in
the city yesterday In consultation with
those most interested in the great prob
lem that is born with the yearly over
flow of the rivers named. Land owners
of Colusa and near-by points that an
nually suffer from the rush of waters
called upon him to offer suggestions.
Their observations were recorded for
future use. '
Applications Pour In From.
Various Sections of the
Nation for Recognition
Will Await Report of En
gineers and Then Proceed
to Secure Needed Funds
Embezzles $^000 From His
Employers While Head of
the Bicycle Department
GETS EIGHTEEN MONTHS
SAN EEANCISCO NAMED
PLAN ACTIVE CAMPAIGN
Congressmen Unite to Se
_cure a Big Appropriation
to Confine the Eivers
Government to Be Asked to
Provide Them at Leading
Centers in the Country
Plea of Guilty Is Entered
When the Case Is Called for
Trial Before Judge Cook
RIFLE RANGES
FOR BIG CITIES
STODDARD GOES
TO SAN QOENTIN
RECLAMATION
THEIR FIGHT
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1904".
9
Freei Freei
Eztfaovdinafy Oiies
TO
HOLIDAY SHOPPERS
To make their
Hoftchay Purchases in the Month of November
5£*$25.QQ p -- • $7.50 l 'S* e Free
Sr$J0.00 R—. $3.00 Free
$5.00 *—. $1.50 ™%t*&L Free
Free <to rn Pcfdutse ' nr worth of goods p
Trttk .$Z,.ZJ\J *-«cn«se. y^C* your own choice rrec
Free C f fjf) Purcha8e . OC r worth of^oods p
vfo. Z^JZ* your own choice rrce
We want you to see our
Grand Holiday Display bf Beautiful
and Newest Creations
Elite Chinaware, Limoges China, French
China, Dinner Sets, Salad Sets, Chocolate
Sets, Rich Cut Glass Ornaments, Vases,
Bric-a-Brac, Lamps, English Porcelain Ware,
Novelties, and Dolls.
Fancy Articles of Every Description. Prettiest,
Daintiest and Newest Things made, Collected
from the Markets of the World.
Top Quality Teas, Coffees, Spices, Extracts,
Baking Powder, Cocoa, Chocolates.
We want you to see our very reasonable prices*
We want you to come just to look.
Take advantage of this very liberal offer.
- CL'T HERE CUT HERE
CUT OUT THIS COUPON, ferine it to any of our stores before
x December 10, J904, aad receive with each purchase a» listed r.
x abeva a very handsome present of your own selection. 5
= SAN FRANCISCO CALL,^Nov. J5 , J904 =
fc Come just to look. g
J Bring this Coupon -with you to any of our stores*
NOT GOOD AFTER DECEMBER 1O. 1904.
. CUT HKKE CUT HERE
Great American Importing lea Go.
CITT STOKES:
861 K&rket st. 213 Sntter st. 705 r ari:ra rt. 2732 24th rt. *
140 Sixtb st. 20C8 Fillsicre Et. 146 Ziizxt'c. st. 2O6 Third at.
475 JZaisrht et. 355 Hayes et. 52 Market Bt. 469 Fourth st.
1819 Dtvlstdero st. 3006 Sixteenth st. 521 Montgomery ave. 366 Tilrd st.
1419Fcikst. 3235 Mission st. 2516 Mission st.
0AKLAK2, ALAKEDA A27S BERKELEY STORES:
1053 'WasUagxon st. 1510 Seventh st. • Berkeley, 2141 Center at.
1185 23d ave. 616 E. 12th at. Alaxneda, 1355 Park rt.
STOEES XZT OTEE3 CITIES AITS TOWNS:
San Jo»». 125 R. First st. Hernardir.o. 421 Third et. Lcig Beach. 220 Pin« ave.
Facrmrr>ento, 426 K st. Patita Barbara, 73-1 Stata et. Merced. 408 Main J>t.
etcrcmcaio. fsfH J gt, Pan Uif^o. f>J2 Fifth rt. Nevad&CIty.Pine FtMaa.bldp.
fc'ama Crui. 14f> PaciSc ave. » s aT:LuisOi>itpt>.T29Hiiruera«t. R.-dlant's. IS E. State st.
Stuoktcn, 44D E. MUn st. Tulan-. Kern St., near K. Santa Monica. 227 Third st.
Gi'.roy, 13 N. Monterey rt. VlrKinl^ City. 08 S. C it. Stnta Ana. 2CJ E. Fourth at.
Lfjs Gatos. Kh-- Main Et. Ventura. 2O& Main St. VWalla, 216 Main Et.
SAnL«eandro,PanL«orer.roave. Crockett. Woodland, 6C5 Main Bt.
L/OFAnt^'es, 42j^.Hrosidwar. Lincoln. Vatsonvilie. 323 Main Bt.
LcsAn«elcs.2F.2.'iPaf=adcna. av. 'Winters. K»-n!ci't, G First St.
Salt I-r ».• -. 215 Main *t. Ii^dwocd City. Chico.Bdwy.,bet.3d £4th eta.
Portland, 3.H WaishirKton St. t?utter Cr< ek. Cars&nCit>,C«.ra'n st.nr.Klns.
Pcr^land, 223 Flryt «t. Nai>a, 5 Main st. Erlffbam City, Main st.
Seattle. »0*> Second ave. Petaluma, R2S Main st. Mo<l*«:to, 10th St., bet. H & I.
Seattle! 30» Pike st. Bt. Helena, Main Ft. Oroville, C»S Meyers st.
Tacoma 9S7 C st &mta P.osa, 411 Fourth st. Provo. Academy ave.
£rxkar.e S10 Frraim* a/re. Vallf jo, 339 Georgia Ft. ParkClty.Main st,Schlelda ba;.
QJBdcn M0 Twt-nty-nJth st. Hayvar4*,B»t..b«t.Main&lat. RedBluff.Maln & Oak Bta.
B»k-*ref.fld. lt.13 19th sU- Fan Kafa<-1. K23 Fourth st. Salinas. 254 Main et.
Fi-'eho J145 J «t Pasadena. I'M) E. Colorado st. OregonCIty.Main st.eo.5th.
K«rysr!IXc. 3Z2 D st. Astoria, Commercial et. Uerld?l-urs.
Pomona 402 W. S«?oond rt. Eugene, 30 E^ Ninth st. Placervllle.
Reno 19 Commercial row. Eureka, ccr. Fifth ar.d F sts. Ocean View.
RtddinK. 421 Market st. Grass Valley. T>C Mill st. Callstoga
Blverside W31 Mam »t. Hanrcrd, Cf»f> N*. Iraln st. Sonoma.
Our 100 Stores Help Us to Help You.
. The ORIOINAL remedy t&ct "kin* the Daedrstf Oenn."
0mm rv% • ***** niAmn * * A » **e* lcId * ratkn this "duty" such a pleasure that tne
THE HBRPICIDE HABIT •*#*. HJsr^-sSrBh&t
CarafuJ people now coeslder It • duty to use a ladle* by fceeplnt the haU ll/thtaad fluffy and by
acalp prophyuac. as It Insure* cleanliness and rlvln Z It a silken t l<»»- <»««« d * mJru JL. ft0 5 t
freeloia fro^ dandruS Blcrobes. The refreshtar hUlot hair. Ghrea aattstactJon an4 exdtes ad-
«,u*Utyat»de«pi!slte fragrance of Newbro'sHerp- mh-atTon. Stops lUhlnt instantly. .*.> :
I &Q1NG« i! CyQNEi ! ! I
mnan niuxt it. ' mrtciK iu wt it. too uti foi ieimcibl
firu Stsrtj, S1JXL ' Sa9 10c, ttssps, ta EEE?1CIBE CO, Dipt R. Oetraru Htok^far • uo^to. /
ApyucATioars at paoMigxarr bameb glow.-
AMUSEMENTS.
llULUlHm A IEAD1SQ THEA.3
MATINEE BATURDAT.
LAST SIX NIGHTS.
Hmry TV. Savar* presents Oeoxxa
Ade's Quaint Comedy Drama,
M COUNTY CHAIRMAN
"You *ot some votes."
Last time Sunday night. j
Besinnlns Next Monday,
Charles B. DUllngham
Presents
Marine Elliott
In the Clyde Fitch Comedy,
HER OWN WAY
Seat Sale Begins Thursday.
Special Mat Thanksglvlns day.
*
BETTER THAN MEDICINE FOR
WHAT AILS YOU.
"A FRIEND OF THE FAMILY"
THE BIG HIT of Last Season.
With an Exceptional Cast of well
known favorites: William Friend. Har-
ry Crandall. Eugene Redding. William
Woodslde, Thais Magrane, Helen Trav-
ers, Vlolette Villiers, Lucille VlUlera.
Next Sunday Night— Poaltlvely tha
Original New Tork Casino Production.
ARTHUR DUNN In the Shubert and
Nixon & Zimmerman $75,000 Musical
Extravaganza. THE RUNAWAYS.
First tour of the Famous CASINO
SHOW GIRLS. Over 75 Playera.
H. W. BISHOP, Lessee and. Manager.
TO-NIGHT th'I^h. TO-NIGHT
Oliver Morosco Offers
HOWARD OOUL3 — J. H. OILUOUB .
And the Majestic Theater Company In
Hearts Aflame
The Intensely Emotional Socfcty Drama Sug-
gested by the Novel of Louis* Winter*,
O«T/» Thursday Matinee !>*>!»
*OC seats Everywhere **9%r
GRANT) SS5i£
THIS WEEK ONLY
MATINEE SATURDAT.
The International Success
The FATAL
WEDDING.
NEXT SUNDAY MATINEE
The Show Girl
THE BEST OF ALL GIRL SHOWS.
TAKE AN AFTERNOON OFP
Or Come To-Hlrht and See the
GBEATIST VATJDEVIH.E PER0E*OB2S-
ANCE IN ALL THE WOBLD IOS
THE PRICES:
10c and 20c— No Higher.
Ten Hew HEAPHNKTM Every Week.
Afternoon' Performances at 3:30.
Twice, Each Vi*ht, at 7S3O and 9.
Contlnnons Perf ormanoes on Saturday
and Sunday, from 3 to 5 O'clock p. m.
and from 7 UntU 11 O'Cloc* at Wight.
CHILDREN 10 CENTS AT ALL TIMES
And to any part of The theater.
Only house displaying absolutely New and
' Remarkable Moving Pictures. '--
. MIgCEUiANEOUS AMUSEMENTS.
Grand Prize Carnival Ball !
SAN FRANCISCO AERIB No. 0.
EAGLES
SATURDAT EVENING, NOVEMBER 1», 1904
MECHANICS* PAVILION. ,
Prizes will be awarded for most* original
and best sustained character and handsomest
costumes. ¦ '
lEEEimi
16 Pages. $1 per Year
; ADyjEBCTSlSMtii.BdTB. ¦__ L ._ n _. u . 1J . Lri _
ftg^jL™gg£ b I! For Infants and Children.
IllllJliTlie Kind You Have
Always Bought
slmilalingtfteFoodandBeguIa- 1|| " , ff
I ting the Stomachs aMBqwgls of |B| JJQgjS tllO M 4
Promotes Digestion.CheerPul- n| jf *f IAt
ness and Rept.Contains neither fl n f ffk Jt 9&
Opium.>forplttne norMineraL Pfj Ul Jfiv\lj
T«i(OT^fAB.COTIO, |M . AVlW'
n T * |. J ¦*¦£¦ U rm m\
|£gA*- r 1 (\ jjfr '"
™z=^=—L m fwt nfj y q o
A perfect Remedy for ConsCpa- || W (r VWU
rion.SourStomach.Diarrhoca eft I ¥jkf
Worms .Convulsions .Feverish- m\ ffl^ f AH fa imp
ness and Loss of Sleep. a \^ lUl UVul
Facsimile Signature of *3
G&tfft^ m ThiTtu Yoare
y^vYogK^^ I Illiriy SOdio
tmc ct«T«u» eoitnir. mw ran* city.
AMUSEMKM'ra.,
OPERAf I Y®i_i KOUSt
THTSD WEEK
Of ti« Gnat Musical Comedy Triumph
THE
MESSENGER
BOY
A SUPERB SCENIC SKNSATIOX.
¦ 'i A GREAT TTVOLI CAST.
Pradnotiaa arplxloy tnd I I M |« I 1 1 1 1 I
Ladii'icmtMaU optra |\| II U UUUU
Spaelal Thtakigiriag X»L HSSSZ593B BOT
tTanal TItoH Prlce»— 23c, 60c, T3«.
Seata always Belling. Rear. mat. Saturday.
8FECUL-8CNDAY 4FTEKW0O*. KOV. Mth
vans. TAJsnxra tbaxtcxsca.
la Dosisatti's I lip I A
Gmt Op«r» L.UW1A
Pricea— 23c SOc, T5o, $1.
A Big Banner Bill
Mr. ouid Mrs. Mark MnrpHy; Carlisle's
Dors and Ponies : Anffusta Gloae; Tlurea
Romanian j Twelve Savajo Gixla;
Canflald and Carleton; Woe Jeaaia
riatcliar and
JOHN T. KEILT A2>3> COM7AZTT.
Regular Matlne«a Bvery W«dnaaday, Thurs-
day, Saturday and Sunday. Prices — 10c, 25<i
and COc.
AT PA7AD Belaae* A Mayer.
ALCAZAR
—..r •.- General Manager.
TO-HIOHT — AXiXi THIS WEES.
MATINKES 3AT. and SUN.
FIRST STOCK PRESENTATION
Clyde Fltch'a Pow«rful Play,
The Climbers
BEST OP SOCIETT PLATS.
Eve., 25c to 73c. Mats. Sat. and Sun., 23a to 50c
Thanks&lvingf week. NEXT MONDAT— IniriaJ .
Production Here.
THE VILLAGE POSTMASTER,
Th# Bert of Rustle Comedies — 30O Xlghts in
New York, Five Tears In tfio East.
Market Street, Near Eighth. ..Plion« South 533
TO-NIGHT — ALL THIS WEIX.
Traraendona Production of U>« Beat ot All
/ Military Dramas.
Winchester
Bterllni Story of Lor* and War.
Exciting Bcenlo Effacta! Hilarious Comedy t
THE MIUTABY BAXJCt
the Toxmo orai. spyi
THII THBTtiUIfO BIDS FOX XJTX2!
FKlCES-rEJva. 10c to 60o; Mats. 10c, 15o, 23<v
Thanksfftrtag; Week. ~Sar. 21, First Produc-
tion Her* of the Stupendous Melodrama
"QTTEEIf OP TBS WHITS SIEVES."
PETCHING BROS.
JOHNSON AND WELLS
Ami a Splendid Snow Every Afternoon
and Evenlnjr in tne Theater.
TAKE- A RIDE ON THE
KZHXATtrBS SXSOTBIO RAH,BOAI>,
SEVEN BABT U0N3 Df THE ZOO.
Hear tlie Pneumatic Symphony Orobestrton.
View the Johnstown Flood.
AMATEUR NIOHT THTntST>AT.
ADMISSION 10c CHILDREN 8q
Rail! ARacii!
New >flfir Jockey
California W Club
oakiAnd track.
Commencing SATURDAT. November IX
Racine every week day, rain or ahln*
Races start at 3:15 P- m. sharp.
For special trains atoppinff at th« track tak»
B P Ferry foot of Market street, at 12:0%
12 -SO* 1-00 '1:30 or 2:00. Returning train*
leave' the traok at 4:10 and 4:15 p. m. and
immediately after the last race.
THOMAS H. WILLIAMS. President.
PERCT W. TREAT, Secretary.
h^E^ULtOOKS
plAKC WAPR-Y' GUB5T6
All/ ft VGUf r.nrtk
VIVO /WUI VWIfc
Liebig Company's
Extract of Beef
It makes fine cooking easy.
There's only one real "Liebig"
with this f%
VaUrtk DORTT FAIL TO
j COURT Lounging
/Ififl room, the EMPIRE
auu Parlor, the
r * PALM ROOM, th«
iirafl a louis xv par.
ui auu LOR> the jj^
U X~1 ~ DIES' WRITING
Hotels room.

xml | txt