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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 20, 1907, Image 7

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WATER FRONT WORKERS
TO PARADE LABOR DAY
Hoisters, Stevedores and
Riggers Will Have
3,000 in March . .
OFFER A SILVER CUP
Cigar Makers Present Hand
some Trophy for
Ball Game
. Will J. French.
* T^l^C*J^'^ K Sfo chairman of the
Labor day cele
bration commit
tee of the San Francisco labor coun
cil, has been advised by the city front
federation that six unions will take
part In that division of the parade.
These are the riggers and stevedores,
hoisting engineers, pile and bridge
builders' -, union, shipwrights of San
Francisco, and Oakland, city . front
teamsters' and riggers' protective
union. These organizations ' will have
about 3,000 men in line.
The blacksmiths' union has notified
the chairman that It will have a float
In line. This will be a blacksmith's
shop In full blast, with smiths In
the act of shoeing a horse. -
The cigar makers' union has sent to
the chairman a sliver trophy 15 Inches
high In the shape of a large iris. It
bears the following Inscription: "Cigar
makers' baseball trophy; given by the
cigar makers' union. Labor day, Sep
tember 2. 1907." There appears also
with this Inscription a facsimile of
the cigar makers' label.
•• • •
The painters' union at 1U meeting
last night decided to hold a special '
meeting In Walton's pavilion next
Monday night to act upon a plan to
provide sick benefits for members. It
will also nominate officers for the In
ternational union. Seventeen mem
bers were admitted on clearance cards,
cix strangers were Initiated and nine
applications received. '
At the close of the strike commit
tee's meeting last night It was an
nounced that the board of health will
Inspect the several barns of the
United Railroads today.
President Cornelius stated that there
was no change in the situation.
• • •
The Janitors' union decided at its
meeting last night not to parade as
a body, for the reason that many of
the members will have to work on
Labor day, but such as are not em
ployed will march with other labor or
ganizations. Three applicants- were
initiated.
The steam laundry workers are se
curing many recruits to fill places that
are vacant in laundries. At the meet
ing last night 20 candidates were ini
tiated.
Lathers' union Xo. 65 having elected
Its president, John D. Nagle, marshal
for the Labor day parade, proposes to
make the best showing it has ever
made on an occasion of this kind. It
expects to have 500 men In line, to be
attired in a uniform consisting of
white duck trousers, blue shirt, straw
hat and Jaunty tie. The union will
have new badges for the occasion and
a new banner, which has been
to replace the' one destroyed in the big
Hre. This union Is enthusiastic and
f xpects in a short time to stand again
In the forefront of labor unions of this
:ity. Until its hall at 34 Julian avenue,
which Tras badly damaged by fire sev
eral weeks aso, is rebuilt this union
will hold its meetings in Master
Plumbers' hall at Page and Go ugh
itreets.
At the last session of the executive
committee of the musicians' union
;oca] No. 6, 53 members were sus
pended for nonpayment of the assess
ment levied for the benefit of unions
>n strike. The suspension carries with
It loss of all rights of membership dur
ing the period of suspension. John J.
Hundwyler, an old time member of the
local, has presented to Its library a
bound volume of the American Musical
magazine.
Considerable headway has been made
In the alteration of the local's head
quarters at 68 Haight street, and It
will not be long before the members
will occupy the premises again. When
finished the quarters will be one of
the most pleasant in this city.
Carpenters' union Xo. 1082 at its last
meeting decided to take part In the
parade Labor day. During the early
part of the session the union admitted
cix applicants to membership by
Initiation.
At the meeting of upholsterers' union
No. 28 tomorrow night the members
will nominate candidates for delegates
to the meeting of the next Interna
tional body of the order.
A gigantic movement to establish a
nine hour day to go In effect Septem
ber 1 for union machinists employed
by railroads throughout the northwest,
which Is expected to Include black
smiths and boiler makers and embrace
a total of 30,000 men, has been
launched. The plan is being backed
principally by the northwest consoli
dated district of the machinists' union,
although the blacksmiths and boiler
makers, who also have powerful or
ganizations, are looked to for active
co-operation on behalf of their crafts.
According to reports the supply of
brick masons in Texas is far from ade
quate to meet the demands,' which are
heavy on account of extensive building
operations. It is said that contractors
are having much difficulty in carrying
on building operations, owing to the
shortage of masons, and that it is fre
quently the case that men will" work
half a day at one place and then go
elsewhere for the rest of the day in
order to prevent too great delay on
any one Job.
At the recent session of the , state
commissioners of labor in Norfolk, Va.,
the following were elected as officers
for the current term: Charles P. Nein,
Washington, D..C; president; James F.
Doherty. Richmond, Va., vice president;
J. D. Beck, Madison, Wis., second vice
president; W. L. Johnson, Topeka, Kan.,
secretary-treasurer. N The . convention
will be held in Detroit. Mich., next
year.
The barbers of Macon, Ga., have or
ganized and will affiliate with the
Macon federation of labor.
All the printing offices " of Lincoln,
Neb., are now working on the eight
hour basis and everything Is serene.
The annual ' convention of the Mary
land state federation will be held Sep
tember 10. »
Electrical workers, machinists and
blacksmiths of Great Falls, Mont, who
went on strike recently, have ' signed a
contract for five years. All the smelt
ers' employes ar«now back at work
and all are bound by flve year con
tracts, -i
Refuse substitute* or Imitations. Get
what you ask for. Insict on It. \u25a0
"The- Man of the flour" Bluntly Discloses
flow Public Servants Betray Their Trust
CHARACTER SKETCHES IN "THE MAN OF THE HOUR" AT THE VAN NESS THEA
TER. SKETCHED BY A CALL STAFF ARTIST.
James Crawford
There is but little variance of theme
between "The Man of the Hour," pre
sented last evening in the Van Ness
theater, and "The Undertow," staged
several months ago in the' Alcazar.
Both plays are based upon the great
est menace of this nation's political
life — corruption of public ~ servants—
and both are plays for men. The fem
inine Interest is almost superfluous, al
though the heroine of "The Man of
the Hour" Is entangled •'• more thor
oughly in the plot than is the corre
sponding character in "The Undertow."
Mr. Broadhurst, who ~ wrote the* first
named drama, has also ..wrapped the
main thread of his story with more In
cidental complications, and made 'the
intrigue more credible, the dialogue
more pungently colloquial and the
characterization more human than the
man who .built "The Undertow" suc
ceeded in doing. In addition to all
that, "The Man of the Hour" is a
"classier" play. ' Throughout ; Its four
acts there is no suggestion of squalor,
.unless It be derived from Alderman
Phelan's description of the poor of his
ward.
As in "The Undertow," the interest
of "The Man of the Hour" hinges upon
the endeavors of the .president of a
street railway corporation to set a
franchise from a city, and he calls to
his aid the boes of the party in power.
In return for a block of the corpora
tion's shares and a liberal contribution
to his campaign fund the boss agrees
to get the bill through the council,; but
in order to assure the election of his
ticket he finds it necessary to nominate
for mayoiyan honest man.
Such a -one Is found. -He Is young,
wealthy, ambitious, unsophisticated in
politics — so unsophisticated, indeed,
that, he emphasizes his intention to ob
serve his oath of 'office. Laughing in
his sleeve, the. boss accepts the condi
tion. When the novice is elected he
does observe his oath of office and
sturdily refuses to approve the i fran
chise bill, which is a most, flagrant at
tempt to steal forever the city's streets.
Every means to corrupt him fails. Ef
forts to buy him, to bankrupt the
woman he loves, to blacken the name
of his dead father — all come to naught.
And eventually he wins the girl. That's
the play.
While the characters do much toward
acting themselves, the cast has been
specially well selected. The role of
the young .mayor Is convincingly car
ried by Frederick Perry, and two
opposing aldermen are played with. fine
skill by Felix Haney • and Louis Hen
dricks. f Frank Sheridan ! does the
scheming financier excellently. The
heroine is made impressive by Ruby
Bridges, and Ethel Brandon is a gra
cious old lady. All the other players
meet the requirements.
i Some of the colloquial dialogue is
particularly pertinent to this commun
ity ;at this time. "The woods are ' full
of investigations. Indictments and nub
penas," the boss says ' tor the financier,
"but I notice there are d—"-dd — "-d few rich
men in Jail today."
"Every nian •is a grafter," says the
same authority. "A lawyer will tako
a fee for showing his client* how he
can break the law and evade the punf
ishment— Graft! Churches and colleges
accept money they know has been ob
tained by fraud and oppression— Graft!
Newspapers and magazines " publish
advertisements they know to be ' fakes
and worse — Graft! A railroad presi
dent accepts stock In a : firm vwhich
ships over his line— Graft! Senators
become millionaires on a Balary ..\u25a0-; of
$5,000 a year— Graf t! rAnd so it ' goes,
high and low, rich and poor— they all
graft; in fact the man •; who doesn't
graft hasn't the chance or else he's a
fool."
It Is the same boss who says .'lt's
just as well to keep the judges on the
anxious \u25a0 seat a bit; it , teaches ; them
their places." And the mayor declares:
"God help ' justice . when money and
politics contrpl the Judiciary."
How : the house did come down , when
the mayor shouted: 'Til chaln^not: only
the bribe takers, but the -'gentlemen'
who "give the bribes." 'What an ap
proving :• burst of hand >. clapping fol
lowed his ; assertion .'" that' all^ men .in
public "\u25a0\u25a0 life " are ;- not* dishonest— that
Roosevelt," . La Follette ' and Folk \ were
rewarded by- the people because -of
their:honesty.'-".\ ; ;:..''" : -V.':_^, . i "..Y./:^-.. ..-
Most of "the honpolltlcal epigrams are
voiced , by Mr.' Haney; as Alderman Phe
lan/ and : his ; brogue is a delight.". z He
says to his -enemy,- "As; for; you, ,Horrl
gan,; somefday- I'll . drop ; something; on
you. and ,lf It doesn't -knock you -down
I'll come '\u25a0. back and walk around ; you to
see what's holding you up."
\u25a0r- When the heroine eulogizes his ,pa
THE SAN. FRANGISGO CALL, TUESDAY, 20, .1907.
ternal care of his poorer constituents
he responds, "I turkey 'em \u25a0In the wlnV
ter and I picnic 'em in the summer.
It's a happy, day when I down the man
that's agin me; it's a happy day when
I help the man that's for me, but the
happiest days of all Is me Phelan pic
nic days."
. "I was once like that." he solilo
quizes, watch lngj- the Juvenile sweet
hearts. "I had a girl, and 'when she
loved me I . was ;In heaven^ but when
she . threw 'me : down vmy address ; was
changed to 23 Lemon street."
"The Man of the Hour" shows little
constructive art, I; but it ", is : valuable ' as
a revelation' of unpleasant .truths con
cerning present day municipal life and
financial and political j methods through
out the United States. ; It Is a drama
tized campaign document of : such worth
that its two weeks' stay. In San Fran
cisco should result in bringing but at
the coming election a big vote for civic
honesty.; With T emphatic bluntness it
sounds the tocsin of that is
also the death k^ell of graft. I
-' Langdon, ; Heney, Burns and most of
the other men - prominently " identified
with the . local graft '< prosecution 1 were-
Interested witnesses of the play last
evening.:
CENTRAL THEATER
"Broadway After Dark" was pre
sented by Ernest Howell's : players at
the Central last evening with spectacu-"
lar scenery. Including a variety of New
York ; scenes : from ; an' underground
den in Canal street to the • top of Trin
ity church steeple. The part lof ~ the
hero, Tom Hall, is taken by. Gus Mor
timer, who ; has been 5 jJlaylng Juvenile
roles in the company.l He has the un
grateful task of supplying the place of
(he late lamented r Herschel ; Mayall,
whose engagement at the Central has
closed to the tearful- regret jof the
feminine votaries of the temple of
melodrama. Evelyn • Selble Is the hero
ine Flora Ross, while T.N. Heffron and
Claire , Slnclalre " rival each other In
villainies as usual. : :lf
The plot hinges on the attempt of the
villain to rob the heroine of \u25a0 her .for
tune, to which he Is next ; heir.™ With
the assistance of,: Benedict' McQuarrie,
who ,playß assistant : villain,, he drives
theglrl Into an opium 'den, and there
she finds her brother, ,whi> i had been
thought dead. \u25a0 The machinations, of
the villains are diverted to ithe good of
those whomi they are] persecuting. \u25a0/
The most ; thrilling 1" scene :i is ,when
Heffron chases ; the ~ fair victim of his
intrigues up to the; top; of the f church
steeple/ When -; she can ' flee . no .far ther
she ; climbs ; out r of ' the ..window and
down •a I ladder on'the With
fiendish glee ?he * cuts - one ; of : lthe 7 two
ropes that bind the ladder and Is about
to- cut the" second. Then while, she
hangs *on ;.the I ladder ,; flopping . ; by; a
single [ rope,**. while \u25a0• death ' yawns : below
her ; and , .the f villain ': leers I above T her,
then that* benevolent" humorist, James
Corrlgan, who this. time -is. lnlthe guise
of :a ' Hebrew,"^ uses ' :: his pistol 1 with
deadly . on ' the , villain. The I mer >ne
rope, is saved, rv and: the .heroino* reaches
tho arm* of the hero, while tho villain
gasp* ; his \u25a0 last.* . \u25a0
OVATION FOR O'SULLIVAN
: Rollicking ; ;; f un, \u0084 t ender' ; sentlnient,
Irish repartee and i picturesque'; staging
were; the «. attractions ;. of "Arrah-na-
Poerue,'* i with > which. Denis O'Sulllvan
celebrated \u25a0 his . homecoming / ' to •" San
Francisco] last \ evening. : ', The' new Al
cazar ?. theater,! was i- crowded^ with [ex
pectant : ; listeners.^. They _; greeted ; him
cordially at first,: : ; because -.-, they* were
glad : to see him back/ ;. As ' the play pro
Tlie Wholesome
Gqrnplies in every respect with all
Pure £opd Laws.
UNEXPECTEDLY LARGE
ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOLS
Enrollment Approaches the
Number Before the
i Disaster - *
AMPLEROOM FOR^lil;
Accommodations Will Be
:i Provided Despite the
Great Increase
r.Wlthi an attendance that' far ex-"
ceeded^all .expectations -the', publlo
schools' '-of .' this city; were" opened; for
the ! I fall I- term yesterday. \r More •: than
82,000 ;puplls ! .were enrolled '.In : the | J8
different j schools and ,' the I Indications
areV;that*before the'iend'of; the .week
another. -thousand will ; be added.
The- day was spent in- arranging and
classifying the and in explaining
to • them > what books they, would * have
to';purchase. Nof lessons were ;•, taken:
up and ; before noon the youngsters
had;- been 'released \" to- return*, today,*
when active < work will >be commenced.
-Under : th« * state "' law. all ; pupils who
had fnot '\u25a0\u25a0 already a certificate of ; recent
vaccination - were required hto '*\u25a0 procure
one" yesterday,- and quite ;a - number "of
the incoming, pupils who were; attend
ing ) school for the first I time, as • i well
as others who entered : 'l from : i outside
districts, .were affected by ; the order.
| Although . the attendances \u25a0was r much
larger than .had been;'expected,'mem
bers of the school board | gave I assur- :
ance last . night that accommodations
would 1 be \u25a0 provided f or r all and that.n o"
pupil would suffer > for; lack of a J desk.'
Makeshift desks were. resorted to last
year andlin'some Instances empty soap
boxes were "jmade to r do .duty as both
seats and desks. This year the Ocean
slQe, Fairmont, Franklin, Garfleld and
South End {and other % school^bulldings
have been enlarged, 'new " schools; have
'been erected and by, holding^ two \ ses-*
sions, one in the morning and \u25a0' another
in the afternoon, sufficient room * will
be' provided for all. A renumber of
building contracts ' for new schools
have already, been let and it is thought
that when a few of /.the \u25a0 more ; impor
tant of these have been: completed the
double sessions can be' done away*with.
As itls, one class rof pupils -will; be
gin their lessons at;B o'clock 'in 'the
morning, .finishing \,for the /day \u25a0" at
noon, and: another class will tbegln :in
the same schoolroorhi"at 1 o'clock : and
end at 6 : o'clock. "Thls^ method necessi
tates ' the . carrj'ing home each day of
air books by the students. . '
7" The school roll: falls but a
few.; thousand shorty of the number ; be
fore the' fire . and ,'is ! ,an ' increase
nearly 75 ; per cent over : that of ; last
year. The high schools and night
schools "were also opened yesterday,
with, a similar increase in! attendance.
The night - schools, ' to , the
plans lof : the .' board "«of \u25a0" education, will
be; carried to the highest point of per
fection. \u25a0
FAKER DISAPPEARS
The ; police received t a dispatch from
Los Angeles yesterdayjthat Charles H.
Brockway, the clairvoyant who was
wanted here on a charge of grand lar
ceny for swindling ; Otto; Vierdeck :of
821 Webster streetjout of $2,280 v last
May, had been released on $3,000 cash
bail', and .had ! disappeared. : Vierdeck
left for Los Angeles Saturday; evening,"
but- Brockway had been : released "be
fore : he ' got ' there.' ~ Every effort ' will
be? made to find Brockway". and ; bring
him * here for trial.
ACCUSED OF EMnEZZLEMEJXT
I Joseph \u25a0" J." Robinson was arrested .yes
terday by.; Detective Ryan , on a .warrant
charging him with embezzlement/ 'He
was released on \u25a0; JSO cash bail. - Vl The
complaining witness Is Hugh r. Law,
grocer, 608 Haight street, who alleges
that Robinson, while acting as a clerk
and collectorjfor.him, embezzled various
amounts v aggregating $ 1,0 00.
gressed the 'cordiality rose to an ova
tion, and there were curtain calls with
out' number. ;* : : ' -
Dion \u25a0 , Bouclcault's comedy.- drama
gives Denis O'Sulllvan as Shaun an op
portunity to' show his gift of ; humor,
pathos,. wit and primitive emotions suc
ceeding ? each other ; with kaleidoscopic
rapidity; 7 A feature of the -play? is his
singing i of !: the \u25a0' be'a/itif ul *; Irish \u25a0' songs,
VBelieve\Me>lf } All Those Endearing
Young' Charms," "The Low-backed
Car" and* ."Savourneen Dheellsh," the
last rbeing; sung in^Gaellc."" He^ has a
fine '.voice?' of,- an .unusually sympathtlc
quality and sings with great \u25a0 power of
expression. -\u25a0\u25a0. *:':"'.'\u25a0 . ' '.Vv. 'It--S
-The>,> play abounds In Interesting
scenes,', and- the .: costumes \u25a0 of ; the \u25a0 Irish
peasants flaunting; the green in spite* of
laws, together with the gold and scarlet
of ; the English, add the charm ' of ; vivid
colors 3 to : . the ~; picturesque grouping i In
the < scenes of • the >wedding., and home
coming. AS veritable hymn of - patriot-
Ism is s "The; Wearing of ;. the ; Green,'^
sung '.by '; Shaun, .'while the young men
keep watch i against the approach of the
British soldiers,/ and' the old men listen
with i heads 'i reverently bowed, , while
the children look- on i wondering/at ; the
sudden-seriousness that had come. over
the: festive crowd."-"-. ,
' '.The' star' Is well supported by the "Al
cazar-stock 'company. Vv Daisy \u25a0 Loverlng
as the girl 'Arrah" Invests the " part with
individuality ;• and shows 'that r : she lis
capableVof r eniotlonal : acting." 'The part
of f Beamish McCoul ; Is .taken by ,' Ernest
Glehdinning ahd;that of his sweetheart,
Fanny. Power,. by Genevieveßllnn/' John
B/yMaherJ impersonates the! villain/
whose': great-grandfather,, according^ to
Shaun, ; - had ; been v" forgotten : . when a St."
Patrick : rid ) lreland ' of snakes. rWill" R;
Walling thas ia \ { very ; likable ; part i ; as
Colonel .O'Grady., Other members of
the cast are ; A.*>Burt ' Wesner, "i- Edward
Coxeh, Walter 7 Whipple," Herbert < Far-
Jeon and Anita Murray. ;
You're^ Sure of : Pare'; Milk
When you- use. lsleton: Evaporated Milk
"—it's ; sterilized;: then ;. put in =. airtight
tins; reaches you untouched; unopened.*
, ARRAIG2TED : FOB J HTTaDEß—Harry '\u25a0 Black
bnrn,/. accused .of; murder;' for.'.-naTinc rehoi -u.jj
killed Josept). Slater^.' ln -ith«>.- Cnllfomls •^-n^
hall, , 1034 Kearny, street, early, Sunday mdrnlM,'
*waß . arraigned ;• in j Police " Juage :• Couion's c court
yesterday. :j By t consent : the case,; was i continued
until August 27.'- Blackburn's , face | gave evidence
of • the f act-, that '\u25a0 be ' had 'been .badly beatpn: \u25a0?\u25a0 .-«-.
g For Infants and CMldren.
riSHfißi^ 6 m aye
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ApaffectfiemEdy forCoitsfipa- Is f « \u25a0 fir
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WonnsjConviilsions .Feverish- jjM\ M Eft^-fIIFQ?
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Tac Surule ; Signature ol «\u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0 ' *'^' *§
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:; : \u25a0', " , The Newserie.': : v
1 1651 "CHURCH i STREET
; vGeorgeirPrewitt's;' Branch. .
\u25a0 .-\u25a0 • ~- : \u25a0=\u25a0 " \u25a0.-"\u25a0^- ' \u25a0'\u25a0>.";,\u25a0.. ~ \u25a0 "
PhoneWest:to7o;
Ckdles* Tailor
Has i^ast • retnrned ; from ". New : York \u25a0. with \u25a0 il-i 1 -- tall
I line \u25a0of - importations > for ; ladies' tailor ' gowns,'
both* plain -.apd^ fancy, v '
*^^^O3 j CAUIFfORrstI A ST.
THE! . WEEKJUY CALL, 91 ; PER YEAH
AMUSEMENTS
H ALCAZAR ,TH, TH F R
ABSOLUTELY "CLASS A" STRUCTURE
CORNER SUTTKR AND STEINER STS.
Belasco & Mayer, Owners and Managers.
TONIGHT AXD ALIi "WEEK
DENIS O'SULLIVAN
Supported by ' the New Alcazar ' Stock Company,
In Dion Boucicaulfs Great' lrish Drama.
ARRAH-NA-POGUE
Matinees on Saturday and Son day
PRICES^-Night, 25c to $1; Mats., 25c. 35c. SOc.
Next Week— DENIS O'SULUVAN
In "PEGGIE MACHREE"
VAN NESS THEATER
Cor. Van Ness and Grove — Phone Market 500.
Nightly,'. Including San. — Matinee Sat.
First Time Here — Direct from Savoy Theater.N.X.
William A. Brady and Joseph R. Grismer
Make Known, .
By ; GEORGE : BROADHURS?r.
THE PIiAY SENSATION OF THE YEAR
, Prices— s2, $1.60. $1, 75c. 50c.
Coming— "ln the Bishop's Carriage^
CENTRAL THEATER
ERNEST E. HOWELL...Proprletor and Manager
Market and Eighth streets. ...Phone Market 777
THRILLING MELODRAMA EVERT NIGHT.
MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. .."
First time in San Francisco— The Great New.
.-York Spectacular Success, - --. .
BROADWAY
AFTER DARK
PRICES— ISc, 25c and SOc
BEGINNING NEXT MONDAY EVENING.
"SAVED FROM SHAME"
ELLIS ST. NEAR ' FILLMORE.
Absolutely Class "A" '. Theater ... Building.
V MATINEE * TODAY AND EVERY . DAY.
ADVANCED VATJDEyiLXB
: FRED ' RAY and Co. 'In Roman Travesty;
FERREROS, Musical Clown, with hia WON-
DERFUL-MUSICAL DOG:- EMILE SUBER3,
Monologist; MLLE. MARTHA, Qneen of th*
Trapeze: .THE IMMENSAPHONE: THREC
P.ENARDS: KELLY and VIOLETTE;,NEW OR-
PHEUM r MOTION PICTURES, and LAST
WEEK of -WILLIAM COURTLEIGH and Co. in
the jrreat Lambs' Club hit, "PEACHES."
— PRICES — Eveninjrs. 10c, 25c. 60c. 73c. Box
seats. $1.00. Matinees (except Sundays and
Holidays),. 10c. 25c, 50c.
PHONE WEST 6000.
NOVFI TY THEATE^
11 VVIwLw II PJoa Wot 3990
All Thia Week — Matinees Saturday, and : Sunday.
BEST RESERVED SEATS— 2Sc and SOc.
Latest and: Most Successful Melodrama of the Day
HER FIRST FALSE STEP
The ; Finest Production , Yet. Splendid Cast.
. Next Week— Big "Uncle > Tom's ; Cabin" , Show.
THE CALIFORNIA PROMOTION COH»nTEE :
(Organized 1002)
-PROMOTION: The act, of promoting: afl-
vancement;. ENCOURAGEMENT.—^>ntury Dic-
tionary.
\u25a0 - The : California - Promotion .committee has for*
its object the PROMOTING -of California as a
whole. -" -
It has nothing, to sell.
.-^Jts energies are devotfd to fostering all things
that have the ADVANCEMENT of California as
their object.3gjggHßgggj!g^; \
.7 It gives: reliable information on every . subject
connected with the Industries of California."
It gives ENCOURAGEMENT, to the establish-
ment of - new Industries : and invites '• deoirabla
immigration. '
1 1 « i s" not ; an * employment i agency, although it
gives • information regarding labor conditions.
[ ' It: presents the opportunities and needs In all
j fields <of ' business and professional activity.
: ."•. The 'committee -is supported by popular «üb-
• scription and : makes *no charges for any service
! rendered.
: •": Affiliated 1 with the : committee ;\u25a0 are 160 ,'com-
! merel.il organizations of _ the state, with • a mem-
; bershlp of , over 20,000. j
: ': Meetings : are ;' held •emlannually. In different
i parts :of - California." where matters of state in-
terest are discussed.
;', Headquarters of the committee are maintained
in San ,- Francisco In California building. Union
Square."" 7 '
CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. •
CAL^ W^
BRING RESULTS
| Pur© Teas
I are healthful-nerve
I soothing-delicious.
| FOLGER'S
I GOLDEN GATE
f^^^^^j • TEAS \u25a0 |
is? ft tii&\ Oolonrf
S ' >s§|^k BreaKfait
Wff |Cn powder
I mCEYlM|Bi«cK<a
\u25a0^$&ZZZZ === ~^\ Green
arc pure. Packed flavor-
tight in dust-proof car-
tons to protefct their
purity and flavor.
| y/jj'JL. Folger QDk Co*- '
c San FvaaolMO
InporUr* of Pom T**a '
\u25a0.. - \u25a0 *
The & PATENTED
RIMLESS EYEGLASSES
are Guaranteed
MAT TA break
ranj TO -chip
iivi loosen
I TheOcularium \
/SOS VAN NESS AYS: 1
6*t.BUSM*ndSUtTER STS.
JOHN J. DEANE
NOTARY I'USLIO
Special Cara Taken AVlth Dejuttion* \u0084
mad All Lcsal Docnments '
Northwest Corner ol S utter and
Stelner Streets.
Pacific Grand Hotel
127-131 EIXIS STREET
IVOVV OPEIS
European plan. First-class Cafe
In connection. Next to Southern
Pacific Railroad and Steamship of-
fices. All Cars pass tho door.
RATES $1 PER PAY AXD UP
STATEMENT
OF THE CONDITION AXD AFFAIRS OF THB
Connecticut Mutual life
, Insurance Company
OF HARTFORD* IN THE STATE OF CON-
on tae 31st <!ay of December.
1006, and for the year ending on that day.
made to the Insurance Commissioner of toe
State of California pursuant to the requirements
of Section 613 of tie Political Code of Mid
State.
CAPITAL.
Capital paid up -
ASSETS. \u25a0 • "\u25a0 l ™ s -« a — \u25a0
Xet.valna of real estate owned by
the company;.... $9,133,301.70
Amount of loans secured by bonds
and mortgages on real estate.... 24,631,132.80
Loans made to "policy holders on
company's policies, assigned as
-collateral ..'-... 1,307.413.00
Loans secured by pledg* of bonds,
stocks or other collateral 1.250.000.00
Premium notes and loans in any
form ta&en in payment of prem- . . -
turns on policies now in force. ... 413,507.40
Cash market ralne of stocks and
• bonds owned. by company ...... 26,687,309.90
Cash In. company's office ........
Cash deposited in banks 1,530,292.33
Interest due and accrued \u25a0 942.803.66
Rents due and accrued 14,742.65'
Net amount of premiums. in process
of collection and of deferred
premiums .......... 892.999^3
Comptroller's certificates State of
New York 12,333.20
Agents' balances ................. 81. CT
Total assets *R8.437.ft57.8ft
LIABILITIES. .
Claims for death losses and ma-
tured endowments due and unpaid 134,062.77
Claims for death losses and ma-
tured endowments in process of
adjustment, or adjusted and not *
due 170.273.00
Claims for death losses reported, no
proofs received 118,465.00
Claims for death losses resisted by
.-.-..: 3,000.00
Present value of amounts not yet
. due on supplementary contracts
not InTolTlng life contingencies.
Net present Talue.of all outstand-
ing policies, computed according
to the combined experience tabla
of mortality.' with 4 per cent in-
terest and American Table with - •*
3 per centrr.Trr.-.'jr.... .\u25a0•539,353,721.00
Dividends or other profits duo -
policy holders 1.504.257.3S
All other liabilities ...:... 530.270.9 a
Total liabilities |«1. 983. Q50.tf
y-Y ' income. '
Cash received for premiums on \
new policies during year H75,530.30
Cash received for renewal of prem-
iums during year 5,050,743.9$ -
Consideration for supplementary
contracts not Involving life con-
tingencies .............*.
Cash received for interest ..' 2.519,37^23
Cash received for rents ~. 532,423.03
Cash received from all other
sources .167,732.23
Total Income - .< 3.74G.343.68
EXPENDITURES. =-*==•»-\u25a0—•
Cash paid for losses and matured '
endowments ......: f $4,330,911.06
Casit paid to annuitants ...'..\u25a0... 17.577 81
Cash paid for surrendered policies. 617 76440
Cash paid for dividends* to policy
holders .; ..' 1,133,827.50
Cash paid for dividends to stuck
holders '.
Commissions paid to agents 406,35053
Salaries and other compensation of
officers and • employes., except
agents and medical examiners. . 171,432 43
Salaries " and ' traveling . expenses of '
managers of agencies, agents,
,. c i*. rk ?*;, etC -. "VV • 72.053.35
: Medical Examiners' fees .......... 22.D91.25
Cash paid for taxes M 2 BS4V*
jCash paid for reats ......'.. 40,503.58
i All other disbursements 370.927.25
I Total expenditures $7.7ff7.R74.43
; Premium notes, loans or* \u25a0 "™ a "= M " : " 1™"1 ™"
\u25a0 : liena on liaad December
\u25a0 31st of prevlons year. . .^61,927.78
1 Restored by revival of
, poltdes ...:.... 22.00
| Total i. ...$4«1.P4».78
I : Deductions durias tie year a* follows:
C3ed :in pay meat of losses
and claims ...: $16,733.24
' Used in puixbase of sur-
rendered policies ». 2,1t5!.13
Voided by lapse 341.00
; Used in payment \u25a0 of div- ,\u25a0 ,
-- dends to ttocS boldera:.^ 20,979.30
\ Redeemed by maker to
| cash « 6,005.69
Total deductions of policy note ac-
count .........: lit., 442.38
Balance of note assets at ' end of .
j year •-••-"- .3413.807.4 ft
JOHN M. TATLOG, President.
WILLIAM H. DEMING. Secretary.
I Subscribed and sworn to me this 21st
day of February, IUO7.
NATHAN F. PECK. Notary PubUcw
A. Xv pIiARMON
Supervisor, of Agencies
I Rooms 700-701 Class Sprockets Bldf.
! San Francisco, *; OaJL
7

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