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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 22, 1910, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-04-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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_ AMUSEMENTS
Flonzaley
Quartet
NOVELTY THEATER
OKarrell aa d gtclner
TOMGHT AT S:l5
KAKEWEU, SIXDAV AFT. AT
GARRICK
?2. ?;.s<t. ?i. r.enerxl Admission SI.
\u0084..'• y " oriun ". Clay &. Co. "is.
Visit "Java" With
Burton Holmes
THAVELOGUKS
... , <pc«wet\ed by Wrijtut Kramer).
'"uiftlu. SMS; Tomorrow AH. at 3
GAItRICK THEATER
.Si.-iis .-.!>.•, 7.- >c an( i $Ixo.
THIS AKT. at 3:30
I YE LIBERTY — OAKLAND
N>lt Week— "RKRUX," "PARIS.;'
SPECIAL MATINEES
\ext Friday Mnmlnc at 11 o'clock
onpuEijii
Last Time Sunday Afternoon, Mit 1,
GARRICK
Scats $2,50. $2. and Plenty at $1.50 and $1.
MAIL ORDERS NOW, accompanied by
rti«* or money order, to WILL L. GREEN- i
BAT M. at Sherman. Clay &. Co 's
SALE OPENS MONDAY, at fl'A. M..
At Sherman. Clay & Co."s..
1'
In Oakland Tues. Eve, Ye Liberty I
Coming — WALTER DAMROSCH ,
I
A I rA7 A D Sutkr and steiner
nl\ja l t\ X »« j™
BELASCO & MAYER. Owners and Managers.
POSITIVELY LAST THREE NIGHTS
MATINEE TOMORROW AND SUNDAY
Lottie Blair Parker's Great Play ;
SOCTHERNSKIES
Replete With Atmospheric Charm
PRICES — Nicht, 25e tv $1 : mat., -oc to 50c.
Seats Selling at Theater and Emporium
NEXT WEEK — ReTiTal, by popular demand, of
"MERELY MARY ANN"
(L_^*t?4 Every Iwpht. Th;; ar.d Next Week.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
LAMBARDI GRAND OPERA CO.
TONIGHT — -LA TOSC.V
S;;tur.lay Matitx-e •"MADAM BUTTERFLY"
Saturday Nijrbt "AIL>A"
Sunday Niplit "MASKED BALL" I
NEXT WEEK
Monday anrj Saturday. "LA BOHEME": Tues-
day. '-'BlGOLETTO": Wednesday Matinee.
"CAVALLLKIA" and "PAGLIACCI": Thurs-
day. "MASKED BALL"; Friday. "LA
FAVORITA': Saturday Matinee, "LUCIA";
Sunday. "EKNANI."
Seats for Next Week Now Ready. 50e to $2.00.
Comlnc — GRACE GEORGE
in "A WOMAN'S WAY."
arroastsuL * vx.s»iocktqh & ?ovft.u
Safest aad Most Magnificent Theater in America
MATINEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY
EVERY EVESIXO AT 8:15
ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE
WILL M. CREBSY and BLANCHE DAYNE in
Mr. CreejT'e Own Play. "The Wyoming Whoop";
Gt'P EDWARDS' "NIGHT BIRDS," With Nellie
• Brewstw and TwelTe Singing and Dancing
YouEffsters.; LOCKWOOD and MacCARTY ;
LANCTON, LVCIER CO., Assisted by Theodore
Paly; AL WHITE'S DANCING BUGS; WALSH
LYNCH CO.: THE I'ICQUAYS: ORPHEUM
MOTION PICTURES. SHOWING ROOSEVELT
IN AFRICA." Last Week. Immense Hit.
KEXLIE NICHOLS, tbe Famous Socgetress Come-
£iesae.
Erening Prices, 10c, 25c. 60c, 75c Box Seats
$1-00. Matinee Price* (Except Sundays and
Holidays). 10c, 25c. 50c.
PHONE DOUGLAS TO. HOME C 1570.
McAllister st. near Market.
Phones— Market 130. Home JTS22.
ONLY TWO NIGHTS MORE!
LAST MATUkTEX TOMORROW.
MORT H. SINGER Presents
HENRY WOODRUFF
THE PRINCE OF TONIGHT
A MUSICAL OEM in a BEAUTY SETTING.
Prices— 2sc to $1.50.
- Keats at tbe Theater end Emporium.
nnVTKVnnin Van Ness and Grove
Q"A » . HiM IkV^ PHONES :
11/«lkt3M»3ft] Market 500
\MJks££2si£xiitm Horn* 31661
LAST 3 NIGHTS— MATINEE SATURDAY
America* Greatest Comedienne,
MAY ROBSON
In Anne Warner'a Great Comedy Success,
THE REJUVENATION OF AUNT MARY
PRICES— SI.6O. $1. 75c and 50c
300 Choice Orchestra Seats, $1.
MONDAY NIGHT. APRIL 25TR,
CUARLES FROHMAN Presents
"THE THIEF"
SEATS NOW READY.
Oakland] S|^ keyrouteJ
\VA<;\ER CONCERT TOMGHT
FERCLLO'S GREAT ITALIAN DAXD
March end Pilgrims' Chorus from "Tann-
bnuwr": trombone solo. "Recitation," from
"Lohengrin": "The Walkure"; selection from
Grieg's "Peer Gynt." and Twlialkowsky's OTer-
ture. "1812" <by request!. pirinK the retreat of
' Napoleon and burning of the city; also "The
Funeral March of the Marlonets." Tonight's is
the flnept Wajmer program erer presented at
Idora.
"25c Round Trip, via Key Route, from San
Fran<"li«<v. include* admission.
57TH AND TELEGRAPH. OAKLAND.
% S. LOVERICH, MANAGE*
Fills Street Near Fillmore. Ciasu A Theater.
Mntln'ee- Dally 2«15. Every Eve. 8«15
Vaudeville and Musical Comedy
r_SA.VTA LUCIA TROUPE — 7
Famons Italian Vocalists and Dancers. ;_y a
r ITIIMORE GREY
Greatest of Classical Dancers.
PRINCESS MUSICAL. COMEDY CO.
With Edwin T. ,Emery in
"The Commanding Officer,"
A Company of 20.
Positively Last Week of
THOMAS C. LEARY and
GEOnGE.VA LEARY
Fire Other Features -and Latest Motion. Pictures.
Prices 10c 23c end 50c. Mattaees, excepting
CuCtv • «&d ' Bolida j-a, 19c ud SSc. *
NEWS OF THE
LABOR WORLD
O. M. BOYLE
_ Organized lat> or
Eia2|SfijgpoWirE W in watch with in-
terest the forth
coming St. Louis convention of the
farmers' educational and cooperative
union of America. This union claims
a membership of 3,500.000 and has
active organizations in 29 states, ilt
is not improbable that a merger be
tween this army of farmers and organ
ized labor may be effected in the near
future.
Among the subjects to be discussed
are: Abolishing gambling In farm
products; securing a parcels, post and
postal savings banks; stringent legisla
tion restricting foreign immigration;
defeat of the proposed central govern
ment bank. *
The American federation of labor is
on record already as advocating most
of these propositions.
At the meeting yesterday of leather
workers on horse goods union a com
munication was read from Los Angeles
stating that it was reported there that
the members in San Francisco had
gone back to work at the iold wage
scale. The local sent a denial of this
to the southern city, saying that every
member was standing firm for the eight
hour day.
Word was also received that a mem
ber of the National saddlery manufac
turers' association was in the clutches
of the law over the discharge of union
men in Kansas City. The labor com
missioner of Kansas is prosecuting the
case against the Ackenhausen saddlery
company, the offending concern. The
Kansas law forbids discrimination
against union men.
There was an unusual number of
applications for membership presented
to San Francisco lodge of machinists
Xo. 6S at its meeting Wednesday night.
These were referred to the investi
gating committee. Three candidates
were initiated.
The lodge voted $35 to members on
the sick list, paid $5 to the barbers, of
this city and made another donation to
the men on strike on the. Baltimore and
Ohio system.
International Vice President William
Hannon was present and announced
that he would start the next morning
for Stockton to look after the strike
of the machinists there.
Before leaving he explained the
strike was brought about by the dis
charge of eight machinists from the
Samson works. The men had joined
the recently formed Stockton lodge of
machinists. When asked for a reason
for discharging the men the manage
ment is said to have replied that it
could not pay union wages and com
pete for work in the iron trade against
eastern firms. This being reported to
the machinists and pattern makers in
the place, all refused to work any
longer and they are still out.
At the Wednesday night meeting of
glass workers' union work was re
ported plentiful, all 'glaziers were at
work and but few bevelers idle. Three
candidates were initiated.
A tentative agreement has been
reached in Chicago between the coal
miners and operators of Illinois grant
ing the "closed shop." The joint scale
committee authorized the above state
ment.
The meeting of the waiters' union
\u25a0Wednesday night was presided over by
M. P. Scott. It was reported that sat
isfactory results are being obtained in
AMUSEMENTS
WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP RACES
Ingleside Racetrack
SATURDAY — SUNDAY
APRIL 23-24, AT 2 F. M.
Special S. P. Train leaves 3d and Tfrnnßend
at 1 p. m. All United K. U. Car* go direct
or transfer. Regular Auto Boats from Oak-
land, special boat Sunday, 11:15 a. m.
Tickets on Bale Clark Wise & Co.. Grant
ay.. Heeseman'R, Hub, and N. Y. Tea Co..
Oakland; also Shrine Headquarter*. 41
Powell st-.-sl. Including Grand Stand.
VAUDEVILLE THEATRE
New Main Entrance Eddy St. Near I'lllrnore.
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. ;
JACK eOLDEN'S MUSICAL GOHEOY GO.
In Another Big Scream.
"THE BARON FROM BERLIN."
With NEW SONGS. DANCES, COSTUMES.
But the SAME PRETTY GIRLS.
AND OUR UNEQUALED VAUDEVILLE
« Including "Market Street Before the Fire."
Prices — Aftf-.. l«c and 20c. Xl(rlit«. 10c. 20c, 30c
Special Prices for Children.
Theater Patron* Admitted Free to Grounds.
AMATEURS TONIGHT!
OCEAN WATER. BATHS
BUSH AND LARKIX STREETS
Swimming and Tab Batbs
Salt water direct from the ocean. Open
every Car and evening, including Sundays
and 'holidays, from 6 a. m. to 10 p. m.' Spec-
tators' gallery free.
Natatorium reserved Tuesday and Friday
morolccs fr° m 8 o'clock to noon for women
only.
"Filtered Ocean Water Plnnnre"
Comfortably beated. PORCELAIN TUBS,
nith hot, cold. Bait and freih water. Each
room fitted with hot and cold salt aad freab
" Branch Tub Baths. 2151 Geary «t near
DevUadero.
RACING >^^^^>
CALIFORNIA \*/^y
JOCKEY CLUB 4 M
Oakland Racetrack If yV^C -*^»
RACING EVERY Att^V
WEEK DAY . « f
Six Race* Dally, = y7
Rain or Shine. .- \ r *A> fi
FIRST RACE -AT 1:40 P. M.
ADMISSION. $2. LADIES. Jl.
For epeclaJ train* stopping at the track take
Soot hern Pacific ferry, foot of Market street;
leave at 12 m.. thereafter every 20 minutes
until 1:40 p. m.
. No smoklns In tbe last two cars, which' are
reserved for ladles and their escorts.
THOMAS H. WILLIAMS. President.
tEECX .W. TREAT." Secretary.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, 22, 1910. >
regard to the elimination of Chinese
and Japanese help in cafes and restau
rants. Eighteen candidates were obli
gated and a number of applications
were presented. At the next. meeting
the union will have more than 20 to
initiate. . " • :
The theatrical stage employes at
their last regular meeting v voted that
they will actively participate in the
proposition to build a new labor tem
ple for the central labor council. It
was also declared that .all stage me
chanics employed by manufacturers of
picture films must become members of
the union. Announcement was made
that the official organ of the interna
tional body, which is to be under the
editorial supervision of the president
of the International, body, will be is
sued May 1. • • .
After years of effort and despite the
solid opposition of their employers, the
railroad workers of : this country,
through the combined strength of the
American federation of labor and the
brotherhoods, have succeeded in secur
ing the enactment of two laws by con
gress, compelling the railroads to equip
th,eir cars with uniform safety appli
ances and amending the employers'
liability act so that suit may be brought
at the home of the plaintiff and in the
state courts.. Of importance is the new
law calling ' for the standardizing of
safety appliances. Many are killed and
injured yearly because of the lack of a
uniform system of appliances. The
new law makes unlawful the movement
of cars with appliances in any way
defective. The employers' liability act,
through the new law, has been so
amended that an injured employe will
be able to get whatever relief the law
affords.
Millmen's union No. 422 at its Tues
day evening meeting -decided to parade
with a banner, May I—international1 — international
Labor day. Some 25 labor unions will
turn out. The local's parade committee
is as follows: Henry Cattler, Conrad
Phillipi and J. Seaman. Two candi
dates were obligated and two were ad
mitted upon clearance cards.
It was decided at Wednesday night's
meeting of milk wagon drivers' union
No. 226 to hold its annual banquet
within a short time, and $200 was set
aside for that purpose. The business
agent reported business good.
The officials of the International
brewery workers have given the Port
land brewery workers permission to
strike in case the California wage
scale is not paid. It is believed In this
city that no drastic measures will be
necessary in Portland.
The local brewery workers have jiTst
learned that in the settlement of the
Rochester, N. V., strike the new con
tracts reduce working time for driv
ers, helpers and stablemen from ten to
nine hours, and for brewers and bot
tlers from nine to eight hours. Sun
day and holiday work is to be paid for
as overtlroa at the rate of 50 cents per
hour. Maltsters are guaranteed work
the year round. Increases in wages
were granted from $1 to S3 per week.
The painters' union of Vallejo' has
filed a complaint with the trades and
labor council against the officers of the
Mare island navy yard for making en
listed men on the receiving ship Inde
pendence do painters' work on the
island. The complainants were direct
ed to present a definite charge, so that
the matter can be taken up with the
commandant of the yard and with Sec
retary Meyer of the navy.
The demand for a raise in wages by
the journeymen tailors' union of Sacra
mento has been sustained by the inter
national body. The question of pre
senting this demand was referred to the
executive committee of the union, and
meantime it was decided to advertise
in the San Francisco, papers a warning
to .journeymen of the trade to keep
away from. Sacramento.
"The extraordinary expenses recently
incurred," said President Kruger of the
Philadelphia rapid transit company,
speaking of the corporation's losses in
the late strike with its employes, "have
so reduced the reserve capital on which
the company was counting to make
improvements, that we are asking (he
city authorities' permission -to float a
new $2,500,000 loan."
* * *
At a labor conference recently held
in Newport. Eng., a report was read
by the executive board in which it was
held that if.' the decision which de
clared the use of trades union funds for
political purposes to be illegal remained
good law, the labor movement would
suffer a greater setback than thafgiven
by the Taff-Vale judgment.
HOLOCAUST OF OCKREIT
ONE OF WORST IN WORLD
Fear Maddened Crowd Finds
Only Door Nailed Up
The holocaust In the village of Ock
reit, Hungary, will stand as one of the
great disasters in the history of the
world. In point of loss of life it does
not rank with the Ring theater fire in
Vienna, December 8, 1881, when nearly
1,000 persons lost their lives. Many
were burned to death in the disaster of
29 years ago, but the larger number
were suffocated and some died in the
crush at the exits, says the Washington
Star. The doors were built so that they
opened inward, and when the people
jammed against them they could not be
opened, and the firemen coming to their
rescue were compelled to chop into the
crowd, and thus several persons were
slain in the very act of loosing those
behind them. \u25a0 .
The Hungarian catastrophe was more
like the charity bazaar fire in Paris,
May 4, 1897, in that the structure was
decorated with dried branches of trees
and other light, • tinderlike trimmings.
At the charity bazaar fire, in which 150'
people were killed, the hall .became a
mass of flames, almost instantly after
the first flash, being filled with the thin
nest of draperies festooned in a manner
to invite disaster.: The blockade at the
exits cost many lives.
A peculiar, element of horror enters
into the Hungarian catastrophe. The
single door which afforded entrance and
exit had been nailed up after the hall
was filled in order to prevent the ad
mission of any of those who were left
clamoring outside.: .Thus when the
flames started there . was no way out
for the fear maddened people. Conse
quently the percentage of death was
probably/ greater in this instance than
In any other known catastrophe of mod
ern, times. .' : , : :.: '':\ ;". ' •-. . .7 \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0;::'\u25a0'
The Iroquois theater fire in Chicago
cost betw«en.soo and 600 lives.\ Many
persons were trampled to r death, as
in all other cases of fire panic. The
flames leaped Into ithe, upper galleries
from the stage in a manner, to burn and
suffocate many scores before they, had a
chance to escape, v ' ." "
. The Ocean Shore Railway ; is -the most
wonderfully scenic- road -in .;. the .world."
Go « and • enjoy; a i ride : on < it— a< f ascf nat-~
lnjr trip along; the •ocean^bluffs>:fpr» 38
miles. t \u25a0'•' ' :'; " :-, • >'\u25a0>?'*£&
PLAN PARADE FOR
RAISIN DAY FETE
Fresno Workers Arrange for
New Carnival Feature on ,
Night of Celebration
Fraternal Orders, Militia, Police
and Fire.men to March
With Fireworks
LSpecial Dispatch to The Call]
FRESXO, April 21. — The carnival
committee held its second meeting this
morning at Raisin day . headquarters
and formulated more plans for the cele
bration in this city April 30.
In addition to having large repre
sentations from the various fraternal
orders in the parade on thatn ight, the
two local militia companies will.be in
line, a battalion of police and the fire
department. There will also be a big
representation from the Chinese and
Japanese residing in this city. Many
automobile owners have already signi
fied their willingness to decorate. their
machines for theparade. \ >
Owing to the fact that the majority
of the stores will not close until 9
o'clock the parade will not be held un
til after- that hour, but before and after
that time the merry makers will revel,
care free, in the streets of the city.
VOTIXG FOR CARNIVAL QUEEN'
The voting contest for the carnival
queen has started, but' as the ballots
were issued only this evening no can
didate has yet entered the race. The
voting will start in earnest tomorrow
and will be brought to a close Tuesday
night.*
Alden Anderson, Mayor Rowell and M.
F. Tarpey. have been asked to deliver
addresses in this city on Raisin day,
and it is probable that they will do so.
An effrt is also being made by A.
G. Wahlberg, sperintendent of music
in the Fresno schools, to have a mon
ster chorus of school children sing in
the Courthouse park on- the afternoon
of Raisin day.
The Japanese have expressed their
willingness to donate fireworks for
Raisin day, and in addition to day
and night displays at the park they
will have a quantity of night fireworks
in the parade.
RANCHERS TO PROVIDE FLOATS
The carnival committee has ad
dressed letters to ranchers living in
the vicinity of Fresno asking them to
prepare floats symbolical of the raisin
industry for the parade. One will rep
resent a hauling of raisins to the
packing- houses, while others will rep
resent raisins in different stages of
preparation for the market.
Fred Shoup of the Southern Pacific,
who is in Fresno to assist the Raisin
day celebration, received a letter today
from J. R. Wilson of the Illinois Cen
tral, in which he stated that J. P.
Gillette of the New York Herald, who
was in San Francisco on a pleasure
trip, would come to Fresno and send
a number of articles on Raisin day
to his paper. _ '
Reports have been received from the
two boosting" committees .which were
sent to San Francisco and Los Angeles,
and both have had great success. The
Los Angeles committee was obliged
to telegraph this afternoon for more
literature, having distributed 25,000
folders in 24 hours.
Boosters Visit Stores
Never was a day more diligently
spent than yesterday when the five
members" of the Raisin day boosters'
committee waged their campaign
through th 3 city. Early in the morning
the committee met at the ferry build
ing and set out for the different por
tions of the city assigned to them in
automobiles, which were provided by
business firms. East, west, north and
south thi machines sped, stopping every
few minutes while a store was invaded
and a grocer or a baker added to the
list of Raisin day boosters.
Noon time came and the committee
men paused at the most convenient
restaurant in their particular district
just long enough for a meager lunch
eon. The work was resumed and until
darkness the committee visited store
after store. Raisin day posters, raisin
bread stickers and pamphlets telling of
the raisin industry were .distributed.
When the tired workers from Fresno
gathered at the Manx hotel before din
ner it was estimated that more than
300 retail stores had been visited. The
supply of literature" and lithographs
was sadly diminished and the members
of the committee, though extremely
weary, were happy. The day was a
success.
Chairman H. H: Holland, in telling of
the hours of toil, remarked that every
one had seemed to appreciate the ef
forts of the boosters^
Holland said that the only objection
met with was the fact that the com
mittee had not made the rounds a little
sooner so as to give the merchants a
chance to lay in a stock of raisins.
Today the committee will be in Oak
land at 10-o'clock. An automobile tour
of tha bay cities will be made,- and in
the evening the boosters will return to
Fresno :to report the success of the
work that has been done.
MEXICOOWES EAGLE ON
FLAG TO AZTEC TRIBES
Capital Located for Wanderers
by-Monarch of Air
The meaning and origin of the eagle
device on the Mexican flag is explained
as follows by Jose Dosal, Mexican con
sul to Kansas City, says the' St. Louis
Post-Dispatch.
"Only a few hundred years after the
Christian era the Aztec tribes started
on a long Journey south from some
point, probably now In the United
States. They traveled year after year,
stopping a season at a time to cultivate
crops. Finally they arrived in the beau
tiful valley of Mexico.
"At a spot' not far from : the present
site of the capital the Aztec emperor
consulted the : astrologers and was j told
to follow the flight of the first eagle
seen from the camp to its first resting
place and there build the city. , v y
"One day an eagle was sighted, scouts
were detailed to. follow the bird. and. in
the middle of Lake Texcoco they saw it
light on a* cactus growing on an island.
When the scouts approached they, saw
it held' in its^talons a snake, which it
was devouring. v ...
"The "device yof an eagle eating a
snake, profile, was adopted as the Aztec
coat of arms; by; Montezuma : 11. The
"Mexican ';; republic } likewise adopted the
eagle and the "snake to use on its flag,
making the picture' face view.; The
present flag of Mexico was adopted by
the ; Cura Miguel Hidalgo y; Costello at
11 o'clock sp. m., September, 15.. 1810.
There ls;a story told to the effect;that
the colors were suggested by an Italian
in the rebel; army,: who made: them: the
same as those of his native country." \u25a0 |
Americans living in . Beirut can re-,
member when there; was not a window
pane in the city. // Twenty-five years ago
there' were' no 'carriages, women mak
ing their i social .calls on the backs 'of
donkeys. "The city, now has- 600 licensed
victor! as, ;» besides > the i private "vehicles;
with automobiles and electric street-
Bake Raisin Bread!
Gup Tor Best Loaf
Handsome"
tterling silver cup
offered fcj
:-: The Call:-:
as the
prize for the best
loaf of
California raisin
iread
baked by any baker
or confectioner
in
California north of
the Tehachapi
BAKERS and confectioners — all of you in California between the north
side of the Tehachapi and the Oregon line— here's a challenge and a
chance for you.
Housewives and cooks other than professional bakers and confectioners
—all of you in California within the same north and south boundaries—
here's the same kind of a challenge and a chance for you also.
A handsome sterling silver cup is offered by The Call for the best loaf
of raisin bread baked by any baker or confectioner in the territory described.
Another sterling silver cup, equally handsome, is offered by The Call tor
the best loaf of raisin bread baked by any housewife or cook, not a pro
fessional baker or confectioner, in the same territory.
The sole restriction, beyond the geographical limitations already fixed,
is that none but California raisins shall be used. So go ahead, bakera, con
fectioners, housewives and cooks. Begin experimenting right away. See
what you can do with one of the finest delicacies Calif ornia produces.
Three of the best known chefs in California have consented to act as
the committee to judge x the bread and award the silver cups. They are:
ERXKST ARBOGAST, Chef of the Palace Hotel
VICTOR HIRTZL.ER, Chef of the St. Francis Hotel
ARTHUR LOGAN, Chef of the Hotel Stewart
The men who ivill determine the vtinner of The CaWs raisin bread contest, j
These three, men are at the top of their profession and contestants can
be assured that the awards will be made strictly on the merits of the bread.
The conditions are few and simple.
The loares must reach The Ca.ll office not earlier than the morning of
the 28th, nor later than noon of the 29th. All loares that come oa the 28th
will be tested and judged on the afternoon of that day, while they are still
fresh. The judges will hold another session on the afternoon of the 29th to
pass upon the loares that are receded up to noon of that day.
Each loaf should hare a label announcing the name of the contestant and
stating whether the maker is a professional or nonprofessional cook.
The awards will be announced in The Call on the morning of the 30th.
SICILIAN AVENGES
"FIRING" WITH FIRE
In a desperate effort to take the life
of'his foreman to avenge his discharge
of the day before, Cardinale Simone, a
Sicilian, last night emptied the five
chambers of his revolver at Rafael
Balza at the corner of Powell street
and Broadway, two or the shots finding
lodgment in the leg and groin of Anto
nio Balza, age 19. who heroically
sought to save his brother from death.
The wounded youth -was hurried to
the emergency hospital. He will prob
ably recover. '
Following his unsuccessful attempt
to kill Balza, Simone fled the scene. •
The two brothers were on their way
to night school when the attack was
made. . They had left their home at 53
Vernon place and as they approached
the corner of Powell street and Broad
way they met Simone. .Rafael recog
nized the man and greeted him. For
answer Simone drew a revolver.
"I'll show you- how a Sicilian avenges
a wrong," he said and began. firing.
None of the shots took effect on their
intended victim.
Consul Frank Deed,meyer, writing
from Charlottetown, Prince Edward Is
land, says that dealers in millinery in
Canada usually advertise their goods
as imported from or made according
to the latest styles prevailing in New
York.
The most effective means of life-sav
ing in the, event of a storm'is' the life
boat, the first one of which was
launched on the Thames on January. 4.
1785 by Lionel Lukln, a coach maker of
an Inland town near London.
Taxicabs have displaced the hansoms
of London to a very great extent.
Opening of the Famous
PIGaiidWHISTLE
The Most Magnificent i
' Shop in the World
Luncheon, Tea, Chocolates
and CANDIES
Pastries^ Sodas, Ices
' The same Prices as Ordinary Shops
Remember thVr Day— S ATURDAY— at
1 30 Post St., above Kearny
Handsome
sterling' silver cup
offered by
;:-: The Call :-:
- for best
loaf of California
raisin bread
made fcp any cook
or housewife
in California north
of Tehachapi,
not a professional
baker
or confectioner.
U.S. DOGS CALLED
OFF COTTON RING
NEW YORK. April 21.— The sudden
adjournment today of the federal in
quiry board into the alleged cotton
pool sent a thrill of hope to certain
quarters of the financial district that
perhaps the government had decided to
calloff the investigation.
Clark McKercher. assistant attorney
general, soon dispelled that hope by an
nouncing that other witnesses were to
be called at further grand jury ses
sions.'
James Patten of Chicago banged his
fist on an old -table of a downtown
brokerage office this afternoon and said
he. was not in "this game to squeeze
any one" and further that there would
be no corner in cotton. Patten said:
"A great deal has been printed to the
effect that Frank Hayne, W. P. Brown,
F. Scales and myself. are engaged in a
conspiracy to corner, the May crop of
cotton. No more ridiculous statement
was ever made. Why, there are 2,000,000
bales of May cotton in sight. At $75 a
bale it would require $150,000,000 to
maintain a corner. It is a matter of
history that no man has ever succeeded
in cornering a cotton crop."
THBOWS WATER OVEB WOMAN— Mrs. OU>e
F. Carson, midwife. 1310 Golden Gate arenae,
was eonrleted , of. battery yesterday. While
Mrs. Charlotte Buchter. ,957 Hayes. street, was
sitting on the steps Mrs. Carson threw a buck
etful of water . orer her..
VERIFIED STATEMENT
FOUND IN BOOKLET
i *V*l l I'l N.^. ---f^ 'I I I Iv" I * cet and was so badly crippled that I
I ~»^. jL4 1 f~^S v^*^ fl tvj I i^—v was unable to perform any work for
If\| VJ i^>*^" *^^v \J V I two months. I consulted two doctors.
iMS^Yl^jT'^'r V*C^lr (CXCi decldedl y better than It has been in/.
I "•^- \u25a0 •*^' m^^^*^e*^> ' Rheumatism is a result of impure >>:
; Ai statement. of^more than usual in- blood, the primary cause of which is a .r
terest has been made by r P. = N.Robles, bad stomach. Cooper's New Discovery
livlngon rural route iNo. "3," Floresville, corrects the stomach and drives disease jj
Texas,-* regarding 'his 'recovery- from from the system. We are agents for l 4
rheumatism, \u25a0 in i which: he says: the Cooper medicines in this com-
i "I suff ered "from; rheumatism, in both munity.— The Owl Drujr C*.
CHURCHES JOIN IN
WHITE PLAGUE WAR
All Denominations Will Devote
"Tuberculosis Sunday" to
Fight on Disease
From the pulpits of nearly 200
churches of all denominations, educa
tional sermons on how to prevent the
spread of- the dread "white plague" by
the observance of simple rules will be'
preached tomorrow and Sunday. This
Sabbath is to be tuberculosis Sunday
and will be observed by thousands of
churches throughout the United States.
The movement originated with the
National Association for the Study and
Prevention of Tuberculosis.
Tomorrow the campaign begins In the
churches of the Jewish faith. Rabbis
Meyer. Nieto and Kaplan have already
sent a hearty commendation to the lo
cal committee of the association and
have promised to devote their services
to the movement.
The 55 Catholic churches of the city
will also take part in the movement
and Bishop O'Connell of this diocese has
expressed himself as interested in the
work.
Chinatown will not be overlooked.
Large signs printed in Chinese will
tell the people of that district of the
national effort to eradicate the disease.
All of the nickelodeons of Chinatown
will be visited by a lecturer and an ad
dress-in Chinese will be given on the
subject.
CHARGE OF THEFT trNFOTTJrDED— Mrs. Jeasle
Burchard. 1170 Ellis street, bad Maritarn
Kick, a Japanese, arrested for stealing a dia
mond rinsr valued at $>o while he wa* bHping
her to move her effects. Several prominent
women and men were In court to testify to
the good character of the Japanese yesterday
when a telephone message was received from
Mrs. Burchard saying tbat she had found the
ring.
Pleasant Reading for the Fat
"What a simple and inexpensive solv-
ing of the fat woman's problem the
Marmola Prescription Tablets provide.
She takes one of these harmless, pleas-
ant, little tablets after each meal and
at bedtime and loses from 12 to 16
ounces of fat each day, and yet suffers
no harm, creates no disturbances In-
wardly and produces no wrinkles. Thi3
elegant preparation (made exactly in
accordance with the famous Marmola
Prescription) has rendered exercising
and dieting for the reduction of ex-
cess flesh as superfluous as a fifth
wheel. A further recommendation is
that it is the least expensive fat re-
, ducer on the market, a large case (cost-
ing only 75 cents from any druggist,
or by mail from the Marmola Co., 24S
Farmer bldg., Detroit. Mich.) contain-
ing a quantity of tablets large enough
to give very decided results In most
every case.
HOUR OF
MUSIC
Will Be Held in Our Recita! Hall
Tomorrow (Saturday) Afternoon
at 3 o'clodr.
SOLOIST
Miss Olive Hyde
VIOLIN
The Public Cordially Inrlted
Shemanjpiay & Co.
Kearny and Matter, Elxath Floor
BROWN'S
Bronchial Troches
An absolutely hirmlcsa remedy for Sor« Throat,
Home nm and Coughs. Give immediate rclici ia
Bronchial and Lung Affections. .
Fifty years' reputation.
Price, 25 cents, 50 ccnta and $t.OO per box.
Sample sent on request.
JOHN I. BROWN fe SOW. Bo«ten. Mass.
AUTOMOBILES
Ready Reference for Buyers
MITTHEI I OSEN * HUNTER AUTO CO.
I'll I t/IICLL. 521 O. G. af. TeL Market 2723
Automobile Tires
EIPF^TfiXP TIRE AND RUBBER CO..
rirVCO 1 UnC 442 Van »as. T.Market 2331
MAGNETO
RftCfH BOSCH MAGNETO CO..
DUOvll 357 van Ncsa cr.Fnlton: t.Mkt. 3563
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