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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 14, 1910, Image 9

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_\u25a0 AM USEM ENTS
BURTON HOLMES
TRAVELOGUES
Delivered by WRIGHT KEAJCER
GARJUCK THEATER.' j
••NEW JAPAN ft
Prats 50c-. 7.V. %\. at Sherman. Clay & Co.'a
I Oakland— Tomorrow at 3:SC— Ye Liberty j
Ke»t Week, -OLD JAPAK" aad "JAVA"
SKATS .VOW OX SALE FOR
Thp W.M-lds Greatest String Quartet
FriOmj Eve, April S3, at The Xovelfy-
•Mimin v Aft^ April 24. at Thr Garrlrk
!!>> " *~- *l-~*>. ?1. at Sin-rman. City & Co.'s
I'LO\7.ALEVS IX OAKLAND I
Thumday Aft., April 21«t, at 3:15 I
f j
tr\ ScatM Ready Monday
-£/* at Sherman. Clay & Cu.'s .for
MAUD
r ALLAN'S
M\4' Farewell Performances at
VTV VALENCIA THEATER
w |\ Saturday and Monday Eves.,
a .. , April 23 and 25.
Npji:v 9U ILSO, *2 and S2.r>o. Box soats. $.T
Mail order* must »«» socompanied t.j- <-h*»<k or
Tn..-.i.-r orjfr. |»ayatilo ;o Will 1.. <;*r*-«»DTiauni.
ALLAN IN OAKLAND j
Too. Eve., Apr. 2<t, at \> Llherty
Coaing — Walter Damrosch aad Hi» Orcheatra
Ss'eft and Mo«t MasaiSt-eni Theater in America
MATINEK TODAY AND EVERY DVY
EVZHY EVEKIKO AT 8:15
AUTISTIC VAUDEVILLE
NELLIE NICHOLS, the Famous SonjrMrvss
<.«osedl«ice: AL, WHITE'S DANCING BL"<JS-
WALSH. LYVCH an.i CO., In Tteir Orlrinai
Oae Act I'lay. "Huckln"* Run": THE TIC*
QCATS: I-ss-t Week of the Mucloal Playlet.
-THE LEADING LAI>Y." with MARGAKITE
HANEV. Ralph Lynn. Ed Coleman and a Com-
pany of Tea: CHARLES F. SEUON: BARNES
AND C3AWFORD: NEW ORPHEI If MOTION-
PICTt'RnS. Last Week EDWIN HOLT & CO
in Georpe Ade's Comedy. -"THE MAYOR AND
THE MANICURE."
Erecing Prire* — 10c. 25c. srtc. 750; Bos Seata.
Si. Matinee Prlc^i «Eicept Sundays and Uoli-
<J«y»'— loc. £s<-. 50c.
PHONE DOUGLAS 70. . HOME C 1570. ;
S. LOVESICK. MANAGER
ELLIS ST.. NEAR FILLMORE. Class A Theater.
Matinee Daily, 2:15: Every Ev».. 8«15
Vaudeville and Musical Comedy
ATHMORE GREY,
Greatest of Classical Dancers.
THOMAS C. LEARY,
San Francisco's Favorite Coiaedi&a, and
Georprna I.eury.
In "DAD AND THE GIRL."
PRINCESS MUSICAL COMEDY CO.,
With Edvrfn T. Eure-rr,
In -THE MILLIONAIRE."
A Company of IS). \u25a0<
Fi»-e Other Features and Latest Motion Plcturep.
PRICES— 10c. 25c and 50c. Matineea. except-
isg Sna<iar» and Holidays. 10c and 25c.
McAllister ft. near Market.
rbon«>s — Market 130; nr>n»» J2<?22.
Only Matinees Tburs<lay and Saturday.
STARTING NEJtT SCXDAY NIGHT
MORT. H. SINGER Presents
HENRY WOODRUFF
IN "
The Prince of To-night
A UCSICAL GEM In a BEATTY SETTING.
- Pr?<-»^ — 25c to f1.50: Thursday Matinee.
25c to 75c
SEATS KOW ON BALE.
At tne Theater and Emporium.
LMfctAl.iiJtl Van Ness and Grove
IVlIi HilkWl PHONES:
ft/otkEakf Market 500
riJrtrr^Saafiltiirr ,rt >m Home 51661
BIGGEM' COMEDY HIT IN YEARS
THIS WTEK A2fD KEXT
Nightly. inciudißg Sunday — Mat. Sararday onlj.
In the Comedy uf Sunshine and I.su?b<.
The Rejuvenation of
Aunt Mary
SPECIAL PRICES— S<V to $L3O.
SCO CHOICE ORCHESTRA SEATS, $1.00.
S«ats f<»r Second Week Now Selling.
COMING— -THE THIEF"
AIAsALAsX gsjaiSSSs
BELaSCO 4c MAYER. Owners and Managers.
TOJfIGHT— THIS WEEK ONLY— TONIGHT.
MATINEE SATURDAY AXT> SITNDAY.
MaHaa Fairfax's Delicious Comedy,
THE CHAPERON
Mazine Elliott's Most Soccessful Vehicle.
Seats telling at Tbeater and Emporium.
PrW* — Nl^ht. 23c to $1; matinee, 25c to 50c.
Next Week=Under Southern Skies
MATINEE SATURI>AY. "
OTIS SKINNER
In His Latest Triutaphant Comedy.
Your Humble Servant*
Two Weeks — Be^innim Next Sunday, <
LAMBARDi GRAND OPERA CO.
Sua. and Fri. *rg*.. "LA TOSCA"; Mon. «rg.
and 6at. oat.. •'MADA^IE BUTTERFLY": Tne*.,
••IL TROVATORE": W»d. mat.. -RIGOLETTO";
Wed. erg.. "IRIS": Tburs. er%.. "MIGNON";
gat. erjr.. "A IDA."
Seats on Bale. 50c to $2.00.
%•'\u25a0\u25a0** f^S i's i**^ Ear* MtYy K3 wp«
(OAKLAND f^Af?|CF V
TZh.ui.LOb ITAXJAN BAND Oi 60 bOLOISTS.
GKAND OPEBA MUSIC
SPECIAL CONCKRT TONIGHT.
In<-h;dlnir Rejection* from Verdi. Wagner. Lena-
caval'o. Maacagnl. DonizettL Meyerbeer and Ton-
rh!elU. The Bell Chonw from "< - aTallerla no*tl-
cana"' *nd the Sextet from vuicla" vM be
given. Don't mis* it. Notblag like It erer
fceart in California.
TOMORROW NIGHT— WAGNER CONCERT.
IDORA PARK g£££s?i^
Via Key Route Includes Admission.
REGENTS ADVANCE
FACULTY MEMBERS
George C. Edwards and Charles
A. Kofoid Are Given Full
Professorships
BERKELEY, April 13.— Associate
Professor George C. Edwards, who has
been long in the service of the univer
sity, has been promoted, to a full pro
fessorship by the regents. A number
of other members of the faculty were
given higher rank on account of meri
torious service, the appointments being
announced today. •. ~<^-,'
Charles Atwood Kofoid was also
given a full professorship in the de
partment of zoology- and this is believed
to be an indication that he has been
made head of the department In place
of Prof. William E. Hitter, who is now
doing most of his work at the La Jolla
laboratory near San Diego.
The promotions follow:
Ivan Mortimer Linforth, assistant professor' of
Greek.
liugeae Irving MeCormac, assistant professor
of American history.
Bernard Alfred Eetehererry, associate professor
of irrigation englnewing.
Albert Edward Chandler, arslstant professor of
irrigation institution*!.
Baldwin Mucger Woods, instructor in mathe
matics.
Elmer Edgar Hall, associate professor of
physics.
John Allen Child, assistant professor of
Italian.
Charles Bernard Llpman, assistant professor
of voila.
Nela Christian Xelaon. instructor in anthro
pology and assistant curator of the anthropologi
cal museum.
Sturla KlnarESon, instructor In practical astron
omy.
William Ferdinand Meyer, Instructor In as
tronomy.
WUfoii Joveph Wyilif. aittstant professor of
drawing.
Charies Chapel Jndsou. assistant professor of
drawing.
Carl ]Euren Neuhaus, instructor in drawing.
I>. N. M-hnier. associate professor of mathe
matics. \ 0
Martin Charles Flaherty, associate professor of
forensic*.
William Morris Hart, associate professor of
philology.
Clarence Hancuall. assistant professor of Ger
uiiia.
James Tnrney Allen, associate professor of
Greek.
Farnum Pond Griffiths,' a graduate of
the university with the class of 1906,
who will return to the campus in a few
months from Oxford, where he was the
second Rhodes, scholar from the uni
versity, has, been made a lecturer in
law. Rumors on the campus have It
that the brilliant student and debater
will be reappointed secretary to Presi
dent "Wheeler to succeed Ralph Merritt,
who took the secretaryship when Grif
fiths left for England two years ago.
Other new men in the faculty are an
nounced as follows:
Edward E. Thomas, assistant In agrlcuUural
chemistry at the southern California pathologi
cal laboratory at Whittier, to aid in building up
and advancing agricultural education in schools,
in teacher*' institutes, etc.
Cyril Adalbert Stebblns. instructor in aprlcul
toral education.
Tbomaa T. Waterman, instructor in anthro
pology and assistant curator of the anthropologi
cal museum.
Charles E. Chapman, teaching fellow in his
tory.
Adolph yon Hemert-Engert, teaching fellow In
history.
C. B. McGiumphy, M. D., assistant In state
hypienlc laboratory.
Robert Wallace Pack, instructor in paleon
tology.
F. C. Becker, instructor In philosophy. -
Hiram Wheeler Edwards, Whiting fellow in
pbyeics.
Wendell Prescott Roop. Wbiting fe'Jow In
physics.
Ed*ln Preston Dargan. assistant professor of
French.
I>r. W. T. D«k!T». Instructor in zoology.
CLAIM $750,000 ESTATE
OF JULIUS FRIEDMAN
' Members of Grunwaldt Family
Contest Will as Cousins
The fight of the Grunwaldt family
• for the 5750.000 estate of Julius Fried
j man, who died 10 sears ago leaving
j most of his possession* to charity, 'was
I resumed in Judge Grahams court yes
terday with the reading of the deposi
j tion of Arthur Grunwaldt, a furrier of
| 40 Rue de Calais. Paris.
The other claimants are Paul E.
Grunwaldt, who is said to have been
! decorated in every civilized country in
j Etarope; Constantine Grunwaldt, a
j lawyer in Russia, and Edward Grun
i waldt. a consul in Russia. These
claimants are grandchildren of Her
man Grunwaldt, wbo married Flgel
Friedman, aunt of Julius FrlTOman, the
testator.
Friedman In his will declared that
lie had no relatives. More than a hun
dred self-styled relatives have ap
peared, but the contestants have been
reduced to five groups. :
ATTEMPT TO COACH
CHINESE IS FOILED
Watchman Detects Attempt to
Instruct Detained Orientals
The first attempt to coach detained
Chinese In the new Angel island Immi
gration station was intercepted yes
terday when Feng, the Chinese chief
cook, was searched as he stepped off
the island ferry after a visit to China
town.
In Fong's hat. Watchman Graham
found some Chinese manuscript in
tended for one of the detained coolies,
who might have effected an illegal
landing by memorizing the contents.
Fonsr was immediately dismissed from
the government's employ by Commis
sioner Hart North.
At the Pacific Mail sheds, now
abandoned, coaching was done openly.
It was then difficult to stop, as the
tutor could remain on the outside and
shout to his client en the other side
of the bars.
AMUSEMENTS
LURLINE I
OCEAN WATER. BATHS
BUSH AXD LARKIV STREETS
Swimming and Tub Baths '\u25a0\u25a0:?\u25a0%
Salt water direct from the ocean. Open
•T»rv day «nd »TH>iDg. Including ScDdajs
and kolldars. from 6 a. m. to 10 p. m. Spec-
tator*' call«rj free.
Natatorlnm reserved Tuesday aad Friday
morales* from 9 o'clock to noaa for women
•nlj. v • •
"Filtered- Ocean TTater Plnnsre"
Comfortably heated. POROEUUN TTTBB,
with hot. cold, calt and fresh water. Eacn
room fitted with hot and cold ult aad fresh
* Branch Tub Baths, 2151 Gearj it. near
DeTlsadero.
RACING
CAI/IFORM A jfig^lt \TvJT \U^*
JOCKEYCLUB ™ \vL iT'* '5
Oakland Raortraclc If Vfi^^g
R.VCIX6 EVERY •»*jif \m^V
WEEK DAY 4*3** H
Six Races Dallr> U
Ruin- or Shine *" *4> (_( - s
riEST RACE AT 1:40 P. M.
ADMISSION. $2. LADIES. $1. .
For special trains (topping at the track take
Southern Pacific : ferry, foot of Market - street;
leave at 12 n.. thereafter erery 20 mlnntes
until 1:40 p. nj. .
No emoklag in toe last tiro can, which arc
rewrred for ladles. and ttelr escorts. \u25a0\u25a0 £ ,
THOMAS B. WILLIAMS. . PrtsMtßt.
PEBCY W. TBEAT. Secretory.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, THURSDAY, APRIL via- 1910;
NEWS OF THE
LABOR WORLD
O. M. BOYLE
The San Fran
tT»AMtlfi^cwjweiry cisco labor council
has received infor
mation that the parlors of. the Native
Sons of the Golden West will comply
\u25a0with the request of the council in the
matter'of union labels on uniforms and
regalia to be worn during the 1910 Ad
mission day festival.
Sheet metal workers' union No. 104,
at its last meeting, listened to an ad
dress by <\u25a0 Organizer Treuber and ini
tiated eight,candidates. -
. The officers of cooks' helpers', union
report that several houses have re
cently replaced their oriental help with
white.
• * *t
The referendum vote taken by the
International printing pressmen's and
assistants' union authorizes the board
of directors to erect a home at Roy
erville, Term. The 'site occupies 519
acres situated in the Allegheny moun
tains. Many mineral springs are lo
cated In the vicinity.
• • •
It is stated that S7 pen cent of all
operators, machinist operators and
machine tenders working in the juris
diction of the international
ical union are affiliated with that or
ganization. Eighty-two per cent of all
type setting and type casting devices
are In union shops. •
• • • ' \u25a0 • .
James Stanners and J. Malloy of this
c'ty have affiliated with the glaziers'
union of Sacramento.
• • •
The latest report from the interna
tional cigar makers' union show* the
amount of sick benefits paid by the lo
cals in the United States and Canada
annually amounts in the aggregate to
more than $200,000.
•*' • '
William M. Reilly of Dallas, Tex.,
the opponent of Incumbent President
Lynch for the office of president of the
international typographical union, goes
into the contest with the indorsement
of 125 unions.
•* * *
Circulars have been mailed to all
secretaries of unions calling attention
to the coming election of the interna
tional typographical union. Attention
Is called to the fact that the April per
capita tax, old age pension assessment
and all other Indebtedness to the pa
rent body must be in the secretary
treasurer's hands not later than May
IS, the day of election, otherwise the
vote of the union will not be counted.
• • - '•. \u25a0
The musicians' union of Stockton
and the Merchants' association of that
place are jointly having an elaborate
music stand built in Hunter plaza.
• • •
The Boston labor unions have In
dorsed proposed legislation, to the ef
fect that there shall be inquiry into
public utility disputes before either a
lockout or a strike may take place.
a. • •
There are 23 labor unions in the
labor council of Stockton and 22 build
ing trades organizations in the build
ing trades council of that city.
• • •
Painters' union No. 896 of ,Lodi has
elected the following officers for the
current term:
A. Thomas, president; L. A. St. John,
vice president: W. Huberty. financial
secretary: T. H. Meyers, treasurer; U.
K. Warren, conductor; John J. Cunnie.
warden; S. K. Walter, preceptor, and
J. L. Pickering, T. H. Meyers and
Louis Alexander St. John, trustees.
• • «
The imperial statistical department
of Berlin. Germany, recently made an
official inquiry to ascertain the income
and expenditures of small families, and
discovered that^ the average income
of a skilled workman was $455.53 year
ly and the expenditures $457.71, of
which 51.5 per cent was spent for food.
I The unskilled workmen on an average
earn $4"11.7S and expends $409.70, of
which «<i4 per cent goes for food.
• • •
. Professor Irving Fisher of Yale uni
versity, a member of the national con
servation commission, in a report of
"National Waste," said the following
on hours of labor:
> The. present .workicg day. from a phyjl
ologlrai point of view. In too long and keeps
the majority of men and women In a con
tinual state of overfatiguc. It starts a
rlclous circle, leading to the craving of
LOVE OF WHISKY
LEADS TO DIVORCE
Otto Heynemann Recites Sad
Story of Ten Years' Effort
to Reclaim Wife
X sad story of an attempt to reclaim
a woman from the drink habit was
told in Judge Graham's court yesterday
by Otto Heynemann, a salesman, in
the trial of his suit for divorce from
Florence E. Heynemann.
Heynemann said he had endeavored
for 10 years to wean his wife from her
love of whisky.
Mrs. Edith Cheminant. sister of the
defendant, was questioned by Judge
Graham and admitted that what
Heynemann said about his wife's un
fortunate failing was true. A decree
of divorce was granted. , X
Andrew Nelson didn't know he had
been deserted by his wife until an ex
press wagon arrived at his place of
business with a trunk containing his
personal belongings. He was granted
a divorce by Judge Van Xostrand yes
terday. *
Bessie Van Zandt Fish was granted
a divorce by Judge Van Nostrand from
Arthur' G. Van Zandt on the ground
that he had failed to maintain her.
Emella Louisa Francis was granted
a divorce by Judge Mogan from Albert
William Francis on the ground of de
sertion.
Suits for divorce were begun yester
day by:
Alfred Onken against Catherine On
ken, desertion.
Pearl Baldwin against Samuel C.
Baldwin, desertion. .
Jeanette H. Murray against Robert
Murray, cruelty.
Harriet Cecil Kerr against Andrew
L.. Kerr, cruelty. \u25a0
Mary Elizabeth Carlton against Gal
vln Truman Carlton, desertion.
FOUR ROBBERS SENT TO
STATE PENITENTIARIES
Frank Murphy, convicted of burglary,
was sentenced, to fiveiyearsVimprisoTi
merit* by Judge Lawlor; yesterday. A
five year, sentence was also imposed
by Judge "Lawlor-on I^awrence B. Hill,
\yh6 entered the apartments of Ardill
Walters at 3040 pacific avenue. The
following sentences were passed by
Judge Cabanios "yesterday:?-"? Xathan
Howe, who pleaded guilty of burglary,
three years in.Folsom; Harry TVillard,
who stole . a purse, one year In 6an
Quentln.' .-.:-\u25a0:•<;,
" moans for deadening fatigue, thus Inducing
drunkenness and other excesses. Experiments
in. reducing the working day show a great .
Improvement in the physical efficiency of la- .
borers and in many rases result in even-in
rreaslng their output nufficiently to com- '
pehsate the employer for the shorter day.
Several examples of such a result exist, but
the real justification of a shorter wort day
is found in the interest of the race, not the
employer.
Ope company, which keeps its factory go
ing nijfht and day. found, on changing "from
two shifts of 12 hours each to three shifts
of eight hours each, that the effleleney of •
the men gradually increased, and the days
lost per man by Illness fell from TJ4 to
&Vi n year. ' -
Public safety requires, in order to avoid
railway collisions and other accidents, the
prevention of long hours, lack of sleep and
undue fatigue in workmen.
A typlcel Biiccesßlon of eyents Is, first
fattpue, then colds, then tuberculosis, then
death. The prevention of undue fatigue
means the arrest at the Mart of this ac
celerating chain r>L calamities.
The ordinary working man works two or
three hours too much every day.
• \u2666 ' *\u25a0'.
The molders' union at its meeting
Tuesday night appointed Thomas !Dowd.
M. Roche and A. .Wynne a committee to
investigate the recent action of the
Result laundry of Oakland in trans
ferring its stock to another concern.
The union subscribed for stock some
time ago, and now that a transfer has
been made an assessment has been
levied on all stock holders. The union
received -one application for member
ship.
« « *
Bindery women's union, local No. 125
of the international brotherhood .of
book binders, will give a ball in Golden
Gate Commandery hall Saturday, May 7.
. . • • •
At the meeting of the stationary
firemen's union Tuesday night it was
reported that there was a prospect of
a settlement of the difference with the
Mutual ice company. The union re
ceived a communication from Congress
man Hayes acknowledging the receipt
of a notice of the union's action on the
Hetch Hetchy water proposition. In
his letter Hayes said that he was for
San Francisco's claim for pure water
from the valley and that he would ren
der all assistance possible.
* * . . •
Millmen's union No. 423 adjourned
its meeting Tuesday night out of re
spect to the memory of Thomas Farm
er, its business agent, who died Mon-.
day of paralysis, and to that of the
wifejaf F. M. Pendergast. Its treasurer.
Who 'died a few days ago. The union
initiated two candidates and admitted
one member on clearance card.
— .- * • • *
The lumber clerks' association, by
unanimous vote Tuesday night,
condemned the attitude of Sec
retary of the Interior Ballinger
in the Hetch Hetchy water matter .and
indorsed the action of the local joint
committee on water. Three candidates
were initiated and four applications
were presented.
• -v • *
John McMahon.one of the business
agents of the union of street, concrete
and asphalt workers, tendered his
resignation at the meeting Tuesday
night and P. J. Minnehan was elected
to -succeed him. Fifteen candidates
were admitted by Initiation.
• • *
Butchers' union No. 1 received a re
port last night from its board of trus
tees showing that the union is in a
flourishing condition.
The committee, in charge of the pic
nic of the drum corp sof the union re
ported that it had made all arrange
ments for the event to be given in
Biggio's park May 15.
Three candidates were initiated.
.• • *
At the meeting of the greater district
council of carpenters. last night Secre
tary F. E. Maxwell and Business Agent
F. J. Kramer reported that last Tues
day they Instituted local No. 948-of the
brotherhood of carpenters at San Bruno
park with 40 charter members.
• • •
The carriage and wagon workers'
union by unanimous vote last night in
dorsed the Hetch Hetchy water propo
sition and instructed the secretary to
inform the California congressmen of
the action taken, i
• • •
Housesmiths' union, local No. 78,
transacted only routine business " last
night. Next Wednesday night matters
of usual importance to the trade will
be considered.
WOMAN ENDS HER
LIFE WITH PISTOL
Mother of Mrs. May Graham
Finds Her Dead on Bed With
Weapon in Hand
Mrs. May Graham. 35 years old, liv
ing at the Hotel Splendid. 1102 Masonic
avenue, committed suicide by shooting
herself some time after 3 o'clock Tues
day afternoon, and the body was found
by Mrs. Ad<?ll a Hesthal, her mother, at
4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. She was
lying in bed with a pistol clutched in
her hand and a bullet hole over her
right temple.
Mrs. Graham, who was a divorcee,
had been in poor health for several
years, during which time her mother
had placed her in different hospitals of
the city. It is thought that she became
despondent.
The room of Mrs. Graham was not
on the same floor as her mother's. Mrs.
Hesthal and her. daughter were last
together Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
Mrs. Graham did not appear at break
fast table yesterday, but, as she often
slept late, no notice was taken. As the
day wore on and she did not put in an
appearance, the mother decided to see
if her daughter was ill, and went to
her room. Nobody heard the pistol shot,
and it was until the . mother entered
the room that the tragedy was known.
Dr. Joseph Morrlssy was called, but
Mrs. Graham had been- dead several
hours. The body was removed to the
morgue. ; .
There were four notes left by Mrs.
Graham/ addressed, to relatives and
friends. In these notes she said she
had been accused wrongfully and could
not stand it. One note was to Mrs.
M. E. Carleton of 643 Cole street, and
another to Ferdinand Hesthal of Du
boce street, her -uncle. Neither Mrs.
Carl eton ' nor Hesthal could explain
what Mrs. Graham meant by saying
that she had been wrongfully /accused:
MRS. MAYBRICK DENIES
.MOTHER DIED IN WANT
CHICAGO. April: 13.— Mrs. Florence
E. Maybrick did not learn -of the. death
of her mother, Baroness'de Rogues, in
Paris until last night. "The story of
her ?. dying iin want is false," said Mrs.
Maybrick. ," ."I have, ; taken care ;of her
and we have^ been., together ever since
I r. left England. < She had- been with me
here, but .had been in' poor health'and
believed, that if she returned to France
she would get :'atronger." ; ';.'*-**:'
OVERLAND FACTORY
TO BE BUILT HERE
J. M. Willys Announces That
Demands of Coast Make
Plant Necessary g
R. R. L'HOMMEDIEU
J. M. Willys, the head of the factory
that builds the Overland and Marion
motor, cars, leaves this morning for the
east by way of the northwest. Yester
day before he* left "automobile row"
he announced he practically had \u25a0 de
cided to establish a factory in the
immediate vicinity of San Francisco.
In speaking of the project Willys*
said:
"It is foolish to say that the Pacific
coast is not a big factor in the auto
mobile trade. Our sales and deliveries
so far show that the coast must be con
sidered v seriously. If I gave out the
figures that I have -received from the
factory it would be seen that the dif
ference in freight would easily pay for
the "erection of a plant. This, however,
is not the object of what I am consld
ing. The sales demand that we give
the coast the best of our endeavors,
and this means to give to the dealers
all the cars they can sell at the time
that the public demands them.
Under ' present circumstances we
may have the cars to fill the demands,
but under the present conditions the
railroads are swamped for demands for
cars that will carry automobiles. We
have to employ a force just to get
cars so that we can place out output
in the hands of* the selling force. We
manage to accomplish this in the east,
where the hauls are short, but it is
different out to the coast. The rail
roads do not like to let their cars go
on such a long journey. Any kind of
freight car will carry our cars when
they are not assembled, and In this one
fact I think is the solution. wVcan
not get motor cars out to the coast
fast enough to supply the demand, but
we can get the cars here in bulk, as
it were.
"Now," what is the difference whether
we assembler them in the east or out
here? It only lies in the cost of a
plant and the few men to oversee It.
Does the demand warrant this expen
diture? I think it does. Some may
think that there will be a time when
the coast trade will be supplied, but
we are reaching farth-er than even
the Pacific coast. Ed G. Eager, a«
old bicycle man, has gone to Australia
ajpd New Zealand for us and will be
in charge of that territory. Then there
is Hawaii, the countries of Central
America and South America on' the Pa
cific side, not to mention the Philip
pines and the far east. •*\u25a0 .
"Already we have received orders
from these sections. All three coun
tries are going to buy automobiles just
as thejv have bought carriages • and
wagons in the past. There is no get
ting away from this fact. So if we
should suddenly be abre to supply all
the demands on the Pacific coast, we
would still have a broad field that will
take years to supply.
"Now just think of shipping cars to
these distant points in shipments of
six autos to a carload, freighting them
2,000 miles before they are put on the
steamers. With a factory here all we
have to do is run them to the steam
ship and they are on their way. This
is why I am saying that I am thinking
very seriously of building an assem
bling plant here, and this almost means
that I can say that It will be built.
"A conference at the factory when I
get home will be the first thing I will
call for, and if it is possible to start
the project at once we will have a fac
tory in the immediate neighborhood of
San Francisco.
Mr. and Mrs., George W. Shiveley are
at the Palace hotel. Shiveley is secre
«. tary of the Perm-
I sylvania rubber
company of Jean-
nette, Pa., and is
here looking: after
the interests of his company, which re
cently decided to change the manage
ment of its Pacific coast interests, which
have been handled by the Pennsylvania
rubber company of California.
At a special meeting of the stock
holders held April 2 a new board of
directors was -elected consisting of J.
E. French, C. J. Heggerty and W. H.
Madden. The new board- of directors
then elected J. E. French president and
general manager and C. J. Heggerty
secretary and treasurer.
Shiveley says that the factories are
enjoying a very large business in th*e
east and with the new organization
here, which will shortly open branches
in Portland, Seattle and Spokane, now
having one' at Ix>s Angeles, the concern
will be in the best possible position to
handle the requirements of tlje coast
trade. - •
The Pennsylvania rubber company is
one of the largest manufacturers in
the United States of mechanical rubber
goods, automobile, motorcycle and
bicycle tires and was the first rubber
concern in the United States to place
Areoplane tires on the market.
Shiveley will on leaving- San Fran
cisco stop at Portland Seattle. Spo
kane, Salt Lake City and Denver be
fore returning to Jeannette, Pa. ;" .
Prominent life
Maker Here
A. J. Smith, the well known Elmor©
agrent, left for Sierra City this morning:
-. to deliver a demi
tonneau to Dr. "VV.
A. Lavery. Smith
. reports that before
buying, a car Doc
tor Levy made an exhaustive search
among the many high priced and
high powered cars, fully considering'
the fact that he was living 65 miles,
from the nearest repair shop, and de
cided tßat the Elmore was the car he
desired. Doctor Lavery purchased his
car early in the year, but owing to the
condition of th«» roads was unable to
take delivery of It until now. ; .-. v
PhywJcina Ruth
an EJmoff Car
J. Emmet Hayden, the automobile
enthusiast, will pilot a number of mo
- « torlsta who will
tour to the open
ing of Skaggs hot
.springs, which
~"" . 'takes place on
next Sunday. In the party will be
members the San Francisco motor
club and the Olympic club. It is re
ported that the roads ov«r to the
springs are in good condition at the
present time, and taking into consider
ation that the route runs through some
of the prettiest parts of the state the
event should be most enjoyable.
I Motorist Will ' I
Goto Skaggn
In increasing: number automohjle
owners are relying upon the motor car
>. to aid them in the
swift transaction
of business when
y calls at a number
of places must be
made,' and particularly is this true; of
physicians. Like the doctor himself.
~9- — - \u25a0 -\u25a0 \u25a0
1 Doctor's Record
I In FranUUu Car
uk \u25a0.— ' »\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 — —— '
The Army of
Constipation
Is Growing Smaller Every Day.
CARTER'S LITTLE jf^fe}^
LIVER PILLS aw -^HfT*Sg;i
only pT« relicf — ij||B|Bil (f*ADTFtfC
jure Con> tipa^^^HECT^n V J TiUjJ
acts, ladijeition, Sick Htadacbe, Sallow Skin.
yjMALL PILL. : SMALL DOSE, SMALL PRICE
GENUINE must * bear signature :
Domenico Palma,
Trumpet Soloist
Of Italian Band
the motor car must be ready at a mo
ment's notice, night or day. in good
weather or bad. for a long-'or snort
trip.
The extent of the doctor's trips is
shown by the experjences of Dr. J. G.
Sheldon of Kansas City, who has driven
his motor car 22.000 miles since May.
190S, making an average of more than
33 miles a day. His car is an air cooled
six cylinder Franklin of 42 horse
power.
While the car has been making its
thousands of miles, the cleaning of the
auxiliary exhaust ports is all the over
hauling which It has had. The tires
have shown unusual freedom from
trouble, and during the covering of
the first 14.000 miles thre* of the tires
carried air pumped in at the factory.
C. E. Jlathewson. Pacific coast man
ager of the Diamond rubber company,
has received froiw
the home office the
following letter in
testimonial of the
good service of the
Bailey tread Diamond shoe:
"A Bailey tread Diamond shoe has
made a total mileage of 12.85$ miles on
the rear left wheel of my 45 horse
power." writes James F. Burns of
Philadelphia.
"While this shoe has given me the
best service of any I have ever used, I
must compliment you on the quality of
your tires, from the fact that they all
give me a mileage exceeding 6,000
miles; my right rear is now up to 6,180,
and still good."
Philadelphia
I. lkes Diamond*
m 4wfc , yp>b J* \u25a0§§#
! wk $&&- • e w SL Jir
4 Per Cent Interest Paid on Savings Accounts
Deposits Accepted Saturdays From 10 A. M. to 8 P."M.
Regular Banking Hours on Other Days.
METROPOLIS TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK
Market, at New Montgomery Street
:;*;^ Capital and Surplus, $900,000.
Alfred L. Meyersteln. President Frank N. Fish. Cashier'
Clarence Grange. Vice-President. John H. Spring. Vice-Presldeat
DIRECTORS: ;-^ "
Alfred I^. Meyerstein Geo. C. Boardman Jr. A. A. "Watkins
Clarence Grange J. H. Spring Gavin McXab
Chas. Hagmaier Robert Oxnard G- H. Umbsen
John M. Keith Harry N. Stetson
BERGER'S NOVEL
DEMONSTRATION
One of the most novel and interest-
ing demonstrations of the advance in
the art of clothing manufacture ever
shown^is attracting great crowds to
the display windows of Berger's new
store on Market street, just east of
Powell.
A handsome young" man — tryfng on
various suits is one of the unusual fea-
tures of this exhibit. The suits used
were all taken at random from stock,
in the size used by the model and
prove conclusively the scientific cor-
rectness with which the clothing
handled by Berger's Is made to fit
men's figures. This holds good not only
of the usual and average types, but
also of the stout and slim men whom
the merchant tailor experiences such
difficulties in fitting. .
Another interesting portion of the
demonstration Is a coat taken,, from
stock and ripped open to show the
"inside facts." Every garment in Ber-
ger's stock is as honest inside as It la
clever out; and it is the inside. Intrinsic
honesty of these garments that counts
in their wear and enables them to hold
their shape. "
During the last year . or two there
has frequently Appeared the statement
that there are no all wool garments on
the market.
A most interesting part of the dis-
play consists of the apparatus used
in testing every fabric which is used
in making up clothes for Berger's.^ A
piece of the cloth is placed in a warm
solution of caustic, this dissolves the
woo! and leaves the cotton strands in-
tact.
.This process reveals at once the pres-
ence of cotton in the fabric. All such
are thrown aside; only those fabrics
made of pure wool are considered. ":
This* test T enables Berger'3 to guar-
antee every suit in their house to be
mads ; of all .wool, no matter wbetbar It
Is priced at |13 or $40.^ — • - >
MUSIC ENTHRALLS
PATRONS OF IDORA
Selections From Popular Grand
Operas on Bill for Even
ing's Entertainment
Ferullo's big Italian band continues
to entertain the music lovers at Idora
park. In Oakland, every afternoon and
evening. The fiery "maestro" and his 50
bandsmen have made themselves the
idols of tbe "Idoraites," and nightly
the vicinity of the band shell U
crowded with music lovers.
Selections from the popular grand
operas will comprise this evening's
program;
Among; the numbers will be excerpts,
from "Lohengrin." "Cavallerla Rustic
ana," "TPagliacci," *La Giaconda.'
"Manon,"' "Lucia" and many others.
Friday Is "Wagner nfght, and a pro
gram which promises to surpass tht»
exquisite selections of last week has
been prepared.
COURT STENOGRAPHERS
BLAMED FOR INJUSTICE
Judge Indorses Complaint of '
Assistant District Attorney
The official stenographers of the po
lice courts were severely criticised yes
terday by Fred L. Berry, assistant dis
trict attorney. In Superior Judge Law
lor's court, for their delay in preparing
transcripts of testimony. The case of
Frank Merrlman, charged with grand
larceny, was on trial yesterday, and
Berry said that the transcript had been
delayed 32 days, necessitating another
postponement.
"Men rot in the county jail because
they can not be tried in the absence
of the transcript of the police court
testimony,** said Berry.
Judge Lawlor also criticised the po
lice court stenographers for neglect
ing their duty.
WOMAN TENANT FAILS IN
SUIT AGAINST LANDLORD
Fell Off Platform and Claimed
$10,000 Damages
That landlords are under no legal
obligation to erect safety barrfera
around platform 3. from which clothes
lines are hung, was decided by Judge-
Hunt yesterday in throwing out of
court the suit for $10,000 damages in
stituted by Marlon Benjamin against
Robert Leonard, owner of a house at
Twenty-fifth and Kansas streets. Mrs.
Benjamin fell oft the platform and sus
tained serious Injuries. Judge Hunt
held that the woman was supposed to
know that if she overstepped the plat
form she would be injured.
AUTOMOBILES
Ready Reference ior Bayers
MITrHFI I OSES * HUNTER AUTO CO.
ITU I WIICL.L, Xl C. O. ar. TeL Market 2T23
Automobile Tires
PIPPCTnXP TIKE AND RUBBER CO..
MAGNETO
Rfl^rH BOSCH MAGNETO CO..
UV/OWU s3TVan Nes» eT.Fultoa; t.Mkt. 2963
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