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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 02, 1910, Image 27

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-04-02/ed-1/seq-27/

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28
CALHOUN STRIKES
BLOW AT BOARD
OF SUPRVISORS
United Railroads' Attorneys Kill
Argument for Death of
Bancroft Bill
Contention Is Raised That No
"Gap" Exists at Sutter and
Market Streets
; By tlip contention of its own attor
neys in the pending litigation with the
city over its right to a switch connec
tion from its Post street track into the
Market street tracks at the foot of
Post, the TTnitcd Kailrosids has deliv
ered a death blow to the argument ad
vanced by meznbexta of the public utili
ties committee of the board of super
visors in defense of their refusal to
recommend the passage of the Ban
croft ordinance providing for a through
Sutter street service to the ferry over
the inside Market street tracks.
HERGET MAKES EXCUSE
The explanation given by the mayor
.u-i the four members of the public
utilities" committee \u25a0who -refused to
sanction the Bancroft ordinance was
based upon an assertion of belief that
to order the installation of such serv
ice might jeopardize the rights of th«
Geary street municipal road to a lower
Market street right of way. Pressed
for a definite statement as- to how such
an embarrassment could possibjy re
ealt Supervisor Herget and other mem
bers of the committee declared that as a
gap of several feet existed between the
end of Sutler street proper and the mid
dle tracks of Market street an order
to the Unlud Railroads to operate its
cars across this gap mieht be construed
as a command to us© tracks belonging:
to the dummy Sutfcer street railway
company, and hence at. a recognition
of that company.
DAM* ADVICE PREFERRED
Though City Attorney Long promptly
pointed out the fallacy of such a con
tention and declared that ao possible
jeopardy to the rights of the Geary
fetreet road could result Herget replied
that Cleve Dam. the mayor's private
attorney and legal adviser, held a dif
ferent view, and allowed it to be un
derstood that he and his colleagues
preferred to rely upon the advice of
Dam rathrr than that of l#ong. ,
The L'nited Railroads, however, has
provided one of the strongest proofs of
the un^onndness of the excuse given by •
the mayor and, (supervisors. It deliber
ately noie a right of ,way for a con
nection of Its Eddy street tracks with
the Market street rails over a similar
"gap" at the foot of Eddy street in the I
face of an explicit limitation of the
extent of the Eddy street franchise to
the westerly line of Powell fetreet. It
attempted the same thing at the foot
of Post street and laid the connecting
track.
THERE IS NO "GAP"
\u25a0
The Post street connection was or
dered torn up, and the United Hail
roads enjoiraed the city from carrying
out such an order. That suit is now
pending, and one of the principal con
tentions of the United Railroads at
torney* has been that as the Post street
franchise rans "from the junction of
Poet street and Market street" •without
more specific designation, its provi
sions must :>e construed to mean "from
the center line of Market street," thus
allowing of the connection between the
tra< kf. I
* The tame principle applies to the
Sutler street matter, as pointed out
yesterday by Supervisor Bancroft. The
deed of the *>Id Sutter street railway
company's property to the United Rail
roads describes the line "from the junc
tion of Sutter street and Market
street." If the United Railroads' own
argument is to be applied there is no
•gap." '
BLACK AROUSES CRITICISM
The admission made by General Man
ager Charles N. Black of the United
Railroads that the only real purpose
of his company in fighting the city
over the Geary street road question
was because of its desire to retain a
monopoly of the lower Market street
situation has aroused decided criticism.
President WJ V. Stafford of the board
of harbor commissioners sat up with a
jerk when he read Black's statement
in The Call.
Stafford declared:
"The question of giving terminal, fa
cilities at the ferry to another streetcar
lino has not as % yel come up, and under
ordinary circumstances I do not believe
in crossing streams until I reach them.
I think, however, that Mr. Black lost
his head a little when he said the
United Railroads did not' propose to
lose its monopoly. The privileges that
the United Railroads enjoys in East
street are from month to month, a^d
the company pays the state $250 a
month for the privilege of looping the
loop. When the Geary street line comes
to the ferry, Mr. Black will find out
now much of a monopoly the United
Railroads enjoys."
A strong showing is to be made be
fore the board of supervisors next Mon
day by those interested in securing a
through Sutter street service without
any abrogation of the city's rights. A
minority report In favor of the im
mediate passage of the Bancroft ordi
nance will be presented to the board
by Supervisor Hocks, who will de
mand a vote.
BAXCROFT BIL.L IXDORSED
Resolutions strongly Indorsing the
Bancroft ordinance were adopted at a
meeting of the executive committee of
the good government league Thursday
afternoon. The resolutions, signed by
President Frank W. Marvin. Samuel W.
Backus, John J.. Pratt, A. M. de Vail,
E. Stewart. Isidor Jacobs, Henry Col
ombat, Edgar Matthews, Milton T.
U'Ren and B. H. Gurnette, were, in
part, as follows:
Whereas, the Sutter street rail
road company and various civic
associations have filed with the
board of supervisors petitions, al
leging public inconvenience by rea
son of patrons of the United Rail
roads being compelled- to transfer
at the foot of Sutter street; and.
Whereas, by the so called Ban
croft ordinance, compelling- the
United Railroads to run their Sut
ler street cars down the * inner
tracks to the ferry, a practical so
lution is afforded; and.
Whereas, the city attorney has
given his opinion that . this ordi
nance compelling the United Rail
roads to operate the Sutter street
cars on the inner tracks 'on lower
Market street will not interfere
with the rights of the city in any
way. shape or manner, or jeopar
dize the Geary street railroad -
project; therefore, be it- • . *
Resolved, that we request the »
board of supervisors of this city to
approve and adopt the said ordin
ance at as early a date as pos
sible.
CAKDLE STABTS FlEE— Flimn sUrtinr from
» candle enrelop*} tbe bedding of Mrs. C.
ScMUingcr »t 45 Debou street e»rly. yesterday
niortiinc and newly destroyed the btnmt. -Mrs.
Schillincer «-«s r»«<llnc when xhe smelt Kmoke
«u<l <H«-(»Torod that the bod clothe-* were on
fire. TU*- lire d"partmcnt was called ami the
falexc extlsguitbcd.
Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys
GUM MAN TO BUILD
BROAD GAUGE ROAD
Chicago Magnate Contemplates
Connecting Eureka With
Red Bluff
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
RED BLUFF. CaL, April I.—An
nouncement has been made today by
N. K. Guyot, manager of the Tomhead
copper mining company, that a Chicago
multimillionaire chewing gum magnate,
named Wrigley, will be in Red Bluff
on June 1 and .will, be prepared to
Invest in the construction of, a broad
gauge railroad from .Red Bluff to Eu
reka, via the Tomhead copper mines,
41 miles northwest of this place.
The plans already advocated by a
popular movement were -to ' build j a
narrow gaujre line over this ! route,
but now Wrigley is prepared. to finance
a broad, gauge road.
The citizens of Red Bluff have
pledged themselves to raise $100,000
toward the road and will raise twice
that amount if necessary.
Wrigley is Interested in the Tom-,
head mines.
ORGANIZATION FORMED
BY CHICKEN FANCIERS
Plan to Give Annual Poultry
Shows in Stockton
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
STOCKTON, April 1. — The San Joa
quin poultry and pet stock association
was organized last night by a number
of chicken fanciers. The object of the
assx>ciation .is to encourage the breed
ing of high class poultry and to give
annual poultry shows'. Membership is
open to all fanciers." of chickens.
William H. McKay presided over the
meeting last night and Eugene P. Sabin
acted as secretary. A members-hip
committee consisting of Ben M. Wood
hull. II- L. Wooster. C. H. Robbins, J. P.
Dentoni and W". P. Rothenbush was ap
pointed.
The committee on permanent organ
ization Is composed of John D. Gall,
A. B. Clay and C. H. Robbing.
The members are: -
A. B. Cloy . • |GPorse TV. Ponpelwell
R. L. W.wster jC. H. Robbins
\V. I*. Rotnenbush . JO. E. Crawford
.1. F. IVntonl John D. Gall
BeDJamin M. WoodhoH (Claude M. Gill
T. J. Oill 1 Eugene P. Sabin
<'. F. Coffelt I William U. McKay
C T. McAlmond" i
MOUNTED THUGS TRY
RAID ON DRUG STORE
Masked Man Beats Retreat. at
Sight of Gun
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, April I.— A pair of
mounted robbers tried^ to raid the drug
store of J. Quirin in the residence dis
trict about midnight last night, but
upon finJing the proprietor waiting for
them with a revolver, beat a hasty
retreat. Quirin was behind his pre
scription desk when he saw a masked
man approaching. He brought' him tp
a halt and then chased him out of the
door. Tb<» thug ran to where a partner
waited with two saddle horses and the
two rode away.
ASKS^'MUST LITTLE
INDIANS GO TO SCHOOL?"
Opinion to Be Given by Attor
ney General Webb
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, April I.— The right of
Indian children residing on Indian res
ervations to refuse to attend school is
to be decided by Attorney General
Webb. .Superintendent Amos of the In
dian service, United States department
of agriculture, has. asked Superintend
ent of Schools Hyatt for an opinion,
and the latter has passed, the matter
up to Webb. Amos wants to know if
Indian children can be compelled to at
tend school in California. V..
CHINESE FOUND DEAD
FROM LACK OF FOOD
{Special Dlspeich to The Calf] •
PLACERVIIjLE. April I.— Coroner
Winchell recorded a verdict today to
tbe effect that the Chinese who was
found dead along the road above here
yesterday came to his death by starva
tion. It Is believed that the oriental
ran oat of provisions and got snowed
Id so. that he could not get to a camp.
BRAKEMAN KILLED BY
FALL FROM CABOOSE
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
SACRAMENTO, April L— J. C. Burns,
a young brakeman, fell from the top
of a caboose on Southern Pacific freight
train No. 37, eastbound, at Armstrong
station near Lodi today. He was
rushed to this city, but died at -the
hospital.
SEWER SYSTEM BONDS
VOTED AT OROVILLE
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
OROVILLE. April 1- — Voters of Oro
vllle yesterday for a -bond.
Issue of $12,000 for the installation of
a complete sewer system for the down
town section. The vote was 439 for
the bonds and 95 against. '
\u25a0 :^i^ «c / i<^ I Aor I . i \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0
to- Our Children's Department
';:,\u25a0' \u25a0;\u25a0.{\u25a0 ;\u25a0.;. (third Floor)
Child's y A White : Serge \ Coats— With black; hair ;
stripe, embroidei'ed pink or blueilinen. collars, sizes '2 to ,
, 5 years. Special ... :.'. : . . . . : .53175
fni;;,-- - , r -- '..\u25a0.. ; •;.. . . . \u0084t--- ;- r ;. v •; \u25a0
Child's Reef er— Double breasted, in solid .colors an d
mannish mixtures, sizes" 2 to 7 years. . Special . ;"v ;
. \ \u25a0 Child's % Coat— Of all wool material, V. neck, circu-
lar skirt, brass buttons; neck, sleeves and skirt silk braid
trimmed ; colors, Navy, Copenhagen and Red ; sizes 2 to/
; 5 years. Special . . .... "/•.'.':;/. V:.;. . ..... . . ... . . .||3i7si
Grant Aye; and Geary St. . :
THE SAN FRANCISCO^
400 SOCIETY FOLK
DANCE AT KIRMESS
Charity Show Given at Capital
and Audience Taxes the
Capacity of Theater
v. - - . • \u25a0 . \u25a0 \u25a0 " . \u25a0

[Special Dispatch' to .The: Call]
SACRAMENTO. April I.— Four hun
dred Sacramento society, folk danced
and sang in the first '.kirm'ess- given
in this city for many years. : The big
charity show opened 'at the Clunle
tonight."
It will be repeated Saturday matinee
and night. The performance this even
ing was given before an rfudlence "that
filled the house., r , : <\u25a0
The Muscovian. and Japanese dances
were the big! features of the perform
ance. Elizabeth 'Finney, as the Merry
Widow, and Mr. Linwood, with 16
others, danced- the. Muscovian. . Will
Lovdale and Willa Lobner sang the
principal parts in the Japanese act.
BRIDGE PROJECT MEETS
OPPOSITION IN TEHAMA
Protestants Hire Special Train
"to- Visit Superiors
[Special Dispatch lo 7 he Call] \
TEHAMA, April I.'— Many residents
in this city will go in a; special train
to Red Bluff Friday, 'April S, when
the county supervisors- take up the
question of constructing a bridge across
the Sacramento river at this pointy .
Citizens of Los lloliiios will be in
vited to go. At a mala meeting here
last, nigrht enoug-h money was sub
scribed to Insure the chartering of t lie
special. 1 \u25a0\u25a0 " •
The supervisors are considering a
proposition to construct a bridge for
$85,000. People here believe this is too
much, as they have the word of a
bridge builder that it can be construct
ed for half the amount estimated.
APPEAL IS BASED ON
"TREAT" TO JURYAIEN
Superior Court Will Hear; Dis
pute Over, Burned Hay
[Special Dispatch to . The Call]
JACKSON. April" I.— Alleging that
Lawrence Burke treated several. jurors,
who were sitting tn the case wherein
he" was a- defendant, Edward 'Van
Vrankan has filed ah appeal, from the
jury's decision in justice court and the
suit will be tried in the superior court.
Van Vrankan owned a stack of hay
valued at $1,500, which- was destroyed
by lire, he alleges, because of careless
ness on the part of Robert Jameson
and Burke.
The defendants won in the justice's
court. ,
PLAN CRUSADE AGAINST
KEEPERS OF SALOONS
Those Selling Liquor to Minors
Will Be Prosecuted
[Special Dispatch to The Call] ,/ V
PLACERVILLE, April I.— Warning
notices relative to the selling to minors
of liquor .have been sent to all saloon
keepers in the county by District At
torney George «H. Thompson and Sheriff
Gilbert and a crusade will be begun at
once against 1 those who fail to comply
with the law. District Attorney Thomp
son is determined to break up 'this
practice and will cause arrests to be
made if the law is not obeyed.
THUGS BE AT CHINESE
AND TAKE HIS CASH
Vegetable Peddler Has to Seek
Physician's Aid '
[Special Dispatch to The Call] >
GRASS VALLEY, April I.— The police
are looking for two young thugs who
robbed and then brutally beat 'Ah Jim,
an old Chinese vegetable peddler. The
Chinese is under the cate. of a physi
cian.. He was on his : way hope . last
night ' when the- two attacked him,
robbed-him of $16 and; left him' in a
bad condition oh the sidewalk.
CARPENTERS' NEW WAGE
SCALE NOW IN EFFECT
ISpccial Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, , April i._ vfhe new
wage scale of J5 a day demanded by
the carpenters* union' went into effeot
today. This being Friday, a day, be
fore the end of the week,' very ; little
difference was made in the .number, of
men 1 employed by the local builders,
but tomorrow "will determine how far
the; contractors will go in laying off
men. ... r \u25a0 \u25a0
CHILDREN GET ESTATE
OF CATHERINE HANSEL
[ Special Dispatch to The Call ]
' STOCKTON, April : I.— The will of
Catherine" Hansel has been-, filed; for
probate by Henry Hansel, j ; The ' estate
Is valued at $10,000 /and divided
equally among , the 'children, 2 $500 each
belng.bequeathed'tothe grandchildren,
Lois O. and Edna L. Stamper.:. The chil
dren are:' Henry C, Louis^ J.,,Frederica
and Gertrude M. Hansel and Emma L/
Stamper and Catherine; Cadle.
MISSION WORKERS
MEET IN STOCKTON
San Joaquin Presbyterian Soci=
ety Opens Twenty-third
Annual Session
-. -'\u25a0\u25a0. •• * - •'••-.-. \u25a0 , ' .-\u25a0\u25a0
[Special Dispatch Jo. The Call] / ,
STOCKTON; .April I.— The twenty
third annual meeting of the San Joa
quin Presbyterian . missionary society
was called to order this morning in the '
I'irst Presbyterian C-, church, delegates
being in attendance from as far south
as Bakerstteld. The principal speakers
are Rev. N. K. Clemenson and Rev. Ray
fenntb.' -. ..... , - • .:
.They. The y - morning session was taken up i
..with: -reports 'of officers. Addresses
were delivered this afternoon as fol-»
lows: "Outlook." Mrs. Aldrich of' Stoc
k-ton; 'Study , Class Symposium," Miss
Morton, state secretary; "India," \u25a0 Rev.
Ray C. Smith, and ."Problems of Mor
monism," Rev. N.E. Clemenson.
.rne prog-ram "tomorrow . will be de
voted to foreign .missionary society
work. . It is as follows:
H' — I'ralse >=cryiee
! 10:15— Reports. ' . . '
to^ ecor( "nX secretary, Mr*. H. S. Holley, Stock -
Kre"no C!iriOndinS SeCret " rj '' MrSt UP. Dralle,
' Treasurer, Jliss Uuby Olney, Fresno.
r.r*r r TJ ar ? yotln S People's ' work. Mrs. F. D.
Prescott, Kreeno. . ,
Hox storetary.'Mrs. A. W. Johnson, Preono.
Fovrl^ Dal> . v bands. .Mrs. E. E. Gower,
'. Se "etarx of literature, Mrs. G. T. Easton,
olOOKtOll* j \u25a0 \u25a0 - ~ . .
Secretaries mission »=tudy. Mrs. E. G.~ Steven-
Ron M«ilern. and .Miss Morton, San Francisco.
11 :l.>— Round tabie. .
ll:4n— KlPction of officers.
1- — Luncheon. :
'; - — Derotional. ' ;, :
L'.-ir.— l'apor. -if Christ Should Come Today,"
Mrs. dirties I.emoore.
"Under the Palms." \u25a0
•3 — Vocal soloA
?:1?7? :1 ?7~ A , dllr '' 5S by Key - I{a y C- «mith.
4 — Music. : . - ,
; Heport of committee on resolutions; hymn,
Mixpnh : benediction and adjournment.
Among those in attendance, at the
meeting are. , ; .
"Mrs. T.t B. Matthews of Selma. Mrs. M. E.
« i eF T ° . Lpmoor(> . Mrs. Edwin Ross of Selma.
Mrrt I. A. Mflvin of Fresno. Mrs. Herbert 7..
AustirLof Fresno, Mrs. M. F. Grore of Visalla,
Mrs l.wcp E. Steele of Turlock. Mrs. S. n.
Uitihey of Turlock. Mrs. McKlnnon of Tulare.
-Mrs. I). A.. MoMpj- of San Francisco. Mrs.' Edwin
Grower of Fowler. Mrs. P. E. Kerr of Modesto.
Miss H. .J. Fentem of . Fresno. Mrs. H. X - Pit-
mnn of Mfidcsto. Mrs. M. M. Vincent of Merced.
Mrs. 8. . F. Surryhno of Modesto, Miss <*arrie
Jlorton of San Francisco and Mrs. J. P. Pruutz
man.of San Francisco. '• : \u25a0 ,
NEW OIL WELL COVERS
1,000 BARREL SUMPHOLE
Adjoining Flat Covered in Less
-V Than Four Hours
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
• BAKERSFIELD. April I.— ln less
than four hours this afternoon a ne.w
well , belonging to the Johnson oil com
pany in the Maricopa field filled a 1,000
barrel sumphole and overflowed on the
flat.- The oil is said to be of lighter
gravity than that of other producing
wells in the vicinity. The volume of
the flow is difficult to estimate, as no
facilities for. measuring are available.
It promises- to be one of the best in the
neighborhood.
GRAND CHIEFS VISIT
FORESTERS OF AMERICA
[Special dispatch to The Call]
STOCKTON, April I.— Grand : Chief
Ranger Leo Kaufman and Grand Trus
tee R. L. Rebolia paid Court Stockton
No. SG, Foresters of America, an official
visit last night. A -class 'of. 20 ' cand
idates was initiated. Past Chief Ranger
Daniel Thoman and Dr. E. L. Blackmun
were elected delegates to the grand
court sessions to be held at Merced in
May. James H. Ford and Guy O'Brien
were chosen alternates, i-
DEATH CLAIMS GEORGE FIDDES— Alameda.
1 • April 1. — Leorsre Fldrtes, for many years con
nected with tbe United earrlage companr In
San Francisco, died at his home here, *13T9
Pearl, street. Jast nijrlar. He was 61- rears
of -age.- husband of Eva G. Flddes and father
of Mrs.. Fred E. Brooks and Mrs. George S
\u25a0 Rotrers. ; , .
O'CONNOR, MOFFATT <& CO. \
Children's Saturday
j Today is a day of opportunities for mother and the
i little girls at the O'Connor, Mofiatt & Co. Storc^ Here
! are noted some of the attractions for_ the young people— but
each department Ml exhibit a charming array of spring
raiment for mothers as well.
Stylish 3-Piece Jumper Suits
For Misses of 1 0, 1 2- an d \4 Years.
- Graceful little suits of linen or repp in three stylish models-
Sailor, Buster Brown and Russian Blouse— prettily trimmed with
-self material of contrasting colors. Come in -Pink, Blue Natural
and White— \u25a0 -• '\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0 ''\u25a0 : '\u25a0 '' \ •\u25a0 ! .\u25a0:\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0- .; \. \u25a0;\u25a0•;\u25a0:-
$9, $1 0, $ 12.50 to $ 1 7.5Q
Pretty Lawn Dresses
For Children from 2 to 6 Years. •;'
A special value in Russian Blouse Dresses of. good quality
| lawn, neatly , trimmed f with • pleats : and belt of same ---I- C^
I . ; \u25a0 materia1 . ...:.. . . . . . .... ... . ... . . .... . . . ... . . ... ;. ; ;. ; .OVIC
Children
: In Sizes from 4 to;)A Years. .
SPECIAL PURCHASE -iffISSES'OHATS^-Eight y different -
stylish shapes of Milan straw, with variety ot colored trimmings—
. 100 Misses^ Leghorns-- Variety, -of good /styles. :. C #\
/*; Values up' to" $2.50, ;on • special Vsalefatr/. : . ': ':. . : :.:;<|kr«OU
THE LATEST "DREADNOUGHT^ Jaunty Aft
shaped Milan- straw /hats for Girls '.and; Boys; :V. : ; . . <p«J«\/K)
AVIATOR HAS A
NARROW ESCAPE
Julius Dusoevoir's Monoplane
Wrecked at San Jose and
Aeronaut Pinned In
[ Special Dispatch to The Call ]
SAN JOSE. April 1.-^Julius Dusoevoir
had a narrow escape from death this,
afternoon "at --4 o'clock when he fell
from his monoplane in Its- first success
ful flight on the Linda Vista golf links.
His fall was broken by - piano wire
supports; running underneath the aero
plane and he escaped ;with a\.broken
finger. -The aeroplane was* badly
wrecked,' the three supporting .wheels,
planes and ' propellers being /crushed
when . the-, runaway air&bip; hit^the
ground. . \u25a0 ' <'\u25a0 \u25a0 .
' The accident .was witnessed, by sev
eral-hundred people.; Dusoevoir's en
gine clearly showed its power when, he
turned; it Moose. The aeroplane rah
swiftly/ along '- the ground and then
gradually, ascended. >,:.
, For a hundred feet or so the machine
skimmed along, the wheels clearing the
ground fully _10 feet. Suddenly the
aviator plunged' backward • from his
seat and would g have been dashed
against the ground > but for the wires
running; from the framework iunder-,
neath the planes. Here he was, held
as the craft dashed along for 50 more
feet without a guiding hand.
\u25a0 Thenit'dropped suddenly and people
.flocked to the rescue of 'the aviator
caught in the wreck. Dusoevoir was
unable to t offer an explanation for his
fall. . " -
MORE WAR AGAINST
HIGH SCHOOL FRATS
Sacramento School Director
Making Investigation
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, April 1. — A war
against tha high school frats existing
in this pity despite, the state law is to
be waged by School Director VV. G.
McMillin. He is to conduct a personal;
investigation of conditions and If he
finds\ that there is a- fraternity of any
kind ha'says he will put them out of
business. . . . .
WOMAN SEEKS DEATH ;
BY TAKING POISON
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
STOCKTON. April 1. — Mrsv Jennie
Youngßlood, divorced 'wife of H. . R.
Youngblood of Tracy/attempted suicide
last night in Independence square by
swallowing 20 tablets of bichloride of
mercury. She and her former husband
met and she told him she would kill
herself if he would . not consent to a
reconciliation.' He refused and sfie
swallowed the tablets; Youngblood
fired his revolver and helpwas quickly
summoned. The woman's life was* saved
by prompt work of the emergency hos-'
pital doctors.
RESIGNED CLERK ,
TAKES BACK OLD JOB
[Special Dispatch to The Call] .
SACRAMENTO, April I.— Lou Norton,
wjip recently resigned his position as
chief of the department of corporation
license tax collection in , the secretary
of office, has reconsidered his
action and upon the request of Secre
tary Curry has returned - : to the job
until Curry's tarm. of office expires.
There was some mystery as to Norton's
reason for resigning a 52,500 job, but
he said it was to enter business.
TINNER TURNS BURGLAR
AND GETS SEVEN YEARS
[Special Dispatch to The Call] "/
SACRAMENTO, April I.— Ralph Fos
ter, a young tinner, who robbed "the
home of Mrs. Caroline Schulze of Dixon,
Solano county, last week, \u25a0 .was sen^
tenced today by Judge Hughes to serve
seven years in v th,e penitentiary at Fol
,som. He pleaded guilty to the charge
of .breaking into the residence and
stealing jewelry worth $800.
Store «* ooqd^^ otore
Jfemen Muslin Skirts
A surprise awaits each purchaser of these handsome
muslin skirts. So great are the values and so small
\u25a0 >' the price by comparison that lively selling necessarily
, must result. The skirts are carefully made from serv-
//iceable muslin. Fashioned extra wide, made with a ,
deep flounce of embroidery and an extra dust ruffle,
and trimmed in many cases with clusters of tucks.
Saturday Is Children's
Day at Hate's
• Spring I '«£^Si ~~ Spring
Opening *Mnm Opening
in the %*J^ in the
Baby /&£!^\ Baby
Shop U^^W li Shop
It is Truly Worth Stock Anew the
pvery Mother's |ff.l| Baby's Wardrobe
While in Money 3^&J^ fOTf 0T Spring and
to A ttend M bummer
if-. ... '\u25a0. I — ' '; :.•.•:/ -. * . .. ; "^
•Toraark the occasion eventful there are special- offerings
'.'."."in^babies' wear, such as bonnets. 'wash hats, under-
wear, dresses, coats, bibs, • crocheted wearables, etc.
Also such accessories as baby .baskets and trunks, car-
riac;ea*obes,'etc. ! The best for the monevin* every- case.
\u25a0 v ;, ;-,;=• _ '\u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0- \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 :\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0-\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0"*\u25a0" »
Men's Underwear
at $1.00
Undoubted^ the best, artd perhaps the most complete
stock of men's underwear to be found in this vicinity,
for $1.00 a garment. Perfect fitting shirts and drawers,
accurately and perfectly made. Included are wools,
merinos, lisles, balbriggans and heavy cottons. All
sizes.
Specials in Dress
At. but 60c the Yard
A quantity of all wool ij 42 inch wide worsted suit-
challies, 27 inches wide. i ngs> in white grounds '
shown in polka dots and ?-\v,'C:*w v-«. 1 • i-
„ .* , with white .hair line
small patterns. Depend-
able Hale qualities, the stripes, or black and
best for the money. j white alternating stripes.
Ih i iivirLi .a 'Irian wants to get
> > ; : ~ J awa y from all^ connection with the busy
world, the telephone is an important helper.
The Local Service, is useful in arranging his affairs
N at homeland the^ Long Distance Service of the Bell
System helps him to decide/where to go and what to take J
By means of his Bell Telephone he can find out
whether the fish are biting or the* birds are flying, and
\u25a0 ' . i : whether guides or ho rses can be secured.
After he has been out awhile, if he wants to get
word from the city, the nearest Bell Telephone is a
#1^ The Pacific Telephone /^\
u^pj/ and lelegraph Company 4^^ J
-^^k&SEvery'Bcll Telephone is the Center of the System
. , PROPOSALS
. PROPOSALS FOR .ARMY TRANSPORTA-
TION.—D epot Qo«rterm«Bter'» Office. 10S8 North
Point ' Street, San ; Ftanctsco, Cal.^ April 1
1910. Sealed proposals, in triplicate, will be wv
celred \u25a0 here until ill '«.- m.; Saturday. May »
1910. for . the fiscal ' year ending June 30 1911
as -follows: Between (either direction) San Fran-
} Cisco.. Honolulu. Gnam.< Nagasaki and Manila:
between j Honolulu.- Guam. ; Nagasaki and Manila!
| and between Guam. Nagasaki and Manila, and
i between ' Nagasaki , and Jlanlln. Bids. to specify
rates for, transportation • between* the - aforemen-
tioned ports for passengers/- freight " (including
i liTestock) fand remains of. officers, * soldiers and
\ employees I of : - the . Gorernment. I Proposal blanks
! and . full \u25a0 information * furnished on . application
I Right reserved .- to | accept . or . reject ; any or all
| proposals ;or • ' any^ part ; thereof, l^roposals' should
j be enclosed In . lealed ' envelopes. - 1 endorsed "Pro-
posala : for \u25ba Trans- Pacific - Transportation," to be'
i opened at lt.a. M.,.May 2,i1910, and addressed
11. P. 1 TOUNG, Depot Quartermaster^ \
3|;PSE-CA^WANT ADS ];
THE CALL'S
BRANCH OF»If?ICES
Sabserlptioma ' and adrcrtUemeat*
win b« retelved la Saa Vruncimc* at
the (ollofrlas offlceas . : \u25a0>*"tr?-zmr£KX
1831 FILUIORB STREET
Open .until - 10 o'clock every nizht
110S VALENCIA STRKSTT
Blake's < Bazaar
818 VAX NESS AVENUE
. Parent's Stationery Store
2200 mUIORE STREET
Tremayne'g Branch -\u25a0\u25a0 *
SS3 H.UGHT STREET
Christian's Branch
- SIXTEENTH AND MARKET STb.
: - . Jackson's Branch
•74 VALENCIA STREET
;,'.» Halllday'a Stationery Store
... Mil WTHST. COR. MISSION
- International Stationery Stor«
NINETEENTH ST. NEAR CASTRO
Maas", Bazaar. . Phono Mission 22ii

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